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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 48

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013

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Policy threatens park performers’ stage By VERONICA CARCHEDI

HANNAH COHEN/WSN

A new policy will limit the space in which Washington Square Park musicians can perform.

Difficult ‘Lux’ rewards patient viewers By JON MARCUS

Met with an unlikely combination of boos and a Best Director award at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, Carlos Reygadas’ “Post Tenebras Lux” has much at stake in its theatrical New York release. “Post Tenebras Lux,” which is Latin for light after darkness, is a stark portrait of a Mexican family who moves from a wealthy urban environment to the rural countryside. They experience a rude awakening, finding themselves helpless against the whims of nature. The film is far from feel-good. Stepping into Reygadas’ brutally surrealist world, the audience witnesses a fatal beating of a dog at the hands of its owner, a particularly graphic scene in which the female lead is given as a ritual sex offering and self-decapitation.

That being said, the shock value of these depictions is somewhat counterbalanced by the innocence conveyed in much of the film’s stunning portraiture. The characterizations are on point, and Reygadas does a splendid job of captivating his audience with dialogue that feels incredibly organic despite the film’s borderline sensationalist tone. These characterizations are bolstered by performances from Nathalia Acevedo and Willebaldo Torres, who puts forth an admirable performance in his portrayal of El Siete. Where “Lux” shines most, however, is its powerful imagery, for which the viewer can thank cinematographer Alexis Zabé. In certain scenes, the film’s picturesque visuals are so engross-

LUX continued on PG. 5

The presence of street performers, one of the defining characteristics of Washington Square Park, may dwindle this spring due to a recent change in park policy. The expressive matter rule, originally adopted by the New York City Parks Department in June 2010, determines where and how artists can sell their art in public places. Current rules state that artists cannot sell within 50 feet of a monument or five feet from any bench or fence. The change in ruling will now explicitly include entertainment within these parameters and define park performers who accept donations as vendors. This change will take effect May 8 and could subject performers to court summons or tickets of up to $250 for the first offense and up to $1,000 for subsequent violations. Katie Kat — a master’s student in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human

Development for classical voice and a frequent performer in Washington Square Park — criticized the new ruling. “The restrictions being placed on street performers are an epidemic and damaging to the cultural health of New York City,” Kat said. “I am afraid for the future of a city known for the quality of its art.” But according to the Parks Department, this change is merely a clarification of the preexisting rule. “[The Parks Department] always intended that the [expressive matter] rules would apply to street performers, buskers and entertainers soliciting fees or donations,” spokesman Philip Abramson said. “Parks adopted the change to clarify this intent.” The Parks Department initially restricted both park performers and artists after the rule was put in place. But on Dec. 19, 2011, Community Board 2 held a public hearing packed with performers and parkgoers oppos-

PERFORMER continued on PG. 3

Tres Carnes fuses Tex-Mex favorites By DANA RESZUTEK

The Flatiron District’s newest fusion joint Tres Carnes, which means three meats in Spanish, offers Mexican cuisine with a smoky Texan twist. Since its opening on April 16, New Yorkers have already been drawn to this casual restaurant, with lines out the door during lunch hour. With large, open windows and colorful wall murals, Tres Carnes has a laidback atmosphere. The friendly service and music ranging from classic rock to the latest top 40 hits lend the restaurant a welcoming, neighborhood feel. Combined with fresh, flavorful meals, Tres Carnes seems to have all the qualities of a successful establishment. The namesake’s three meats are brisket, pork and chicken. All are prepared using classic Texan hardwood slow-smoking techniques, which bring out unique flavors of Texan-Mexican fusion.

CHUCK KUAN FOR WSN

Tres Carnes serves several types of Tex-Mex style soft-shell tacos. Owner Michael Rodriguez describes the food as, “Texas style meats, without the barbecue sauce, mixed with Mexican fare.” “If we had to highlight one of the meats, it would be the brisket,” Rodriguez said. “We smoke it for a very long time, 16 to 18 hours.” Menu items include burritos, soft-shell tacos and rice bowls ($8.04 to $8.73). Each comes with a choice of three meats or a vegetar-

ian option, rice, beans and four salsa options varying in spiciness. Steinhardt freshman Danielle Drumgoole was impressed with the variety of flavors in the food. “All that time cooking the meat for the dishes really pays off,” Drumgoole said. “The food is packed with flavor, and I’m definitely coming back to try more.”

CARNES continued on PG. 4


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

OnTheSide NEWS

ARTS

FEATURES

SPORTS

OPINION

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MULTIMEDIA

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SPECIAL EDITIONS

Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

AMY ZHANG Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN Deputy Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ Assistant Managing Editor

NICOLA PRING Creative Director

KALEEL MUNROE SENIOR STAFF FINDING THE MUSIC

Local record stores branch out to survive p ws

Top five sights to see in Washington Square Park

The no-confidence votes against NYU President John Sexton have sparked conversations outside the NYU community and even national coverage. But though they continue to mark critical moments in university history, they are not the only stories that have moved us this semester.

Biggest stories this semester

foreign correspondent JULIE DEVITO senior editors GENTRY BROWN, DAN

HINTON, CHARLES MAHONEY, CLIO MCCONNELL, STEFAN MELNYK, LAVYA YALAMANCHI

university KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR city/state EMILY BELL,

l Girl tanning in 68-degree weather l The pigeon man

l Humans of New York

WICY WANG

DEPUTY STAFF

l Dylan Sprouse’s new haircut

l Chalk artists

university TATIANA BAEZ city/state VERONICA CARCHEDI investigative NICOLE BROWN arts JOSH JOHNSON features KRISTINA BOGOS sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN copy MICHAEL DOMANICO,

‘To the Wonder’ entices viewers with stunning visuals Alex Greenberger

April 10, 2013

ANDREW KARPAN books/theater OLIVIA GEORGE film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment ALEX GREENBERGER music ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE the highlighter blog SAM RULLO features HELEN HOLMES, JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU beauty & style MICHELLE LIM dining ANGEL CHANG sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia REBECCA CLEMENTI, JOON LEE

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

Francisco Navas

SAMEER JAYWANT

Best 2013 album for your studying soundtrack

deputy opinion editors

l “Cerulean Salt” — Waxahatchee

BUSINESS MANAGER

l “Desperate Ground” — The Thermals

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, RAQUEL WOODRUFF

ADVERTISING REBECCA RIBEIRO

Inside the Storm: A nurse recognized Kristina Bogos

CIRCULATION MANAGER

CHLOE COFFMAN

February 24, 2013

l “Woman” — Rhye

UNIVERSITY SALES COORDINATOR

l “The 20/20 Experience” — Justin Timberlake

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

KAITLYN O’BRIEN ELLEN MCQUEEN SALES ASSOCIATES

ARIANA DIVALENTINO, ALISON LIZZIO, SAM WANDER

l “Ghost on Ghost” — Iron & Wine

CIRCULATION ASSISTANT

Josh Johnson

Top five cheap ways to decorate your dorm l Christmas lights from Surprise Surprise

BENJAMIN SWINEHART

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

KALEEL MUNROE

Pushing for Transparency: Examining the NYU decision-making process Veronica Carchedi

March 25, 2013

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY

l Hang thrift-store tapestries on the wall

EDITORIAL ADVISER

l Movie, TV and music posters

EDITORS-AT-LARGE

KEITH LEIGHTY MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG

l Host a wall-drawing party and hang up butcher paper l Use empty glass bottles for flower vases Veronica Carchedi

Advertising dependency for free social media sites makes for risky business model Marcelo Cicconet

March 25, 2013

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About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Amy Zhang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

PERFORMER continued from PG. 1

Change in park regulations discourages artist presence

ing these restrictions. At this time, the Parks Department withdrew many of the summons against park performers, but not artists, because they had been “incorrectly applied,” Abramson said. “There is no public demand to get rid of performers,” said Robert Lederman, a street performer and president of Artists’ Response To Illegal State Tactics. He argued that public outrage was the reason for the reversal of the unpopular policy against performers. Lederman is currently in a lawsuit with the Parks Department over the expressive matter rule, which is under consideration by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. His claim is twofold. First, the original expressive matter rules violate the First Amendment rights of artists and performers, and second that the differences in enforcement between these two groups violate the equal protection rights of the Fourteenth Amendment.

“One of the biggest issues was that, even though the new park rule said performers had to be subject to the exact same enforcement as artists, that’s not the way the city was doing it. They were enforcing the rule against visual artists. They were not enforcing it against performers,” he explained. Lederman has begun a petition to request Parks Commissioner Veronica White and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to repeal the restriction. So far the petition has garnered over 300 signatures. Community Board 2 is hosting a public hearing on May 1 at the Grace Church School. Performers have said that they will continue to push for the right to busk in parks. “I intend to be there May 8, performing,” Lederman said. “If they want to start giving out tickets, I’ll be there to receive one.” Veronica Carchedi is city/state editor. Email her at vcarchedi@nyunews.com.

Legal age for cigarette purchases may rise By ADJOA HACKMAN

New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley recently proposed increasing the legal age for buying cigarettes from 18 to 21. If passed, the new regulation would not allow those under 21 to buy cigarettes or other tobacco products. However, it would not prohibit them from being in possession of or smoking cigarettes. This is the latest effort by city officials to decrease the smoking rate in New York City. The proposal has not been approved by the City Council orsigned off by the mayor, but both the City Council speaker, Christine Quinn, and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg have expressed support for the measure. “With this legislation, we’ll be targeting the age group at which the overwhelming majority of smokers start,” Quinn said in the announcement. However, NYU students are not enthusiastic about the new proposal. “It’s just like alcohol,” CAS sophomore Anouk Thevenin said. “People are going to have their way around it.” This is not the first method of decreasing the level of smoking activity that city officials have proposed. Bloomberg recently suggested raising the minimum price of cigarettes to $10.50 and requiring stores to keep cigarettes out of sight from customers until they request to buy them. “The campaign is intended to shield children from tobacco marketing and to keep people who

have quit smoking from buying cigarettes on impulse,” Bloomberg said of this most recent initiative. “Such displays suggest that smoking is a normal activity, and they invite young people to experiment with tobacco.” According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the current New York youth smoking rate is 12.5 percent, which is below the national average of 18.1 percent. Some NYU students who support the new proposal believe increasing the smoking age would benefit young people, but the decision of whether to smoke is ultimately their own prerogative. “I think it’s smart to make the smoking age higher than the drinking age, but I don’t think there should be any regulations for people who can enlist,” said CAS junior Joe Condren. “If you are old enough to make the decision to fight in the army, you are old enough to make the decision to harm yourself by buying cigarettes.” According to citywide data, smoking causes 7,000 deaths per year in New York City. The Bloomberg administration has also banned smoking in almost all public spaces, including parks, plazas and beaches, as well as restaurants and bars. New York State officials recently expressed support on Sunday for the proposal and have considered expanding it to the state. Adjoa Hackman is a contributing writer. Email her at cstate@nyunews.com.

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NYU SLAM leaves footprints By JACQUELINE HSIA

The NYU Student Labor Action Movement recently made headway in its efforts against sportswear corporation Adidas, a major manufacturer of NYU athletic wear. SLAM, a student-run organization that campaigns against labor injustice, tries to choose protests strategically and find the best way for students to participate, encouraging them to support fights for human rights and social justice. “That includes the right to organize a union, the right to work with dignity and the right to meet your basic human needs,“ said Gallatin junior and member of SLAM Caitlin MacLaren. SLAM recently helped the Indonesian PT Kizone workers gain compensation by forcing Adidas to pay severance fees legally owed to its workers. Working with United Students Against Sweatshops, other chapters and workers, SLAM and the Badidas campaign helped pressure Adidas into compensating 2,700 former Indonesian garment workers who created collegiate apparel at PT Kizone. The campaign provoked the largest collegiate boycott of a top-three sportswear company in history, with 17 universities and colleges ending their contracts with Adidas. Last week, the union representing the workers in the Indonesian factory reached a settlement with Adidas. Meanwhile, Adidas is still licensed to make apparel for NYU. Because of the settlement, NYU is not planning to cut ties with Adidas, NYU spokesman Philip Lentz said. “The university agrees with the students that Adidas’ relationship with workers that manufacture its products raised serious concerns,” Lentz said. “And that is why we were pleased that the company reached a settlement with the union representing the workers.” However, NYU’s licensing agreement expires at the end of the year, which will give NYU a chance to assess whether Adidas is still living up to the terms of the settlement. MacLaren said the group was satisfied with their success. “No one person, group or action wins a victory like this, but every one of us who put pressure on Adidas can be proud of this victory,” MacLaren said. One of SLAM’s ongoing campaigns involves advo-

cating for nursing home workers employed by NYU School of Law trustee Daniel Straus’ company. SLAM supports the workers who argue that the company requires them to pay more than they should for healthcare, sacrifice their lunch breaks and take away their sick and vacation days. It recently held a protest at a law school basketball game. “We wanted to show that students are outraged by a law school trustee who violates labor law and abuses workers,” MacLaren said. In response to SLAM’s actions, the law school issued a statement that it has not been a part of the ongoing controversy. “We are confident that all sides will respect any decision the courts ultimately make in this matter,” the statement read. MacLaren said the next SLAM protest will most likely be during the law school’s alumni reunion this weekend, and she hopes to gain alumni support. “I believe there are a lot of alumni who will be equally outraged by the way that Daniel Straus is tarnishing the reputation of the law school,” she said. Jacqueline Hsia is a staff writer. Email her at investigative@nyunews.com.

VIA FACEBOOK.COM

Students protest in front of Bobst Library.

Student council president-elect aims to better inform student body By KEVIN BURNS

Junior Victoria Ettorre was elected CAS Student Council President in the 2013 student council elections, after votes were recast due to a change in candidates. The revote lasted two days, and the candidates were not allowed to campaign outside of Facebook. Ettorre beat out sophomore economics student Sara Samarasinghe in the race. Incumbent Yee Ting Wu dropped out midrace after receiving word from an internship, when some students had already cast their votes. In an effort to make the race fair, the previous votes were nullified and a revote began on April 22. The CAS Student Council announced the results of the revote on Monday via email. Ettorre, a biology student on the pre-med track, already has big plans for next year. She said her first goal is to return to the basics of what student council really is. “We are looking for more than just programming and fo-

COURTESY OF VICTORIA ETTORRE

CAS junior Victoria Ettorre is a pre-med biology student. cusing a lot more on the political side of things,” Ettorre said. Ettorre said students are becoming more interested in issues like the no-confidence vote and NYU’s expansion plan, and she hopes to make the student council an unbiased source of information for students. However, she said she could

not say whether the student body could have a larger say in these controversial issues. “At this time, it’s hard to say only because the student body has not really been engaged in discussions concerning it yet,” she said. Ettorre said the student council’s role is to educate students with unbiased information, not to take a position. “As the students have no say at the current time, we will not be holding a position on this issue,” she said. Ettorre has been active in student council since her freshman year and served on the executive board for the past two years. She decided to run for president because she believed the experience and knowledge she gained from her previous student council involvement would make her a good leader. “I am very passionate about making some changes to the student council to enhance student life for CAS students,” Ettorre said. Kevin Burns is a deputy university editor. Email him at kburns@nyunews.com.


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DINING CARNES continued from PG. 1

Tres Carnes becomes Flatiron favorite

She especially enjoyed the brisket burnt ends chili ($4.59). “The chili has to be my favorite. It doesn’t skip out on the meat, and this recipe is definitely fighting with my grandmother’s.” The chili, cooked for an additional four to six hours after the brisket is smoked, provides a hearty addition to any main dish. Refreshing beverages including Tres Carnes’ homemade agua fresca ($2.76), a mix of cucumber, apple and lime, are offered daily. For a sweet dessert, try the double-smoked churro doughnut ($3.22) filled with caramel and coated with sugar and cinnamon. Rodriguez said locals have been receptive to the restaurant. “It’s been a great response [so far],” he said. “We’ve received lots of great comments and feedback that has been overwhelmingly positive.” Rodriguez said the Flatiron District was a good place to open his fusion eatery. “It’s a great area with lots of food places around,” he said. “It’s a place people come to for lunch, and Tres Carnes is a change of pace from what’s around here.” Bringing a great twist to anyone’s regular burrito or taco, Tres Carnes impresses with flavor and friendliness and is sure to become a regular for many students on their lunch hour. Tres Carnes is located at 688 Sixth Ave. Dana Reszutek is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

EDITED BY ANGEL CHANG DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

Hester Fair returns with creative vendors By ALEX PASTRON

Nestled on the edge of Chinatown, Hester Street Fair opened for its fourth year this past Saturday, with 60 different vendors selling goods ranging from vintage clothing to handmade jewelry to soap to food. Suhyun Pak, one of the fair’s coordinators, shared his outlook on the event. “Food has become entertainment,” Pak said. “When you hire caterers for an event, there is no story behind them. Our vendors at Hester Street Fair bring that story.” And he wasn’t exaggerating. Many of the vendors, like Macaron Parlour and Melt Bakery — selling four different types of ice cream cookie sandwiches — gained popularity because of the fair. Many started out as little stands and eventually worked up to their own storefronts in the city. Judging by the interminable line, Luke’s Lobster is a favorite and a Hester Street Fair classic. The menu consists of fish sandwiches with shrimp, crab or lobster served chilled on a buttered and toasted bun. Several vendors made their debut at this year’s fair. One such participant is Khao Man Gai. Pak explained that when the husbandand-wife team behind the stand immigrated to New York from Thailand two years ago, they were unable to find Thai street food anywhere in the city. So, they traveled back to Thailand to perfect the popular garlic, ginger chicken and jasmine rice recipe. In addition to their namesake dish, the one other menu

item is nam krachipa, a refreshing iced drink made from dried hibiscus flowers. Also new this year is Heart of Tea. With flavors like pomegranate, orange and peach, this black tea, currently only available in shops around the East Village and at the fair, makes for a healthy and refreshing treat. “We get our ingredients from five different countries,” said Vadim Seliankin, one of the owners, as he poured cold samples of the tea for thirsty fair visitors. “And there is nothing artificial.” Electra Colevas, a freshman in the Liberal Studies Program, suggested the white truffle cheddar popcorn at Pop Karma for those seeking an unusual item. “Truffle oil is my recent favorite,” she said. “But I can’t believe how good it tastes on popcorn.” For vegetarians, there is Rachel Mae’s Farmstand, which sells community-supported local products. For $600, customers can take part in their 24-week program, where they come to the fair every Saturday and pick up a week’s worth of fresh, seasonal produce like asparagus, garlic, tomatoes and melons. Customers can also buy lemonade and preserves at the stand. Most of the produce comes from farms on Long Island, and whatever doesn’t get picked up is either canned by Mae or donated to Community of Unity, a local youth empowerment leadership community. Featuring these and many other vendors, Hester Street Fair will be open every Satur-

day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Oct. 26, so grab some friends and arrive hungry and ready for a unique street-food experience. Hester Street Fair is located on the corner of Hester and Essex streets. Admission is free and open to the public. Alex Pastron is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com

RACHEL LIQUINDOLI FOR WSN

Unique clothing options and food vendors add charm to the Hester Fair.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

ARTS

EDITED BY JOSH JOHNSON ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM LUX continued from PG. 1

‘Lux’ challenges audiences

ing and captivating that at times viewers may forget they are watching a movie. It would seem that Reygadas has a distinct flair for the unconventional — this is evident in the many production aspects that add to the film’s sometimes otherworldly feel, from the movie’s 1:33 aspect ratio to the use of a beveled lens in certain scenes, which creates a kaleidoscopic effect. While the film’s chronology is highly irregular, scene cuts are well-placed, with each shot allowing the viewer just enough time to begin drawing inferences in one shot before shifting to the next, leaving viewers asking for more. Even though the transitions are somewhat jarring at first, they eventually become a seamless part of the film’s fantastical narrative style. “Post Tenebras Lux” may call for a degree of devotion from viewers that may be unrealistic. But if viewers are willing to submit to the task of wrapping their minds around the many pieces that make up this bizarre journey, their efforts will be rewarded with a stunning experience. Jon Marcus is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF NO DREAM CINEMA

“Post Tenebras Lux” combines family drama with surrealism.

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NYU alum David Call stars in upcoming Western drama By ISABEL JONES

Actor and NYU alumnus David Call — whose résumé includes roles in “Gossip Girl,” “Smash,” “Fringe,” Lena Dunham’s film “Tiny Furniture” and much more — took a moment to discuss his role in the upcoming Western drama “Dead Man’s Burden” with WSN. The re-emergence of the American Western has been in large part due to the success of Quentin Tarantino’s acclaimed and unconventional “Django Unchained.” Call feels a sense of nostalgia toward the classic genre, both personally and as a tribute to America. “I grew up watching a lot of Westerns with my dad as a kid,” Call said. “I’ve always been a huge fan, and there’s always been a big part of me that wanted to be in a Western, playing a cowboy. I love it on a personal level, but also I think it’s really important because it’s such a uniquely American genre, and part of American history, American mythology and American cinema. So I’m really happy to see that coming back, and I think it’s important for us to take a look at our own history and illuminate it.” Call mentioned that he is very much influenced by the genre’s patron saint, Clint Eastwood. He also discussed how shooting in the wide open spaces of the New Mexico desert offered an ideal location.

COURTESY OF ROB HAUER

“Dead Man’s Burden” celebrates Western aesthetic. “It was heaven, actually,” he said. “It’s always great to shoot in that sort of location because it really concentrates everybody and allows you to sort of immerse yourself in that world and that time. Going up to a cabin in the mountains and watching the sun rise every morning is not a bad way to spend the day. It’s sort of a paid vacation.” Call has dabbled in many different genres, but perhaps his most notable role is that in Dunham’s “Tiny Furniture,” which he said took a page from real life. “We’re friends, so she wrote that part for me, and half of those scenes were based on conversations that Lena and I had actually had,” he said. “We talked a lot about the character, but she was very averse to actually rehearsing any of the scenes. She wanted to

keep it sort of as loose and natural as possible.” Call would love to work with Dunham again. About a possible guest spot on “Girls,” he said, “Of course. Anytime Lena wants me, I’m there.” When asked about his time at NYU, Call discussed how being a student is what you make of it. “There are a lot of amazing opportunities that come with attending a school like NYU. There’s amazing faculty, there’s New York,” he said. “But NYU is also a bit of a behemoth in that there are a lot of students, and there’s a lot going on. If you really want to get everything out of your NYU experience, you really have to work hard to find those opportunities and maximize them.”

Postelles bring ’80s to future By ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE

New York locals the Postelles are back to make the ’80s cool again with their sophomore album, ”And It Shook Me.” The record features 12 tracks that reinvigorate ’80s pop-rock style with modern melodies and bright guitar riffs for a refreshing yet vintage rock and roll sound. The band’s eponymous debut album was produced by Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr., whose solo records reflect a similar pop-rock feel to what is present on “And It Shook Me.” Starting with their titular track and continuing on “Pretend It’s Love” and “Oh My Luck,” the Postelles demonstrate a sound heavily influenced by The Kooks through the presence of unconventional vocals and acoustic guitars. Lyrics like, “I won’t go if you won’t go/and I don’t ebb if you don’t flow,” in “Sweet Water” are fun and endearing, and they fit the general theme of light-hearted love songs on the album. While the verses themselves are often nothing outstanding, the overall composition of each track on the album demonstrates a keen sense for unique melodies and flawless instrumentals. One cannot help but feel that the words sung are not as important as the way the song sounds as a whole. Many tracks exude an ’80s teen-idol feeling, with romantic lyrics and upbeat melodies accompanied by subtle bass and piano parts. “You Got Me Beat” is reminiscent of Wham!’s youthful exuberance but made modern with chipper electric guitars and crisp vocals. The album takes a well-placed break on “Parallel Love,” a mid-tempo track about nostalgic memories, before kicking things back up with “Waiting by Your Window.” Given the number of outstanding new musicians and bands that have gained popularity within the past year, the Postelles have stiff competition in the race to reach larger audiences. However, with time, persistence and a lot more experience, the band may grow to have a new, unique sound to offer fans.

Isabel Jones is a staff writer. Email her at film@nyunews.com.

Alexandria Ethridge is music editor. Email her at aethridge@nyunews.com.

Xbox Live, ‘Heroes’ will not make winning combination By MARCUS JONES

The first half of “Heroes’” first season was arguably perfect. The characters were complex, there was plenty of suspense, the concept was unique for network television at the time and one phrase perfectly captured the essence of the plot: “Save the cheerleader, save the world.” “Heroes” had everything going for it, and fans and critics were excited for what was NBC’s riskiest show yet. Then the 2007 writer’s strike happened. While “Heroes” did push through, the quality had suffered significantly. What promised to be an epic season finale turned out to be a flash in the pan, as the apocalyptic exploding man was thwarted faster than the speed of light.

“Heroes” had seriously lost its momentum and did not know how to return to its initial greatness. It was great to see actresses like Kristen Bell and Dania Ramirez come on the show, but both stars had ridiculous powers that made them forgettable and a part of the show’s trend of showcasing strong — though ultimately uninteresting — women. The show ended in a carnival setting, which was an apt metaphor for a television series that had become a sideshow act. Given that people look back at the series and shudder at the painful four seasons the show survived, it is interesting to hear the news that Microsoft is thinking of reviving the series as a way to launch original content on Xbox Live. Adding original content could

mean that Microsoft is aiming to compete with Netflix. That idea is not even that outlandish considering that Netflix’s “Hemlock Grove” lacked the critical success of the service’s other original series “House of Cards,” presenting Microsoft with a potential opening. However, many of the actors from “Heroes” have moved onto different ventures in television and film, the most successful being Hayden Panettiere, who now stars on ABC’s “Nashville.” It is unlikely that any of the original cast would return to the show’s relaunch. There may be a chance showrunner Tim Kring would come back to helm the series on Xbox Live, but Kring is busy with “Touch” on Fox.

Kring may not even care about “Heroes” anymore — a prequel miniseries and a TV movie sequel to the series were rejected by NBC. As nice as it would be to see “Heroes” return to its former glory, it may be in the best interest of Microsoft to launch original programming on Xbox Live with a different show. The name “Heroes” has been tarnished by some mistakes in the majority of its existence, and it seems everyone has chosen to forget the show. Perhaps it would be more interesting to take the idea of a show about superheroes and turn it in a different direction. But if the status of “Heroes” over the past few years is indicative of the show’s future, it may not be the right show to begin Xbox Live’s first foray

into original content.

Marcus Jones is a staff writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF NBC

After a strong start, “Heroes” struggled in later seasons.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

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Crossword Across   1 Where some  commuters  drink   7 Chuckle sound 10 Trash site 14 Pique 15 Better than  normal 17 ___ system 18 Light 19 Where  36-Down is 20 Silly 22 “That’s  enough!” 24 Hospital fluids 28 “The Price  Is Right”  announcer  Johnny 30 Tater ___ 32 Squabble 33 Like many  arenas 35 What you may  call it?

37 Auto additive 

with a red oval  logo 38 Swabbie 39 Ring separator 41 Brunched, say 42 “Wheel of  Fortune”  request 43 Resorts 44 Small piano 46 Herbicide  target 48 It’s in the air 50 Tennis’s Agassi 51 Size up 53 Engaged  in some  histrionics 55 Made believe 57 Santa ___,  Calif. 60 Hidden water  menace 63 Swab target 65 Island near   Tahiti

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day!” 68 Felipe or  Fernando 69 Not as longwinded

Edited by Will Shortz 1

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25

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No. 0327

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puzzle by david j. kahn

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47 Best … or 

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59 Lumberjack, 

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY SAMEER JAYWANT OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

TERRORISM

Definition of terrorism must be re-examined By EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY

The weeks after the Boston Marathon bombings have been quite distressing not only because of the violence of the act itself but also because of the political violence from the subsequent media coverage and the behavior of our elected officials. Thus, perhaps we have to rethink what we constitute as violence and even terror. Traditionally, we have considered something an act of terror if it was ideologically motivated to terrorize. Thus, random shootings — such as those in Aurora, Colo., and Sandy Hook Elementary School — which are psychological or sociopathic events, do not constitute terror because they do not have any ideology behind them. But this type of logic runs into serious flaws. If we explore the aftermath of the tragedy in Boston more deeply, we can see that aside from the Tsarnaev brothers, there were other agents responsible for spreading terror. For example, I witnessed how politicians and different media outlets escalated Islamophobia to the point where all Muslim or Chechen people suddenly became enemy number one, even though it was later revealed that the suspects’ actual time

spent in the North Caucasus was relatively brief. The Islamophobia perpetrated by the media may not have been intentional — nevertheless, this is an alternative form of terror because it certainly targeted and terrorized Muslims who were unrelated to the perpetrators. The actual lockdown of Boston created terror as well. Disregarding the debate about whether the lockdown was justified, one can still say that the image of a militarized police force with heavily armored tanks patrolling the streets produced terror. The tragedy in Boston highlights a broader trend of the transformation of police forces into de facto military units in recent years. In fact, some of our elected officials are now talking about ways to create ever-stricter policing policies. New

York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg went so far as to say that in light of the bombings, traditional interpretations of the U.S. Constitution must change so that the government can implement greater security measures. What greater security measures would Bloomberg want to institute if he already boasted about heading the seventh largest army in the world — the New York Police Department? The role of the police should be to protect us, but instead we fear them. And isn’t this the ultimate goal of terror — to atomize society by instilling fear? Thus, if various agents can unintentionally produce terror, how can we have a stable mechanism to define terrorism? Perhaps in a strange way, this question is not worth pursuing. Terror is produced under the sign of security, war, peace, liberation, etc. What an act is meant to do matters less than the effect it has on the world. By attempting to stabilize the definition, we exclude the possibilities of state-produced violence from conceptualizations of terrorism. Edward Radzivilovskiy is a deputy opinion editor. Email him at eradzivilovskiy@nyunews.com.

HEALTH

Restaurants should show nutrition information By NIKOLAS REDA-CASTELAO

It is interesting to think of calories in a context of general knowledge because, well, what is a calorie? A calorie, as the average person may be able to identify it, is the number on the back of food containers that correlates with serving sizes, telling you how much you can eat before reaching your daily food intake. Both are very vague numbers though, and it is rather difficult to conceptualize it in a way that actually brings it to physicality. A Calorie is actually a kilocalorie, or 1,000 calories, and one calorie — with a lowercase “c” — is the amount of energy necessary to heat one gram of water by 1 degree Celsius. Even then, as a measure of energy, it is completely vague as to how that manifests itself in our daily behavior and diet. The result of poor nutritional understanding is the current American obesity epidemic, and so it comes to a point of necessity to realize we need effective means of helping people comprehend what it really means when you eat a Big Mac. Menus that display caloric intake are a necessary step to curbing this issue. A study was done and presented at the Experimental Biology 2013 meeting in Boston, Mass., two

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weeks ago, indicating that people make healthier decisions in their food intake when they realize what it physically requires to metabolize. People respond to negative incentives. The human mind is more likely to react to things that are detrimental or that they find unpleasant more so than being rewarded. For instance, a Big Mac is 550 Calories. To burn off a Big Mac, you would have to do one hour of brisk walking or more strenuous activity like jogging for 30 minutes. For those people who are mindful of their weight, which according to a survey by the International Food Information Council is around 70 percent of Americans, this presents a dilemma: these activities are

both time-consuming and present a physical strain. The opportunity costs therefore outweigh the consumption of this burger. The graphs and figures illustrate the physical metabolism of 550 Calories of energy in a language that is understandable — otherwise, it is very difficult to grasp what burning 550 Calories looks like. There are a few contentions to the idea of displaying this information and holding restaurants, particularly fast-food restaurants, accountable for making these distinctions clear. Some argue that mandating this information equates to quelling the restaurant’s freedom of speech, but I argue that withholding this information is selfish and harmful in the same way that a pharmaceutical company decides to withhold a drug’s side effects. If research shows it encourages healthy eating, and if it holds little cost to multibillion dollar enterprises, then there is no reason not to do it, lest we risk letting the obesity epidemic explode. Nikolas Reda-Castelao is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Bombing suspect deserves Miranda rights

Although the Boston terror suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has finally been read his Miranda rights, constitutional scholars are still debating whether it was appropriate. Must Tsarnaev, as a U.S. citizen, necessarily be Mirandized? One can argue that the Boston Marathon bombings were a rare case and a legitimate exception to the rule. There may have been knowledge about an imminent threat, and reading his Miranda rights could have compromised such important information. Indeed, there is an idea that states cannot intrude upon certain fundamental rights, but none of these are absolute. Free exercise of religion is not an absolute right. Polygamy is not allowed. Free speech is also not an absolute right. Fighting words, imminent danger and obscenity are all curtailments of free speech. Similarly, Miranda rights are not absolutely guaranteed. They should not be read initially if there is an imminent security threat. If Tsarnaev were read his rights, perhaps he would have remained silent and not given the information about the Times Square plot or not have shed light on acting alone with his brother. However, carving out an exception is a slippery slope. A very controversial constitutional event occurred in 1977 when the Nazi Party in America decided to march through Skokie, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago populated by Holocaust survivors. The Chicago authorities moved to ban all political demonstrations in public parks. The American Civil Liberties Union defended the right of the Nazi Party to march, its argument being that the principle of free speech supersedes the content of speech. Therefore, if we purport to stand for these ideas of rights and liberties, and we claim that terrorists are fighting against our way of life, then we have to be the strongest, most positive instantiation of the things we stand for. Are we willing to trade less safety for more freedom?

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Sameer Jaywant (Chair), Raquel Woodruff (Co–Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co–Chair), Nickhil Sethi, Matt Luo, Nina Golshan, Ian Mark, Jess Littman, Marcelo Cicconet

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.



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