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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 66

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

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Violets continue their home game win streak The women’s volleyball team remains undefeated after their game against the United States Merchant Marine Academy. The Violets beat the Mariners in three straight sets at home.

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Alum signs to play basketball Two NYU alumni earn with Slovakian club team MacArthur genius grants By WILLOW FREDERICK

Carl Yaffe, a four-year standout of the NYU men’s basketball team, officially signed a contract to play professionally in Slovakia this past Friday, Sept. 20. “It had always been a dream of [mine] to play professionally,” the Bethesda, Md. native said. Yaffe initially realized that he had a chance to play overseas in his junior year in college. During his basketball career at NYU, Yaffe led the Violets in just about everything — average points per game (14.9), rebounds per game (7.6), assists per game (3.5), blocked shots per game (0.8) and minutes per game (35.3). He scored his 1,000th career point for NYU last November and ended his senior

season as the fifth leading scorer in NYU men’s basketball history with a staggering 1,365 points. That puts him behind former NBA players Mal Graham and Barry Kramer on the all-time record list. It comes as no surprise that head coach Joseph Nesci’s first word used to describe Carl is “hardworking.” “I have great confidence that Carl will be very successful in his playing career going forward,” Coach Nesci said. Not to be limited by the university’s Division III status, Yaffe participated in the Maccabiah Games held in Israel this past summer, becoming more and more acquainted with the Division I atmosphere and near-professional level. At the games,

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By EMILY BELL

Two NYU alumni were among the 24 recipients of the 2013 MacArthur Fellowship or so-called genius grant, announced yesterday. Dancer and choreographer Kyle Abraham and organic chemist Phil Baran will each receive a $625,000 grant over a five-year timespan. The MacArthur Fellowship, which has been awarding grants to intellectual and artistic leaders in different fields for the past 30 years, gives a “no-strings attached” grant to award recipients. According to their website, the grant money can be spent in whichever way the recipients choose and, unlike other grants, there are no reporting requirements. The fellowship increased the amount of the

grant from $500,000 awarded since 2002. “It was both shocking and humbling and it comes with it a great sense of responsibility to not rest on any laurels,” Baran said. Baran said that the freedom that comes with the money will allow him to fund projects that would not be possible from other grants, as well as fund fellowships for graduate students and purchase equipment and supplies. “We’re not going to waste it,” Baran said. “We’re going to use it do things that were impossible in any other way. This time, [we can] pursue very speculative science. It will allow me to help my students more.” Baran is a professor of chemistry at

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Gordon-Levitt impresses with directorial debut ‘Don Jon’

By SHAWN FLANAGAN

Jon only cares about a few things in life — “My body, my pad, my ride, my family, my church, my boys, my girls and my porn.” At least he’s honest. In his directorial debut, Joseph Gordon-Levitt has crafted a great film and titular character with “Don

Jon.” The social critique presented in the film — the idea that people do not understand how to have intimate relationships — is simple, touching and hilarious, but goes a long way because of its relatability. Looking at the list of Jon’s priorities and character traits, this film is not a traditional love story. Rather,

it is a tale about one man discovering what real love actually entails. Jon (Gordon-Levitt) prefers pornography to his many sexual relations in real life. Every Sunday, he attends confession at his local church and goes to dinner with his family. He says his Hail Marys at the gym the next morning, but then he’s back in

his regular routine at the bar and on porn sites. Enter Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson), the most beautiful girl Jon has ever seen. They begin dating, going out for food and meeting each other’s families. She even drags Jon to see romantic comedies, which he can’t stand. And then, inevitably, Barbara catches Jon

watching porn. Jon’s addiction to porn has crippled his ability to be a part of a real relationship. Jon’s statement that romantic comedies are “fake, but they watch it like it’s real life” echoes throughout the film. What he fails to realize is porn is not real love

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This project was not planned or meticulously considered, but rather it grew organically from my interactions with the community of fishermen with whom I interacted. The first set of photographs came about one restless December night on a desolate beach in Puerto Escondido, Mexico. There, I climbed down from the large, airy house in which I had exhausted my capability of exploration and set out to walk the lonely beach. After a half hour, I began to make my way back, sure that, as has often occurred in these sudden and vigorous excursions, I would not shoot any pictures that day. That’s when I came up on Andrés, a blocky, expressionless man, standing in the spasmodic waves and occasionally cursing the vigor of the sea. He acted almost as if he had been expecting me. As I shot, he engaged me in good-natured conversation about the situation in Mexico. It sounded as if it was him versus the sea — in some ways they were collaborators, but always in competition. Following the encounter, I dedicated myself to finding and capturing similar moments of everyday strife in the lives of these fishermen.

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About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jordan Melendrez at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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MACARTHUR continued from PG. 1

NYU dancer, chemist among recipients for prestigious MacArthur grants

Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif. He is currently working on “total synthesis”, which attempts to replicate natural processes in lab settings. The lab process can mass produce desired compounds, which can contribute to pharmaceutical development.

COURTESY OF THE JOHN D. AND CATHERINE T. MACARTHUR FOUNDATION

Kyle Abraham, an NYU alumnus, is a dance choreographer.

His environmentally-friendly experimental method could reduce the cost of compound production by increasing the supply. Baran, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry in 1997, said that NYU Professor Emeritus of Chemistry David Schuster had a huge impact on his career. “It was probably [my] most important decision ever to go to NYU,” Baran said. “If it wasn’t for David Schuster I would probably be flipping burgers at the local fast food joint. He taught me both physical and synthetic organic chemistry.” Abraham graduated with a master’s in fine art from Tisch in 2006 and founded his company, Kyle Abraham/Abraham. in.Motion, during the last year of his program. He built his company with many dancers from his undergraduate alma mater, SUNY Purchase, Juilliard and NYU. He said that working with NYU students and his fellow master’s candidates while at NYU was influential to the start of his company. “They were committed [to] what my vision was and wanting to move forward with my ideas and make work and form a com-

pany,” Abraham said. Abraham said he wants to spend the money on his company, and potentially pay off some of his debts from NYU. He said that the awarding of the fellowship, coupled with an October fundraiser, may be a great push forward for the company, including to help with the formation of a company board. “[I want] to build up the infrastructure of my company,” Abraham said. “We just implemented health insurance for the company, so thinking of stuff like that and how we can move the company to the next level.” Abraham’s current work for his company is Pavement from 2012. He is a New York Live Arts Resident Commissioned Artist for 2012 to 2014, and his choreography has been performed in the United States and around the world. He said being a MacArthur Fellow was the highlight of his career, next to performing in his hometown of Pittsburgh. One of his pieces, “Another Night,” was performed by Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in December 2012.

COURTESY OF THE JOHN D. AND CATHERINE T. MACARTHUR FOUNDATION

Phil Baran is a NYU alumnus and organic chemist in California. “Kyle’s work is amazing to dance,” Alvin Ailey company member who performed in “Another Night,” Antonio Douthit-Boyd said. “He leaves so much freedom for you to express yourself as an artist. Kyle’s style is what every dancer wants to try, with it’s abandoned moments and story lines, it helps you to find your own voice.” In a press release, Cecilia Conrad, the vice president of the MacArthur Fellows Program, said the recipients can represent a

diverse array of fields. “They are artists, social innovators, scientists and humanists who are working to improve the human condition and to preserve and sustain our natural and cultural heritage,” Conrad said. “Their stories should inspire each of us to consider our own potential to contribute our talents for the betterment of humankind.” Emily Bell is news editor. Email her at ebell@nyunews.com.

Mayor’s Management Report Steinhardt professor shows increase in smoking sends UN education goals By ELAINE LEE

New York City has seen a marginal increase in its smoking population, according to the Mayor’s Management Report published by Office of Operations. The rate of adult smokers increased from 14.8 percent to 15.3 percent from the 2012 to 2013 fiscal year. The medical director of NYU’s Student Health Center, Marcy Ferdschneider, was still optimistic that the overall trend of smoking had decreased for several years. “With rates that have dropped so dramatically over the past 10 years we seem to still be well below the national average, which is terrific,” Ferdschneider said. “The Quit and Win Smoking Cessation Program is coordinated by the Student Health Center’s Health Promotion Office,” she said. “These individualized, confidential services are available to all NYU students at no cost and provide a terrific opportunity to experience the benefits of a smokefree life.” CAS sophomore Nikki Payne said older generations were addicted to nicotine, which is why they might not be able to stop, and that the increase showed young people were smoking despite knowing the health risks. “But the fact that the rate rose means that new people —

assumedly new York’s youth — [are] starting to smoke,” Payne said. “They are making the decision to ruin their bodies, waste money and put others at risk because of secondhand smoke.” The center provides programs to lower the rate of student smokers at the university. In 2011, the SHC conducted a survey of students who reported their own behavior. The survey showed that 4 percent of NYU students smoked cigarettes daily and 5 percent smoked 20 or more days in a one-month period. “Smoking is harmful to both the smoker and those around them,” Ferdschneider said. “We know that both smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke is directly related to increased rates of various illnesses.” Ferdschneider also said the university wants to assist students who want to quit. “Smoking is a very difficult habit to break,” he said. CAS sophomore Jun Hee Lee said he understands smoking has severe consequences, but he also recognizes that quitting is not simple. “People are always offering to help me quit smoking, but it does not work like that,” Jun said. “As long as I need to smoke, I think I am going to continue smoking.” The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has ongoing treatment projects and aims to increase awareness about the health risks associ-

ated with smoking, with one of its critical objectives being to reduce illness and death caused by using tobacco. According to the report, educational campaigns and nicotine-replacement therapies are two current strategies the department is relying on to bring down the amount of smokers in the city. CAS freshman Erin Lee said she wishes students realized the serious effects of smoking for both their own sake and for people around them who are affected. “I would like to walk to class without having to smell cigarette burning and the wind blowing it all straight to my face,” Lee said. Elaine Lee is a contributing writer. Email her at news@ nyunews.com.

FILE PHOTO BY KELSEY LEDGERWOOD

A students smokes a cigarette outside Bobst Library.

By SU SIE PARK

Steinhardt professor Hirokazu Yoshikawa and Madhav Chavan, cofounder and CEO of Pratham, an organization in India that supports primary school children, want the United Nations to set a target for early childhood development in its Sustainable Development Goals for 2015 to 2030. The UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network was launched in 2012 to accelerate the advancement of global countries by the use of academia, civil society and the private sector. The network consists of 12 thematic groups which try to find solutions to facilitate growth in developing countries. Rather than being research oriented these groups look for solutions. One of those thematic groups consists of Yoshikawa and Chavan, who focus on early childhood development, education and transition to work. Yoshikawa and Chavan’s report is entitled, “The Future Of Our Children: Lifelong, Multi-Generational Learning For Sustainable Development,” and is a draft of goals and targets for education and early childhood development. “The belief of our group is that children have the right not only to survive but to thrive, so they have a chance to contribute to sustainable societies and a sustainable world,” Yoshikawa said. “Our target and indicators for comprehensive early childhood development and learning address the critical needs for health, education and poverty reduction during the first years of life.” Steinhardt senior Antonia Forika said that this information is critical because of the lack of information regarding education. “I think it is extremely important to

focus on early childhood development because it is an area that the world as a global society is sorely lacking truly effective policies in, somewhat due to the previous lack of information about just how critical early childhood development is to communities,” Forika said. Yoshikawa noted that research from neuroscience, developmental science and economics indicate that early childhood development programs influence a person’s life for years. “This evidence shows that early childhood development can serve as a very strong foundation for economic development and social inclusion,” Yoshikawa said. Forika said that to see positive outcomes in education there must be an investment in education. “I believe that a good preschool program can make a huge difference in the development of a child anwd can predict progress in future grades,” Forika said. “The other initiatives are equally important because if children are living in poverty or do not have access to quality health care, their education and development suffer.” Steinhardt education professor John Mayher said the call for action is also needed in the United States, especially after recent efforts made by the Republicans to cut programs such as food stamps. Steinhardt first-year graduate student Yonwoo Kim said the report will bring attention to this issue. “Many people will know the importance of the early education and nutrition of young children with this report,” Kim said. Su Sie Park is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.


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FEATURES

EDITED BY JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU FEATURES@NYUNEWS.COM

Tisch alum details theatrical past, performance as ‘Romeo’ BY UTPALA MENON

While chatting with Julian Cihi, who graduated from the Tisch School of the Arts in 2012, it’s a pleasant surprise to discover a nonchalant composure hidden beneath his credulous layer of enthusiasm. Cihi, who plays Romeo in the Classic Stage Company’s off-Broadway adaptation of “Romeo and Juliet” alongside actress Elizabeth Olsen, speaks of his diverse past, exciting present and hopeful future within the NYU community. Part-Japanese, Cihi studied in Tokyo where fans soon discovered his musical and acting talent. “Someone from the drama department saw me in choir and said that I should do a musical, which was ‘West Side Story’ at the time,” Cihi said. “That was my introduction.” While at NYU, Cihi’s performances resonated among his professors and peers. Tisch graduate professor Hovey Burgess, who teaches a class for circus techniques, remembered Cihi as a committed student. “Julian is enormously gifted and talented with a superbly trained body and a brilliant mind,” Burgess said. “He has a dedication and work ethic second to none.” Unfortunately, the road to success wasn’t straightforward for Cihi. Even while breezing through a Masters program at NYU’s Tisch Graduate Acting School following an undergraduate program at Brown University, Cihi’s academic future was in question for over six months. “Financially I was struggling, and it gets to you when you are fresh out of school,” Cihi said. “You have great opportunities. And then you are, well, jobless.” But Cihi’s impressive credentials as Roger in the

Japanese tour of “Rent” and recent performances in the Williamstown Theatre Festival earned him one of his biggest breaks — working alongside names such as Olsen, Daniel Davis and T.R. Knight. “It’s really cool to be working with these very experienced actors,” Cihi said. “They have different training, different styles and different approaches. I like that I can take advice from people like Daniel Davis, T.R. Knight and just be in awe of living.” While Cihi’s stage presence is prominent, it is often accompanied by an amiable and hysterical persona. “Julian should be given some type of award for choreographing the dance moves to ‘Everybody Dance Now’ [“Gonna Make You Sweat”] for our entire fraternity pledge class,” Tom Flaherty, his former college roommate, said. “He tirelessly taught people without a single artistic bone in their bodies how to dance. It’s his fantastic sense of humor and humility which makes him a cut above the rest.” As Cihi continues on his successful journey, he continues to demonstrate a modest, respectful mindfulness of his past efforts and leaves his fellow juniors at NYU with some inspired attitudes. “I think whatever you do and wherever you are in life, if you know what your passion is, or even have a morsel of an idea, you have to go a hundred percent and commit fully,” Cihi said. “This is something that a customer told me when I was working at a restaurant, and it made sense when nothing made sense.” Classic Stage Company’s “Romeo and Juliet” begins previews Sept. 28, with the official opening scheduled for Oct.16. Utpala Menon is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

DAY IN THE LIFE By KIMBERLY SCHU Day in the Life is a recurring feature where students with interesting lives share what it is like to spend a day in their shoes. Few students have a fulltime job, let alone a career in real estate. But Steinhardt sophomore Olivia Harris has already obtained her real estate license. Because of her job at Prime NYC Real Estate and her rigorous curriculum in the music business program, Harris knows how to balance her school, work and social life. 8 a.m. | Harris’ alarm goes off, and she begins her day — sometimes after pressing snooze a few times. Harris prepares for her upcoming commitments. Occasionally she blends a breakfast smoothie to start the day off right. 9:10 a.m. | Harris hops on her Razor scooter and prepares to embark on a long, fast-paced day. She can usually be seen speeding down the streets from her apartment to Washington Square Park. She is always on time to her 9:30 a.m. Russian or Music Theory course.

12:15 p.m. | Harris heads to the Prime office, where she works as a licensed real estate agent. The dedicated 19-year-old spent a portion of her freshman year studying for the State Real Estate Licensing Exam, which she passed in April. Now she spends nearly every weekday researching locations and communicating with clients. One of her favorite aspects of working in real estate is helping NYU students and families find apartments to rent. 1 p.m. | Once she is settled into her desk, Harris and her co-workers order lunch. One of her favorite restaurants is Spice, as she loves their red curry. Harris enjoys interacting with people while working and said she is the youngest employee at the office, as everybody else already graduated from college. 3 p.m. | Harris usually meets with her listing appointments and attends various open houses for the apartment listings that are showing. Some days she spends her afternoons attending a brokers’ open house, which is a party at a new devel-

opment for brokers and their potential clients. “These events definitely help me with networking, as well as cross-market analysis,” Harris said. 5:30 p.m. | The long, eventful day is finally over. Harris resigns to her apartment to relax with her three roommates, complete homework and watch “Keeping Up with the Kardashians.” 7 p.m. | Once she completes her homework, Harris meets up with friends from the Steinhardt music business program to attend local concerts. Some of her favorite locations include Knitting Factory in Brooklyn, Webster Hall on 11th Street, and DROM on Avenue A between Fifth and Sixth streets. 10 p.m. | Harris uses her downtime to unwind from a busy day of class, work and meetings. She tries to sleep a reasonable amount because she knows she will need an abundance of energy for the next day. Kimberly Schu is a staff writer. email her at features@ nyunews.com.

Steinhardt students experiment in art galleries By KATHERINE MARIN AND ASHLYN BOYLES

The Barney Building, part of the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, is currently hosting several galleries with works created by Steinhardt students. “Dream:Space,” one of the newest exhibitions featured in the Commons Gallery at the Barney Building, opened on Sept. 18. The gallery offers insight into the subconscious minds of Steinhardt seniors Shanti Flagg, Sara Holburt, Monica Park, Sejin Park and Arielle Stein. Through an assortment of photographs, drawings, paintings, film and mixed media installations, the collaboration brings the abstract visions and personal memories of the artists to life. The artists were inspired by a previous gallery they produced featuring cave art. The audience is able to explore the different caves within the exhibit to represent how the mind explores its subconscious in a dreamlike state. “We wanted to expand the installation to a bigger area,” Flagg said. “We sort of expanded on the dream part and [minimized] the cave part due to time and material constraints. I’m still really happy with how everything came out.” “Mercy Mercy Me” also opened Sept.

18, but it is showing in the Barney Building’s Rosenburg Gallery. The enticing exhibit features Steinhardt sophomores Elaine Jen and Christina Blue. Blue and Jen work with a variety of mediums but decided that discarded remains of old objects, ready-made materials, paper scraps and pictures the most satisfying for creating their pieces. The collages ignite the mind on important social topics, and their use of found objects make the viewer question the story behind them. Often, Blue focuses on the theme of race in her work. “I think I try to investigate conversation and perceptions of race because, I mean, of course at the scientific level it doesn’t exist,” Blue said, “but it is a very socially important thing.” Jen decided she wanted to shift her focus from sculptures and videos. “I feel like I’ve been taking art a little too seriously the previous year or so, and I kind of wanted to go back to basics and use materials that are more simple,” Jen said. Both exhibits run until Sept. 29 at the Barney Building, 34 Stuyvesant St. Katherine Marin and Ashlyn Boyles are contributing writers. Email them at features@nyunews.com.


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ARTS

EDITED BY JEREMY GROSSMAN ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM DON continued from PG. 1

Despite minor script issues, ‘Don Jon’s’ acting, directing impress

either — his favorite porn stars make love because they are paid. Jon faces the challenge of learning to give up his porn for a relationship with Barbara. A brilliant supporting cast complements this lead duo — Tony Danza, Glenne Headly and Brie Larson, who play Jon’s father, mother and sister, respectively. Danza delivers a bravura performance and provides many of the film’s best laughs. However, Julianne Moore, whose touching and incredibly honest performance as the broken Esther, one of Jon’s classmates at a local community college, steals the show. She brings the film heart, and provides the most beautiful and tender moments. Despite focusing so frequently on porn, “Jon” is an incredibly tasteful film. Yes, there is occasional nudity, but the context and timing is important to remember. The nudity only serves the film’s social critique, as the filmmakers do not exploit what could have been raunchy scenes. Gordon-Levitt has established himself as an intelligent and original writer and filmmaker with “Don Jon.” The screenplay may falter slightly toward the end of the film, as some of the dialogue seems forced, but the film’s ideas and performances shine far above its few flaws -- even if you don’t share the web pages on Jon’s Internet history. Shawn Flanagan is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

Michael J. Fox returns to sitcom roots By SEAN HICKEY

With the curtains closed on two of its most successful comedies of the past decade, “The Office” and “30 Rock,” NBC faces the looming challenge of filling those very funny shoes. But “The Michael J. Fox Show,” one of the most anticipated sitcoms of the fall TV season, could be the solution. After spending years in film and taking a break from acting, Michael J. Fox returns to television in this half-hour, New York-city based sitcom that is inspired by Fox’s own life. The pilot introduces Michael Henry (Fox), his wife (Betsy Brandt), their three kids (Juliette Goglia, Jack Gore, Conor Romero) his spinster sister (Katie Finneran) and Michael’s old boss (Wendell Pierce) from his days as an NBC local news anchor. Henry, who left the news desk after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, is deciding whether or not to return. Parkinson’s, New York and NBC are major topics in the first episode. Expect witty and sweet references to the disease, shots of the Upper West Side and cameos by Matt Lauer and Al Roker. Unfortunately, “Fox” does not always meet the expectations that result from its lead’s presence. While the pace is quick, the comedy cannot keep up. Rapid one-liners feel hectic more than

they do rhythmic, though this may result from writers trying to squeeze as many jokes into one pilot as possible. The pilot also suffers from a symptom plaguing many comedies where children portray overplayed stereotypes. And the pilot’s mockumentary style, which includes interviews with each family member, is better left to shows like “The Office,” which perfected the craft. Though it is played off as an assignment for the middle child, Eve, the directorial choice does not suit the rest of the show. Despite these issues, the pilot does demonstrate why NBC already ordered an entire 22-episode season of this show. Fox, who has a pre-installed fanbase, is charming and extremely watchable. Brandt also draws a crowd after her time on mega-hit “Breaking Bad” and plays a believable and likable wife and teacher. A sitcom about the news is finally given a unique concept. The scenes at NBC are some of the most entertaining, and Henry’s reporting makes the show and character feel grounded. This strong and unique setup offers the potential for great future episodes. All of these elements, if used correctly, are bound to deliver funny yet humanizing scenarios that Fox will knock out of the park. “Fox” may have some kinks to work

Ron Howard film delivers thrillride through F1 racing By ZACK GRULLON

When it comes to storytelling, Ron Howard never plays it safe. Howard switches genres at will and — even when he tells a true story, he usually intensifies and fictionalizes it to successfully attract an audience. His latest film, “Rush,” is a prime example of how successful Howard can be when he adheres to this formula. With “Rush,” Howard tells the true story of two Formula 1 drivers from the ’70s — Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl) and James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth). Abandoned by their families, both decide to pursue Formula 1 racing, hoping one day to win the world championship. Their devotion may be equal, but their personal lives could not be more different. When Lauda returns home at night, he goes to bed early to wake up refreshed the next morning. Meanwhile, Hunt spends his nights drinking and womanizing. Ultimately, the two clash when they go head-to-head in a defining F1 race in 1976. While “Rush” is probably a minor entry in Howard’s portfolio of historical dramas, the film is still entertaining, and much of that entertainment value stems from the convincing performances by Brühl and Hemsworth. Peter Morgan’s wonderful screen-

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play ensures that even when the two are not racing, they are still in competition with a battle of words against one another. One noteworthy aspect of Morgan’s screenplay is how it remains neutral toward Lauda and Hunt. Lauda’s attitude can be obnoxious and headstrong at times, but that very attitude also pushes his team to make his car the fastest in the business. Even though Hunt may be squandering his nights more than he ought to, his devotion to the sport remains obvious. Moreover, the film boasts some impressive race sequences that deserve to be seen on the big screen. These scenes are carefully choreographed, with strong editing choices to back up the tense action. Even though “Rush” includes some stellar action and a few forgivable mistakes — unnecessary voiceovers and forced dialogue, for example — one major problem looms. “Rush” marginalizes its female characters. Lauda’s wife, Gemma (Natalie Dormer), is used to bring out his more heartfelt side in a calculated, melodramatic way. The same goes for Hunt’s wife Suzy Miller (Olivia Wilde), who serves to outline Hunt’s inability to keep a steady relationship. These women never become more than eye candy throughout the film.

Still, the problems in “Rush” are small when considering the big picture of Howard’s work. Like any good sports drama, “Rush” beautifully captures the spirit of its captivating subjects whose high-octane energy embroils them in their craft. And even if car racing is not for everyone, “Rush” makes it hard for viewers not to get swept up in Lauda and Hunt’s world. Zack Grullon is a staff writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

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Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Brühl impress in “Rush.”

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Michael J. Fox proves he hasn’t lost a step in his comedic timing. out, but comedy pilots are rarely fully formed out of the gate. The missteps evident at this point are easily fixable and, with a long season ahead of them, the writers and producers of the show have plenty of time to smooth things over. With NBC’s comedy lineup desperate for hits, “The Michael J. Fox Show” may just be what the network needs. Sean Hickey is a contributing writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

All-star cast fails to deliver ‘Crazy’ laughs By MARCUS JONES

While the presence of Robin Williams and Sarah Michelle Gellar in a room together is enough to pique people’s interests, the first reassuring aspect of watching the pilot for “The Crazy Ones” is the supporting cast. With all-stars from some of the most talked about shows still on the air, including James Wolk (“Mad Men”), Hamish Linklater (“The Newsroom”) and Amanda Setton (“The Mindy Project”), the show’s cast is strong across the board. “Crazy” focuses on the visionary ad agency run by Simon Roberts (Williams) and his daughter Sydney (Gellar). While the pilot starts with Sydney casting children for a cookie commercial, the real conflict is that McDonald’s, the agency’s biggest client, is planning to fire the Roberts’ based on Simon’s recent eccentricities. Simon, however, saves face with a great pitch to McDonald’s involving a catchy jingle. Now the ad agency seeks an international pop star within 24 hours willing to sing it. Enter Kelly Clarkson, as herself, who wants to sing a sexy song rather than a simple jingle. This request gives the agency a new goal, as they strive to portray the wholesome McDonald’s brand while complying with Clarkson’s request. Wolk serves as one of the pilot’s

highlights as the agency’s resident charmer. Whether flirting with the head of marketing at McDonald’s or grinding and dancing on Clarkson during their recording booth session, Wolk manages to woo audiences whenever he’s on the screen Williams guarantees wacky antics and voices. And for Gellar, Sydney’s heroism clouded by neuroses is a familiar persona. Some of these typecasts work, seeing Setton play the same gum-chomping, doe-eyed, administrative worker with a “New Yawk” accent is a shame — and too similar to her role on “Mindy.” Hopefully she will have a bigger role here than she did on that show. At its worst, “Crazy” comes off like a half-hour advertisement for whatever the agency is selling, with the actors playing caricatures of their former roles. On the flip side, CBS finds a way to harness the immense talent packed into one show to deliver a fun and fleshedout workplace comedy. The endof-episode blooper reel is probably the funniest part of the show. But even with a not-so-perfect pilot, CBS might eventually have a hit on its hands. For a pilot called “The Crazy Ones,” CBS played it pretty safe, but it is hard to deny the appeal of Mork working alongside Buffy. Marcus Jones is a staff writer. Email him at entertainment@ nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD & DAILY SUDOKU Crossword ACROSS 1 Stop threatening 12 “How to Marry a Millionaire” actress 15 One’s initial response to this clue, perhaps 16 Police dept. broadcast 17 Suspended avian home 18 While, in brief 19 Campaign pro 20 Bamboozled 21 ___ de Guerre (French military award) 23 What shepherds may shepherd 25 Superior home?: Abbr. 26 Actors James and Scott 27 Kind of jet 29 Web opening 30 Deterrent to swimming 33 Three-time N.H.L. M.V.P. 34 ___ trap

38 Audition rebuff 42 “Or what shall a man give in exchange for his ___?”: Mark 8:37 43 Sea urchin delicacy 44 Many opera houses have them 45 Throw off 47 Dimwit 49 Lhasa ___ 51 Worked (up) 52 Biltmore Estate state: Abbr. 56 Pooch, in Paris 57 Mantles 59 “Ti ___” (Italian lover’s declaration) 60 Owner of Moviefone 61 Site of W.W. II’s first amphibious landing 64 Number of colori on the Italian flag 65 Commercial figure holding six beer mugs

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE S T A N D S I N E W W A I T A N R E G O O F F O M A R A C H A C H A S U L T A N A R D G I A L O I N S T A N J A P A N O T I S U E I R E Z S E E D I

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66 Singer known as La Divina 67 Extremely tight DOWN 1 Homer’s Muse 2 Discombobulate 3 Two-time Olympic running gold medalist ___ Gebrselassie 4 Bolivian president Morales 5 Place ___ Concorde 6 Quick combination 7 It may be full of dirt 8 Math ratios 9 Ancient theaters 10 Moroccan city known as the Athens of Africa 11 Moneybags 12 One being passed in a race 13 Black fly, e.g. 14 Roadside fixture 22 Rogue 24 German wine made from fully ripe grapes 26 PC key 28 Reminisce about 29 Much of central Eur., once 30 Circular parts 31 Head overseas 32 Animal whose young is a calf 33 Be obliged 35 Size up 36 High, rocky hill 37 N.S.W. locale

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39 “O’Hara’s Choice” novelist 40 Inebriate 41 Ford last produced in 1986 46 In the midst of, poetically 47 The Blue Demons of the N.C.A.A. 48 Verdi opera

49 Hoy día 50 Gobs 51 Was equipped for summer heat, as an auto 53 “That’s enough!” 54 Ruben ___, Phillies Gold Glove-winning shortstop 55 Class starter

56 Sound of derision 57 Family head 58 Agronomy and metallurgy: Abbr. 62 ___-Aztecan (language family) 63 Historical period

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY RAQUEL WOODRUFF OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

INTERNET

Social media eludes online permanance By MARCELO CICCONET

Who never had a second thought about something posted online? A comment might receive no attention, trigger too much controversy or simply embarrass the author after a — literally or not — sober analysis. Acting as Orwell’s Ministry of Truth can possibly clear one’s public image. Although deleting a post is supported by Facebook and Twitter, the feature is not standard across the Internet. Now, according to a recent article by The New York Times, legislators in California are discussing a bill that would force websites to offer the option to online users under 18 years old. Any attempt to control the Internet runs into the standard controversies about free speech and privacy. But in this case, the bill also prompts a more general discussion about Internet etiquette (or “netiquette,” as it goes) and safe approaches in the online environment. Without supporting or opposing the initiative, some points about the nature of online communica-

tions are worth pointing out. First, regardless of the privacy setting on a website, there’s always the risk — albeit small — of hackers stealing your data. Second, even if information is publicly available online for a fraction of a second, it is safer to assume it will remain public. For even if there are no people looking at the website during that interval, public information is constantly being monitored by software. Third, our own judgement of what is proper to post online changes with time. And as John Green would say, “me from the past” is not the wisest person you can mention. In what concerns the law, it seems natural that regulations should be as consistent as possible across different types of media. If a certain advertisement cannot be shown

on TV before 9 p.m., then the same should hold online. In the case of public online posts, laws related to books or magazines would apply. Of course, online media poses new challenges for lawmakers, especially because ideas become trends before the legal implications can be reasonably analyzed. To avoid trouble, the user has two options. The first is to minimize online presence, refraining from publishing any content, or from releasing private information, as much as possible, especially in social networks. The second is to realize that an online personality is a public personality, and behave accordingly. It is similar to the experience of actors, singers and other public figures — people are looking and judging, even when you don’t think they are. Keeping that in mind is especially useful if one plans to eventually run for public office. No need to name names. Marcelo Cicconet is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

UNIVERSITY

NYU prestige does not excuse debt burden By NIKOLAS REDA-CASTELAO

Last week, WSN contributing columnist Sibora Lalaj dismissed the dangers of NYU’s massive debt incurrence in her piece, “High tuition necessary for NYU to function, compete with top universities,” which also seemed to encourage debt incurrence as a necessity to the prestige of the school. The piece was filled with a casual tone when acknowledging the university’s fiscal infamy as the necessary byproduct of both its own ego and prominence. It was not entirely conscious of what these costs mean for NYU students. First, Lalaj points out that one reason the university is expensive is because of its location, which is a valid point. Real estate value in the Greenwich Village is in the area of $1,600 per square mile and the median home sale price is $1.1 million. New Haven, Conn., where Yale University is located, only holds a median market price of somewhere above $200,000. Now, without claiming to know how much real estate ties into the overall price, these numbers indicate what exactly those incurring

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debt will experience. Also, NYU was not always a toptier school. It was almost facing bankruptcy in the ’70s, and did not become a prominent location until the late ’90s and early 2000s when NYU President John Sexton became president of the university. His leadership propelled the prestige of many departments, if not all, and attracted great minds the world over to teach here. NYU is has seen a meteoric rise as an academic institution, to be sure. Lalaj could have made many arguments that defend the high cost of our living — discussed the national trend in high price, emphasized the involvement of personal accountability or even the difficulty of fundraising for our endowment. Rather, we get throwaway adages such as “comparing apples to oranges.” At the beginning of the millennium,

NYU’s massive expansion began because it was a time when expanding was manageable and attracting renowned faculty, but it is now becoming inexcusable. Lalaj considers the scandal about the financial aid funds embezzled for vacation homes, but refuses to mention it again. Harvard University has instituted a program where they would pay for any student in an income bracket under $60,000 whereas NYU can barely provide 60 percent of those in need of financial aid. NYU’s expansion plans are amassing costs well into the billions, surpassing what the school can actually afford. Property prices in the city have decreased, as NYU’s tuition rose well above the 24 percent national average of other colleges. The university pretends to be a dream school to attract students, only to reject them to improve its prestige. All prestigious universities are guilty of this, but they at least meet their student’s financial needs. Nikolas Reda-Castelao is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@ nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Cruz fakes filibuster for media attention

Tuesday afternoon, Junior Texas Sen. Ted Cruz ended a 21-hour, 19-minute assault on Obamacare. While not a full-fledged filibuster, his lengthy denunciation of the established legislation has proven controversial. More notable than the substance of his speech, however, was the response it elicited within his own party. Cruz’s positioning on the rightmost side of the political spectrum, and the onslaught of media attention that has stemmed from it, has alienated him from his Republican peers. Conservative commentators Byron York and John Podhoretz took to Twitter to protest the critical coverage Cruz garnered compared to the positive reaction Wendy Davis received for her filibuster in June. But they failed to acknowledge the distinctions between the two. Tuesday’s events cannot be considered a filibuster, as voting was not delayed as a result of Cruz’s action. Davis could not break or stray off-topic during her filibuster, whereas Cruz was relieved by his Republican colleagues’ interjections, and passed time by reading Dr. Seuss and quoting “Duck Dynasty.” Davis and Cruz may both be from Texas, but the differences in circumstances surrounding their protests could not be more stark. Did Cruz’s explanation for taking to the stage in an effort to defund Obamacare actually hold water? No one can say for certain what Cruz’s true motivations were. One rational way of judging motivations is by looking at the actions. Given that President Obama would veto any legislation from Congress to defund his own policies and that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid would cut out any provisions slashing funds from Obamacare, there was no possibility that Cruz would meet his objectives. This suggests that Cruz’s actions were nothing more than an orchestrated attempt to attract media attention and acquire political momentum. While the speech may not have helped the Republican party, it is doubtful that was the intention. According to 80 percent of Americans, threatening a government shutdown is an unacceptable way to negotiate — Cruz presumably knew this, and likely factored that into his decision to not actually filibuster the debate. Then why make this speech? The speech made Cruz a trending topic on sites like CNN.com and Twitter ahead of others such as Miley Cyrus. Such skewed media coverage, in an era where presidential primaries are often heavily affected by name recognition, encourages grandstanding in place of actual debate and policy making.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Raquel Woodruff (Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Peter Keffer (Co-chair), Harry Brown, Marcelo Cicconet, Nicki Sethi, Nina Golshan, Ian Mark, Omar Etman, Christina Coleburn

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


8

NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS YAFFE continued from PG. 1

After strong work on NYU’s team, Yaffe begins professional play the team earned a gold medal for the U.S. A can-do attitude and a little research led Yaffe and his agent, Mike Naiditch, to BK Inter Bratislava, a team in need of a “four man,” or a power forward. After the review of Yaffe’s game tapes and highlights of his college career, Inter Bratislava agreed to sign the 6 foot, 8 inch, UAA player. The transition has been relatively easy for Yaffe so far, and he has already landed a spot in the starting five for his new club. “It is easy to communicate, since pretty much everyone [in Slovakia] speaks English,” he said. Furthermore, his teammates have welcomed him and “are really fun to be around,” making his new situation even easier to cope with. Despite his enormous success, Yaffe has not forgotten where he came from, and gave NYU an enormous amount of credit for helping him get to this point. “After playing with D-I guys in Israel for the Maccabiah Games this summer and now playing for Inter Bratislava with other imports from America, I can honestly say that I stack up well compared to guys coming from higher levels of play,” he said. “That just goes to show what NYU did for me and the type of program that NYU has.” Willow Frederick is a contributing writer. Email her at sports@nyunews.com.

EDITED BY FRANCISCO NAVAS SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Alumna fights cancer, crosses English Channel By KENNETH LIM

Allison “Alli” DeFrancesco swam the English Channel last month in 11 hours and 14 minutes. For the former NYU swimmer, the trip was only more difficult as her time in the water passed. “I got violently ill the last three hours, and found myself crying into my goggles,” the 25-year-old said. But DeFrancesco did not think about giving up — not with the memory of former swim coach Lauren Kyle Beam in her mind. “Lauren was my main source of motivation,” DeFrancesco said. “Lauren would be in the back of my head saying, ‘Come on now, you said you were going to do this...’” Beam was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2009. Three weeks later, DeFrancesco received news that she herself had Hodgkin’s disease, a cancer of the lymphatic system. The art history major graduated a semester early, returning home to North County, San Diego for treatment. DeFrancesco eventually received a successful bone mar-

row transplant. Unfortunately, Beam succumbed to her cancer in September, 2011. DeFrancesco, now an assistant registrar at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, recalls her former coach’s amazing ability to tap into the potential of every member of the swim team — a team of nearly forty girls from all over the country with different athletic backgrounds. “She gave us not only the freedom, but the push to succeed in both worlds, which was essential to the NYU experience,” DeFrancesco said. “And through it all, she never stopped coaching.” On her flight back to San Diego from Beam’s funeral service, DeFrancesco decided to swim the English Channel, “knowing full well what it’s like to be young, seemingly healthy and yet fighting for your life,” she said. “I felt I had to do something,” she said. “I had to turn a negative into a positive.” Ultimately, conquering the English Channel was an opportunity for DeFrancesco, a dual Italian and United States

citizen, to do something recognized as universally challenging but also within her means. “You mention cancer to anyone on the street and they wince,” she said. “You mention the English Channel to that same person and, most likely, you won’t have to offer too much of an explanation. With the ocean at my door, an A-team of coaches assembled and an extensive swimming background, it seemed like the obvious choice.” DeFrancesco trained at La Jolla Cove in San Diego during her preparations for the swim. There, she found herself a support group of fellow Channel swimmers. “Everyone was eager to share what worked for them and what didn’t, from boat pilots to diet tricks,” she said. “In the midst of a very solitary sport, I soon found myself surrounded by more positive encouragement than I had ever felt, even through cancer.” To DeFrancesco, there are many similarities between training for the swim and battling cancer. These include taking a risk, committing to a plan and preparing

COURTESY OF ALLISON DEFRANCESCO

DeFrancesco swam the English Channel in honor of her late coach. for the unknown. “Both experiences are unique to the individual, require a certain amount of research and preparedness, a leap of faith and a respect for life,” DeFrancesco said. “One doesn’t just wake up and swim the English Channel and, similarly, a cure for cancer doesn’t come overnight.” Kenneth Lim is a contributing writer. Email him sports@ nyunews.com.

WSN092613  

Washington Square News September 26, 2013

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