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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 52

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013

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Cast opens curtain on Reality Show By DANIEL HUANG

JOON LEE/WSN

The cast of the Reality Show rehearse all summer before performing for incoming students at the Presidential Welcome.

City theaters offer range of indie, mainstream films By CHARLIE SPECTOR Cinematically inclined freshmen will likely be wondering what movie theaters will soon become their filmic hot spots. New York City has a wide variety of movie theaters, with films ranging from independent to mainstream, and spread out across all five boroughs. A few select names, however, deserve attention for their contributions to the New York film community and must be acknowledged by any film-obsessed student. For those in the immediate area of Washington Square Park, it’s a cinematic must to check out the IFC Center. Home of the old Waverly Theater, this independent mecca hosts a litany of repertoire screenings, midnight showings and exclusive Q&As with celebrities, from Fred Armisen to Christopher Nolan, all while displaying the latest in independent

and foreign cinema. It’s $13.50 for a single admission; however, student memberships can lower that price by a whopping $5. It may not sound like much, but every dollar counts in this city. If you’re looking for mainstream hits as well as the occasional indie, look no further than the Regal Union Square. By far the biggest theater in regard to the number of screens in the immediate NYU area, this four-story behemoth specializes in the latest that Hollywood has to offer. Nestled on Broadway and 13th Street, the theater’s location is also extremely convenient. It also offers fine dining options such as hot dogs and burgers, and even onion rings. For a mainstream theater, the indie films it often carries can be pleasantly surprising. Despite its location all the way across the East River, film fans

THEATERS continued on PG. 13

When the lights go down and the curtains rise at the Beacon Theater on Monday night, it will be time for the freshman class of 2017 to experience the Reality Show — an hour-and-a-half performance that captures the joys and traumas of college life through song, dance and comedy. Now in its eighth year as an NYU-run performance, the Reality Show is commonly viewed as the highlight of Welcome Week. The show kicks off this year at 2 p.m. on Aug. 26 with a welcome from NYU President John Sexton. “It was hands down the most memorable thing I went to all week,” said Gerianne Perez, a 2013 Tisch graduate and cast member of this year’s show. “As

REALITY continued on PG. 3

Chow down on new dining options By FAY LIN

This year, NYU Dining is opening on-campus options that include a Jamba Juice, Starbucks kiosk and convenience store while the Rubin dining hall is closing. Owen Moore, assistant vice president for Business Development in Campus Services, said the Jamba Juice will open in September in Weinstein Food Court and will accept both Dining Dollars and meal exchanges. Moore also described a twopart process for the convenience store construction. “NYU Dining is adding a convenience store adjacent to Peet’s Coffee in Upstein for the fall semester and planning an expansion for the spring,” Moore said. He said a new Starbucks kiosk will open on the second floor of the Kimmel Center for University Life in the spring semester. It will accept Dining Dollars and remain open on weekends. LSP sophomore Nira Martinez

expressed uncertainty about the new programs. “I don’t know if the convenience store will make much of a difference since the Space Market is nearby,” Martinez said. “Jamba Juice seems like a nice ad-

dition, but Starbucks at Kimmel seems unnecessary. You have one right by Goddard, and the staff is always friendly. So why have another one literally yards away?”

DINING continued on PG. 3

VIA FLICKR.COM

Jamba Juice will be coming to Upstein this semester.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE letter from

THE EDITOR JONATHON DORNBUSH EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

COMPILED BY THE

WSN STAFF

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN Creative Director

LYANNE NATIVIDAD Blog Editor

AMY ZHANG Special Issues Director

“Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in awhile, you could miss it.”

A

s cliché as that quote might seem close to 30 years after Ferris Bueller said it. These words ring no less true today than they did in 1986. For NYU students especially, the time you spend either in New York City or abroad can disappear in a flash. So yes, spend the next few years taking advantage of everything NYU and New York City can offer, but don’t forget to soak it all in. And that means doing more than stopping to Instagram every moment. Welcome Week is just the start — it will offer you a taste of a city that never ceases to present you with new experiences. Never hesitate to explore the city around you. Take in as many Broadway shows and concerts as you can, join a club — or a dozen — enroll in a class and learn a skill you may never have the chance to acquire, see an improv group and maybe even try it yourself. Living in the city will require some adjustments, but in due time you’ll learn to walk at a faster pace, know your food order before you get in line and find the best coffee shop to study and people watch. But as you’re walking faster, slow down to peek into that bookstore you never noticed as you sped to class. You may know your food order by heart, but don’t be afraid to branch out and enjoy all of the delicacies the city has to offer.

KALEEL MUNROE SENIOR STAFF

news EMILY BELL, NICOLE BROWN,

MICHAEL DOMANICO investigative KAYANA PHILIPPE arts JEREMY GROSSMAN features JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU sports FRANK NAVAS multimedia JONATHAN TAN copy CASEY DALRYMPLE senior editors VERONICA CARCHEDI, TONY CHAU, DAN HINTON, MICHELLE LIM, STEFAN MELNYK, SAM RULLO, WICY WANG

DEPUTY STAFF

news DANIEL HUANG, NEELA QADIR,

BILLY RICHLING books/theater DYLAN JARRETT film ALEX GREENBERGER entertainment ISABEL JONES music JAKE FOLSOM the highlighter blog VALERIE NELSON features MARINA ZHENG beauty & style ARIANA DIVALENTINO dining DANIEL YEOM sports CHRIS MARCORTRIGIANO multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN, JOON LEE video ALEX LINZMEIER

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

RAQUEL WOODRUFF deputy opinion editors

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, PETER KEFFER

ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER

ELLEN MCQUEEN

CIRCULATION MANAGER

CHLOE COFFMAN SALES MANAGER

ALISON LIZZIO

PROMOTIONS MANAGER

KALEEL MUNROE UNIVERSITY AND ALUMNI COORDINATOR

CLAIRE MAHANY

And as you’re absorbing every book you read — or skim over — for class or watching the people surrounding you in the Bean, the Washington Square News will be there to help you notice what you need to. The news stories, the latest movies, the students starting charities, websites or a dozen other enterprises — we’ll be there to keep you informed and hopefully engage you in a conversation about the university and community you are now part of. Our stories should remind you of one important lesson: don’t forget to contribute as much to the world as you take in. You’re at NYU because you have something amazing to offer, so don’t be afraid to use what you have, whether it is in that improv group, or by writing, teaching or performing whatever your passion may be. Had I never taken the time to realize how important the WSN and its staff are to me, I wouldn’t have the chance to write this letter to you. I spent my freshman year searching from one student organization to the next, hoping to find a home. Once I slowed down and realized the potential WSN offered, I only focused on how I could be part of this group. As you begin your own search, always remember to take stock of what matters most to you in your journey.

SALES REPRESENTATIVES

ARIANA DIVALENTINO, ETHAN JACOBS, SAM WANDER

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY EDITORS-AT-LARGE

JAEWON KANG, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG

Your time at NYU is going to move pretty fast. If you don’t stop and take in the city and school around you, you might miss the relationships and opportunities waiting for you. About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jordan Melendrez at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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Welcome Week tradition carries on, never calm

By KAYANA JEAN-PHILIPPE

Beginning today, the Welcome Week 2013 staff has activities planned each day of the week. “Coming to New York City and NYU can be a daunting experience, and we try to make the transition as fun, informative and supportive as possible,” said Welcome Week leader Mikayla Terrell, a CAS senior. Student Resource Center executive director David Vogelsang said Welcome Week is a tradition for all new students starting at NYU New York and is produced by the Division of Student Affairs’ SRC. The university will welcome 5,000 freshmen and new transfer students as well as other new arrivals including graduate students, sophomores transitioning from NYU study away sites and NYU Abu Dhabi students in the city for the fall semester. The week includes a vast array of school orientations, departmental offices and more than 350 workshops, socials, receptions and shows, Vogelsang explained. This year, a new program called 13/13 was added, which follows the Welcome Week experience through the eyes of a diverse group of 13 incoming students, including commuters, international students and a student at the newly opened NYU Shanghai campus. Additionally, there are

VIA FLICKR.COM

Although NYU has no traditional campus, Washington Square Park serves as a hub for students. more programs involving faculty this year, which allows students to engage with instructors outside of the classroom. Annual Welcome Week classics, including the Professional Comedy Show, the Hypnosis Show, Student A Cappella Show, Portraits and Casino Night, are also expected to attract incoming students. The Presidential Welcome and Reality Show tradi-

tions will continue this year. Students will also meet with academic advisors and in-school cohort groups, take campus and library tours, and learn about the many clubs and community service opportunities. Specific events are also held for students in on-campus housing and commuter and transfer students. SRC Program Administrator Zach Harrell said the biggest

event of the week will be the Glo Ball on Friday night in the Kimmel Center for University Life, but the Social Media Scavenger Hunt comes in a close second. “We hope to foster new friendships and connections, both among students as well as between students and NYU offices and resources,” Harrell said. A group of 300 Welcome Week leaders led by 12 captains took

a weeklong training session where they participated in team building activities, workshops and information sessions. Two-time team captain Terrell said the training process is rigorous. With the growing number of international students, the staff is stressing the importance of meeting their needs and being socially and globally aware by hosting workshops for leaders, teaching them how they can best meet the needs of international students. In addition to the many Welcome Week activities, there are individual school events that are mandatory as part of each school’s orientation. These events are listed in the Welcome Week schedule every freshman received before moving in. Incoming CAS freshman Chevaun Samuels said he is concerned about the transition from high school but is excited to participate in the many activities offered during Welcome Week. “I love to challenge my mind, and I know NYU will help me expand my mind,” Samuels said. “I am also looking [forward to] the sports events and the student activities.” Kayana Jean-Philippe is investigative editor. Additional reporting by Nicole Brown. Email them at news@ nyunews.com.

SOPHOMORE SUGGESTIONS Get lost. It's the best way you'll ever learn about this city. BRIANA SYLVESTER | LSP

Study hard, and if you have any doubts go to tutoring immediately. You don't want to regret not ever asking for help. CRISTINA DE LOS SANTOS | STEINHARDT

I wish someone had told me that you will unnecessarily burn through money if you eat out ... during your first few weeks at NYU … but, it’s not worth it to waste that money when our dining halls do a pretty nice job of providing us with good food. ANNE JOHNSON | LSP

JACQUELINE LEDESMA | STERN

I wish someone had told me about the discounted movie ticket prices for students. With ticket prices over $20 now, the student ticket specials could have saved me some money. SANATH SRIVASTAVA | CAS

DINING continued from PG. 1

REALITY continued from PG. 1

NYU’s Reality Show presents comical, lively performance about college experiences a freshman, I remember everything seemed so big. Big stage, big school, big city. The bigness of the show and the impact it had on me really inspired me to be a part of it.” Putting together a performance of this magnitude takes months of work and rehearsing. The cast is selected in April through two rounds of group auditions that whittle down a selection pool of over 100 to a final list of 15 cast members. Rehearsals begin in early June, three to four hours a day, five days a week. “We have a very organized and grueling process,” said Preston Martin, one of the directors. “It’s difficult work and you really have to throw yourself into it.” “We expect certain topics to be addressed every year, but the cast decides how to portray these issues in a way that will touch their peers,” said Zoe Ragouzeos, the assistant vice president of NYU Student Mental Health. Original content comprises about two-thirds of this year’s incarnation of the Reality Show. “Songs, skits and movements are all created by the cast,” Perez said. “We change and morph it every year to the kind of music and trends that are popular.” In July, the focus shifts to finalizing the script and staging the show.

Professors are humans … and your life is a lot easier if you approach them during the semester.

“The performance has a very clear arc that starts with the actors saying, ‘Hey, we’re just like you. We’ve been where you are. Now let us show you some of the things you might come across,’” Martin said. After establishing a connection with the audience, the actors dole out advice on topics like time management, budgets and roommates. The content then takes a turn to a deeper, darker place, addressing issues like substance abuse and mental health. “We want to create a conversation about things that people are sometimes too ashamed to talk about,” Martin said. “Just being aware that there are others out there who may have the same issues can allow someone to release their shame and take that first step to becoming better.” On Monday night, before the curtains fall on the final show, the performance will drive home a concluding and uplifting message with one of the more simple lyrics, something that rings true for every incoming student studying at the university: “You’re in New York, New York.” Daniel Huang is a deputy news editor. Email him at dhuang@nyunews.com.

As Rubin dining hall closes, NYU Dining opens Jamba Juice, convenience store The additions are a byproduct of the university’s decision to close Rubin this fall. Moore explained that the rising popularity of other dining options, such as Burger Studio and Upstein, has caused a decrease in customers to Rubin. Meanwhile, there will be some adjustments to the other dining locations to make up for having one less option. ���To compensate for the additional traffic at other locations, Hayden dining hall will open on Friday nights and weekends,” Moore said. “And additional staff will be reassigned to Weinstein, Hayden and Kimmel Center.” Former Rubin resident and Steinhardt sophomore Josephine Chang said Rubin was one of the most welcoming dining locations on campus.

“It was a really cozy little place in comparison to the other dining halls, and generally convenient for the people who lived there,” Chang said. “I’m going to miss the hospitable atmosphere and the fantastic, loving dining hall staff that really brought it to life.” CAS sophomore and former Rubin resident Kevin Carter agreed that the dining hall was convenient for Rubin residents, but preferred other dining locations. “It was nice having the option to eat at home so I didn’t have to go out in the snow for a meal, but I feel like they just needed to be more like the other dining halls,” Carter said. “The food at Rubin was below average in comparison.” Fay Lin is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

Disorientation offers alternative events to Welcome Week by DANIEL HUANG

For the incoming batch of freshmen, the longest summer of their lives is about to come to a close. With over 300 programs and workshops, a carefully crafted Welcome Week is finally here, promising to acquaint new students with everything NYU. Well, not everything. Missing from the orientation schedule are events that explore a side of the school that campus tours and receptions do not delve into — rising student debt, no-confidence votes and community protests against NYU’s impending expansion. Enter NYU Disorientation 2013. The weeklong event aims to bring attention not just to the wonders and opportunities that NYU can offer, but also the debated topics present in our community. “These are issues that affect everyone … whether they know it now or not,” explained CAS senior George Georgiadis, who is one of the organizers of the first-ever Disorientation. The organizers of Disorientation, or Diso, said that at the school with the highest tuition costs and some of the most indebted students in the country, these issues are important for freshmen to understand. “The goal is a genuinely student-run alternative to the official NYU Orientation,

[which] is more relevant and coincidentally more subversive,” said CAS senior and Diso organizer Paul Funkhouser. During Welcome Week, Funkhouser and other contributors will be distributing a student-published guide announcing Diso’s events and highlighting a number of issues. The group has been busy preparing and spreading the word, posting updates on their Twitter and launching a Facebook page and website. Many freshmen do not have a full idea of what Diso is. Some consider it a simple play on words and a farce of the more traditional orientation process. “I think it’s really funny,” incoming CAS freshman Cristina Gnecco said. “I don’t know much about it, but I think it’s a good idea.” Others, like Uday Karri, originally believed Diso to be a form of demonstration. “At first glance it seemed like a sort of rebellious uprising, but it really isn’t,” Karri said. “It’s actually a wonderful group of people uniting their fellow students to make the most of not just their vital years of university but also their massive investments.” Georgiadis wants freshmen to know that they are inheriting the university’s problems. “All of this affects you,” he said. “You have a vested interest in all of these issues. It’s important to get involved in protecting your interests, rather than the

FILE PHOTO BY DAVID LIN/WSN

Diso will present incoming students with a unique perspective of NYU. interests of a few NYU board members.” Amid the noise of awkward icebreakers and Amanda Sarah bangers, Diso extends an inviting hand to do something different — an opportunity to be informed about the issues that face the NYU community and be active in bring-

ing forth a solution. NYU representatives did not respond to requests for comment at time of publication. Daniel Huang is a deputy news editor. Email him at dhuang@nyunews.com.

Summer in the city included changes to city institutions, laws By EMILY BELL For a city like New York, change is frequent, and the summer months have been no exception. New city programs were tested, policies overturned and cultural institutions altered. Here are a few of the biggest changes you should know about as you settle into the city.

Hudson River Park and Tompkins Square Park. Each unit can charge up to six phones at a time including iPhones, Androids, Blackberrys or any phone that uses a standard USB cable. The New York Times reported that stations will be in place until October, and could expand to other cities if it is a successful project.

Bike Share

Stop-and-Frisk

Since its introduction in May 2013, CitiBike has been making transportation waves across New York City. As of August 16, there have been 2,186,228 cumulative trips on CitiBikes since the launch of its 320 active stations. According to data compilations from the past two months, the bikes are most popular on weekends, despite problems with bike distribution among the stations that have occurred. CitiBike has created a team of rebalancers to address this issue. CitiBike has also announced a partnership with Bike & Roll, a rental and tour company, to give CitiBike users a discount for helmet rentals. Check out CitiBike stations on University Place, Washington Square East and next to Rubin residence hall.

The stop-and-frisk policy practiced by the New York City Police Department was ruled unconstitutional on Aug. 12. Stop-and-frisk was linked to racial profiling — The New York Times reported that 83 percent of stops from 2004 to 2012 “involved blacks and Hispanics.” The city plans to appeal the decision, and the judge ordered community meetings where the public could voice its opinion. In addition, certain officers will be required to wear cameras while on the street.

AT&T charging stations AT&T is sponsoring a pilot program called Street Charge, which has set up 25 free solar mobile charging units distributed across all 5 boroughs. A June 18 AT&T press release announced that they were motivated to create the stations because of Hurricane Sandy. Some of the nearby charging stations are located in Union Square,

the New York City Council. The Bloomberg Administration was going to extend the operating permit for 15 years, and the Garden wanted the permit extended indefinitely. There are aims to rebuild and expand Penn Station, while the current Madison Square Garden’s most recent renovation will be completed this fall. Both the Knicks and the Rangers play

home games in Madison Square Garden. It is also the site for many concerts and events for the city.

The Met The Metropolitan Museum of Art is no longer giving out the colored metal tokens with an “M” on them to indicate admission. Instead, paper tickets with stickers are to be worn and are being

used as a cost-saving measure. The buttons were seen as part of New York’s culture and history, with many people saving theirs as souvenirs since their introduction in 1971. In another first-time change to a 1971 tradition, the Met will also be open on Mondays. Emily Bell is a news editor. Email her at ebell@nyunews.com.

Trayvon Martin Protests After George Zimmerman was acquitted in the Trayvon Martin case, a large protest began on July 14 in Union Square Park. Protesters marched around the East Village and ended in Times Square, with some arrests taking place for blocking traffic. The night prior, when the verdict was released, a group also gathered in Union Square with candles and posters.

Madison Square Garden Moving Madison Square Garden will be moving from its current spot above Penn Station to a currently undetermined location in the next 10 years, after a vote by

JONATHAN TAN/WSN

After George Zimmerman was exonerated, people gathered in Union Square to protest the ruling.


NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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Freshman’s guide to university faculty’s votes of no confidence By NICOLE BROWN

Tensions in university politics in the form of faculty’s votes of no confidence made headlines way beyond WSN’s homepage last semester. Here’s the breakdown of what you need to know about the latest in the biggest story in university politics:

What is a vote of no confidence? The votes of no confidence are symbolic. They make a statement about the tenured faculty opinion, but passing them can not force NYU President John Sexton to resign. The Board of Trustees, which has the ultimate power to choose the president of the university, showed continuous support for Sexton after each of these votes.

What are the issues? + Shared Governance Some NYU faculty believe that they do not have adequate representation in university government. The Faculty Senators Council has made efforts to increase faculty involvement in the university decision making since May 2011, when they drafted and approved resolutions to increase shared governance. The university responded agreeing to work with the FSC and consider their suggestions, but argued that the FSC does not have the right to pass such resolutions based on the university bylaws. + Expansion plans NYU 2031 is NYU’s plan to expand the Washington Square campus by 2.5 million square feet by the university’s bicentennial in 2031. Greenwich village residents say it encroaches on the character and green space of the village. Meanwhile, NYU spokesman John Beckman has repeatedly said NYU needs to expand because it has one of the lowest student to area ratio compared to universities such as Columbia University.

Meanwhile, some faculty see Sexton’s plan to expand NYU’s degree-granting presence abroad as another expensive venture, while university officials believe it will help raise the university’s prestige, with the opening of NYU Shanghai this fall and NYU Abu Dhabi preparing for its transition to Saadiyat Island in 2014. + Mortgages program As media scrutiny increased on NYU, media outlets reported that hundreds mortgages beginning with loans of several hundred thousand dollars were forgiven for Jacob Lew, a former NYU Vice President of Operations who became President Obama’s treasury secretary this year. The university also extended multimillion-dollar loans for vacation homes to some administration and professors.

Who is FASP? One of the most vocal faculty groups against the Sexton administration is the Faculty Against the Sexton Plan, which comprises more than 400 faculty members who originally formed in opposition to NYU 2031. FASP members have written letters against NYU 2031 in The New York Times. On July 16, the group wrote an open letter requesting Board of Trustee Chairman Martin Lipton’s resignation, as they felt their concerns and lack of confidence in Sexton had been ignored.

How did the university react? University Provost David McLaughlin took to the the University’s public affairs blog to refute the claims, pointing to the rise in incoming student SAT scores from 2002 to 2013, as well as a 12 percent increase in tenured faculty from 2002 to 2012.

What has happened most recently? On Aug. 14, the Special Committee of the NYU Board of Trustees, which was created after the first no-confidence vote, sent an email to the entire NYU

community addressing the issues the faculty voiced last spring. “Our reaction is that we heard you, and we are taking steps to improve faculty and other constituents’ participation in the governance of the university,” Lipton said. The email also said that Sexton will not renew his contract past 2016. Beckman explained that in 2009, the Board of Trustees announced the renewal of Sexton’s contract to at least 2016. “It is important to remember that the email sent [on Aug.14] was not intended as an announcement of when John would retire,” Beckman said. The university will also discontinue vacation home loans program for administration and faculty members.

Is the faculty satisfied? Professor of social studies education Robert Cohen expressed disappointment that the email ignores the no-confidence votes and that the board does not plan to expedite Sexton’s presidential term at the university. “What kind of Board of Trustees can be ‘extremely satisfied with the direction and leadership of the University’ when five schools’ faculty have voted no confidence in the president?” Cohen said, quoting the special committee’s email. Cohen added that there are positives of the message, including the creation of the Joint Committee, which will allow direct faculty and student involvement in the selection of the next president, as well as the elimination of the vacation homes loan program.

How does this affect students? “The Board of Trustees and the administration have determined that this will not in any way interfere with the students’ education and the students’ enjoyment of their time at NYU,” Lipton said. Nicole Brown is a news editor. Email her at nbrown@nyunews.com.

OPEN HOUSE Located at 838 Broadway, Fifth floor Tuesday Aug. 27, 1 - 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, 1 - 4 p.m. Interested in being a writer, copy editor, photographer, graphic designer or videographer? The Washington Square News is always looking for new students to join our team in any of these positions. Work with a team of over 100 students to produce daily content and help keep the NYU community informed. Stop by our Open House to learn more, meet our editors, grab some free food and see if WSN is the right fit for you. If you cannot make it to our Open House, come to our first weekly pitch meetings on Sunday, Sept. 1. Take a story to write from any of our desks, suggest your own and begin contributing to the WSN community. Email editor@nyunews.com with any questions.

First graduating Abu Dhabi class reflects on last four years By SU SIE PARK

Rising seniors at NYU Abu Dhabi this year are making history as the school’s first graduating class. As the first comprehensive liberal arts and science campus in the Middle East to be operated abroad by a major American research university, NYUAD welcomed its class of students in August 2010, when it joined the Washington Square campus as a degree-granting campus of NYU. Students and professors at NYUAD said they are proud of what they have accomplished thus far. “I taught in different institution[s] in different countries for over 17 years, but never have [I had] such … satisfaction by teaching such a group of talented and enthusiastic students,” said Arabic language professor Khulood Kittaneh. Kittaneh said building the university from the bottom up was challenging, as there was no blueprint to follow, but NYUAD achieved success through collaboration and the exchanging of ideas. Juan Felipe Beltran, a senior from Colombia, said he decided to attend NYUAD when he experienced its intimate selection process. Candidates are invited to participate in a weekend on campus where they take sample classes and converse with faculty members and other prospective students. “During my Candidate Weekend I was blown away by the quality of the faculty, the fantastic student-to-faculty ratio, and the passion and drive I saw in my prospective classmates,” Beltran said. NYUAD represents 40 countries around the world. Greg Bruno, director of Public Affairs and Community Relations at NYUAD, said the class of 2014 is a living embodiment of NYU’s

COURTESY OF NYUAD

The NYU Abu Dhabi campus opened its doors in 2010. evolution into a truly global university and played a critical role in helping to develop the campus community. Bruno also said that among the program’s many successes was a victory in the 2012 Hult Global Case Challenge. The NYUAD team, represented by Madhav Vaidyanathan, Songyishu Yang, Muhammad Awais Islam, Gary Chien and Neil Parmar, won the top prize for its solution in providing solar lighting to one million homes in Africa by 2013. “The fact that they were able to do so while also excelling academically is a testament to their hard work, dedication and enthusiasm,” Bruno said. Vaidyanathan said this contest brought his team closer. “We truly learned what it means to work as a team, to listen to the other and build on that,” Vaidyanathan said. “Being open-

minded and patient are two qualities that were really tested during this period.” Also of note are the accomplishments of senior Alexander Wang, who was named a Truman Fellow in April. The award is presented to individuals who show leadership and an interest in a public service career. Arts professor Catherine Coray said the graduating class also set a high bar in the drama department with their work ethic, curiosity and creativity. She added these talented students auditioned for and were accepted into study abroad programs at three of the Tisch School of the Arts’ acting studios in New York, and several of them were also accepted into competitive actor-training programs in Amsterdam, London and Florence. Seniors are also busy working on their year-long research endeavors known as Capstone Projects, which are the culmination of their NYUAD education. “When they return to Abu Dhabi this fall, they will have studied on three continents and gathered the kind of experience that will make it possible for them to create new work of their own,” Coray said. “I can’t wait to see what they come up with.” Rafael Scharan, an NYUAD senior from Brazil, said the experience of settling far away from home and helping to establish a new university from scratch was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “Being part of the first graduating class of NYUAD is an honor,” Scharan said. “Looking back at all we’ve been through and accomplished together fills me with immense joy.” Su Sie Park is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.


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Crossword ACROSS

32

1 Green

gem used in Chinese carvings 5 Noisy bird 10 Mimicked 14 Mountain goat 15 Actor Davis of “Grumpy Old Men” 16 Enclosure for a pet bird 17 Expensive neighborhood in 43-Across 19 Istanbul resident 20 Acts of the Apostles writer 21 Co-creator of Spider-Man 23 Doctor’s request before a throat examination 26 Some gym wear 27 The Beatles’ “___ Road” 30 Understand

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE H I T C H

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

FEATURES

Exploring your city: New York vs. Boston By BRYNA SHUMAN

New York City and Boston are some of the largest centers of culture in the American Northeast. But they’re far from similar, so how do the two cities compare?

Culture New York City is the height of everything new and exciting in the world. A wonderfully fast-paced city, New York is home to shows quickly coming and going on Broadway and exhibits at museums swapping out to display the newest art, artifact or scientific research. In contrast, Boston is a city built entirely on remembering the past. One of Boston’s most famous attractions is the Freedom Trail, a red-brick road that runs through the city. People can follow the path to nearly every well-known Revolutionary War site in Boston, including Old North Church, Paul Revere’s house and the USS Constitution.

platters are some of the comfort foods that can be enjoyed throughout the city. New Yorkers may rush to Starbucks in hopes of ordering a coffee frappuccino before the line is out the door. Comparatively, any self-respecting Bostonian prefers large iced coffees from Dunkin Donuts, often referred to as Dunks, even in the dead of winter.

Sports NYU may not be known for its sports teams, but the city

Celebrities who call the city home New York City, as one of the top performance centers in the world, is home to a wide range of actors, musicians and celebrities. Greenwich Village itself is home to many famous names, and it is not unusual to see celebrities such as Alec Baldwin, Louis C.K. and Sarah Jessica Parker out and about near campus. While Boston has less well-known names, those who grow up there never really forget their roots. Mark Wahlberg, Matt Damon and Ben Affleck have all starred in movies set with heavy focus on their hometown, such as “The Fighter,” “Good Will Hunting” and “The Town,” respectively, and many films shoot on location throughout the city.

Food New York City celebrates its diverse ethnic makeup in many ways, including the wide range of food spread throughout the city. New Yorkers can choose from almost any cuisine — from Italian to Chinese to Thai to Mexican — at nearly any time of day or night. While Boston also has a wide range of options, from the Italian restaurants of the North End to classic Irish pubs, Bostonians tend to appreciate traditional New England cuisine. Clam chowder, baked beans and lobster

Bryna Shuman is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

VIA FLICKR.COM

The NYC skyline is one of its most attractive features.

Gallatin student elected to Wantagh, N.Y. school board By KIMBERLY SCHU “As a graduate of Wantagh High School and a lifetime resident of Wantagh, I am aware of both the strengths and weaknesses of this district. I have been involved in many different facets of the Wantagh School District, and I believe I can provide the voice needed to represent the student body, as well as the community as a whole,” said Gallatin sophomore Peter Mountanos in the introduction of his official campaign platform, this past May. With the support of family, friends and the residents of his community, Mountanos was elected to be a trustee on the Wantagh Board of Education, despite only graduating from high school in Wantagh, N.Y., in 2012. Now on the verge of his sophomore year at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, Mountanos is actively working with the school board — a major part of his life throughout the past five years. Along with four other elected trustees, he will serve a three-year, term during which he will deal with the policies and affairs of both his own school district and other local boards affiliated with the state of New York. “Peter cares deeply about the education of our students,” said Kera McLoughlin, a fellow trustee on the board who was sworn in on the same day as Mountanos. “He is incredibly hardworking and approaches issues in a thoughtful and measured way, while working collaboratively and respectfully with his colleagues on the board.” Mountanos campaigned to increase revenues for the district, improve Wantagh students status as candidates for college admissions and improve technology education and the school’s technology infrastructure. His fervor for expanding science programs and emphasis on the importance of Advanced Placement courses has made Mountanos popular among constituents.

is famous for its athletic franchises. Don’t let the city’s glitz and glamour fool you. True New Yorkers are seriously passionate about their teams and are willing to fight you tooth and nail to prove it. The same atmosphere can be found in Boston, as streets crowd with fans on game days. Mass celebrations occur all over the city after an important victory. The hometown loyalty of each city can best be demonstrated in the famous New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox rivalry. Wear one team’s jersey in the opposite city and be ready for some serious heckling.

COURTESY OF PETER MOUNTANOS

Sophomore Peter Mountanos was elected as a trustee for a school board. Voters easily align themselves with his ideologies, especially because of his perspective — Mountanos was a student at Wantagh High School less than 15 months ago. To help with his campaign, Mountanos launched numerous projects. In the spring, he worked with two of his high school alumni, Dan Charytonowicz and Chris Fiscella, to host a workshop known as the Wantagh Technology Day Conference. The goal was to teach students the science of the future with skills including coding. “The reality is that our education system is constantly evolving, so it’s extremely important to have someone who has recently experienced it firsthand to be weighing in on decisions,” Mountanos said. “As a member of Wantagh’s Board of Education, I have been given the opportunity to directly make decisions that benefit our students. I’m extremely excited that I now have the ability to provide the voice our students deserve.”

Haircuts freshen up image as symbolic change By DANA REZSUTEK

The idea of reinvention, whether it is for a career, style or otherwise, seems to be a continuous trend in our culture. We thrive on the idea that everyone is capable of changing, improving and altering themselves to better their lives. And such need to change, improve and reinvent can be seen in the American college culture — the idea that for four years, we have the ability to constantly recreate ourselves and become different people to somehow find out our true identity. When it comes to fashion and change, the two are almost synonymous. Each year, we wait for the latest collections or the newest items in stores, to dictate what, for the next few months, will be in style. But one of the simplest and most economical modes of transformation is the traditional back-to-school haircut. It seems that we all want to return looking noticeably different — in a good way. We want our appearances to reflect the ideal of a life-altering summer, and

VIA FLICKR.COM

Kimberly Schu is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

Back-to-school haircuts act as a stepping stone for other changes.

many of us do so by taking a trip to the hair salon. After restyling, recoloring or just getting a trim, when we look in the mirror, there is almost an instant boost of confidence — we know that for the next two days, our salon product-filled look will be perfect. But how can a few inches shorter, or a few shades lighter truly change or reinvent a person? Take a look at celebrities such as Miley Cyrus or Lady Gaga, who both recently made drastic alterations to their looks — Cyrus opted for a short, edgy platinum cut, while Gaga ditched the blonde wigs and went for a natural, brunette hairstyle. Not only did these looks make headlines, they also marked a moment of change for both artists — new music, new style, the birth of a star different from the one that was previously known. It’s almost as if by seeing the stylistic changes of celebrities, we know that other changes will follow perhaps a new album or a new film. But this thought process can also be applied to anyone. It seems that through the physically transformative process of adopting a new hairstyle, people seek to change other aspects of their lives as well. Freeing oneself from a hairstyle that has been worn for years shines a new light not only on how one looks in the mirror, but also on how one feels. The literal lightness and rejuvenation one feels after inches are cut away can be described as nothing but refreshing — imagine that just a pair of scissors and a comb can make a true difference in one’s life. That haircut can be a symbolic first step to change. So go ahead and get the look you’ve always wanted. A new haircut can open doors to a new style and a perhaps even a new mindset. Dana Rezsutek is a contributing writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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EDITED BY JONATHON KESHISHOGLOU FEATURES@NYUNEWS.COM

Reality Show cast members discuss creative process By JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU

DELIA KEMPH

Tisch sophomore Delia Kemph is one of the new cast members in the Reality Show, and while she is excited about working with people who have already experienced what NYU has to offer, she certainly has her own experiences to contribute. She said her role allows her to tap into any aspect of herself, which affords her the chance to let wildly different parts of her personality come into focus, such as an immediate transition from shy freshman to street-wise dispenser of city knowledge. Her favorite part of the show is a sassy doo-wop number that emphasizes safety in numbers. “It sounds a little lame, but it’s actually so much fun to perform,” she said. *Delia Kemph worked for WSN in the fall 2012 semester as a copy editor and contributing writer.

FINN CUTLER

Tisch junior Finn Cutler stated that he is playing a heightened version of himself in the show. He also said that his character also evokes the college archetype of a socially awkward freshman with a tendency to put his foot in his mouth. His goal is to combine clowning around with realism so the audience will not only have a character to sympathize with, but one they can recognize. “‘Oh God, I totally know someone just like that,’” Cutler said of what he hopes audience reaction will be. “‘And, oh God, I’m just like that, too.’” He has had difficulty thinking of a favorite moment, but while he doesn’t want to spoil anything, he is particularly fond of a kung fu sketch that is new to this year’s show.

TATIANA WECHSLER

Tisch senior Tatiana Wechsler can normally be found in the New Studio on Broadway of the Tisch School of the Arts, but during the summer, she has been rehearsing the broad range of sketches and songs that the Reality Show features. “The Reality Show has been a great experience for me as an actor because we get to stretch ourselves in so many different directions,” Weschler said. And her personal role in the show means she can tap into her playful, angry, goofy and serious sides without having to worry about breaking character. Her favorite part of the show is a song about the college generation’s overwhelming and insatiably addictive love for media and technology, even when it affects relationships with friends.

ZACHARY INFANTE

Tisch class of 2013 graduate Zachary Infante has been with the show for the past two years, and he continues to play a reflection of himself as a freshman. “It’s as though we are highlighting the playful, liberated and at times uncertain mindset of a new student on the NYU campus,” Infante said. A highlight of his experience was when NYU President John Sexton brought the casts of the New York, Abu Dhabi and Shanghai Reality Shows together to meet. He also enjoys a sketch in the show where he finds himself running into street scammers. He said he believes his character has taught him a lot about watching his back on the street. “Count your change,” he said.

Jonathan Keshishoglou is features editor. Email him at jkesh@nuynews.com. Photos: courtesy of Tatiana Wechsler, Finn Cutler, Delia Kemph, Zachary Infante

Klann laboratory research may offer breakthrough By BHARGAVI GANESH

Neurological development disorders are an enigma that have eluded scientists for decades. For NYU Center for Neural Science professor Eric Klann and his team of researchers, the results from a recent study that tracked the effect of protein level alteration in laboratory mice could prove to be the latest piece in the puzzle. The study, conducted at NYU’s Klann Laboratory, provides insight into the manifestation of impairments comparable to those caused by Angelman syndrome — a neurological disease that results from the mutation or deletion of a gene copy located on chromosome 15 known as the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A gene. It is characterized by motor disabilities, slow intellectual development and, occasionally, seizures. “Angelman syndrome is intriguing on a couple of levels. First, the gene that is affected in Angelman syndrome is maternally imprinted, which means that it [is] inherited only if the mother has the mutation,” Klann said. “Second, its manifestation is interesting because children with the syndrome seem to develop normally until around two years of age, and then they begin to digress.” During the study, genetically engineered mice that lacked a certain protein were used as models exhibiting AS. Examining the electrical properties of the brain cells, researchers in Klann’s lab determined that the mutated mice all had axons — the part of a neuron that sends information to the next neuron — with abnormally long initial segments. The team discovered through these tests that several proteins in the initial segments of an axon are more abundant in AS mice than in regular mice. The team focused on one in particular — an enzyme subunit called Na/K-ATPase. “Our research was one of the first studies

that showed that the axon initial segment is involved in neuropsychiatric disorders,” said Hanoch Kaphzan, an NYU postdoctoral fellow involved in the project. “It suggested that by altering this cellular region we might be able to treat disorders like Angelman syndrome.” Furthermore, the isolation and research of this protein could be useful in curing other conditions such as autism. The researchers also tested whether decreasing the abnormally high levels of Na/K-ATPase could correct the deficits exhibited in the AS mice. “We decided to take a genetic approach by breeding the AS mice models with mice that were engineered to have half as much of the alpha subunit of the Na/K-ATPase,” Klann said. Cognitive and memory test results showed that the AS mice models with this protein decrease responded better than the AS mice that still had high levels of the enzyme subunit. The Klann lab’s study, published in August in the journal “Cell Reports,” received funding from the Angelman Syndrome Foundation, who provided over $988,000 in grants to a half-dozen principal researchers. “There is an increasing scarcity of funding for rare disorders,” said Eileen Braun, executive director of ASF. “So it is important that we all work collaboratively to further our understanding of rare disorders and work together to fund research that benefits as many as possible.” Ultimately, Klann sees neuroscience research as a form of scientific introspection. “Studying the brain to many of us is the frontier of biological science where we hope to understand how the brain develops and functions in ways that make each of us who we are as individuals.” Bhargavi Ganesh is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

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NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

EDITED BY JEREMY GROSSMAN ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Skirball Center schedule caters to all audiences By JAKE FOLSOM

The Skirball Center for the Performing Arts’ 2013-2014 season has a little something for everyone. For those whose musical tastes lean toward jazz or avant-garde, or perhaps something more popular, the season includes a varied roster of names, instruments and performances that run the cultural gamut. This week, on Aug. 30, Brazilian multiinstrumentalist and singer-songwriter Jorge Aragão takes the stage. His music cannot be confined to a singular genre — his output is categorized as both samba and pagode. Another genre-bending show comes Sept. 15 with a performance of avant-garde composer John Zorn’s 2004 piece “Book of Angels.” The piece runs three-and-a-half hours and features guest groups of many different genres. Classicists may be a bit put off to learn that this spring the NYU Symphony is steering clear of standards such as Mozart or Bach. On May 12, they will perform composer Tan Dun’s piece, “The Map,” inspired by Dun’s trip to the Hunan Province in China. The piece will utilize the multi-

NATALIE BRASINGTON VIA MARIABAMFORD.COM

Comedian Maria Bamford is only one of the varied acts performing this fall.

media techniques Dun is known for, as he has integrated video and audio of the Hunan Province into his performance. While “The Map” uses Western instruments — it features renowned cello soloist Wendy Sutter — it also borrows from Chinese traditions such as antiphonal singing and percussive dance, which are heard via the aforementioned audio feed. If these sound a bit musically esoteric, don’t despair. The season contains many pop culturally visible acts and easily accessible genres. “Suddenly I See” singer KT Tunstall will grace the Skirball Center with her voice and stage presence on Sept. 24. The singer-songwriter is known for her roots in the United Kingdom, but has found creative inspiration after a visit to the deserts of Arizona. The Southwest influence will doubtlessly be audible as she performs cuts off her new album “Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon.” Comedy album collectors will rejoice in the news that comedian Maria Bamford will headline Skirball Center’s fall comedy series on Nov. 8. This “Comedian of Comedy” has appeared on Adult Swim’s “Tim & Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!” as well as the fourth season of “Arrested Development.” Past headliners of fall comedy have included Rob Delaney, Zach Galifianakis, Aziz Ansari, Kristen Schaal and Reggie Watts. Considering how these comedians’ careers have taken off, the time to see Bamford live might be sooner rather than later. Many patrons are eager for an update on whether New York staple group The Joshua Light Show, described by Rolling Stone as “The Most Psychedelic Light Show of All Time,” will return to the Skirball Center stage. Interested students are encouraged to check in with the venue, which will continue to update its schedule throughout the year with more music and performance announcements. Jake Folsom is music editor. Email him at jfolsom@nyunews.com.

MUSICAL MOVEMENTS By JAKE FOLSOM This summer, the sub-genre of R&B called PBR&B proved a force to be reckoned with. It is used to refer to the new crop of R&B in which artists put a premium on raw emotions and more avantgarde instrumentation. The genre is in its infancy, with a nebulous identity and a goofy name. The blogosphere has a history of tongue-in-cheek genre labels, and this one is no exception — PBR&B is along the same schticky lineage as chillwave or “witch house.” But tacky labels be damned — over the summer, British duo AlunaGeorge’s “Body Music” demanded serious consideration. The album, to many, felt like a fulfilled promise. The band built consistent buzz throughout the past few years, and the LP’s new tracks were up to par with blog favorites such as “Your Drums, Your Love” and “Attracting Flies.” Even more visible to the mainstream was Miguel, whose “#Beautiful” collaboration with Mariah Carey earned the dubious title of “first hit song with a hashtagged title.” Even more infamous was Miguel’s onstage mishap — a miscalculated leap landed the crooner on an unsuspecting fan. Hashtags and headbangs aside, “#Beautiful” delivers. When Carey comes in, she lets you know she’s playing for keeps. Her vocal pyrotechnics in the opening lyrics of her verse are unforgettable — “I like/When you run red lights/Don’t stop till you thrill me/Oh how you thrill me.” If only Carey could recapture the airplay of her former years. Part of the problem, however, seems that Carey’s identity is, by definition, against the trends. She is a perfectionist, a resolute lipsyncer. She seems unable to surrender the illusion that she maintains her whistle register. Today’s tastes are more tailored to sensitive men like PBR&B artists like Frank Ocean, the Weeknd or Drake — we’re eager for artists

VIA WIKIPEDIA.ORG

Miguel and Mariah Carey’s “#Beautiful” may be too overproduced to appeal to PBR&B fans. who are brave enough to let you hear their voice cracking. Cut to footage of Carey’s interminable lipsync scandals over the summer. We may see her vulnerable, but she always keeps her vocals most guarded. She’d rather we catch her lipsyncing than hitting a bum note. Surely Carey longs for the heyday of “We Belong Together,” with its near-perfect production and quality. In those days, the atmospheric haze on modern hits like “Adorn” or “Thinkin Bout You” wouldn’t make the cut. PBR&B underdog Ciara is also one to watch closely. For much of the summer, her “Body Party” was bubbling, stirring online buzz and seeming poised to jump up the charts. The song feels like an update of Janet Jackson’s “Rhythm Nation” work, with thin vocals and hazy atmospheric synths as proxy for the echoing 808’s of the Minneapolis sound. Will PBR&B last? Will the Mariahs of the industry have to adapt? Considering Drake’s new single, “Started From the Bottom,” it’s anyone’s guess. If that song is any indication, the Champagne Papi is distancing himself from the less mainstream direction he pursued on much of “Take Care.” His new music has more staccato, more fronting and less emoting -— and perhaps proof that PBR&B is only a fleeting trend. Jake Folsom is music editor. Email him at jfolsom@nyunews.com.

Explore unique art scenes throughout NYC

By ALEX GREENBERGER

Although many may groan at the prospect of visiting an art exhibition, this fall there are more than a few galleries and museums that should make NYU students think twice about spending their day on Netflix. With an NYUCard, students receive free admission to several museums — one of them is the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which already incorporates a pay-as-you-wish admission fee. Starting Sept. 25, the museum will present an exhibition focusing on two specific symbols — cats and girls. The artist behind these works is Balthus, a 20th-century painter who, unlike his contemporaries, chose not to work in abstraction. Still, his paintings recall the eerie compositions of surrealist painters of his time, and represent his fascination with innocence and adolescence. For those seeking something more contemporary, an NYUCard also entitles students to free admission at the

New Museum, which will open a Chris Burden retrospective called “Extreme Measures” on Oct. 2. Burden’s work has ranged from his famed 1971 performance “Shoot,” for which his assistant shot him in the arm at close range, to his more recent large-scale sculptures. The exhibition marks Burden’s first major museum retrospective, and it includes enough of his works to fill the entire museum. Other free contemporary art alternatives opening this fall include a rare retrospective of pop artist Robert Indiana — the man responsible for the famous “Love” sculpture — at the Whitney Museum, a display of “Life of Pi” designer Alexis Rockman’s work at Sperone Westwater and several installations by minimalist sculptor John McCracken at David Zwirner. Those in search of something less avant-garde will find solace in the Frick Collection’s exhibition of Dutch painting from the Mauritshuis Gallery, opening Oct. 22. Such an exhibition may

sound like just another dry lecture, but this show offers the rare chance to see Jan Vermeer’s exquisite “Girl With a Pearl Earring,” which is not to be missed. The painting is on special display in New York while its original home, The Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in the Netherlands, is closed for renovation. Even those more interested in television than in paintings can enjoy “From Mr. Chips to Scarface: Walter White’s Transformation in ‘Breaking Bad,’” currently at the Museum of the Moving Image. The exhibit is a must-see, featuring props and other memorabilia from the AMC show’s six-year run. For those who want to channel their inner Heisenberg for free, a trip to Astoria is in order. But for something a little closer to campus, here’s NYU’s best-kept secret — NYU’s own Grey Art Gallery. On Sept. 10, the gallery will open what is sure to be a fantastic exhibition of important black performance art, featuring work from Kalup Linzy, who has previ-

RACHEL KAPLAN/WSN

The Whitney Museum will house a retrospective of artist Robert Indiana. ously collaborated with James Franco and Adam Pendleton. And if the Grey Art Gallery’s location can teach us anything, it’s that great art lies only a 10-minute walk away in a city with as vast cultural options as New York. Alex Greenberger is film editor. Email him at agreenberger@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

13

ARTS THEATERS continued from PG. 1

Movie theaters near NYU deliver cinematic reprieve must check out the Brooklyn Academy of Music. While the name of the institution doesn’t explicitly indicate a film presence, make no mistake — it has one of the best film repertoires in the city. Located a few minutes away from the Barclays Center sports and entertainment arena, the film division splits itself across two massive venues: the Peter Jay Sharp Building and the Harvey Theater. Both of these buildings house the latest and greatest in independent cinema as well as an impressive array of director interviews and foreign classics. In addition to its movie screenings, the BAM is as passionate about other arts as much as it is about cinema. Of course, there are many other great theaters in New York City — other notable names include the Nitehawk Cinema in Brooklyn, which serves food and alcohol directly to your seat, and the Landmark Sunshine Cinema in the East Village, another hot spot for indie titles. Thankfully, with four long years of college, students have the opportunity to take advantage of them all. Charlie Spector is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

Students stand center stage in fall theater productions By DYLAN JARRETT

The start of a semester always brings with it new classes, new friends and a lot of schoolwork. But more importantly, it heralds the start of a new theater season at NYU, where one can find some of the most exciting theater in New York. This fall, keep your eyes out for a slew of fantastic theatrical experiences around campus. A funny, entertaining and always relevant program designed to address college life, the Reality Show is written and performed by NYU students at the start of each year. Although it is required viewing for incoming freshmen, the show remains a favorite of upperclassmen and can be seen at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts during the early weeks of the semester. Another annual student production is “Forbidden NYU.” A product of the College of Arts and Science Theater, “Forbidden” is a parody of a parody — “Forbidden Broadway” — that takes popular Broadway songs and rewrites them to describe life at NYU. Songs from last year’s production included “Seasons of Loans” and “The Phantom of the Trolley.” “Forbidden NYU” will be presented in October. At the Skirball Center, there will be two National Theatre Live productions broadcast in the upcoming months — “Othello”

and “Frankenstein.” For those unfamiliar with the program, National Theatre Live is a project to broadcast top-notch London productions to the rest of the world on the big screen. “Othello,” which will be broadcast Sept. 26, is Shakespeare’s classic military tragedy of love and betrayal. “Frankenstein,” which will play on Oct. 30, stars Jonny Lee Miller and Benedict Cumberbatch (both of “Sherlock” television fame) as Dr. Frankenstein and his monster, respectively. The Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development will be presenting “Sweet Smell of Success” from Sept. 12 to 14. A musical based on the classic 1957 film, “Success” is the story of J.J. Hunsecker, a gossip columnist in the 1950s whose influence extended far beyond the reaches of his newspaper. Prior to the Sept. 12 performance, there will be a ceremony to induct the show’s composer, the late Marvin Hamlisch, into the NYU Musical Theater Hall of Fame. The Tisch School of the Arts is presenting a new musical, “Murder at the Gates,” from Sept. 3-8. Billed as “‘Clue’ meets ‘Clueless,’” this new rock musical has book and lyrics by Steven Sater (“Spring Awakening”) and music by James Bourne (“Loserville”). With the show’s cast fully composed of NYU students, “Gates” promises to be an exciting show that should not be missed. This semester will undoubtedly provide

a myriad of fantastic performances. Those who have attended NYU productions in the past can attest to the quality of theater present on campus, but for those who are new to campus or have never checked out NYU theater, there is no time like the present. Pick a show, find a date and get thee to a theater. Dylan Jarrett is books/theater editor. Email her at djarrett@nyunews.com.

FILE PHOTO BY JONATHAN TAN/WSN

“Forbidden NYU” includes parodies of “Forbidden Broadway” songs.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

SPORTS

EDITED BY FRANCISCO NAVAS SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Rising student athletes promise strong season for NYU sports By FRANCISCO NAVAS AND CHRIS MARCOTRIGIANO The now four-time UAA Athlete of the Week Brandon Jones made his NYU wrestling debut in the 133-pound class last year as a sophomore when he transferred from Iowa State University. Jones, who finished with a 17-2 record (.895), led the team with his win percentage. At the Will Abele Invitational, he fought outside of his weight class, competing in the 144-pound class instead. There, he went on to win the invitational. Jones shone at the NCAA Division III East National Championship where he qualified for nationals and reached the semifinals of the 133-pound class, becoming NYU’s first individual AllAmerican and All-Association since 2010.

With the exodus of key seniors like powerhouse, goal-scoring forwards Kyle Green and Paolo Luciano, who contributed to about half of the team’s goals last season, the sights have turned to the leadership in the Violets backline. Tino Kardassis, the team’s 6-foot center back, has now taken the reins. Kardassis helped the men keep a clean sheet in seven matches, six of which were in last season’s record-breaking 9-0 start. The men only gave up 19 goals in 21 matches played. Kardassis will lead one of the stronger defenses NYU has seen and help fill the void left in the team’s backbone.

BRANDON JONES wrestling

TINO KARDASSIS men’s soccer

The numbers say it all for senior outside hitter Alexandria Mao. As she captained the lady Violets to their second straight 20-win season, Mao also led the team in kills (436), kills per set (3.79), points (533.5), points per set (4.26) and attack attempts (1,301). She was also second in digs (336) and service aces (48). In University Athletic Association play, she finished second among all players in kills per set (3.88). These stats earned her a top accolade when she was selected to the All-UAA second team. With her final season starting Saturday, Aug. 30, look for her to spike her statistics again.

Attacker Melissa Menta burst onto the scene last season as a freshman out of Somers, N.Y. After starting all four years in high school and becoming team captain her senior year, she lived up to her lofty expectations in her first season at NYU. In 13 games played, Menta led the team in goals (12) and assists (9). Menta also led the team in efficiency — of the opportunities she took, she found the back of the net 27 percent of the time. She has become a potent threat on the front line for the Violets and should prove to be a go-to scorer once again this season, along with junior forward Cami Crawford.

MELISSA MENTA

ALEXANDRIA MAO women’s volleyball

women’s soccer

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Francisco Navas is sports editor. Chris Marcotrigiano is deputy sports editor. Email them at sports@nyunews.com. Photos: Courtesy of NYU Athletics

LGBTQ : Let’s Grab Brunch Together

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LGBTQ and Ally International Students Brunch

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Life after GSA : Queer & Ally Clubs @ NYU

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05:00PM-07:00PM | KIMMEL 602

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First Year Queers & Allies (FYQA) Information Session 08:00PM-10:00PM | SKIRBALL

NYU Portraits : Voices of a People

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What’s Sooo Queer about the West Village? A Walking Tour

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MEGAN DAWE women’s basketball Forward Megan Dawe was a freshman standout for NYU Athletics last year. She led the squad in scoring with an impressive 12.8 points per game. She made 52 percent of her shots (121-232), leading the team among players with more than 100 attempts. Dawe crashed the boards as she registered 6.5 rebounds per game, proving to be an invaluable asset on the front court. The 6-foot forward must hone her free throw shooting as she continues to draw contact inside, especially because of her proven shooting prowess. Things are looking up for the rising sophomore, and for NYU women’s basketball.

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NYUNEWS.COM | SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY RAQUEL WOODRUFF OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

UNIVERSITY AFFAIRS

NYU administration needs to be replaced By BEN MILLER

Should NYU’s current administration stay or go? To answer that, we must first clear away the purpletorch branded bull-pucky handed out by NYU President John Sexton and the university’s trustees and get to the facts. NYU is the most expensive college in the country based on the total cost of an education — tuition, fees and housing. Additionally, the Princeton Review cites NYU as having the worst financial aid of any major university. The NYU 2031 expansion plan’s stated goal is to increase academic space, despite the fact that the majority of it will be non-academic. Projected costs for construction are over $3 billion, and nobody understands from where that money is going to come. That is why professors for the Stern School of Business — hardly hardcore lefties — voted against it 52 to 3, as well as 39 academic departments. In addition to salaries and bonuses, top faculty and administrators currently have $72 million in outstanding mortgages lent to them by NYU, and five top administrators were given millions in loans to buy sum-

mer houses. Many of these loans are either forgiven over time or have comically low interest rates. You simply can’t claim poverty on financial aid, promise to raise $3 billion for construction and pay yourselves millions of dollars — at least not without destroying your credibility. In response to the above facts, votes of no confidence in Sexton and his leadership have passed at seven schools and divisions of NYU and only failed at two. Defying precedent, the administration responded with vague promises to “continue communication” with faculty, and the creation of a trustee committee to analyze the problem. The recently announced and vaguely worded plan to raise $1 billion for financial aid is, depending on whether you’re cynical or not, a nice expression of belated care or a last-ditch attempt to redeem the school’s image. Which-

ever you prefer, it doesn’t erase the 10 years this administration has had to prioritize financial aid, and has done nothing until now. Students are asked to accept all of this because of the increased success, selectivity and prestige of NYU. Again, bull-pucky. Since Sexton took office in 2002, NYU has remained 32nd in the U.S. News and World Report ranking, while tuition has climbed by over $15,000. NYU’s greatest strength — its faculty — are precisely the ones calling for Martin Lipton, NYU Board of Trustee chair, and Sexton to go. The leaders of tax-exempt nonprofit organizations are bound to act according to the interests and mission of the institution. Whether or not NYU’s current leadership should stay depends on your interpretation of our mission. Are we an institution of higher education dedicated to benefiting students and society or an ATM for top administrators and the banking and real estate interests who make up the majority of our trustees? Call me naive, but I think it’s the former. Throw them out. Ben Miller is a contributing columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

IT industry must forgo gender stereotypes By MARCELO CICCONET

What would TV comedy be without stereotypes? Certainly very different, considering that the most watched sitcom in the past season relied heavily on the trope that a blonde girl’s IQ could be higher, and that technology and science-oriented guys utterly fail at socializing. Although shows like “The Big Bang Theory” are obviously meant to entertain and not to influence the career paths of young teenagers, unfortunately they fuel the perception that science is for socially awkward geeks — a perception that drives people, especially women, away from fields in computer science. According to the The National Center for Women & Information Technology, in 2010, only 18 percent of computer and information science graduates were women, down from 37 percent in 1985. Data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency also shows the downhill-trend continuing — 17.4 percent in 2012. This gender disparity in information technology matters for two reasons. First, a more diverse workforce implies a higher probability of discov-

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ering the most talented and qualified workers, as well as fostering creativity and innovation. Second, and more important, since technology is pervasive in everyday life, several women’s demands are being neglected, as computational tools are developed by a working class formed mostly by men. According to a recent study in the United Kingdom, based on the Business and Technology Education Council vocational qualifications exam, girls outperform boys in skills-based science and technology subjects. In particular, 15 percent of the girls taking the more challenging level gained the top grade — compared to 12 percent of the boys. Some schools are taking action to bring more women into fields of technology. At the University of Texas at Austin and Virginia Tech, new female

students share housing with more experienced female engineering students, reducing intimidation and creating a sense of community. Similarly, Cornell NYC Tech teamed up with the nonprofit group Girls Who Code to offer an eight-week intensive computer science course for middle school girls. At NYU’s own technical institute in Brooklyn, a summer program on cyber-security designed for high school girls was offered this year. These are all interesting ideas, but unless they are adopted by more schools, the gender gap is not likely to close. Since the nature of the problem is cultural, it would be better if big influencers, and women themselves, approached tech-related occupations in a less biased way. Considering the enormous gender gap, women’s capabilities and that IT occupations are projected to grow by 22 percent from 2010 to 2020 in the United States, which would add 758,800 new jobs according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer science is now probably the best option for young girls deciding on their careers. Marcelo Cicconet is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Fall semester invites new, ongoing discussion about NYU community

The WSN Editorial Board eagerly anticipates a new year of informed debate and discussion among bright writers and impassioned readers of the news that most affects students and the NYU community. Printed Monday through Thursday, with more content published exclusively on our website throughout the week, WSN remains NYU’s official newspaper and the main source of university news for students. Student-run and studentproduced, we provide a distinct and independent perspective on the management and runnings of NYU. Last year, the university campus was what NYU President John Sexton called, “a hotbed of contention.” But that description fails to capture how fractured his administration’s relationship is with NYU faculty and students, who have voiced fervent objections to Sexton’s leadership in a litany of widely publicized votes of no confidence and student demonstrations. Sexton’s expansion plan, NYU 2031, was also greeted with staunch opposition from Greenwich Village and East Village residents, culminating in two dismissed lawsuits. The university community has also voiced deep concern over the decision to open campuses in the United Arab Emirates and China, claiming it inappropriately diverts funding. Also, given these countries’ records of censorship and persecution, building academic environments in these locations has important implications regarding NYU’s commitment to higher education, diversity and human rights. Outside of NYU, the fierce battle for New York City mayor is underway and the results will leave a large impact on the city’s residents and students. The city’s next leader has a host of issues to address, including housing, stop-andfrisk, education reform and the increasing income gap. The Editorial Board will continue to ask tough questions of our city’s government and our school’s administration, constantly challenging an inadequate status-quo. The Opinion desk plans to examine pressing issues that matter most to students, such as student debt, university governance, employment after college, social equality and more. Additionally, our columnists will contribute a wide variety of individual opinions on current events and university news. Op-Ed Live, our video debate series, will return to provide our audience opportunity to view discussions of the latest, most controversial issues. We look forward to an ever-expanding and improving Opinion section with more online and multimedia content, and to a semester filled with enlightened, ongoing discourse among our writers and our readers.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Raquel Woodruff (Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Peter Keffer (Co-Chair).

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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