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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 44

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013

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Student jailed for air rifle ownership

By NICOLE BROWN and AMY ZHANG

JEREMY LEVICK FOR WSN

Local record stores branch out to survive By BILLY RICHLING

Music from a local DJ flowed out the door of Other Music record store and followed customers of all ages around the block last Saturday afternoon. Along with about two dozen other record stores in Greenwich Village, Other Music was participating in a national celebration that featured live performances, special releases and promotional products throughout the day.

But the fifth annual Record Store Day, a celebration of independently owned record stores, came only a week after the closing of one of Greenwich Village’s music icons. Bleecker Bob’s Golden Oldies, which had been selling records since 1968, closed its doors for good on April 13. “Bleecker Bob’s was more than a music store,” said James Celentano, a Steinhardt music business professor. “They were part of the com-

munity. They were a place people could browse and gather. It was a place to be seen.” According to the Almighty Institute for Music Retail, a music marketing service, Bleecker Bob’s is not alone. More than 4,000 record stores closed between 2000 and 2010 across the United States. Steinhardt professor of music business Michelle McDevitt said independently owned record stores are facing tough challenges these days.

“[Bleecker Bob’s] closing is part of a larger disruption in the music industry that’s been happening for many years now,” McDevitt said. “The music discovery experience hasn’t vanished completely, it’s just shifted to being online.” With the advent of easy downloading and online programs like Spotify and Pandora, some customers are no longer loyal fans of record stores.

RECORDS continued on PG. 3

CAS junior Bernard Goal was arrested by the New York Police Department on Monday night for the possession of illegal weapons. Maintenance crew members found air rifles on his bed in room 1705 of Lafayette Street residence hall on Monday and contacted NYU Public Safety. Public Safety officers searched Goal’s room and contacted the NYPD after finding five weapons in the dorm. NYPD said Goal was arrested at 7:40 p.m. that night on five misdemeanor counts for violating a city administrative code that prohibits the unlawful possession or selling of air rifles. In an email to all the residents of Lafayette, Jules Martin, vice president of global security and crisis management, ensured students that the rifles found in Goal’s room posed no threat. “As it turned out, these items, though they look highly realistic, were not assault rifles,” Mar-

GUNS continued on PG. 3

‘At Any Price’ challenges morality norms with surprising ending By LAURA WOLFORD

Business is business in the new family drama film “At Any Price,” starring Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron as a father and son whose relationship is put to the test by events threatening a family and its farm. In serious fashion, the film addresses dark themes that question what

is considered moral when the safety of one’s family is at stake. Henry Whipple (Quaid) is the archetypal Midwestern farmer whose family farm means everything to him. When his son Dean (Efron) tells him he would rather be a professional racecar driver than own the farm, Henry tries to convince Dean to join the family busi-

ness. Dean has no interest in farming until the business is subjected to an investigation that could ruin the family financially and socially. Quaid and Efron deliver standout performances in their respective roles as father and rebellious son. Quaid portrays the patriarch with ease as he effortlessly turns his character

into the stern but proud father. His character’s emotional depth intensifies as he deals with the weight of the failing farm on his shoulders. Efron holds his own, as his character changes from an uncontrollable young boy into a responsible and reliable man

PRICE continued on PG. 4

COURTESY OF BLACK BEAR PICTURES

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: BURGER JOINT OPENS VILLAGE SHOP: Burger Joint, a legendary Midtown hamburger spot, recently opened a new location in the Village where customers can enjoy burgers that are simply delicious. BURGER on PG. 8

EARTH WEEK ENCOURAGES ENERGY CONSERVATION AT NYU: NYUnplugged seeks to educate students, raise awareness about environmental issues and question the factors behind increasing environmental degradation. DANIEL YEOM FOR WSN

UNPLUGGED on PG. 3

WSN EDITORIAL BOARD: David Boies is not the household name that students had been expecting for a commencement speaker, but he is more than fitting to inspire our graduating class at commencement. HOUSE on PG. 7


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS The Plump Dumpling, on the corner of 11th Street and Second Avenue, is the perfect East Village takeout spot for Chinese food. The décor is quaint and homey if you’re in the mood for a sit-down meal, and the efficient staff ensure your order is ready in less than 10 minutes. The restaurant’s location is convenient for anyone living in the East or West Village, and the prices are student-friendly — a filling plate of General Tso’s chicken and fried rice with hot and sour soup on the side is only $8. They even accept credit cards. If you’re on the go or need to pick up a quick meal, the Plump Dumpling should be your takeout of choice. — SAMEER JAYWANT Delivery.com is a website that connects you with restaurants, grocery stores and other businesses in your neighborhood. You can search for meals by the maximum amount you want to spend or by places that offer a discount for the first order. You can even refine your search to restaurants that don’t charge a delivery fee. It’s the cheapest and most convenient way to get delivery. — RAQUEL WOODRUFF

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IN AND OF

THE CITY

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It’s a big city and a widespread university. Catch up with our daily updates on university and city/state news headlines other publications are covering.

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WSN STAFF

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

AMY ZHANG Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN Deputy Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ Assistant Managing Editor

NICOLA PRING Creative Director

KALEEL MUNROE SENIOR STAFF

university TATIANA BAEZ city/state VERONICA CARCHEDI investigative NICOLE BROWN arts JOSH JOHNSON features KRISTINA BOGOS sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN copy MICHAEL DOMANICO,

WICY WANG foreign correspondent JULIE DEVITO senior editors GENTRY BROWN, DAN

HINTON, CHARLES MAHONEY, CLIO MCCONNELL, STEFAN MELNYK, LAVYA YALAMANCHI

Markburger is a cozy restaurant and bar located in the heart of St. Marks Place. It has great, quality sliders (cheese, bacon or onion) at a cheap price. Although the sliders are small, after eating three or four, you can be sure you will be full and satisfied. Also make sure to try their deliciously crisp cheese fries, which are probably some of the best in New York City. — EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY

DEPUTY STAFF

university KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR city/state EMILY BELL,

ANDREW KARPAN books/theater OLIVIA GEORGE film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment ALEX GREENBERGER music ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE the highlighter blog SAM RULLO features HELEN HOLMES, JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU beauty & style MICHELLE LIM dining ANGEL CHANG sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia REBECCA CLEMENTI, JOON LEE

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

SAMEER JAYWANT deputy opinion editors

VIA YELP.COM

VIA FLICKR.COM

A NEW LOOK AT ANDY WARHOL On May 3, New Yorkers will have the chance to view a collection of recently unearthed photographs featuring Andy Warhol. Taken in 1981, the portraits will be displayed at the “Lost Then Found” exhibit at 345 Meatpacking, W. 14th Street. — THE HUFFINGTON POST

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, RAQUEL WOODRUFF

ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER

REBECCA RIBEIRO CIRCULATION MANAGER

CHLOE COFFMAN

UNIVERSITY SALES COORDINATOR

KAITLYN O’BRIEN

SNAPSHOT

UP IN ARMS ABOUT BRITTANY RESIDNECE HALL RENOVATION The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation is unhappy with NYU’s plans to revamp Brittany residence hall, located at 10th Street and Broadway. The building’s windows — installed during the original construction in 1929 — are “a small but important piece of the Village’s architectural heritage and character.” — CBS LOCAL

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

ELLEN MCQUEEN SALES ASSOCIATES

ARIANA DIVALENTINO, ALISON LIZZIO, SAM WANDER CIRCULATION ASSISTANT

BENJAMIN SWINEHART

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

KALEEL MUNROE

COOPER UNION DISCONTINUES FREE RIDES After nearly 100 years of granting students free tuition, the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art will now charge a minimum of $19,250 for undergraduates. — DNAINFO NEW YORK CITY HONORS NATIONAL PARK WEEK This week is the perfect chance to visit favorite nature spots in New York City because all National Park Service sites are open for free. Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty remain closed due to damage from Hurricane Sandy. — THE NEW YORK TIMES

Michael Fitzpartick, lead singer of Fitz and the Tantrums, belts out some of the band’s hits during their concert at Webster Hall.

PHOTO BY ELECTRA COLEVAS

MTA TO EXPAND CELL SERVICE The MTA promises Wi-Fi and cell service in 30 more Manhattan stations, allowing subway riders to send emails and text messages underground. — NY1

GOT AN EVENT? EMAIL US AT AGENDA@NYUNEWS.COM OR TWEET US @NYUNEWS. GOT SOMETHING TO SHARE? EMAIL US AT TIPS@NYUNEWS.COM.

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY EDITORIAL ADVISER

KEITH LEIGHTY EDITORS-AT-LARGE

MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Amy Zhang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

NYUNEWS.COM


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

Residence halls compete to reduce energy consumption By NEELA QADIR

The NYU community had an energy-saving start to Earth Week with the annual event NYUnplugged, a competition among residence halls to reduce electricity use. NYUnplugged, which ran from April 15 to 22, resulted in community-wide savings of 35,195 kilowatt hours. Carlyle Court residence hall took the top spot with a 35 percent reduction in electricity use. Started in 2008, the competition allows students to take a proactive stance on environmental issues and is a part of the university’s efforts to reach its goal of a 50 percent reduction of greenhouse gases by 2017. “NYUnplugged is meant not only as a competition to reduce energy consumption among the residence halls, but it also serves as an educational campaign on energy reduction for all NYU students living on campus,” said Christopher James, account executive of public affairs. This year’s competition focused on vampire power — electricity that is used when appliances or electronics are powered off but still using energy. “Unplugged is a great opportunity to engage students about the various issues surrounding energy consumption in the United States,” said Thomas Boman, Wagner Environmental Policy and Action president. “Energy, especially electricity, is so pervasive in our society that usually we forget we’re even using it.” Coral Towers residence hall placed secTOP 3 RESIDENCE HALLS 35% REDUCTION Carlyle Court 20.9%

Coral Towers 11.8% Greenwich Hotel

ond with a reduction of 20.9 percent, and Greenwich Hotel residence hall came in third with an 11.8 percent decrease. Steve To, Greenwich Hotel’s assistance director, said the residence hall enforced measures so students became more engaged with sustainability efforts. “I think it took the students by surprise when they noticed the lights dimmed for a week, and it made them ask questions, which we believe to be the starting point of this type of education,” To said. By cutting down on energy use there could also be an economic benefit. “It’s a lot cheaper for us to prevent environmental degradation than to remediate it, and everyone enjoys a lower utility bill,” Boman said. Environmental studies professor Julianne Warren said that although reducing energy consumption is needed and NYUnplugged allows students to participate, new tactics are important to promote global climate justice. “We also need to get our university to participate in a growing national movement of divestment from the fossil fuel industry,” she said. Most dorms cut their energy use, but some showed an increase. Weinstein, Second Street, University Hall and Seventh Street residence halls all used more electricity during NYUnplugged. Neela Qadir is a deputy university editor. Email her at nqadir@nyunews.com.

BOTTOM 3 RESIDENCE HALLS 0.6% Second Street

By HANQING CHEN

David Boies, renowned attorney associated with the Proposition 8 case, has been confirmed as NYU’s 2013 commencement speaker, according to a press release from the university. Boies will receive a Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, degree at the ceremony. He will be one of four recipients of the honorary degrees. Boies, who graduated from the School of Law in 1967, led counsel in Perry v. Brown, the historic same-sex marriage civil rights case currently before the Supreme Court. The case contests Proposition 8, which restricts same-sex marriage in California. NYU alumna Edith Windsor, a central figure in the case against the federal Defense of Marriage Act, will also be honored with the NYU Presidential Medal. “I think it is particularly noteworthy that our commencement stage will have major actors from both of the same-sex marriage cases before the Supreme Court,” said NYU President John Sexton. Steinhardt senior Chelsea Garbell has been selected as the student commencement speaker. “Each year, our honorees are selected not only for their own achievements, but for the example they set for our graduates as they leave our university and go forth to have an impact on the world,” Sexton said. “NYU is proud to honor this group of accomplished men and women, who have had so many successes in so many arenas, at our All-University commencement.”

College of Nursing alumna Kimberly Glassman will receive the Lewis Rudin Award for Exemplary Service to New York City. “I also want to take special note of this year’s Rudin Award winner, Kimberly Glassman, a nursing alum who will receive the Rudin Award on behalf of all the brave, heroic NYU nurses who did so much to safeguard patients’ lives during the evacuation of the NYU Langone Medical Center during Hurricane Sandy,” Sexton said. Hanqing Chen is web managing editor. Email her at hchen@nyunews.com.

VIA WIKIPEDIA.ORG

David Boies graduated from the NYU School of Law in 1967.

As local record stores close, some find solution in selling diversified products

INCREASE

Seventh Street

NYU Unplugged: Seventeen NYU halls reduced electricity consumption in a weeklong competition (measured in kWh). GRAPHIC BY RACHEL PHAM/WSN

NYUnplugged pits residence halls against each other in a conservation contest. GUNS continued from PG. 1

CAS junior charged with selling air rifles

tin said. “They were ‘airsoft’ guns, which shoot small, plastic, BB-like pellets.” NYU spokesman Philip Lentz said Goal is subject to the Student Conduct Policy and Process Handbook, which specifically prohibits the commercial sale of products, services or tickets in the residence hall. “Everyone should understand that, under the University Policy on Student Conduct and the University Policy on Weapons, neither real firearms nor replica guns are permitted at the university,” Martin explained in the email to Lafayette residents. But many students in Lafayette said they didn’t know much about Goal or that he was arrested Monday night before they received Martin’s email. Even Goal’s suitemate Maxwell Per-

Prop. 8 lawyer David Boies to speak at commencement

RECORDS continued from PG. 1

1.7% University Hall 7.7%

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kins, a second-year Tisch dance major, said he had no knowledge of any strange behavior. He said he was as surprised as other members in the building. “When I came home, all the doors were open, and there were police officers both from NYU and NYPD in my room,” Perkins said. Steinhardt junior Ryan McTernan, who also lives on the 17th floor of Lafayette, said he never noticed anything suspicious or strange about Goal, either. “I hung out with him a few times,” McTernan said. “He’s just another guy on the floor.” Additional reporting by Emily Bell. Nicole Brown is investigative editor. Amy Zhang is managing editor. Email them at university@nyunews.com.

“I see these new services not as the death of the music industry but a technological renaissance,” CAS freshman Mike Cziner said. “I hope that records and CDs will still be manufactured, but I wouldn’t mind ordering them online.” Jason P., a clerk at Generation Records on Thompson Street, said he thought rising rent prices had more to do with the closing of Bleecker Bob’s than any perceived decline in the record store business. “It’s very expensive to be in this neighborhood right now, and they couldn’t keep up with it,” he said. “A lot of record stores are opening in Brooklyn, which I think is a sign that it has more to do with location than the business itself.” For some, like Gallatin freshman Jake Strauss, the loss of local record stores is symptomatic of the ongoing homogenization of New York. “I think this is representative of the city selling itself out to businesses that will bring in higher profits, increased land values and a safe, clean and neutral atmosphere that will raise more tax revenue,” Strauss said. As CEO of Forever Yogurt, a Chicago-based frozen yogurt company which will occupy the space where Bleecker Bob’s once stood, Mandy Calara rejected the accusation of homogenization. But he did not deny that money plays an important role in the city’s real estate culture.

“I appreciate the efforts of neighborhoods to preserve landmarks,” Calara said. “But sometimes landlords want to maximize rents.” Record stores like Other Music and Generation Records are broadening their product base to remain profitable. “We have bands playing, and we sell T-shirts and posters,” Jason P. said. “You need to have more variety and offer a little more than just records. We have an eBay store, too.” And even in an era of online music, McDevitt said she was not surprised young people still shop at record stores. “The human condition makes us want to interact with each other, and music is one of the few universal truths that transcends age, gender and race,” McDevitt said. “They lack the nostalgia factor, but young people are there because they want to interact with other humans about music, just like we always have.” Celentano said interaction is the reason record shops might be able to coexist with online retailers. “I have accounts with iTunes, Rdio and Pandora,” he said. “But there is something I get out of going to an indie record store that cannot be matched online. For me, there is an excitement of being in a real store, seeing what’s new, rediscovering what’s old.” Billy Richling is a staff writer. Email him at cstate@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ARTS PRICE continued from PG. 1

Quaid, Efron shine in morally ambiguous ‘Price’ when the family’s troubles become his reality. He recognizes his character’s twodimensionality and brings emotional depth to a role that would have been flat without this duality. Efron creates a connection between the audience and his character that makes viewers feel for him even when he does not deserve our sympathy. Although the film has its melodramatic moments, “Price” has a thoughtful script by Ramin Bahrani, and viewers become emotionally invested. It’s a story about real, workingclass people and the struggles they go through, which can be difficult to find among the superhero and adventure movies that are popular today. The film focuses on family issues ranging from tension between members of the family, such as father and son, romantic relationship issues and even situations beyond the characters’ con-

trol. The mix of these issues actually works for the film, which, instead of being a jumbled mess, succeeds due to the excellent writing. The film’s main theme is morality, and while there is a resolution at the end, it’s not a happy resolution in a traditional sense. The morals that our society holds in the highest regard are completely forgotten here, as justice is not given to the lawful. Even the audience will be fooled by this morally wrong conclusion because of the restored sense of happiness and order at the end of the film. “At Any Price” brilliantly portrays the lengths people will go to for family, and despite the shocking ending — that might not necessarily be the most appropriate conclusion — the film still manages to capture the audience’s attention and hearts. Laura Wolford is a staff writer. Email her at film@nyunews.com.

Big-budget shows make financial, artistic ambitions competitive By ALEX MUJICA

With an average budget of $6 million per episode, “Game of Thrones” is HBO’s most expensive show. And although there is no data available for “Mad Men,” AMC has been known to pour money into the show. These high budgets allow “Thrones” and “Mad Men” to enjoy critical success and maintain a steady audience. The more popular a show, the more a network is willing to increase that show’s budget. However, when the budget for one show increases, it negatively affects the budgets of other shows on that same network. With this in mind, one might wonder if shows with such big budgets should even exist. It is easy to understand why networks favor their highestrated shows, considering the more viewers they have, the more money they can charge advertising companies to air their products during commercials. Considering the ratings of these shows, surely fans will appreciate an improvement in visual quality for their favorites — a likely out-

come of raising a show’s budget. Ratings, however, don’t always represent the quality of a show, and while both “Thrones” and “Mad Men” have won their fair share of awards, they aren’t the only critically acclaimed shows on their networks. For instance, many critics and loyal fans will agree that “Breaking Bad” is a strong show. But because it has received about half the ratings “Mad Men” has for most of its run, “Breaking Bad” has suffered significant budget cuts. In 2011, these cuts nearly caused Sony Television, the studio behind “Breaking Bad,” to drop AMC and look for another network. In a recent interview on Howard Stern’s radio show, actor Bryan Cranston, who plays Walter White on “Breaking Bad,” admitted he is not paid much on the show, and that the only reason he is able to work on it without financial worry is because of past success. It is definitely a bit disturbing to know that an actor who has won three Emmy Awards isn’t being compensated the way he should be.

This summer, “Breaking Bad” will finish its fifth and final season. Although Vince Gilligan, the show’s creator, is more than pleased with his series ending, he does acknowledge that television is a business and needs to make money. Many fans feel that AMC is a little too eager to rush the critically acclaimed ­— though not particularly highly rated — show off the air. While it seems unfair that shows suffer setbacks when a more popular program receives a higher budget, competition is the nature of television. Even if their shows do not all have equally high ratings, networks should be more conscientious when distributing their budgets. While television is indeed a business, and it is important to compensate shows with high ratings. Networks also have the responsibility to uphold the integrity of the art of television — giving audiences the quality they deserve, not just making a profit. Alex Mujica is a staff writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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EDITED BY JOSH JOHNSON ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Despite flaws, bold ‘Reluctant’ invokes important conversations By DAVID LEIDY

Mira Nair’s latest film, “The Reluctant Fundamentalist,” based on the book with the same title by Mohsin Hamid, is a political thriller that takes a piece of history, blends it with fiction and views it from a unique perspective. Unlike more commercially marketed and bigbudget movies like “Argo,” this film attempts to take a more universal outlook on U.S.-Middle Eastern relations. As exciting as the idea sounds, “Reluctant” falls short of reaching its mark. The story centers on a young, intelligent Pakistani college professor named Changez (Riz Ahmed), who teaches in the city of Lahore, Pakistan. The CIA suspects Changez of being involved with the abduction of an American colleague. While the investigation is underway, Changez reminisces about his time working at a consultancy firm after graduating from Princeton University. At the firm, he was taken under the wing of his boss Jim (Kiefer Sutherland) and falls in love with an American photographer, Erica (Kate Hudson). It is only when the effects of a post9/11 world hit New York that Changez’s positive outlook on the United States and his prosperity begin to fade. Nair finds some brief moments of poignancy in elements like Changez’s radical yet understandable viewpoints and his dysfunctional romance with Erica. These moments are lost, however, in what often turns into political preaching and emotional manipulation through boister-

ous scores and hyperbolic dialogue, which makes the more profound, authentic moments harder to appreciate. It is also refreshing to see a Middle Eastern character as a likeable protagonist, working as a strong leader in the United States. But, as the plot progresses, the film expects us to love him one minute and hate him the next, all in such a short period of time that it alienates the viewer. While Nair’s strategy is justifiable, the film has a difficult time translating the original novel’s bigger philosophical ideas to the screen — all while maintaining its emotional vigor. “Reluctant” would have benefitted greatly if Nair had honed in on a particular genre. Overall, the film tries to take on too many facets and feels just as lost and reluctant as Changez. Despite its major issues, there

are moments when the film shines with onscreen verisimilitude, thought-provoking elements and engaging cinematography. Ahmed shows great potential as a future talent, and Sutherland, with the exception of some weak dialogue, steals the show every time he is present. Ahmed plays a believably conflicted character, but much of his performance is drowned in a fundamentally flawed screenplay. The film’s ideas have the potential to strike up a lot of conversation based on their controversial, sympathetic outlook on anti-American, Middle Eastern attitudes. It would be great to see this explored again in the future but hopefully with a better execution and script. David Leidy is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF CINE MOSAIC

Kiefer Sutherland advises Riz Ahmed about business in America.

Richie Havens leaves distinguished legacy By JOSH JOHNSON

On Monday, folk legend Richie Havens died of a heart attack in his New Jersey home. He was 72 years old. Havens was best known as Woodstock’s opening act. As the very first musician to play in the legendary 1969 festival, which included acts like Jimi Hendrix, The Who and Janis Joplin, Havens set the tone for what became one of the most significant moments in American music history. Although a staple of the ’60s Greenwich Village folk scene, it wasn’t until after his set at Woodstock that Havens gained national attention. He earned his acclaim the old-fashioned way: with a mind-blowing rock show. With a sweat-stained back and a furious strumming style, Havens banged out hours of material, including an improvised version of the spiritual “Motherless Child,” which would later become known as “Freedom.” Along with Hendrix’s brilliant instrumental version of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” “Freedom” impeccably captured the spirit of not only a festival but also of an entire nation. In addition to his prolific catalog of original content, Havens was also known for his soulful covers, specifically of The Beatles and Bob Dylan. In fact, his cover of “Here Comes the Sun” was one of his biggest hits. Performers like The Beatles and Dylan are often viewed as untouchable, but Havens’ heartfelt vocals always had a way of breathing new life into

Lauper, Fierstein bring ‘Boots’ to Broadway By DYLAN JARRETT

The curtain rises on a small British shoemaking factory filled with workers happily singing about “the most beautiful thing in the world” — shoes. A bit of skepticism is probably not uncalled for. Unless you’re a Prada enthusiast, shoes may seem like a dull subject for a musical. But as the audience soon finds out, this will not be a musical about just any shoes. This will be a musical — and a lively, energetic and enjoyable one at that — about “Kinky Boots.” With music and lyrics by ’80s pop star Cyndi Lauper and a book by Broadway favorite Harvey Fierstein, “Boots,” based on the movie of the same name, is about Charlie (Stark Sands), a young man forced to take over the family shoemaking business after his father’s unexpected death. Charlie finds the business in serious financial trouble. After literally running into

Lola (Billy Porter), a loud and feisty drag queen, Charlie decides to make a new kind of shoe for a new demographic — women’s shoes that can comfortably fit and support grown men. He and Lola rally the workers in preparation for fashion week in Milan, Italy. Does it sound silly? Absolutely. But with a team like Lauper and Fierstein, that should be expected and embraced. At the sole, pun intended, of this musical is an incredibly touching story about family, love and acceptance. Lauper’s music is equal parts catchy and inspiring — for each up-tempo dance number, the best of which is the act one finale “Everybody Say Yeah,” there is a similarly impressive ballad. With direction and choreography by Jerry Mitchell, the story and the cast are in good hands. The cast of “Boots” is led by the wonderful Stark Sands as the confused and yearning Charlie.

His voice is perhaps best suited to Lauper’s pop-rock style. Billy Porter is dazzling as Lola — he can move the audience to tears of laughter just as quickly as to tears of sorrow. Annaleigh Ashford, who is bright and invigorating as always, plays Charlie’s love interest, Lauren, the girl who acts as his main motivation throughout the show. Despite a small role, her sudden realization of her love for Charlie, “The History of Wrong Guys,” is hysterical. These three front the ensemble of blue-collar workers and drag queens that makes up the heart of the musical. Underneath the feathers and glitter, of which there is plenty, “Kinky Boots” is ultimately about acceptance — of your friends, your family and even people you hardly know. It shows us how we should treat one another, even as it remains a fun and exciting show that reminds us if we accept others for who they are and they

do the same for us, the world will be a better, happier place. “Kinky Boots” is now playing at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre. Dylan Jarrett is a staff writer. Email her at theater@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF MATTHEW MURPHY

Stark Sands stars in a charming adaptation of “Kinky Boots.”

VIA WIKIPEDIA.ORG

Havens (1941-2013) was a force in the ’60s folk scene. their songs. Havens’ affiliation with Dylan grew stronger when he appeared in the film “I’m Not There,” Todd Haynes’ sprawling Dylan biopic. In a scene with child actor Marcus Carl Franklin, he performed a hard-hitting cover of “Tombstone Blues” that proved to be one of the film’s highlights. Havens’ world-worn voice provided a perfect balance to Franklin’s childish confidence. It’s fitting — or as fitting as a man’s untimely death can be — that Havens died on Earth Day, since his smoky vocals often felt like the voice of our planet. Gruff and authoritative yet gentle and reassuring, his voice brought to life a father figure for an entire generation of music lovers. Josh Johnson is arts editor. Email him at jjohnson@nyunews.com.

THE ARTS PODCAST While WSN’s Arts team has already expanded to a dedicated blog, the desk is making its first transition into multimedia with the Arts Podcast. Every week, members of the desk will discuss the most important events in the worlds of film, music, television, games and more. For the first episode, film editor Jeremy Grossman leads a panel of his writers through a discussion of some of their favorite films from the Tribeca Film Festival. Go to nyunews.com to listen to the podcast, or search Washington Square News on iTunes to download, rate and subscribe to the podcast.


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I C E N W T

P L R E E E L A B E E G L Y

33 Softens, as 

tone

59 Way to get from 

point A to point  B hair 60 Tea brand  owned by  36 Dove soap  Starbucks shape 37 Bandleader Kay 61 Mess around  (with) 38 Foreign Legion  62 Super Bowl  hat played in 2005 39 Pince-___ 63 Picnic side dish 40 Harsh cries 41 Add to a film,  Down as music   1 Skater Starbuck 42 Women with    2 Breakfast  esposos restaurant  44 Lee Ann who  chain sang “I Hope    3 Mislay You Dance” 45 Likely to break    4 One to speak  of? out into fighting   5 Creates, as  46 Half of dix havoc 47 Rihanna’s    6 Pends record label   7 Bone: Prefix 50 Yellow blooms   8 Printer tray  54 Sch. that  size: Abbr. publishes the  Daily Bruin   9 Stops for a  while in the  55 Draw ___ on  course of a  (aim at) journey 57 Having a tiff 10 Many a  58 Looney Tunes  commuter’s  animator ___  home Freleng 11 Morales of  “Jericho” TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 12 N.F.L. divs. B I D T A G N O B 13 Cummerbund,  e.g. A S I E V E E A U R D I N N E R H S T 21 Banana waste B A N A E S P R I T 23 “Jeopardy!”  response: Abbr. R Y H E N H O U S E 25 Clotho and  A S P D O W N sisters P H E W I T C H Y 26 ___ lady  (doorbell ringer) P A R T Y O N A A A H A C N E E N C L 27 “What ___?” A S S N U T C A K E 28 Goggle-eyed 29 Zodiac borders N T E A V I O L T E M A R M Z A X 30 Amorphous  creature O F F I C E B L O C K M A R G E E E N I E 31 Debate basis S N O O D R E E D S 33 Sinatra  standard

  1 Leave at the  altar   5 “___ Stop the  Rain” (1970  hit) 10 “II” movies:  Abbr. 14 “Whoops!” 15 Ganja smoker 16 Arthur Ashe  Kids’  Day org. 17 Canseco who  wrote “Juiced” 18 Sweepstakes  mail-in 19 Twix units 20 Paper view? 22 Step on, as a  bug 24 Fun house cries 25 Minimum  number of  times each  letter of the  alphabet  appears in  this puzzle’s  solution 26 Tequila sources 29 Upside-downsleeping  mammal 32 Candlelight  event, perhaps

34 Hard-to-comb 

Edited by Will Shortz 1

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No. 0320

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puzzle by raymond c. young

35 Birth 

announcement  color 37 He wrote  “Capital is dead  labor” 38 Orange fruits 40 Postureimproving  exercises 41 Rum named  for a Spanish  literary hero

43 Genre 

pioneered by  Miles Davis 44 Popular glass  cleaner 46 Cousin of a  raccoon 47 Keister 48 Pantyhose  shade 49 Move like a  hummingbird

50 ___ d’esprit 

(witticisms)

51 Slanty type: 

Abbr.

52 Co-star of Joel 

in “Cabaret”

53 Pack in the 

overhead bin,  say

56 Be a pugilist

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY SAMEER JAYWANT OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

China must take stance against North Korea By RAQUEL WOODRUFF

China’s top general Fang Fenghui said on Monday that a fourth North Korean nuclear weapons test is feasible, and that talks are underway between Pyongyang and other regional parties. Since North Korea recently renounced the 1953 Armistice Agreement with South Korea and shut down its Kaesong factories, a joint-industrial complex employing both South and North Korean workers, the United States has been on its toes trying to ensure stabilization in Asia. But, unfortunately, a diplomatic plea to North Korea to stop its nuclear weapons program is not going to cut it. China, North Korea’s most important ally, is the main player in easing tensions in East Asia. It is a 9.6 million square kilometer-buffer between North Korea and the United States. Yet, despite its tremendous influence over North Korea, China’s reaction to its neighbor’s threats has been relatively relaxed. When Secretary of State John Kerry visited Beijing, he urged China to put more pressure on North Korea. All Beijing has done is sign tougher U.N. sanctions — a move that sends a message to North Korea but only hurts the poor and does not affect the people in power.

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un remains untested, and it’s time his provocations are met with more than just a slap on the wrist. Throughout history, China has been the largest support system for the North Korean regime. North Korea would be committing political suicide if it made decisions that would encourage China to cut them off from its economy. In addition, China has not only one of the world’s largest nuclear arsenals but also the world’s largest military, so there should be no question among North Korean leaders about the devastating consequences of losing China’s support. Yet here we are. North Korea threatens another nuclear test, and Fang still refuses to state whether China will adopt tougher measures against North Korea

in order to mitigate hostility across the Pacific. South Korea and Japan are considering upping their defense, and the United States and South Korea have already organized joint military exercises in the region, with the United States sending B-2 stealth bombers and F-22 fighter jets to send a message to North Korea. The United States is even trying to deter North Korea from obtaining the $4 billion stored overseas by Kim Jong-un’s father, Kim Jong-il. Diplomacy is always Plan A, but alarming instability in East Asia and strong North Korean resistance pose a unique situation for the United States. Military intervention is always on the table, but after fighting two wars over two decades, there is no appetite for more debt, death and destruction. This is why we need China. China needs to take a hard-lined, militaristic stance against North Korean aggression. Without a tougher effort from Beijing, North Korea will continue to undercut the international community, and the United States may be forced to move on to Plan B. Raquel Woodruff is a deputy opinion editor. Email her at rwoodruff@nyunews.com.

WORLD HEALTH

Gov’t must allow NGOs to operate freely By CARLOS ESTEVEZ

This Monday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society. This case involves the Leadership Act, which was passed by Congress in 2003 to allocate billions of dollars toward the eradication of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other diseases. While this legislation marked a decisive step in the global fight against HIV/AIDS, it also required organizations that receive U.S. government funding to include an explicit message against prostitution in their missions. The Alliance for Open Society International, a New York-based nongovernmental organization, conducts global education and health campaigns aimed at eradicating HIV/AIDS. They operate in multiple countries, tailoring their approach to local cultures. Due to the Leadership Act, the NGO would have to either give up government funding or change its official mission due to its neutrality regarding prostitution. The reduced income would deal a big blow to the efficacy and reach of the nonprofit organization’s campaigns. At the court hearing on Monday, the justices seemed divided over the issue,

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asking challenging questions of both sides. The government argued that it does not force any organization to change its message — it simply uses the inclusion of an anti-prostitution clause as a factor when deciding with whom to work. Congress adamantly espouses the view that eliminating prostitution presents the best method of handling HIV/AIDS, which precludes them from funding an organization that thinks and acts otherwise. If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the government, it would allow Congress to compel an organization to follow the government’s desired opinion. The organization has already agreed not to use U.S. government funds for activities related to prostitution. Openly opposing prostitution would severely cripple the organization’s reach by

alienating those most at risk from HIV/AIDS and complicating their relationship to countries that have a different stance on prostitution. In the 1991 Rust v. Sullivan case, the Supreme Court established that Congress, under the pretense of public interest, could create federal programs with set goals and selectively fund organizations that pursue those aims. This avoids discriminating between differing viewpoints and transgressing the First Amendment. In the case of AID v. Alliance for Open Society, the government has gone beyond the point of selective funding and seeks to regulate a private organization’s freedom of speech. Both the NGO and the Leadership Act share the same goal of eradicating HIV/AIDS and other diseases but differ on what the best way to achieve that result. Instead of assessing the organization in terms of its effectiveness, the government may deny funding for the NGO due to its neutrality on prostitution. This reveals an underlying stigma in the U.S. Congress against prostitution, which in this case, seems to trump their official goal of fighting HIV/AIDS. Carlos Estevez is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Brand name graduation speaker is not necessary

NYU announced today that David Boies will be speaking at the commencement ceremony at Yankee Stadium on May 22. Although Boies is incredibly successful in his field, there are conflicting opinions about the university’s decision to have him deliver this year’s commencement speech. The first thing most NYU students are probably saying is, “Who is that?” Past commencement speakers have included high-profile leaders such as former president Bill Clinton, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and cultural icons such as Alec Baldwin. However, it seems that unless you are well-versed in legal history and current events, it is unlikely that you know much about Boies. Perhaps someone more conspicuously famous could have been chosen. However, we don’t simply invite people to speak because they are well-known — if that were true, the administration could have invited Ke$ha. The fact is, Boies is more than qualified to speak at our commencement. He has a formidable legal record, having led the counsel in Hollingsworth v. Perry, the historic same-sex marriage civil rights case currently before the Supreme Court. The famous case contests Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriage in California. Moreover, Boies is one of our own, coming from none other than than the School of Law, currently ranked sixth in the nation. And despite the fact that college students in their early 20s may not be acutely aware of who Boies is, he is very influential — in 2000, Boies was named Time Magazine’s runner-up for person of the year, second only to former president George W. Bush. Thus, although we have become accustomed to expecting big names, the content of the speech should be the most important aspect of the selection process. A commencement speaker should provide words of encouragement and advice to the world’s next active citizens and community leaders. The Editorial Board believes Boies is a fitting choice for the commencement address, and we hope that the senior class will benefit from his wisdom.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Sameer Jaywant (Chair), Raquel Woodruff (Co–Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co–Chair), Nickhil Sethi, Matt Luo, Nina Golshan, Ian Mark, Jess Littman, Marcelo Cicconet

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

DINING

5

P TO

EDITED BY ANGEL CHANG DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

Best banh mi sandwich shops in Manhattan

BANH MI ZON I 443 E. SIXTH ST. Zon, which means crispy and delicious in Vietnamese, is the perfect description for this East Village sandwich shop. Their signature zon sandwich ($6.50) is filled with a combination of pâté, Vietnamese ham, head cheese and shredded pork floss. The savory meats and fresh vegetables combined with the lightness of the French baguette will leave you satisfied but never overstuffed. For a heartier meal, consider trying their new banh mi bo ca ri ($7.50), which is filled with coconut-curry beef and fried shallots. SAIGON VIETNAMESE SANDWICH DELI I 369 BROOME ST. A little taste of Saigon can be found at this deli tucked away in Little Italy. More takeout than sit-down, Saigon Deli is great for grabbing a quick bite between classes — that is, if you can quickly choose between their 17 different banh mi options. From sardines to grilled minced pork, you

can satisfy any craving for just $3.50. Even vegans and vegetarians have a range of options, including the vegan chicken with lemongrass ($4.25). CO BA I 110 NINTH AVE. Although the restaurant was inspired by market food stands in Vietnam, Co Ba offers a casual and intimate setting perfect for dining. Consider indulging in a serving of caramelized pork belly braised in coconut juice and pickled bean sprouts on their banh mi thit kho ($8.50). Their vegetarian banh mi chay ($9) is another crowd-pleaser, with its sweet soy lemongrass tofu, shitake mushrooms, onions and housemade pickles. When you stop by during lunch, you can complete your meal with a cup of soup or a mixed green salad for just $2 more. BOI NOODLES I 240 W. 40TH ST. Although Boi is best known for their pho noodles, they offer several delicious yet unconventional banh mi options. Their signature sandwich is piled high with bar-

By DEBORAH LUBANGA Banh mi is a delicious fusion of Asian and European cuisines. These Vietnamese sandwiches are filled with meat and wrapped in crispy baguettes, reflecting French influences in former Indochina. Served with cucumbers, cilantro, pickled carrots, daikon, mayo and spicy chili sauce, these savory sandwiches have been gaining popularity beyond the unofficial borders of Chinatown. So take this opportunity to sample some of the best banh mi restaurants around the city.

becue pork ($7.81), adding an American spin to this traditional Vietnamese dish. Seafood lovers will be pleased with their hoisin and garlic shrimp cake ($7.81) or the coconut-curried basa fish fillet ($7.81) options. All this comes served on your choice of a baguette or low-carb wrap. SAIGON SHACK I 114 MACDOUGAL ST. Transport your taste buds to southern Vietnam at this hidden gem near Washington Square Park. The baguettes, soft on the inside and crispy on the outside, are good enough to eat by themselves. When choosing your fillings, play it safe with the classic Vietnamese ham, bacon and pâté ($5) or be adventurous and sample their catfish option ($7). Feel free to customize your banh mi further by adding an egg ($1). Saigon Shack also has weekly specials, such as the crab cake banh mi ($9), so you have the perfect excuse to go back for more. Deborah Lubanga is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

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5 VIA YELP.COM

Burger Joint serves simple, fresh food at Greenwich Village location By DANIEL YEOM

Midtown’s legendary Burger Joint, whose cheeseburger was recently named Most Awesome Hamburger in New York City in the final round of Eater NY’s Ultimate Burger Bracket, opened its second New York location in Greenwich Village earlier this month. Ever since opening its doors 10 years ago, Burger Joint has successfully combined low prices with quality burgers. Its Midtown shop, located in the lobby of Le Parker Meridien hotel, has garnered an incredible reputation for serving one of the best burgers in Manhattan — lines out the door serve as proof — and inspired world-class chef Danny Meyer to open Shake Shack. Although the franchise had been reluctant to expand in the past, Burger Joint recently opened a store in Seoul, South Korea, and is actively planning to open another in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. “We decided to open our second U.S. store in downtown New York because we thought the atmosphere of the neighborhood fits perfectly with our company’s vibe,” said Marisa Zafran, director of public relations and marketing at the Jack Parker Corporation, which oversees op-

erations at Burger Joint. Burger Joint at Eighth Street differs from its Midtown location. The dimly lit restaurant is not only three times bigger than the original but will also be equipped with a full bar as soon as it acquires a liquor license. The dedication to making delicious, fresh burgers, however, remains intact. “We have our own butchers in our stores,” Zafran said. “They grind up quality meat and make fresh patties for us.” To bring out the full flavor of fresh beef, Burger Joint not only refuses to use any seasoning but also incorporates a golden ratio of beef — 20 percent fatty and 80 percent lean meat — in making its patties. Food served at Burger Joint is simple — no fuss, just burgers. Customers choose between the hamburger ($5.50) and cheeseburger ($6.50), with condiment options of lettuce, tomato, onion, sliced pickles, mustard, ketchup and mayonnaise. The addition of any other condiment may distract the flavor of the juicy beef. Instead, French fries ($2.75) are always a great accompaniment for the burger. Don’t forget to try Burger Joint’s milkshakes (vanilla or chocolate, $4.50). “We are eager to add the student population at NYU in our customer pool,” Zafran said.

Quality burgers on a college budget, in addition to proximity to campus, will surely make Burger Joint a student-favorite in no time. Steinhardt freshman Luis Jacome said he will be a regular at the newly opened restaurant. “Obviously the burger is really good,” Jacome said. “But the store is really spacious. I will be coming here with my friends a lot.” Burger Joint is located at 33 W. Eighth St. Daniel Yeom is a contributing writer. Email him at dining@nyunews.com.

DANIEL YEOM FOR WSN

Burger Joint serves a host of burgers, fries and shakes.


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