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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 40, No. 13

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012

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Protests abroad affect NYU students

Gordon Brown addresses NYU

By MEGHAN O’CONNOR

By SIDDHI SUNDAR

BUENOS AIRES — On the evening of Sept. 13, metallic harmony sounded throughout the streets of Buenos Aires. Thousands of Argentinians took to the streets with kitchenware in the protest of President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner. Banging pots and pans together is a form of protest used in Argentina that has been used since 2001, when an overwhelming economic crisis mostly hit the lower classes. However, on this particular Thursday the subject of protest was more political than economical. Kirchner, once a political favorite, quickly lost favor as involvement in corruption and issues with increased crime and inefficient economic restrictions have raised questions of her competence. With swiftly

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FILE PHOTO BY JONATHAN TAN

Brown stressed the importance of global collaboration in his speech Monday afternoon.

A sparkling debut for Kaling’s ‘Mindy’

By KEERTHI HARISHANKAR

Fox’s highly anticipated new comedy, “The Mindy Project,” delivers with its series premiere; topnotch writing paired with comedy veteran Mindy Kaling in the starring role proves to be a winning combination. Not only is the writing clever and relatable, but audiences are also sure to find Kaling charming, making “The Mindy Project” a likely hit. In the series premiere, Kaling plays Mindy Lahiri, a 31-year-old obstetrics and gynaecology doctor who doesn’t quite have her life together. The show begins with Kaling describing her love of romantic comedies and her desire for her life to become one. It’s a dream

Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown delivered an address on the global economy to an eager audience of NYU students and faculty in the Kimmel Center for University Life early Monday afternoon. Brown’s speech, which was based on statistics, theory and social philosophy, boiled down to two trajectories. The first projected the fate of the international market within 20 years­ — predictions primarily based on Brown’s anchored belief in the potential of constantly evolving education and innovation. The second delved into the roadblock Brown believes is most critically inhibiting economic growth: a lack of global collaboration. “It’s wrong to see ourselves as threatened by the rise of a new middle class in Asia,” Brown said.

shared by many young women, and immediately establishes Kaling as an every-girl heroine. However, what makes the scene memorable is when the audience realizes that she is telling this to a police officer while explaining a series of drunken escapades following her ex-boyfriend’s wedding. The rest of the episode properly establishes that Mindy has issues in every aspect of her life, and she is very much a work in progress — making the show’s title rather apt. Also introduced in this episode are Mindy’s best friend Gwen (Anna Camp), her smug co-worker Danny Castellano (Chris Messina), and sexy British doctor Jeremy

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NY honors mollusks of Manhattan

By CAROLINE JOHNSON

In a city where festivals are devoted to a variety of exotic cuisines, it is refreshing to come across a celebration of the city’s indigenous foods. The first-ever New York Oyster Week kicked off Sept. 22 and will continue through Sept. 29. Oyster Week is an event to celebrate the oyster not only as food but also for its connection to the history of New York City. Kevin Joseph, one of Oyster Week’s creators and co-founders, explained the rich history between New Yorkers and the mollusk. “For 100 years, the oyster was the most commonly consumed form of protein of all classes of New Yorkers because the New York harbor was so full of

them,” Joseph said. “No other place consumed a single food for so many years, in the same exact way [as New York has with oysters]. It just doesn’t happen anywhere else.” The unique relationship the city has with oysters goes back to when the Dutch called New York City “New Amsterdam.” The shellfish continues to be a staple in the diets of New Yorkers of all budgets. Oyster Week will host special events in and around Manhattan. The kick off event at the Stone Street Oyster Festival on Sept. 22 was an amazing fusion of good food — crab cakes, mac and cheese and, of course, oysters — good music and good company. The streets of lower Manhattan were bustling with people enjoying the

COURTESY OF KEVIN JOSEPH

Oyster Week began Sept. 22 and will last until Sept. 29. last warm, sunny days with their fellow food lovers. The following day featured an Oyster social, where local bluegrass bands played while diners enjoyed the mollusk and mingled with other people.

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE

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WSN STAFF

Weezer’s discography can mostly be described as unsophisticated and cliché. It is nothing short of a pity, however, that “Pinkerton,” the band’s second album, does not get the respect it deserves as a truly bold musical achievement. Songs like “Across the Sea” and “The Good Life” blend Weezer’s tried-andtrue pop formula with genuine, intense artistry and make this album well worth a listen.

Annie Dillard’s “An Expedition to the Pole” is an essay worth rereading. Though it’s initially hard to see what the Christian Mass has to do with the history of polar expeditions, Dillard’s descriptive prowess makes both rides worthwhile. It all comes together as she masterfully evokes an awe usually found only by grappling with our physical and spiritual limits.

- Jason Boxer

- Leora Rosenberg

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Editor-in-Chief AMANDA RANDONE Managing Editor

JAEWON KANG Web Managing Editor

AMY ZHANG Deputy Managing Editor

EMILY YANG Assistant Managing Editors

HANQING CHEN DANIEL HINTON Creative Director

MERYLL PREPOSI

STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS

SENIOR STAFF

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Produced by Quentin Tarantino, “The Man With the Iron Fists” is an upcoming martial arts film that will forever change the genre. The film stars rapper RZA, who cowrote the script with Eli Roth, as a blacksmith who joins forces with others to protect a small community. RZA, along with Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu, will engage in an epic battle that will change the balance of the world.

Minnesota musician Mux Mool’s 2010 debut album, “Skulltaste,” brings a pleasing mix of floating, electro hip-hop beats perfect for dorm raves or doing homework. The 20-song album may be lengthy, but what it lacks in brevity it makes up for in depth. Songs like “Hog Knuckles” and “Crackers” will find a way into your head and refuse to leave, but you’ll be glad for it. With its blend of genres, the record feels pleasingly cozy and homemade.

–Peter Slattery

–Bob Teoh

GRAPHIC BY KALEEL MUNROE AND KATHARINE RYAN FOR WSN

university GENTRY BROWN city/state TONY CHAU arts STEFAN MELNYK features NICOLA PRING multimedia JAMES KELLEHER copy JORDAN MELENDREZ senior editors HANNAH BORENSTEIN,

CARRIE COUROGEN, JULIE DEVITO, BRIDGETTE DORAN, JONATHON DORNBUSH, CHARLES MAHONEY, COLE RILEY

DEPUTY STAFF

university TATIANA BAEZ city/state KAYANA JEAN-PHILIPPE,

CLAIRE ZAJDEL books/theater CLIO MCCONNELL film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment SAMANTHA RULLO music JOSHUA JOHNSON features KATYA BARANNIK beauty & style HILARY PRESLEY dining LAVYA YALAMANCHI special issues ESHA RAY sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA, SARA LEVY, SEBASTIEN VAN HEYNINGEN multimedia GLORIA LEE, JONATHAN TAN foreign correspondent

RICHARD ZHANG social media agent

TODAY

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6 p.m. Department of Cinema Studies, 6th floor, Michelson Theater | 721 Broadway

7 p.m. Housing Works Bookstore Cafe | 126 Crosby St.

7:30 - 9 p.m. Irish Arts Center | 553 W. 51st St.

SCREENING OF “A MIRROR OF IMAGINATION”

Filmmaker Yousuf Saeed filmed this documentary to focus on the development and reinterpretation of classical music in Pakistan to suit the country’s post-1947 Islamic identity.

TUMBLR LAUNCH PARTY

Allie Hagan and Emma Koenig, authors of the hit Tumblr blogs “Suri’s Burn Book” and “F*ck! I’m in My Twenties,” respectively, will be at Housing Works to discuss their websites, that are being turned into books. Join your Tumblr friends for free drinks, readings and comedy.

AN EVENING WITH CHRISTINE DWYER HICKEY

Christine Dwyer Hickey, winner of The Kerry Group Irish Fiction Award 2012, will be reading excerpts from her award-winning novel, “The Cold Eye of Heaven” which explores 75 years in the life of a Dubliner who lives through poverty and prosperity.

NICOLE GARTSIDE

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

CHRIS DINARDO deputy opinion editor

JESSICA LITTMAN

ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER

REBECCA RIBEIRO CIRCULATION MANAGER

CHELSEA GOLD

UNIVERSITY SALES COORDINATOR

SNAPSHOT

ON THE WIRE

Badger for dinner?

Popular British food writer Clarissa Dickson Wright has been disputed after mentioning that she enjoyed eating badger meat when she was younger. Dickson Wright is most well-known in the United States for starring in the PBS cooking series, “Two Fat Ladies.” Badgers are currently a protected species in Great Britain — except in places where they are considered being at risk for carrying tuberculosis. The British government has been exterminating them in such areas, but Dickson Wright suggested they should be consumed instead. Defending her statements, she said badgers were a common staple in the British diet centuries ago. — THE TELEGRAPH

KAITLYN O’BRIEN SALES REPRESENTATIVES

ELLEN MCQUEEN, MELISSA YNEGAS SALES ASSOCIATE

GLORIA LEE

CIRCULATION ASSISTANTS

OMID GOLMOHAMMADI, MAX KANE

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY EDITORIAL ADVISER

KEITH LEIGHTY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN

Sellery Hall dorms hit by burglar

EDITOR-AT-LARGE

FRANCIS POON

— THE BADGER HERALD

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

Bon Iver brought the crowd to its feet at Radio City Music Hall on Saturday.

PHOTO BY CARINA WONG

At fundraiser, Obama ’85 promises return to alma mater orientation week — THE DAILY PRINCETONIAN

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About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jaewon Kang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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NYU Buenos Aires community reacts to growing protest against Argentinian President rising inflation rates and purchasing restrictions, the signs of an economic downturn have been unavoidable. Rumors are circulating that Kirchner has bid to amend the Argentine constitution in order to be able to run for a third term. Dissent builds daily, and Thursday’s protest was just one of many cries of frustration. CAS junior Jennifer Bagby, who is studying politics in Buenos Aires this semester, sees the protest as a significant action. “I think it speaks a lot to the fact that it’s been years since the last protest of this magnitude,” Bagby said. “The patience of people is obviously wearing thin, and they’re not necessarily in another recession, so now it’s more of a political upset. I think it’s just the beginning of something bigger to come.” The ongoing events have not escaped the attention of NYU students studying in Argentina. “I think it’s really interesting that in Argentina mass public protest is a normal part of civic engagement,” said Gallatin junior Haley Houseman. “In the U.S., a protest of the same scale, in all of the major cities, would be an extraordinary event but in Argentina, it was just one of many expected responses to the government’s new policies.” The protest has raised even more of a ruckus because of the way the media portrays it.

Witnessing these protests as an American abroad is a contradictory experience as well. Alexandra Raymond, a CAS junior studying sociology, gives her perspective. “We’re in Argentina at a very pivotal point in modern history,” Raymond said. “While it’s very interesting, it’s also a little scary.” “I think it will be very interesting to see things change here in the next few months,” she said. Because the protests were organized through social media and not backed by any particular political party, support from mainstream media has proved sparse. Another factor in the absence of sufficient news coverage comes from the fact that most newspapers and TV broadcasters are connected to the government. Many officials have purported that the protesters were a minority. When asked about the protest and its implications, on-site NYU creative writing professor Anna Kazumi Stahl had mixed reactions. “A pot-banging protest like last Thursday’s that features a symbolic empty pot brandished by the comparatively more well-off class is problematic on multiple levels,” Stahl said. “But even with the paradoxes it reinforces the frank value of living in a society in which the public space continues to be a blank canvas for spontaneous expression across the spectrum of classes. In how many

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Former UK Prime Minister encourages global cooperation

Brown commenced his speech by highlighting gaps in the drastic shift the global economy has seen in consumer spending. “Why can’t producers and consumers reach an understanding?” Gordon said. “Ten years ago, the American consumer could drive the economy forward ... now, it’s a lack of confidence in the ability to sell products to the European market.” In a quick history lesson about trends in American dependency, Gordon said 18th- and 19thcentury decision-making was a relatively precise mirror of modern day economic woes. Then, states could not solve problems without national legislation, which forced them to embrace a federal offshoot. Gordon equated that collaboration to a similar necessity in 21st-century economics: nations operating in a vacuum will only continue hitting brick walls. “You just need the global help,” he said. “We should be growing quickly right out of a recession,” Gordon said. “What was a four to five percent growth has now become two to three percent.” He attributed the ceiling to a lack of cooperation on the global level. Then he went onto localize the issue by linking mass unemployment and general financial crises to what he considers an integral flaw in the political system. “Politicians always parochialize their problems,” Gordon said. His faith in international partnership drew curiosity and skepticism from the crowd, to which he ac-

knowledged that even though no political leader runs to the electorate with financial solutions rooted in global dependency, it is nevertheless the next elemental step in progress. Jayasree Nambisan, a Stern sophomore who attended the event, said the solutions and options he suggested were a bit theoretical and vague for her taste. “How do we get ‘global cooperation’ to happen? Let’s be honest, most governments and people in power are greedy and want to boost their own economy, so what would make them willing to help out other countries?” Nambisan said. “Especially considering that the increasing wealth stratification is beneficial for the wealthy.” “Another point is that he mentioned that innovating countries can stay on top, but why can’t we equalize and stabilize the global financial industry by compensating manufacturing-heavy countries more?” she said. After a brief examination of the post-Revolution future of Middle Eastern markets and the urgency to move away from public sector education in countries that yield unemployment like Egypt, the former Prime Minister ended his address with a call for belief. Brown said the state of world economics could and will forge a successful path as long as its citizens invest belief in JFK’s Declaration of Interdependence and espouse increased global collaboration. Siddhi Sundar is a contributing writer. Email her at university@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF DIANA FOLLA

Thousands of protesters rallied in Buenos Aires with kitchenware this month. other countries is public space still so heterogeneously voiced?” The Argentinean masses heard Kirchner’s warning, and they are gathering their weapons in retaliation. The people of Buenos Aires

have their pots and pans ready. Meghan O’Connor is a foreign correspondent. Email her at university@nyunews.com.

New proposal aims to establish registry for animal abusers in city

By MITCHELL KAPOOR

City Councilman Peter Vallone has proposed a bill that would create a database of people with a history of animal abuse in New York City. Animal abusers would be required to register with police officials who would create a citywide database accessible to the public and its communities. The bill would also ban any convicted animal abuser of owning or adopting another animal or risk fines and possible incarceration. So far, New York is the only state in the country to have any enacted registries, which are in Suffolk, Albany and Rockland counties. Other states have at-

tempted to pass legislation but have been unsuccessful; largely because of the cost of creating and maintaining an ever-growing database of identities, according to the Animal Legal Defense Fund. New York has attempted to pass statewide bills in the past but has also been unable to place any of them into action. The bill specifically targets people with records of animal abuse and attempts to prevent them from obtaining another pet. “Obviously this law won’t stop the problem because abusers can get animals from many locations, but this will put another obstacle in their path and will put crimi-

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The bill will make it more difficult for abusers to possess pets.

nal sanctions for the first time on a criminal abuser possessing another animal,” Vallone said. But some are concerned about the potential effects of the registry’s use. “If done fairly, this could prevent animals from falling into the wrong hands,” said Jack Carone, the communications director of the non-profit animal rights organization called In Defense of Animals. “If misused, this could ruin lives unjustly. We caution that measures be taken to prevent misuse of such a registry if it is implemented.” However, Vittoria Marcelli, 18, a pet owner in Brooklyn who adopted a dog after it was abused, supported the proposal. “I think animal abusers should definitely be banned from owning a pet because even if they would claim to change, I feel that they can still abuse their pet out of anger if we reach a certain point,” Marcelli said. Rosario Giarratana, a Stern sophomore and owner of two dogs, also believes the database has the potential to be beneficial. “The database would definitely be a useful resource if I had to choose someone to watch my pets or if I was putting my pet up for adoption,” Giarratana said. Vallone hopes to have a hearing before the New York City Department of Health and have the legislation passed this winter. Mitchell Kapoor is a contributing writer. Email him at cstate@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 | NYUNEWS.COM

ARTS

EDITED BY STEFAN MELNYK ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

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‘Office’ star Mindy Kaling makes convincing case for solo career

Green Day’s ‘¡Uno!’ disappoints as first in trilogy of albums By CHRIS FELDSINE

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Mindy Kaling’s new comedy plays with familiar TV tropes. Reed (Ed Weeks). While the story appears to be setting Danny and Mindy up for a will they or won’t they relationship, the show is too smart to make that overtly obvious. Discussing appropriate date outfits for women, the two end up having a biting conversation that goes beyond playful banter, making the audience question whether the two are compatible at all. During her first actual date in a long time, Mindy is interrupted by her job and her perfect evening turns into a panicked scramble. Kaling’s character is deeply flawed, which in another show might prove fatal, but this one handles it properly. Mindy’s flaws work to her advantage and are, in fact, part of her appeal. They make her a fully rounded character and someone you want to watch develop.

Kaling is often compared to Tina Fey for her writing and acting double-threat, and now it seems fair to say Kaling holds her own against the reigning queen of comedy. This is the time of the femaledriven TV comedy, From “Saturday Night Live” veteran Amy Poehler in “Parks and Recreation” to Lena Dunham in “Girls,” women are proving that comedy is no boys club. “The Mindy Project” deserves to stand proudly with those great shows and Kaling’s biggest achievement in the pilot is doing women in comedy justice. Mindy may get relationships all wrong but, like her show, she has plenty of wit and heart. Keerthi Harishanker is a contributing writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com.

Green Day’s ambitions extend far beyond its abilities. “American Idiot” strove to become a definitive chronicle of life in the United States in the early 21st-century, yet largely succeeded in conveying only adolescent boredom and ignorance. The band’s eighth album, “21st Century Breakdown,” sought to become a major aesthetic achievement, but only succeeded in rendering Green Day’s stylistic limitations painfully manifest. Now “¡Uno!” the first entry in a forthcoming album trilogy and the band’s ninth album, proclaims its affinities with the Beach Boys, Ramones and Nirvana, despite being entirely devoid of the anxious curiosity, endearing disenchantment and emotional evasiveness of those artists, suggesting that Green Day is closer to Blink-182 than any of those groups. However, one must admit “¡Uno!” is a terrible record only in comparison to the heights to which it aspires. While it possesses little substance, the record’s commercial viability is indisputable. The music, though hardly mesmerizing, is somewhat enticing. The chord progressions are

Emmys deliver evening of frequent surprises By ISABEL JONES

Rising from the ashes of “Mad Men’s” defeat came new Emmy front-runner “Homeland,” which also beat critical favorites “Boardwalk Empire,” “Downton Abbey,” “Game of Thrones” and “Breaking Bad.” After taking home the award for Outstanding Drama series four years in a row, “Mad Men” appeared to have finally met its match, leaving the acclaimed period piece to a disheartening 17 losses. Among the evening’s losers was leading man John Hamm — “Mad Men’s” driving force in his role as the now-iconic Don Draper. Hamm has suffered five losses in the Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series since “Mad Men’s” debut season. This year he fell prey to “Homeland’s” newcoming, though arguably undeserving, Damien Lewis. Perhaps the era of “Mad Men” idolatry has come to a close — its appeal exhausted by the oversaturation of ’60s-set imitators. Regardless of the past season’s stylistic shift, however, Hamm deserved recognition. “Homeland” remained one of the few rookie series to garner much — if any — Academy recognition. “Veep’s” Julia Louis-Dreyfus stole the Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series from “Park and Recreation’s” Amy Poehler, who was thought to have delivered her most authentic, comedic and compelling performance to date. It was a snub for both Poehler and

the show itself, as “Parks and Recreation” did not even receive a Best Comedy Series nomination this year. The same can also be said for acclaimed ABC comedy “Suburgatory,” which did not receive a nomination as a series or for its breakout star, Jane Levy. HBO’s wildly popular, youth-infused “Girls” was also ignored even though its 26-year-old writer, director and actress Lena Dunham surely deserves a bit of the golden sheen shared by the cast and crew of ABC’s “Modern Family.” The biggest travesty came for Fox’s “American Horror Story.” After 17 nominations and insatiable buzz, “Horror Story” was slated to win big. In the end, Ryan Murphy’s terrifying creation brought home only two awards. One was for Outstanding Hairstyling for a Miniseries or a Movie; the other went to the deserving Jessica Lange for Best Supporting Actress. As for the Outstanding Miniseries or Movie, the award went to HBO’s “Game Change,” an unexpected victor. At times, the surprises at the 2012 Emmy Awards Show rivaled the nominees themselves in terms of drama. The awards narratives of several shows came to an abrupt and disappointing end. Deserved or not, these defeats added intrigue to the frequently uninteresting format of the awards show. Isabel Jones is a contributing writer. Emai her at entertainment@nyunews.com.

not novel, but they engage the listener’s attention, and the distortion is never more than slightly cacophonous. Billie Joe Armstrong uses rankling screaming and plaintive moaning as each song demands it. Mike Dirnt’s bass is distracting on “Nuclear Family” and “Kill the DJ,” but otherwise he fulfills his duties admirably. Tre Cool’s impassioned yet restrained drumming consistently ensnares the listener. “Kill the DJ” and “Oh Love” are infectious, if tedious. Both could easily grace the Top 40 over the next several months. Every other track on this album should probably have been cut, but together they constitute a marginally satisfying listening experience. More troubling, “¡Uno!” is also repugnantly crass. While free of the anemic social commentary that pervades “American Idiot” and “21st Century Breakdown,” it abounds with astonishing puerility. “¡Uno!” will almost certainly appeal to adolescents, but adults will cringe at the childish hedonism it so ardently celebrates and the worldview that it evokes in which women are little more than sex objects. Armstrong seeks to express

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anxiety with his lyrics, but ultimately can only convey his own immaturity. Such petulance could be justified on an album like “Dookie” from Green Day’s younger years, but it scarcely merits attention or sympathy when delivered by a 40-year-old man. Yet, “Dookie” is paradoxically a rather more mature record than “¡Uno!” The former addresses the same frustrations that crop up throughout the latter, but the Armstrong of “Dookie” recognizes his banality and is disenchanted by it. The Armstrong of “¡Uno!” takes himself far too seriously, and in the process, comes off as far more ridiculous. Chris Feldsine is a contributing writer. Email him at music@nyunews.com.

Metric mellow at Radio City show By MARGARET EBY Metric played at Radio City Music Hall Sunday night on a tour promoting their new album, “Synthetica.” Since coming together in Toronto in 1998, the band has released five full-length albums, as well as songs for the “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World” and “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” soundtracks. After Half Moon Run’s opening act, Metric took the stage to raucous applause. The band opened with new album favorite “Artificial Nocturne,” as a light display flashed in the background. They went on to play through several

more of their frantic and upbeat new songs. Despite the black leather and lonely adolescent lyrics, frontwoman Emily Haines played the cheerleader more than anything else — jumping up and down on stage, leading the audience in clapping along and hair-flipping to the point of exhaustion. The crowd, who stayed on their feet for the entire show, dancing even when it was clear they didn’t know the words, returned her enthusiasm. Metric is most famous for the song “Help I’m Alive,” the lead single from their 2009 album “Fantasies.” Clearly,

MARGARET EBY FOR WSN

Metric played a mix of classics and deeper cuts.

much of the audience knew little of the band’s other music, a fact that rendered Haines’ attempts at call and response during other songs almost painful. But the band was energetic and loud enough to drum up enthusiasm for the whole night, albeit with a calmer end than its beginning. One unexpected pleasure was the appearance of Lou Reed near the end of the show. He collaborated with Metric on “Synthetica” with “The Wanderlust,” which Haines introduced as a song “about imagining the world you want to live in.” After that, the pair sang “Pale Blue Eyes,” a song Lou Reed wrote for The Velvet Underground. After a long set, Haines said goodnight and sang what she called a lullaby — a sweet and moving acoustic version of “Gimme Sympathy.” The audience gathered their jackets in the dim blue light and headed sleepily for the doors — a pleasant end to an enjoyable show. Margaret Eby is a contributing writer. Email her at music@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

DINING

EDITED BY LAVYA YALAMANCHI DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

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Messy meals: hot spots for chicken wings By ANGEL CHANG

Regularly conceived as the most sensational type of bar food, chicken wings have adapted to the fancies of countless taste buds. There are now Japanese wings with soy sauce, Thai wings with cilantro, vegan wings, boneless wings and, of course, eternally classic barbecue wings. Here is a list of finger-lickin’ goodness.

BLUE SMOKE This swanky, Murray Hill restaurant’s wings are the epitome of glamour and class. The Chipotle Chicken Wings with Blue Cheese Dip ($10.50), the only kind offered at Blue Smoke, is first brined in apple cider then coated with a dry rub. Afterwards they are smoked over applewood, deep fried and glazed with a sweet honey barbecue sauce. The meat is tender and full; the dip is wholesome and rich. 116 E. 27th St., between Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue South.

WILLIAM MARTIN FOR WSN

Tebaya offers Korean-inspired wings.

TEBAYA We’ve heard of famous Korean, soy sauceglazed fried wings, but seldom do we hear of Japanese wing delicacies. Tebaya serves up a refreshing styrofoam plateful of sesame and black pepper-coated Teba Chicken Wings (10 pieces for $8.69), which are fried twice in soy oil to remove the un-

wanted fatty bits but keep the collagen intact. The juicy wings are then covered with the owner’s special, garlic-flavored sauce called Teba Sauce. 144 W. 19th St., between Sixth and Seventh Avenues GEORGIA’S EASTSIDE BBQ This Lower East Side gem houses fantastic ribs, but is also known for its chargrilled buffalo wings. Perfect for those who want to try something a little healthier, without any additional glazes or sauces, the Sampson wings ($5.00) are pleasantly robust and ingeniously original. 192 Orchard St., between Houston and Stanton Streets DANJI Don’t just turn to BonChon Chicken when you’re in the mood for something Korean and fried. Danji offers

its wings in two ways: a spicy Thaistyle or Korean Fire Chicken-style wings ($10). The Korean Fire Chicken wings are served with a garlic, soy, honey and sesame glaze, and they are deliciously fulfilling. 346 W. 52nd St., between Eighth and Ninth Avenues WILDWOOD BBQ Wildwood puts an alternative interpretation of wings on the table that is suited for those who don’t like to get messy. They have one of the best boneless wings in the city ($10.50). Battered in buttermilk, they come in three flavors: chipotle BBQ, dry rub or Frank’s Red Hot sauce. All wings are served with blue cheese dressing and celery. Try all three flavors or, if you’re feeling daring, go for the spiciest of the three. 225 Park Ave. S., at 18th Street

Angel Chang is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

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New York City kicks off first Oyster Week Upcoming events include Oystoberfest, a fitting gathering to celebrate what is referred to as the aphrodisiac of the sea. The festivities take place on Sept. 26 and will include music and dancing. Perhaps the greatest aspect of the festival is its emphasis on environmental sustainability. “The growing movement [is] to use the restoration of oysters to help educate and actually purify water,”

said co-founder Rudi Ehrlich. One of the major goals of Oyster Week is to help people understand the importance of the organism in the ecosystem; old oyster shells, in addition to helping the growth of new oysters, can also help build new reefs in overharvested places. By understanding the oyster’s ecological importance and by supporting aquaculture, Joseph said people will “enjoy oysters in a way they haven’t before.”

“There are so many food festivals in New York, but when one is centered on a food’s cultural and historical ties to New York and has an educational motive behind it, it’s so special,” said LSP freshman Justin Daum. “I will definitely check out some of the great deals New York Oyster Week has to offer.” Caroline Johnson is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

Food Network chef opens Times Square restaurant By TANAY HUDSON When it comes to Times Square dining, there is Restaurant Row, and many other wonderful eateries to choose from: Bubba Gump, Hard Rock Cafe and Dave & Buster’s. What other restaurant could Times Square need to make it even more fantastic? On Sept. 10, Guy Fieri of Food Network fame opened his first restaurant in Times Square, aptly named Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar. With menu items like Tequila Turkey Fettuccine and Root Beer Ribs, Fieri adds edge and novelty to the heart of New York City. As soon as patrons walk in, they see wall adornaments that say “Welcome to Flavor Town” and “Love, Peace and Taco Grease.” This old New York Times building turned flavor-packing district features three full bars with Guy’s own line of beers and a drink dessert selection, along with signature dishes such as Sangria Glazed Shrimp, Cedar Plank Salmon with Jalapeño Apricot Jam and Cajun

Chicken Alfredo. Prices can be steep, however, ranging from $9.95 for the cheapest appetizer to $39.00 for the most expensive entree. But in addition to enjoyment of the menu items, customers can experience the dedication and passion that goes into the food and design of the restaurant. “This restaurant embodies everything that Guy loves,” said marketing director Maggie Monahan. “Everything in the restaurant reflects Guy and something about his life and his passion, from music to the U.S., his car and the kitchen of course.” Whether you consider these dishes weird or amazing, you can be assured that Fieri puts nothing but love into his creations. “Everywhere he goes he takes a piece of what he finds and likes and he creates ... It’s not about just throwing some things together,” Monahan said. “It’s really a thoughtout process of what is going into the food and what people enjoy.” Hostess Karlie Lewis and waiter Neil Brown both love the restaurant’s

atmosphere. Lewis said the best part of the job is working for Fieri himself, whereas Brown said he enjoys serving the upscale clientele in a classy environment. Even though such daring food combinations could potentially turn people away, NYU students seem intrigued by the idea of a 500-seat establishment that offers fried ice cream and pretzel chicken tenders. “It’s definitely something to treat yourself to,” said CAS senior Christina Alvarez. “Guy Fieri is very eccentric himself, so I wouldn’t expect anything less from him.” Others are turned off by the hefty Times Square prices. “Prices are not student-friendly, but I’m curious of how they put root beer on ribs,” Steinhardt junior Sarah Myers said. “As far as the menu, you need something to stand out ... That’s how the city works.” Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar is located at 220 W. 44th St. between Seventh and Eighth avenues. Tanay Hudson is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

Snack healthy with crispy kale chips

KIM BUESSER FOR WSN

By KIMBERLY BUESSER Kale is becoming ever more popular among the urban community. People are discovering the many delicious ways to use the tough collard, and this is just one of them. Baking kale creates a crisp texture, which satisfies that crunch you get when eating potato chips while also providing you with more health benefits and a lot less calories. The average bag of potato chips has at least 130 calories while a similar-sized bag of kale chips tops the charts at 40 calories. These homemade chips are also good for your wallet. A head of kale from the farmers’ market costs no more than two dollars. A week’s worth of snacks, in two dollars and 40 calories — it doesn’t get much better than that. INGREDIENTS: 1 bunch of kale 2 tbs of extra virgin olive oil Dash of salt, to taste DIRECTIONS: 1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees Fahrenheit 2. Wash and dry kale thoroughly and remove the rib (the tough stem) 3. Break into chunks roughly the size of the palm of your hand 4. Place chunks on baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil and salt 5. Bake 20 minutes, turning them halfway through

NOTES: Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes This is a very basic recipe — you can go crazy with it. I like adding parmesan cheese with the salt, but you can also add garlic powder, red pepper, black pepper and whatever else your taste buds desire.

Kimberly Buesser is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com


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Edited by Will Shortz Across 1 Gossip 5 David Bowie’s rock genre, informally 9 Old Indian ruler 14 Fit 15 Excellent, in modern slang 16 African virus 17 Samuel Adams or Corona 18 Magazine for arithmetic lovers? 20 Momentum, informally 22 [as written] 23 Want ad letters 24 Bizarre demand to a dry cleaner? 29 City served by Indira Gandhi International Airport 31 Sexy 32 Flamenco cry 33 Took part in a bee, British-style 35 Arizona tribe

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69 Ones before whom pearls are cast 70 Hornets’ home 71 Deep black gem

Down 1 Applies with a Q-Tip, say 2 “Yeah, sure …” 3 Retirement attire 4 Usher in with fanfare 5 Important econ. indicator 6 “U crack me up!” 7 “Thank you, come again” speaker, on “The Simpsons” 8 Like drawn-out divorces 9 Bounce around a canyon, say 10 Lincoln moniker 11 Card #53 or #54 12 Dole out 13 First president to have a telephone in the White House 19 Genie’s offering TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 21 Reagan attorney A S P U R E R O S general Ed D U O M O L O O K 25 Chow chow chow brand E P U P U L A Z Y 26 Grand ___ Auto N N E R S G U I D E 27 Least spicy A A R H M O S U M B Q U E S T I O N 28 Emperor of A.D. 69 E E U K R G T O R D E E C A N O E 29 “Uh-uh” B Y E T A S S E L 30 “___ Enchanted” (2004 film) H A S N A I L S A R S N L A C T 34 N.Y.U.’s ___ School of the Y N A N C Y A S T O R Arts O H I O C U R V Y 36 “I repeat …” W O N T A M I E S 37 Droids, e.g., for L Y E S B O A S T short

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38 Aruba or Bora Bora 40 Extended family 41 Ingredient in some suntan lotions 42 Waterlogged locale 47 Counsel 48 Take counsel from

50 “It would ___ me …” 51 Singing ability, informally 52 1980s-’90s courtroom drama 53 Taste that’s not sweet, sour, bitter or salty 54 Many a summer show

58 Green-eyed monster

59 Pope who excommunicated Martin Luther 61 100 years: Abbr. 62 Jungle swinger

63 Checks the age of, in a way 64 “Only kidding!”

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY CHRIS DINARDO OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

HEALTH

STAFF EDITORIAL

Smokers should consider others before lighting up By TERRI BURNS Walking the streets of New York City is always a little shocking. There is so much to see and do; I often feel pleasantly overwhelmed just walking to class. It’s a lot to take in. Most shocking, however, is the number of smokers I encounter when I step outside. Let me start off by saying I dislike the smell of smoke. I find it to be rather unappealing and foul, and I do not appreciate having to constantly smell it when I go outdoors. However, I am also a firm believer in individual rights. Ultimately I do not believe stricter laws should be enacted against smokers, but I urge smokers to be more conscious about the time and place they choose to light up. While the well-known health risks associated with smoking should be more than enough reason to not smoke, those who choose to smoke must be cautious not to burden those who do not. Firstly, choosing the right time to smoke should be a simple mat-

ter of courtesy. One should not have to inhale someone else’s smoke they do not want to. More importantly, secondhand smoke has the potential to cause a number of different health issues. Those who choose not to smoke should not be put at risk at the expense of random city dwellers who are willing to risk their own health. Cigarette smoke cannot be contained, so smokers should be sensitive to the fact that when they light up in a large crowd of people, quite a number of those surrounding them are going to have to experience the smoke. A number of laws are already in place to prevent smokers from lighting up wherever they please. In May 2011, the Smoke Free Air Act extended smoking bans to parks and beaches in New York City. Some employers are going so far as to charge smokers higher rates for health insurance. Taxes on cigarettes are notoriously high. The reason for these rules — to discourage potentially destructive lifestyles for those who choose and to protect those who choose not to

smoke — is justified. While some smokers may find these laws to be strict, they inherently help nonsmokers stay away from the irritation and health risks of secondhand smoke, which is unquestionably important. I support these laws even though I am wary about enacting stricter laws for the sake of preservation of the individual rights of smokers. While I disagree with the choice to smoke, I agree with the freedom to make the choice. If you want to smoke, you undoubtedly should be allowed to do so. Similarly, if you choose not to smoke, you should be allowed to breathe air that is smoke-free. New York City is one of the best places in the world, and I have certainly been enjoying my time here. I love exploring the city, and when I do, I want to be able to inhale fresh air — not dangerous carcinogens. Terri Burns is a contributing columnist. Email her at opinion@nyunews.com.

POLITICS

Democrat or Republican: is either the right choice? By CHRIS DINARDO I submitted my absentee ballot last week, but I did not vote for Barack Obama, the candidate I canvassed for in 2008, or Mitt Romney, his Republican counterpart. And every time I tell somebody that, I’m asked, “Why would you throw away your vote like that?” You would think I was writing in Kris Kringle the way they look at me. And each time, I don’t make any pitches. I steer clear of the pathos that tends to come with candidate support because there is a logical appeal to traditional, democratic principle that needs to be examined. I get it. My candidate won’t win and yours might. Your rationale is that otherwise, my vote may be going to your preferred candidate, and by checking another box I am somehow responsible for a potential loss. But I ask this: What has either major party candidate done to garner my vote? They cannot expect something they never earned. To liberals who want an end to preventive militarism, a restoration of civil liberties, increased government transparency, and greater economic and social justice, I ask, has Obama helped you out there? And to the conservatives who want

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small government, a cutback on executive power, a crackdown on crony capitalism and real job creation, I ask, has Romney shown promise to act on your behalf ? Both of these points simply serve to underscore the inadequacy of these particular candidates, not the two-party structure. It is a choice between an incumbent who has adopted many policy positions he once condemned or a challenger who condemns many of his former policy positions. In other words, they are seasoned politicians — no more; no less. And yet, there is an uncomfortable ease with which both parties will spit in your face and tell you it’s raining — thanks to their fetish for special interests and a status quo that keeps them powerful. Both parties are fighting for the right to oversee a system that is unjust, not overhaul it. And both thrive on maintaining support by relying on the other to take a position more antithetical to their base’s desires. Voters need to realize the lesser of two evils is still evil, and neither of the two party platforms has our best interests at heart. My vote here assures me that I am not complicit in allowing that to continue. Salon’s Jonathan Bernstein wrote, “It may take some courage to support someone despite important, se-

rious, substantive reservations. It is, however, what needs to be done in a democracy.” Except it doesn’t. Quite the contrary, it should not be done in a true democracy, which we continually laud ourselves — with no good reason — for having. True democracy invites the people’s voice, even those that are fringe or heterodox or just plain underrepresented. True democracy makes the perfect the enemy of the good. Even so, it isn’t through voting that true change is accomplished. It takes a combination of activism and dissent, two sides of the same coin. We must actively pursue measures in the public interest while simultaneously threatening to abandon our representatives who threaten to abandon us. It’s the pressure of losing power that results in more populist politics. The continuation of our present system is symptomatic of a culture desperate to evade serious moral self-reflection. So while my vote won’t do much to combat the current state of affairs, I realize greater avenues exist by which a progressive fight can be waged. So don’t blame me if your candidate loses. Blame a system that is set up to make sure you do, too. Chris DiNardo is opinion editor. Email him at cdinardo@nyunews.com.

Keeping tabs on animal abusers a step in right direction

New York City residents with a history of animal abuse may be facing more stringent barriers when trying to own pets thanks to a new proposal in City Council. Councilman Peter Vallone introduced a bill that would create a database for people convicted of animal abuse crimes. The registry would be available to pet stores, pounds, humane societies, animal control centers, law enforcement agencies and the general public. However, there will be limitations on the amount of years, starting from five years for their first offense, that offenders are listed. A bill that protects animals from abusers is long overdue. Our current system leaves loopholes for those who have practiced animal cruelty to purchase or even adopt new victims. The absence of harsh penalties and high standards for basic animal care makes it easy for offenders to repeat their crimes. This new bill calls for a public registry, which would put up a fence to prevent continued animal cruelty and allows other members of the community to see whether their neighbors have committed animal abuse. While this bill is a step in the right direction, it is not a panacea for the problem of animal abuse. Unlike victims of sexual abuse who are usually able to voice their trauma and contact the authorities, animals are not endowed with the same capabilities. This makes it more difficult to apprehend abusers and leaves a large percentage without a leash. Nevertheless, any improvement is preferable to no improvement, especially when the social cost of creating and maintaining a registry is not too daunting. Animal abusers are finally where they belong: in the doghouse. We are delighted that legislation has at long last been introduced to further the protection of some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The drawbacks of this bill are negligible, while the gains are immense.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Chris DiNardo (Chair), Jessica Littman (Co-Chair), Nathaniel Chumley, Christopher Drake, Sanchay Jain, Sasha Leshner, Peter Murphy, Raquel Woodruff and Richard Zhang.

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, NY 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 150 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


8

NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY THE WSN STAFF SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Underclassmen step up at Northeast Regional By NICK NEMEROFF

The weather was merciless for the NYU women’s tennis team this past weekend, forcing the entire Intercollegiate Tennis Association Northeast Regional Tournament to move indoors. Hosted by William Smith College in Geneva, NY, this competition was the opening intercollegiate competitive match of the season, and the inclement weather presented an unexpected fork in the road. Subsequent planning and schedule changing was required, and the format of the tournament was reduced to an eight-game pro-set format on the first day. Despite this alteration, head coach Horace Choy still felt comfortable with his players’ chances. “Although not ideal, the eight-game proset is long enough where the better player will win most of the time,” Choy said. On the first day of competition, sophomore Mariella Tzakis, freshman Ashley Masanto and freshman Alison Wang each won their two opening singles matches, giving NYU a collective 6-0 record. It should be noted that both Masanto and Wang made their collegiate debuts this past weekend and both performed impressively. Choy applauded Wang’s efforts in her 9-7 second round triumph over senior Karisse

Bendijo from The College of New Jersey. “Wang’s upset of Bendijo was not so surprising,” Choy said. “As a freshman, Wang may have been overlooked a little by the seeding committee. However, she was the better player that day.” To add to their singles victories, Masanto and Wang teamed up to win their opening doubles match 9-7 against Skidmore College. On day two, Masanto and Wang each won their third round matches in straight sets, as regular scoring was reinstated because of better weather conditions. After a handful of excellent performances, both Masanto and Wang were eliminated in the quarterfinals of the singles competition. The pair was beaten 8-2 by Vassar College in the quarterfinals of the doubles competition. Going into the competition, the Violets were ranked 19th in the Division III recruiting class, based on the commitment of four-star recruit Ashley Masanto. NYU women’s tennis team takes the court next weekend at the Vassar Scramble in Poughkeepsie, NY, where it hopes to build upon its successes in from the previous tournament. Nick Nemeroff is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF NYU ATHLETICS

Women’s tennis performed well at this weekend’s tournament in Geneva, NY.

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Violets win their eighth straight game with a shutout against Hunter College. By FRANK NAVAS The number 10-ranked NYU men’s soccer team defeated Hunter College yesterday with a score of 5-0 at Randall’s Island Field in New York, with a hat trick from star senior forward Kyle Green. This victory continues the Violets’ historic undefeated run and gives them a record of 8-0-0. NYU and Brandeis University are the only undefeated teams in the Division III conference. “Despite a sluggish start, we kept our composure and had a shutout,” said junior left back Juan Velez. Green had a total of six shots and scored as early as the 28th minute, opening up the match scoreboard. “Overall it was a strong showing for the team, and we created a lot of good scoring chances which is always a good sign,” Green said. This pushes Green forward into fourth place in NYU career points, with

65 points and 26 goals. Sophomore midfielder Mac Yumoto and junior midfielder Nate Simons also added to the tally. Three of the goals were penalty kicks in the second half of the game. The lone assist in the game came from sophomore midfielder Mickey Ingerman for Green’s second goal in the 51st minute. “It could have been up to 7-0,” said senior forward Paolo Luciano. Coupled with a strong and secure defense, possession seems to have been the key to the Violets’ victory. “We pick our moments and then play the penetrating ball,” Green said. The Violets return to the pitch on Saturday, Sept. 29, for their first University Athletic Association conference game against Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio at 7:30 p.m. Frank Navas is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

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Men’s soccer wins eighth game, remains undefeated

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