Issuu on Google+

NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 61

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013

nyunews.com

SLAM delivers message to Sexton

First Town Hall opens discussion Members from the University Space Priorities Working Group answered questions from the NYU community.

STORY ON PAGE 3

By CASSANDRA CASSILLAS

WILLIAM MARTIN/WSN

Dressing rooms come loaded Alum Shaka King with expectations for shoppers talks debut film By HANNAH TREASURE

From the moment we walk into a store, the flashy allure of American shopping culture tries desperately to impress us — expertly dressed mannequins line the entrance, beautifully composed color schemes catch our eyes and strategically placed signs remind us of that ubiquitous “20 percent off sale.” But what about the moment when we leave the sales floor and enter the dressing room? That seemingly small transition from public to private can end up feeling drastic. Like some carnival house of mirrors, the dressing room can warp our self-image, especially when we’re alone. These minutes of privacy are contingent on the tiniest aspects. Even nuances in lighting can enhance or detract the overall mood. Hollister, for example, is known for its sultry, dimly lit fitting rooms. Their light bulbs are placed at the top rather than near the sides of the mirror to have a slimming effect, and the semi-darkness brings an aura of privacy, reminiscent of techniques used in clubs and bars, where the name of

the game is flattery. Similar to this is the difference of a bolt-locked dressing room rather than just a tiny curtain between you and the crowds of other shoppers. But when shopping by ourselves, regardless of the fitting room’s aesthetics, we’re confronted with nothing but a mirror that we sometimes can’t help but fill with judgments of ourselves. “Why doesn’t this size fit me? Have I gained weight? What was I thinking picking this out? Could I really pull it off? What will people think of me wearing this?” We falter under pressure to blame our bodies for unfit clothing rather than the items themselves. In these moments, shopping becomes a personal evaluation rather than a decision to buy. Despite huge sizing disparities between stores, the uncertainty or even shame we often feel in asking for a different size can only indicate an alarming image of the society we live in — a society that tries to identify our bodies as uniform, numerical sizes.

MELTDOWN continued on PG. 8

‘Newlyweeds’

PROTEST continued on PG. 3

By KATIE SCHILLER

Shaka King’s debut stoner melodrama and comedy “Newlyweeds” took him on a wild ride long before its theatrical release. Written and directed by King, “Newlyweeds” earned him a spot on the 2011 NYU Purple List — a list that honors the work of graduate film students at NYU Tisch School of the Arts. And then, earlier this year, “Newlyweeds” premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. “Newlyweeds” follows Lyle and Nina, a young Brooklyn couple struggling in their relationship as their affections for each other are overshadowed by their love of marijuana. Shot by shot, the film takes the viewer through their daily lives, revealing their relationships, jobs and lifestyle, suggesting the nearly lethal effect marijuana can have as the dominating factor in one’s life. In an exclusive interview with WSN, King explained how the film was very much inspired by his own experiences and the neighborhoods he grew up in

NEWLYWEEDS continued on PG. 4

NYU Global Programs

Apply now for fall 2014!

www.nyu.edu/studyaway

Application Available October 1

14GP-A005_A_final_WSNNews.indd 1

The NYU Student and Labor Action Movement met in the lobby of Bobst Library yesterday afternoon to deliver a letter to NYU President John Sexton. The 12 students from SLAM were rewarded when the letter was personally accepted by Lynne Brown, the senior vice president of university relations. The letter demanded that NYU ask the brands that produce the university’s apparel to sign the Accord on Fire and Safety in Bangladeshi factories and to terminate contracts with brands that do not comply. In April, an eight-story building in Savar, Bangladesh collapsed and killed 1,129 people and injured approximately 2,500, prompting the accord. The legal agreement targets retailers, labor organizations and nongovernmental organizations and is meant to protect workers from preventable building collapses, fires and accidents. Several companies signed the accord in May. “Sweatshops are particularly relevant because we wear ap-

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

OWS ANNIVERSARY:

The Editorial Board reflects on the Occupy Wall Street’s legacy and American society two years later. HOUSE on PG. 7

9/9/13 1:33 PM


2

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE

COMPILED BY THE

WSN STAFF

STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN

‘DRINKING BUDDIES’

Creative Director

LYANNE NATIVIDAD

“Drinking Buddies” is a great story of romance in the workplace. Olivia Wilde, Jake Johnson, Anna Kendrick and Ron Livingston star in this interesting story of two couples who spend a weekend together at a cabin, only to return home and find their relationships have become much more complicated. As the title implies, the cast is constantly drinking beer, which lends to the comedy. The majority of the film is set in a brewery where Wilde and Johnson work, and the two demonstrate an easy chemistry, so their friendship feels casual and fun. Although the ending is more open than audiences might want, this film is short enough to enjoy during a study break.

Blog Editor

AMY ZHANG Special Issues Director

KALEEL MUNROE SENIOR STAFF

news EMILY BELL, NICOLE BROWN,

MICHAEL DOMANICO investigative KAYANA JEAN-PHILIPPE arts JEREMY GROSSMAN features JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia JONATHAN TAN copy CASEY DALRYMPLE social media GENTRY BROWN senior editors VERONICA CARCHEDI, TONY CHAU, DAN HINTON, MICHELLE LIM, STEFAN MELNYK, SAM RULLO, WICY WANG

‘A CLOCKWORK ORANGE’ “A Clockwork Orange” is a dark, violent novel about a dystopian society that follows Alex, the protagonist. The plot and scene descriptions are intended for a mature audience, but the novel is an artistic and futuristic depiction of the early 20th century. Despite its chilling descriptions of Alex and his gang’s gross actions, it doesn’t take much time before Burgess’ Nadsat dialect becomes part of your own vocabulary. The novel’s three parts are easily digestible, albeit disgusting, but it is a quick, engaging read that can be finished in one sitting.

‘HANNIBAL’

‘GONE HOME’ It’s difficult to explain why PC game “Gone Home” needs to be played, because providing specifics would ruin the story’s initial impact. More of an interactive short story than a game, “Gone Home” puts you in the first-person view of Kate as she returns home from studying abroad. She arrives to an empty house with a note from her sister Sam on the door telling Kate not to come looking for her. What follows is a powerfully evocative story that few pieces of art in recent memory have matched. At only two hours long, “Gone Home” should not be missed.

As the new fall TV season begins, catch up on one of last season’s most impressive debut shows. Based on the Hannibal Lecter mythos, “Hannibal” takes place several years before “Silence of the Lambs” and tells an alternate story of how the murderer and Agent Will Graham first worked together. Gorgeously shot, with mesmerizing visuals and editing, “Hannibal’s” strength also lies in its amazing lead performances. Mads Mikkelsen makes the title character all his own, and Hugh Dancy explores the fascinating instability of Graham’s life. With a supporting cast that helps flesh out this spectacular series, “Hannibal” offers a delicious blend unlike almost any other show on TV.

DEPUTY STAFF

news KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR,

BILLY RICHLING books/theater DYLAN JARRETT film ALEX GREENBERGER entertainment ISABEL JONES music JAKE FOLSOM the highlighter blog VALERIE NELSON features MARINA ZHENG beauty & style ARIANA DIVALENTINO dining DANIEL YEOM sports CHRIS MARCOTRIGIANO multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN, JOON LEE video ALEX LINZMEIER

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

RAQUEL WOODRUFF deputy opinion editors

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, PETER KEFFER

ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER

ELLEN MCQUEEN

CIRCULATION MANAGER

CHLOE COFFMAN SALES MANAGER

ALISON LIZZIO

PROMOTIONS MANAGER

KALEEL MUNROE UNIVERSITY AND ALUMNI COORDINATOR

SNAPSHOT

CLAIRE MAHANY

SALES REPRESENTATIVES

ARIANA DIVALENTINO, ETHAN JACOBS, SAM WANDER

‘THE MINDY PROJECT,’ ‘NEW GIRL’ While countless sitcoms come and go every season, a select few have the chance to find their comedic strengths. Two of FOX’s most promising comedies, “The Mindy Project” and “New Girl,” have developed a strong pattern of jokes and character work. While both can be a little inconsistent — “Mindy” in particular has its issues — “New Girl’s” second season delivered some of last year’s best comedy and “Mindy” found some impressive ways to use its supporting cast. Give the new comedies this year a chance, but support these two as they continue exploring fresh comedic ground. A DJ oversees the festivities at Bang Bang New York City Grand Opening.

PHOTO BY JOON LEE

PHOTO CREDIIT: MINDY PROJECT - COURTESY OF FOX NETWORK | NEW GIRL - COURTESY OF FOX NETWORK | CLOCKWORK ORANGE - COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. | HANNIBAL - COURTESY OF NBC | DRINKING BUDDIES - COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES| GONE HOME - COURTESY OF THE FULLBRIGHT COMPANY

GOT AN EVENT? EMAIL US AT AGENDA@NYUNEWS.COM OR TWEET US @NYUNEWS. GOT SOMETHING TO SHARE? EMAIL US AT TIPS@NYUNEWS.COM.

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY EDITORS-AT-LARGE

JAEWON KANG, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG

About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jordan Melendrez at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

NYUNEWS.COM


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

Working group, Town Hall opens community discussions

By NICOLE BROWN AND KATE METCALFE

At the Space Priorities Working Group Town Hall meeting last night, some Greenwich Village residents showed that there is still a conflict between the community and the university over NYU 2031. The meeting took place in the Kimmel Center for University Life at 7 p.m. After the Working Group presented their interim report, putting an emphasis on classroom and student life space, they asked for comments and questions from the audience of approximately 40 people in the Eisner and Lubin Auditorium. President of the Washington Place Block Association Howard Negrin raised concerns about the impact the expansion will have on Village residents. He said the expansion should move from the area around NYU’s Core block around Washington Square Park to a different location because the current plans were changing the nature of the Village. “If NYU has a desperate need of new space, many in the community have suggested a sensible alternative to this mindless growth in the Village,” Negrin said. “That alternative is the Financial District.” Chair of the working group and professor of Media, Culture and Communication Ted Magder said the overall expansion will go beyond the Core, but there are certain activities that the group believes must be near the Core. Magder said that of the 38 departments that passed resolutions about the plan, 17 opposed the plan and 16 raised serious questions about the expansion but did not affirm or oppose the plan. CAS senior and Student Council Sen-

ator Kevin Jones said he was pleased that the group addressed the importance of student interests in the expansion plans. “I definitely saw a major improvement this time as far as making students the focus,” Jones said. The first Town Hall Meeting of the school year with NYU President John Sexton, led by the Student Senators Council, was also held yesterday before the working group meeting. Around 80 people, mostly students, sat in Lipton Hall to listen to the question-and-answer segment with Sexton. President of the SSC and CAS senior Mariam Ehrari said she was pleased with the Town Hall, but was disappointed that no questions were asked about the other controversial topics. “It’s disheartening to read the information and complaints out there, and then not have those people present to ask questions regarding their concerns,” Ehrari said. One SCPS student told Sexton he had concerns about some faculty not stepping up to the expectations he and his classmates have for their education. “There are slips, and all I can say to all the students is, if there is a slip, don’t hesitate to let us know,” Sexton said. Other topics covered included divestment of fossil fuel companies, opportunities for entrepreneurial students, possible contracts for student-run businesses and disruptive construction near the School of Medicine. Nicole Brown is a news editor. Kate Metcalfe is a contributing writer. Email them at news@nyunews.com.

PROTEST continued from PG. 1

SLAM members bring NYU labor issues to attention of adminstration

parel every day,” said Gallatin senior and SLAM member Caitlin MacLaren. “We’re doing this as a group because we as students have so much power, and we want them to see how many people want to get rid of death factories.” According to their Facebook page, SLAM is “a group of students committed to building the natural alliance between students and workers,” and that they “demand NYU uses its power to promote justice.” SLAM’s two main focuses this year are student debt and rights for sweatshop workers. “This is not the first time we’ve tried to talk to NYU about abolishing sweatshops, but it is the first time since the Savar building collapse in April,” CAS sophomore Anne Falcon said. “The need is much more pressing now.” The group went to Sexton’s office, where they were met by two security guards. Falcon, letter in hand, explained the cause, and the guards sent for someone from the office. Brown came out to receive the letter and said that the university would respond to the letter shortly. “That’s the first time I have seen anyone come out of the office to retrieve a paper with demands,” said CAS senior Dylan Monahan, who was part of the protest. “SLAM works in tandem with a

larger organization, United Students Against Sweatshops, which has chapters all across the country,” said Nate Christensen, a GSAS graduate student and unofficial spokesman for SLAM. “This is not the first time we’ve delivered a letter to the president’s office, and it won’t be the last.” Cassandra Cassillas is a contributing writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.

FELIPE DE LA HOZ/WSN

Lynne Brown accepts a letter from SLAM students at yesterday’s protest in Bobst.

3

NYU, USC cancer research shows promising results By FAY LIN

A collaborative research project between NYU and the University of Southern California may have made a breakthrough in cancer treatment. According to a university press release, the research groups led by NYU chemistry professor Paramjit Arora and USC School of Pharmacy professor Bogdan Olenyuk have developed a new synthetic molecule that blocks the expression of genes that lead to tumor progression. Their research showed that the synthetic molecule, called a protein domain mimetic, successfully blocked cell signaling and quickly stemmed cancer growth. The molecule exhibits high potential for the development of human cancer treatments, after showing low toxicity to the host body and general compatibility for the host. Arora said the approach of this project differs from the approaches of other research in drug discovery. “Typical drugs target enzymes but fail against protein-protein interactions, which are generally considered to be ‘undruggable,’” Arora said. “The significance of this work is that our designed compounds inhibit these recalcitrant interactions.” The next step in the research process is to improve the synthetic molecule’s compatibility to human subjects. Arora and Olenyuk first met when they studied together at the California Institute of Technology. Olenyuk is an expert in the biology and pharmacology of signaling pathways. Since it began in 2007, this cancer research project has included three NYU graduate students and four USC students. Brooke Lao, co-lead author on the paper and a doctoral candidate at NYU, is enthusiastic about the results of the project so far. “It is exciting and validating to see the compounds you synthesized make it all the way to an animal study,” Lao said. Currently, more extensive animal studies

FELIPE DE LA HOZ/WSN

Professor Arora is working with USC professor Bogdan Olenyuk to prevent tumors. are needed before a timeframe can be determined for clinical trials. However, Lao states that the ultimate goal of the project would be for the compounds to become readily available drugs for patients who need them. For some students studying medicine at NYU, research of this caliber is a goalpost to work toward in their time at NYU. Pre-med CAS sophomore Rijul Asri stated that this research indicates NYU’s instrumental role in research in general. “One of the main reasons I decided to major in chemistry here at NYU was the incredible research going on with regards to biology and medicine,” Asri said. “The work of professors Arora and Olenyuk is truly inspirational and proves the importance of chemical research in contemporary medicine. I am really excited to learn more about the mechanism they devised and to see how it will be applied to ongoing cancer research.” Fay Lin is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.

Prof. awarded for pioneering work in math, science By SU SIE PARK

Yann LeCun, a professor at NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, has been named the recipient of the Neural Networks Pioneer Award by the Computational Intelligence Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The award recognizes individuals who have contributed to the field of neural networks for at least 15 years. LeCun will receive the award in July during the 2014 World Congress on Computational Intelligence in Beijing. “[The award] recognized work I did early in my career, between the mid-1980s, when I was a Ph.D. student in France, and the mid-1990s, when I was a research scientist at AT&T Bell Laboratories,” LeCun said. While at AT&T, LeCun developed the convolutional network model, a pattern-recognition model with architecture that mimics, in part, the

visual cortex of animals and humans — an unusual concept for its time. AT&T eventually used this model to develop a check-reading system. In the early 2000s, LeCun worked on deep learning methods like convolutional networks, first at the NEC Research Institute at Princeton, then at NYU in 2003. LeCun said he and his team promoted deep learning, a way for machines to learn data recognition, within the artificial intelligence community. “For example, building a system to detect pedestrians in street images would use a large collection of images, some with pedestrians in them, some without,” LeCun said. “The machine is shown each image and is told if there is a pedestrian or not in it. After each image, it adjusts its internal parameters to produce the correct answer next time it sees the same image or a similar one.”

Earlier this year, LeCun became the founding director of NYU’s Center for Data Science, a research and education institution that focuses on harnessing big data. Pierre Sermanet, a doctoral student at NYU studying deep learning, said LeCun’s award was well deserved. “[LeCun receiving this award] reminds us that breakthroughs often come from disruptive ideas rather than mainstream ones,” Sermanet said. Michael Overton, a chairman in Computer Science Department, said he is thrilled LeCun is receiving recognition for his important research. “His work has consistently been at the forefront of the field, from the first checkreading algorithms ... to the recent resurgence of interest in his models for image recognition,” Overton said. Su Sie Park is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.


4

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

EDITED BY JEREMY GROSSMAN ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

NEWLYWEEDS continued from PG. 1

Stoner dramedy ‘Newlyweeds’ bring director Shaka King’s career to new highs

VIA FLICKR.COM

Director Shaka King uses his own life to realistically portray stoner culture in his film. throughout his life. King was born in Crown Heights, raised in Bedford-Stuyvesant and has been living on the border of Bushwick and Bedford-Stuyvesant for the last 10 years. “I felt an obligation to portray that world as realistically as I could,” King said, regarding the Brooklyn neighborhoods and settings used in the film. “I had the characters in mind early on. They were characters I observed growing up my entire life. Their voices just came out of me.” “A lot of the issues in the movie were personal issues I had in my own life,” he said.

“Newlyweeds” was King’s thesis film while attending the graduate film program at Tisch. He explained that one of the greatest points his Tisch professors instilled in him was that “reality must be depicted on camera.” As a result, King remained conscientious in his desire to depict reality and tell the truth throughout the production of his film. “[‘Newlyweeds’] was a combination of a lot work,” King said. “The goal was to make a movie people would sit in a theater and pay to watch. It was a professional milestone.” He stressed the collabora-

tive nature of the production process, explaining that when creating a film, “if it’s done correctly, it’s a collaboration of so many different minds and entities that it will be better than the original concept.” King also discussed the importance of the growth and developmental stages a film and crew experience throughout conception, production and post-production. “You will inevitably learn something new every day,” he said. Katie Schiller is a contributing writer. Email her at film@ nyunews.com.

‘Killers’ delivers intimate, absorbing performance

By ANA VERDE

Approximately 10 minutes before curtain, the house doors open and the audience is led to their seats to absorb the details of the theater. With low red and blue lighting, a wood-like set that is painted off-white and seating for about 50 people divided into two rows, it’s immediately clear that “Killers” is going to be an intimate play. “Killers,” which is playing at the Paradise Factory through Sept. 29, tells the story of Bobby and Miranda, two best friends with an animalistic urge to kill, and a nameless woman struggling to balance an office romance with her own suicidal thoughts. The juxtaposition between these two storylines is confusing, yet intriguing. The seemingly unrelated stories intertwine with an unexpected twist that offers the audience a lesson in making the most out of one’s life. Playwright Kevin Armento uses

compelling language and playful techniques like repetition and narration to keep the audience engaged in the story, all the while tackling the heavy issues of gender, suicide, lack of ambition and, most importantly, death. Stefanie Abel Horowitz’s direction is onpoint and perfectly matches Armento’s text. The group of five actors is engaging and active — not once do they let let up on the show’s energy and pacing. The collaboration between the director, playwright and actors is undeniably successful, and it is paired with a show that is quick, playful and to-the-point. The cast manages to convey a message without any of the dull, dragging scenes that frequently clutter the middle portion of modern theater productions. Additionally, the actors take an up-close and personal approach with the audience throughout

the whole show — and in a black box setting, it is hard for them not to. John Gasper and Emma Ramos, who star as Bobby and Julia, respectively, give electrifying performances full of wonderful, youthful energy that makes you want to jump out of your chair and join them on stage. Katy Wright-Mead also treats the audience to a chilling performance as the unnamed suicidal woman. Her soliloquies throughout the play, detachment from the idea of killing herself and deadpan reactions to almost everything are adorably haunting. A beautifully written and interpreted character, she forces the audience to sympathize with her. A definite must-see, “Killers” is exhilarating in its display of young people making, living and breathing art through the medium of theater. Ana Verde is a contributing writer. Email her at theater@nyunews.com.

Tisch alum celebrates 13th Emmy win By IFE OLUJOBI

Having just won his 13th Emmy award at the Creative Emmy Awards on Sunday, one might think that writer and former Tisch graduate student David Javerbaum would be over the whole awards show routine. To a degree, he is, but not because he’s ungrateful or jaded. “It’s always an honor. It’s a cool thing to be recognized for your work,” Javerbaum said of his latest Emmy, which he earned for writing “If I Had Time,” the closing number for the 2013 Tony Awards. Javerbaum won the bulk of his Emmys by serving as former head writer and executive producer of “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” He’s also the author of two books and the co-author of two more, covering topics from religion to politics to fetuses. Javerbaum also serves as the wit behind the popular Twitter handle, @TheTweetOfGod, which is approaching one million followers. “I have commitment issues,” Javerbaum said of his numerous projects. “I don’t like doing the same thing over and over.” After working with “The Daily Show” for 11 years and winning as many Emmy awards, Javerbaum called it quits to focus on his musical inclinations. “It was hard to leave,” he said. “It was the best job I ever had, but it was very demanding.” Since leaving the show, Javerbaum has gone on to win his first Emmy outside of “The Daily Show” for the Tony Awards’ 2012 opening number, “Broadway: It’s Not Just for Gays Anymore.” Both that song and this year’s “If I Had Time” were performed by Tony host Neil Patrick Harris, who Javerbaum said has become a friend and a collaborator. Ja-

verbaum plans to write more for Harris in the future, hinting a possible “smart, clever opening number” for the Emmy Awards. Javerbaum is clearly a man with many interests, passions and talents, but ultimately he is rooted in comedy — and it shows in his list of influences and inspirations, which includes works like “The Book of Mormon,” “Saturday Night Live” and “South Park,” as well as comedians such as Louis C.K. and Steve Martin. “Basically, I try to see everything,” he said. “I try to watch shows and movies and theater that interest me, and I draw what I like from it and try to let it influence my work.” Javerbaum found his start while attending Harvard University, where he wrote original student plays and musicals. Following Harvard, he attended NYU’s graduate musical theater writing program, which he said “absolutely helped me to get where I am now.” Mostly, he says being in the program helped influence his collaboration skills. “I had never done it before, working closely with partners and groups and really having to listen, but you learn how to get the best out of them and out of yourself,” Javerbaum said. Knowing how difficult finding a foothold in the entertainment industry can be, Javerbaum imparted some advice to aspiring writers. “Try everything,” he said. “You’re going to hit homeruns and you’re going to strike out, but don’t be afraid to try something unusual or stupid, because you never know what’s going to work.” Ife Olujobi is a staff writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

5

ARTS

Television antihero fad wears out welcome

By MARCUS JONES

Those who saw the most recent episode of “Breaking Bad” will notice that Walter White’s journey from “Mr. Chips to Scarface” — a phrase creator and executive producer Vince Gilligan once used to describe his show — has reached its climax. Yet the events of this climax bring make audiences question whether the issue of not knowing who to even root for anymore. In recent years, several critically acclaimed drama series have been contingent on a central male antihero as the main character. It is hard to call them the hero or protagonist of the story, because while the story follows them, and we are coaxed to root for them, these men hardly do anything considered upstanding. And with the number of antiheroes that have graced the small screen in recent years, it may be time to move on from this trend. Looking at this year’s Emmy nominees for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series, one would notice that all of the nominated characters are guilty of some pretty unforgivable actions, the worst of which being murder and that one applies to more than one nominee. However, Don Draper and White are currently some of TV audiences’ favorite characters. Viewers have become so conditioned to cheer on bad behavior that if one takes a step back and analyzes the cable dramas and incoming network shows,

many of the main characters are criminals. Look at AMC’s “Low Winter Sun” or FX’s “Sons of Anarchy” or NBC’s new “The Blacklist.” The leads of those shows are crooked cops, a biker gang and a Hannibal Lecter knock-off respectively — and these are the people the show expects us to love. “Breaking Bad” is the most extreme of these examples. Throughout the show, we have no idea who we’re supposed to hate — Walt has frequently made decisions solely driven by money and has betrayed or isolated everyone he has ever loved. He has left a trail of drug addiction, organized crime and murders behind him. And yet, a strong portion of the show’s audience hates Skyler, as evidenced by Anna Gunn’s opinion piece in The New York Times, with viewers jumping down her throat at the first display of bad behavior. It’s questionable how we are made to root for Walt and hate anyone who gets in the way of his drug ring. The same goes for the way we support Draper’s extramarital affairs on “Mad Men,” or Sgt. Brody’s terrorist plots on “Homeland.” In reality, these are not people most audience members would want to spend their time with. It would be refreshing to start seeing protagonists that are actually protagonists, along the lines of the honorable Coach Taylor from “Friday Night Lights.” The era of the antihero has been fun, but it has overstayed its welcome, as characters do not need to be evil to be complex

COURTESY OF AMC

“Breaking Bad’s” Walter White is one of the darkest protagonists recently on TV. and exciting. Even TV executives are frustrated with the trend, as evidenced by FX’s CEO John Landgraf. During a recent discussion at the Television Critics Association press tour, he said, “I can’t imagine a protagonist darker than Walter White. That’s the end of the road for out-darking each other — this nuclear arms race of darkness has ended.”

With the sentiment changing both behind the camera and in front of the screen, we should probably watch who we cheer for from now on, before every show starts to feel like watching the actual Hunger Games. Marcus Jones is a staff writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

‘You Can Never Tell’ explores family life through whimsical comedy By LAUREN GREEN

Before the curtains close, the line “you never can tell” is heard one last time. By this point, delighted members of the audience chuckle at the truth of this simple statement. After all, its message has been repeatedly demonstrated to them over the past two-and-a-half hours. A delightful wit comes to light in the dialogue of George Bernard Shaw’s “You Never Can Tell,” which has not performed in New York City for 15 years. A comedy of errors, the four act play at The Pearl Theatre Company running through Oct. 13, whimsically explores the themes of both family and politics as it follows the story of Mrs. Clandon and her three children at the turn of the 20th century. Directed by David Staller and co-produced with the Gingold Theatrical Group, “You Never Can Tell” marks the launch of the Pearl Theatre Company’s 30th season. The play is set in a small English town where the Clandons have just relocated. There, the family encounters a man they realize might, in fact, be their estranged father. Soon after they’ve discovered his identity, the Clandons discover that they have inadvertently invited this man to lunch. And as one might expect, pandemonium ensues.

Shaw’s dialogue and story spin a web around the audience and ensnare them in his humor. He deftly juggles the ideas of identity and social issues while still making spectators feel as though they’ve been folded into another world. He displays a notably progressive manner of thinking, reminiscent of his famed play “Mrs. Warren’s Profession.” The players of “You Never Can Tell” do a nice, if not remarkable, job of keeping up the play’s momentum. Several notable Pearl Resident Acting Company members head the cast, all of whom manage to bring Shaw’s play to life. Among them are founding member Robin Leslie Brown as Mrs. Clandon, Bradford Cover as the uproarious Mr. Crampton and Obie Award-winner Sean McNall, who sparkles as Mr. Valentine, the dentist. The actors keep the audience roaring with laughter throughout all four acts, preventing the show from feeling like a saga that has dragged on too long. The scenes are fast, and the conversation is fittingly amusing. Every gag is perfectly set up so that when a character stumbles into a joke, it is only natural for the audience to respond with glee. Elaborate sets and lavish costumes complete the production. All of these components come together to provide the perfect atmosphere for audience members

to forget about the churning of traffic outside the theater’s doors and lose themselves within the show’s seaside resort for just a few hours. By the end, the audience has fully shared this experience with the Clandons, and the words “you never can tell” have never been more true. Lauren Green is a contributing writer. Email her at theater@nyunews.com.

VIA FACEBOOK.COM

Pearl Theater founder Robin Leslie Brown plays Mrs. Clandon in Stellar’s “Never Tell.”


6

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

Interested in working for us? Come to our Sunday Pitch Meetings. NEWS: 5:30 P.M. FEATURES: 6 P.M. ARTS: 6 P.M. SPORTS: 6:30 P.M. MULTIMEDIA: 7 P.M. OPINION: 7 P.M.

NYUNEWS.COM

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation

Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 THE620NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD & DAILY SUDOKU For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Crossword ACROSS

35

1 ___

Mesa, Calif. 6 Legs on an insect or strings on a guitar 11 Decryption org. 14 Square dance group, e.g. 15 ___ curiae (friends of the court) 16 Done, to Donne 17 Author Zora ___ Hurston 18 Sells in the stands 19 Insult, slangily 20 Norwegian import in the dairy case 23 Windsor’s locale: Abbr. 24 Bit of ink, for short 25 “Aw, hell!” 26 Some book jacket blurbs 28 Links 33 Not so risky

36 41 42

45

51 52 53 55 56

62 63 64 65

Youngest 600-homer man, informally You can hardly believe it Oscar winner Jannings Inappropriate for the easily offended, say Bit of equipment for an outdoor kids’ game Help (out) Electronically scored duel Western treaty grp. ___-Blo fuse What 20-, 28-, 36- and 45-Across are Cranberry locale Carlos Danger, e.g. Lavatory sign ___ Taylor (clothier)

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE S W I G S

P E T R U C S H A I G O

C A R E B E A R S

G O B A D

J E T T A

I N A N E

A N Y

A S P T I M A R A S E R E C R A H L K I O E T E N T L E E O R N

S W A M I I F O L D S K Y

H E S I R L T R O L W I N E P E X P O P A D T C A R U T V N S E E S T R N O S H I P A P I J E T

P A B L O

A R O L L

R E A D Y

E S T O P

O I L T Y C R O B O I N

W E T S E A S O N

S R S

P R O T O

R Y A N S

66 67 68 69 70

Beatnik’s percussion Ring-tailed primate ___ judicata “S.N.L.” bit Northern Scandinavians

DOWN 1 Scams 2 Where

Polynesia is from square one 4 Blow the whistle, so to speak 5 “This is only ___” 6 Can’t help but 7 E.M.T. part: Abbr. 8 Ped ___ 9 Aussie rockers with a knickersclad lead guitarist 10 Potluck choice 11 Spouse’s refusal 12 Earth movers? 13 Literary sleuth ___ Lupin 21 Do a supermarket task 22 Ending of many an e-mail address 27 French seasoning 29 Grammywinning Eric Clapton tune 30 ___ diavolo 31 Potter or Klink: Abbr. 32 Valhalla ruler

Edited by Will Shortz 1

2

3

4

5

6

14

7

8

No. 0814 9

17

11

27

33

28

36

29

30

31

47

32

35 37

38

39

41 46

44

25

34

3 Go

43

22

24

26

13

19

21

23

12

16

18

20

45

10

15

40

42

48

49

52

50

53 58

59

51 54

56

57

60

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

55 61

PUZZLE BY SARAH KELLER

34 37 38 39 40 43 44

Cambodian currency Marseilles Mrs. Bro, for one Flapper’s do Struggling at the plate, say Amasses, as debt Sales pros

45 46

47 48 49 50

Party room fixture “The Internet in your pocket” sloganeer, once Fakes Sedge locale Many “Well, ___-di-dah”

54 57 58 59 60

61

Participant in 1-Down Chews the rag Zero-star fare Rotgut buyer, perhaps To whom Brabantio says “Thou art a villain” Fit for drafting

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY RAQUEL WOODRUFF OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

STATE GOVERNMENT

Democratic presence is important in Texas By OMAR ETMAN

Dave Carney, longtime advisor to the Texas attorney general and potential GOP nominee for governor Greg Abbott, believes Texas Sen. Wendy Davis is “too stupid to be governor.” Carney, who also served as top advisor to current Gov. Rick Perry’s thankfully failed presidential campaign, consequently tweeted a link to an article that aggressively attempts to undermine the respect politician, who was educated at Harvard Law School, has earned. Carney’s feeble challenge of the longtime Democrat does little to bolster his own image, but does present an interesting question — what would an overwhelmingly Republican state look like with a staunch Democrat as governor? Wyoming provides one answer. In 2002, Democrat Dave Freudenthal was elected governor of the midwestern state after two years of hard fought campaigning. Although Wyoming is, admittedly, much smaller than Texas in most respects, it has a similar conservative. Freudenthal was appointed Wyoming District Attorney by former President Bill Clinton and endorsed President Obama

in his 2008 campaign. Political biases notwithstanding, Freudenthal is considered one of the most successful governors Wyoming has had. During six of his eight years, Wyoming experienced the highest revenue in its history — a consequence of his astute political acumen. He did not drastically alter Wyoming’s conservative trajectory — a difficult task when almost 87 percent of Wyoming’s state legislature is Republican — but did inch the state closer to the center. His two terms provided a much-needed counterpoint to Wyoming politics, and probably more significantly, boosted morale of the state’s undervalued Democratic Party. While it would be ideal if Davis won — her politics would provide a refreshing change of pace to Texas’ tired rationale — it is unlikely. Davis is a

Democrat of the New York variety. She feels strongly and thinks progressively. Her highly publicized, 11-hour-long June filibuster of Texas’ proposed antiabortion law exemplified both traits and made her an overnight superstar in most places, if not unanimously in Texas. Her recent crusade for stricter policies toward gun control, which Carney has issues with, further lessens her chances. Texas may never elect Davis as governor, but the publicity of her potential candidacy would garner could be a boon for her party-mates. When Freudenthal was elected governor, Wyoming needed balance. Now, in light of Perry’s extreme views, Texas needs balance. Davis may not be the right candidate for the top spot — she is too left and she knows it — but she should run anyway. Carney maliciously quipped last month, “God, I hope she runs, it’ll be great. I don’t see her brand of populism … being a selling job in Texas.” If galvanizing the Texas Democratic Party to action isn’t enough reason to run, then an opportunity to spite Carney should be. Omar Etman is a contributing columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

INTERNATIONAL LAW

ICC needs to bring justice to Kenya By PETER KEFFER

In what has become the first international trial of a standing government official, deputy president of Kenya William Ruto has pleaded not guilty to three counts of crimes against humanity. Ruto is charged by the International Criminal Court with murder, forcible population transfer and persecution during the country’s post-election violence in 2007. Nevertheless, days before the accused first stood in court, a majority of Kenya’s parliament voted on Sept. 6 in favor of withdrawing the country from the court’s jurisdiction. Parliament’s intent to withdraw from the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court not only impedes the function of international law, but it also threatens the enforcement of law within Kenya itself and any measures which it has taken to tackle impunity. The parliamentary recommendation to withdraw from the ICC is of mere symbolic and superficial political worth. Notwithstanding the intention to undermine the court, the vote will have no legal effect on the proceedings against Ruto, and any legislation would not come into effect for another

SUBMITTING TO

7

year. Moreover, the Rome Statute itself contends that a “withdrawal shall not affect any cooperation with the Court in connection with criminal investigations.” Tangible implications would revolve around the future removal of the ICC as a court of last resort — not around dismissal of Ruto’s trial. The need for ICC involvement in Kenya is found in the inactivity of Kenyan authorities when presented with evidence. The Waki Commission, led by Justice Philip Waki, tasked with investigation, reported that more than 1,100 people died following the 2007 election under Ruto’s orders. A particularly damning aspect is the allegation that civilians were targeted largely on grounds of their ethnicity. Despite the incriminating nature of its report, Waki’s call for the creation of a special tribunal to adjudicate the crimes was

repeatedly defeated in parliament. A failure to prosecute has shown that Kenya is evidently unable — or unwilling — to address crimes allegedly perpetrated by senior government officials within sovereign borders. Therefore the enforcement of law has rightly become the task of, and is dependent on, the court in The Hague. Any attempts to undermine the court’s power cripples a strong legal deterrent for those who would use their position to breach international law. A politically superficial decision from Kenya’s parliament has eased the legal worries of potential criminals, who might relax in the knowledge that their crimes may go unpunished. It is also an affirmation that justice for the living victims and families of the unjustly dead is only a secondary concern behind the threat of national embarrassment. The trial of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta is due to begin in November. It is incongruous for Kenyatta and Ruto to plead innocence and pledge their full cooperation before the court while simultaneously endorsing hollow measures to attack the court’s function. Peter Keffer is a deputy opinion editor. Email him at pkeffer@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

OWS reminds society of economic disparity

On Sept. 15, a small group of quixotic activists met at the Freedom School at the Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn for an evening of music, food and camaraderie as they embarked on a new project. But this was no ordinary project and no ordinary group of people. They met to celebrate the beginning of a radical transformation in financial services — the launch of Occupy Money Cooperative, or Occupy Bank. Yesterday, a rally of about 100 protesters returned to Zuccotti Park, where thousands of people once camped out in revolt of financial inequality, to mark the second anniversary of Occupy Wall Street. Although OWS is no longer in the form of thousands of protesters, the movement is still thriving through smaller, localized groups focused on specific issues — an answer to critics who claimed that Occupy failed to articulate concrete demands and generate real leadership. By splitting into various groups such as Occupy Sandy, Families of Police Violence and Occupy Money Cooperative, OWS has adopted a more effective approach to bring about change. Last year in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, over 70,000 volunteers under the Occupy banner rallied to provide food and supplies for those devastated by the storm. The Occupy Money Cooperative, a nonprofit led by volunteers, aims to issue debit cards that will serve as an alternative checking method for those whose economic vulnerability excludes them from the mainstream banking system. Under the umbrella of Families of Police Violence, smaller organizations like All Things Harlem have worked to fight NYPD racial profiling and harassment through methods such as sharing incriminating video posts of officers violating civil rights. Although Occupy once lacked clarity, there is an obvious reason behind its resonance with the 99 Percent. While the number of people below the poverty line in the U.S. remained steady at 15 percent, the richest have become richer than ever. The combined net worth of the 400 richest Americans passed the $2 trillion U.S. dollar mark this year, setting a new record. With power concentrated in so few hands, an overwhelming percentage of people are disenfranchised from the political process. As long as the issue of economic disparity is pervasive within American society, the Occupy Wall Street movement and its ensuing installments will always be relevant to our socio-political conversation.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Raquel Woodruff (Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Peter Keffer (Co-Chair).

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


8

NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

BEAUTY AND STYLE

EDITED BY ARIANA DIVALENTINO BSTYLE@NYUNEWS.COM

Bold hairdye colors can still be mature, fashionable By ALYSSA BUFFENSTEIN

VIA FLICKR.COM

Daring colors can be a nice change from drastic but traditional haircuts.

The term “mallrat” can be defined as an adolescent with nothing better to do on a Friday night than loiter outside the local Hot Topic. Said individual claims to have a uniquely original style, despite looking nearly identical to his or her rebellious friends. More than one of us spent a portion of our adolescence as mallrats — our uniform consisted of skinny jeans, band T-shirts and bright, multicolored hair covering at least one eye. While much of the mall-punk aesthetic has, thankfully, disappeared in the last decade, rainbow-hued hair does not necessarily need to be burned with our Algebra I homework. Despite the ugly results of over-processing that accompany impulsive hair dyeing, the appeal of candy-colored hair remains, especially since wild hair color permeates today’s pop culture. Celebrities like Lady Gaga and Rihanna seem to sport a different hair color with every outfit, and ombre hair and dip dyes are making appearances more than ever on street style blogs and runways. Unconventional hair colors aren’t just

MELTDOWN continued from PG. 1

Consumers face host of societal pressures in dressing rooms We may be alone behind the veil of the lights, locks and mirrors, but the hidden stressors behind our consumerist culture and appearance-obsessed nation still surround all of us. Companies’ attempts at breaking down this negative self-image often come off as cheap and impersonal. “I feel like my personal space is stepped on when fitting room attendants hang around without giving me time to decide about clothes for myself,” Gallatin freshman Kim Wang said. For her, it comes off as a “thinly veiled sales pitch.” However, the atmosphere improves significantly when we shop with friends. Time in the dressing room becomes a completely different experience — we receive genuine thoughts rather

than just compliments from employees pressuring us to buy. Furthermore, when a dress or pair of jeans doesn’t fit as we intended, we have our friends to laugh with together at the absurdity of the design or the ridiculousness of the fabric. We may be living in a society of store-bought superficiality and controlling sales tactics, but we can push back by sharing laughs with friends, feeling fearless in whatever we pick out to purchase, and remembering that we are capable of so much more than what a dressing room mirror shows. Hannah Treasure is a contributing writer. Email her at bstyle@ nyunews.com.

VIA FLICKR.COM

Stores raise concerns over image before shoppers buy clothes.

for mallrats. The trick to pulling off a notfound-in-nature shade is to aim for sophistication over shock, and above all, avoid destroying the health of your hair. CAS sophomore Mackenzie Brady, who naturally has dirty blond hair, dyed her locks purple last spring by using a semipermanent dye. “I had done the short hair, I had done the long hair, I had done the shaved head,” Brady said, recalling her desire for color after trying avant-garde haircuts. “Dye was the only thing left.” She noticed her purple hair drew more attention than her natural color, and she said she had to “rock it and not really care” about stares. However, she thinks crazy colors are transitioning into the mainstream, and most people don’t look twice when they see someone with wild color. While Brady dyed her own hair, she said she would be hesitant to bleach it at home, noting the risk of turning her hair into a dry, brittle mess. Her verdict was that bleaching is best left to a professional. CAS sophomore Tanner Nelson said he treats his hair as an accessory and has fre-

quently changed its color to match his state of mind — he has done everything from black to red to his current two-toned blond and brown inspired by Miley Cyrus. “I want my hair to look good, not just wacky,” Nelson said, emphasizing the importance of choosing a style rather than an attention-seeking mess of color. He said most responses to his hair are positive, indicative of NYU’s open-minded community, but he also highlighted that the key to this positive feedback was pulling off dye in a grown-up way. Nelson said he believes a cool dye job can make you memorable and help you express yourself. He said everyone should try a new color. While neon green might not be everybody’s go-to color, a subtle ombre or highlight can be a fashionable way to add some color without appearing too over-the-top. With careful maintenance, crazy colors can add something truly unique to your personal style, even past the age of 15. Alyssa Buffenstein is a contributing writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

Fashion Week experiments with vibrant hair, makeup statements

By GIANNA COLLIER-PITTS With New York Fashion Week coming to a close, consumers of high fashion have only six months standing between them and the recently debuted gems of the Spring/Summer 2014 runways. But in addition to the inventive couture, one must not overlook the attention to detail displayed in the hair and makeup across countless designer collections this season. From short to long, bold lip to nude, every beauty trend found its place backstage and in the spotlight this past week — and there’s no sin in trying them out a season in advance. With regard to hair, the name of the game was sophisticated deconstruction, as models at Michael Kors and Thakoon showcased loose, beach inspired chignons and midlength waves that can be easily made into everyday wear for any hair length. The blunt bob also made a much-anticipated comeback, slicked down and middle-parted as seen in Jason Wu’s Spring/Summer 2014 collection. At koonhor, slicked hair took on another form, as length was exaggerated and soft waves were added to the mix to combine several runway hair trends into one cohesive look. For the more adventurous at heart, a true winner was Marc Jacobs’ choppy ear-length dirty blond wigs, complete with equally choppy bangs that lightly grazed the forehead. Though not a hairstyle for the timid or timecrunched, this punk inspired cut is sure to turn a few fashion oriented heads. For a bold look with less

GIANNA COLLIER-PITTS FOR WSN

Christine Alcalay models sport fauxhawks at Projective Space. commitment, Christine Alcalay exhibited voluminous fauxhawks that can be taken from the showroom floor to the college classroom with a spritz of hairspray and a personal touch. With more people willing to experiment with bolder and brighter shades, the major color of the season appeared to be blue in every imaginable shade. Seen lining the eyes of Marc Jacobs in an electric hue and gently sweeping across the upper lids in pale aqua at Badgley Mischka, this trend is versatile in its execution and completely open for interpretation. Mark and Estel also highlighted eyes by creating cat eyes and a strong line arching over each upper lid using charcoal black eyeliner. In order to achieve a necessary balance when wearing such strong colors and outlines, pair a dramatic eye with a nude lip or vice versa. In the world of lip color, neon and

muted pastels took center stage last week. Designers including DKNY, Prabal Gurung and rag & bone sent their models down the runway in bright tints including orange, pink and lilac, complemented by nude makeup elsewhere, making the “model look” slightly more practical for daily wear this season. Most memorably, Marchesa sent models down the runway with a burgundytinted lip, and stood as one of the few collections to experiment with a darker color palette. From old Hollywood elegance to 1980s androgyny, hair and makeup during this Spring/Summer season’s shows surpassed expectations and brought back an era of practical experimentation with color and style. This year’s beauty trends transfer seamlessly for use off the runway. Gianna Collier-Pitts is a contributing writer. Email her at bstyle@ nyunews.com.


WSN091813