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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014

Friends reflect on Oliva

German art on display uptown

L. Jay Oliva, former NYU president, is remembered after his passing on April 17.

The Neue Galerie is hosting an exhibition of Nazi-era art until June 30.

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Track and field, golf impress over weekend Find out the results from the events and the golf team’s progress. STORY on PG. 8

Ally Week gives voice, support to immigrants By KRISTINE THOMASON

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The fourth annual Ally Week closed with “Undocu (stories),” a panel that shed light on issues undocumented students face.

Students and faculty gathered in the Kimmel Center for University Life’s Rosenthal Pavilion on April 18 for “Undocu (stories): A Call to Action” — the closing event of NYU’s fourth annual Ally Week. “Undocu (stories)” capped off a week filled with workshops and training sessions meant to deepen students’ understanding of societal injustices, as well as ways they can help advocate for marginalized groups. Assistant Director of NYU’s Center for Multicultural Education and Programs Selima Jumarali said she wanted this closing event to have a learning opportunity. “I think focusing on one lens of

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Student trades summer Graduate students research film job for volunteer gig By LORENA TAMEZ

By JULIANNE MCSHANE

When most of her peers will be leaving New York City or pursuing internships at the end of the semester, Stern freshman Abigail Donoghue will be departing on a threemonth cross-country bike ride. The ride will benefit Bike & Build, a non-profit organization that raises awareness for the affordable housing crisis in the United States. Donoghue plans to depart from Charleston, S.C., and reach Santa Cruz, Calif., on Aug. 11. She will be among 33 other cyclists between the ages of 18 and 28. Donoghue said that the cyclists will bike between 35 and 117

miles each day and will sleep in community centers, churches and other free spaces. The group will build houses with Habitat for Humanity and other local organizations for 17 days throughout the trip, including an eight-day stay in Colorado Springs, Colo., where they will build a house. Donoghue said she was initially unsure of how to spend her summer. She originally considered interning, but ultimately decided to volunteer while she still has the summers free. “I really wanted to do something that helped people, as well as teach

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The Tisch Graduate Film Program recently announced Forest Conner, Artel Great, Michelle Ow and Collin Whitlow as the 2014 fellows for the Cinema Research Institute, which will support their research on financing, producing, marketing and distributing films. “The fellowship is a great opportunity for people who want to think about independent film in a different way,” said Ow, whose project will focus on how movie ticket pricing affects different demand variables such as attendance and profit. “The motivation behind something like this is not just that you want to be nostalgic,” Ow added.

“[It] is that you want to be exploratory, you want to be curious about where the industry is going and what its future [is].” Great will explore the future outside of conventional Hollywood productions, focusing on the development of Project Catalyst, a distribution model that emphasizes the importance of multicultural films. “As a media scholar I have been studying that in the mainstream there had been more diversity, but somewhere along the way that changed,” Great said. “What happened to the personal stories, to the intimate stories that reflect true American life?” With Project Catalyst, Great hopes to recognize unheard stories and build community through

cinema and art to promote more diversity in media industries. Other fellows’ projects will examine the future of financing and marketing films. Whitlow’s project intends to create an index based on film financial returns to provide more transparency for prospective investors. “People tend to react negatively when you try to put math into art, but I think the opposite. I think film can only benefit from it,” Whitlow said. Whitlow’s goal is to increase investment in everything from small independent films to big blockbusters by providing a more securely calculated film performance.

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For me, experimenting drives creativity. Always paying attention to what other artists are doing, whether their works are past or current, helps formulate my own work. This set was influenced by Carrie Mae Weems’s work at the Guggenheim, which is still on exhibit. The hardest part was trying to get the lighting right, until I figured out that there’s nothing like duct tape and your iphone flashlight to help you. — LAWRENCE WU

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TODAY ON CAMPUS French Novels French novelists Jean Echenoz and Catherine Cusset will speak about their works in La Maison Francaise at 7 p.m. The event is in French.

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Neuroscience Head of NYU’s neuro-economics lab Paul Glimcher will speak today at 12:30 p.m. in room M4-60 of 44 W. 4th St. Glimcher will give advice to entrepreneurs in neuroscience research.

Women in Entrepreneurship

The colorful streets of Burano, Italy.

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A discussion about women entrepreneurs will take place at the Puck Building (295 Lafayette St.) at 6 p.m. It will feature five different speakers who have founded their own companies. Caroline Moss of the Business Insider will moderate. TODAY’S EVENTS ARE FREE FOR NYU STUDENTS.

GOT AN EVENT? EMAIL US AT AGENDA@NYUNEWS.COM OR TWEET US @NYUNEWS. GOT SOMETHING TO SHARE? EMAIL US AT TIPS@NYUNEWS.COM.

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About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Michael Domanico at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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THE GAZELLE: UNIVERSITY SENATE MOVES FOR NYUAD SEAT DESPITE GA CONCERNS Published on TheGazelle.org on April 19, 2014

By CONNOR PEARCE The NYU University Senate passed an amendment on April 17 that recommended the Board of Trustees create a senator’s position on the Student Senators Council for NYU Abu Dhabi. This comes following a motion on April 13 by the NYU Abu Dhabi General Assembly requesting the representative bodies in New York to hold off on proposing this amendment. The motion sent read: “The NYUAD Student Government formally requests that the NYUNY SSC does not vote on the enfranchisement of NYU Abu Dhabi through the Senatorial position until approval thereby into the NYUAD Student Constitution.” As a result of the motion, Student Government sent a communiqué to the chair of the Student Senators Council, Mariam Ehrari. Unaware that the amendment was to be voted on by the University

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The University Senate pushed for NYUAD represenation in New York. Senate, the GA drafted its message asking the SSC not to move on the amendment until the Abu Dhabi student body had time to deliberate. This amendment is part of an amendment package incorporating NYU Abu Dhabi, Shanghai and the Polytechnic School of Engineering with senatorial positions on the Student Senators Council. Following a discussion with Eh-

rari, Student Government President Mohammed Omar sent out an email announcing that the communiqué was not forwarded to the University Senate: “we decided it best not to release this statement to the University Senate.” Omar explained that because this statement would have preceded the final meeting of the University Senate in this academic

year, there was a possibility of jeopardizing the passage of the rest of the amendment package. News of Ehrari and Omar’s decision to not forward the communiqué was delivered via the above-mentioned email to active members of the GA on April 17, just under eight hours before the University Senate meeting began. Although this does not mean that NYUAD now has a representative on the Student Senators Council, the Board of Trustees acts upon recommendations from the University Senate and usually approves them. As to whether there is still any possibility of NYUAD not having a senator, senior and a current senator-at-large representing NYUAD Juan Felipe Beltran said, “That ship has sailed.”

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Twelve individuals are currently under isolation at an Abu Dhabi hospital for the Mers-Coronavirus infection, a viral respiratory illness. Three people will soon be released after testing negative. — GULF NEWS SYDNEY

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Ally Week closes with focus on undocumented students

allyship was the perfect close, so people who didn’t know about undocumented issues could come to learn,” Jumarali said. The event began with a student-produced film about allyship and an address from NYU President John Sexton. Later, student activists for undocumented students, including Neriel David Ponce, Angy Rivera and Francisco Gutierrez, spoke in a discussion moderated by NYU DREAM Team member Mark Putterman and co-founder Maria Monica Andia. The students educated the audience about the difficulties undocumented individuals face in a discussion. “When I was growing up, my mother never wanted us to go into the DMV or any government building,” Rivera said. “You just always live in fear of deportation.” Gutierrez said many undocumented people who are also queer frequently live in fear that they will be sent back to a country where their sexual orientation means prosecution. Each panel member has actively worked to eradicate these fears by advocating for healthcare and financial aid for undocumented individuals. NYU’s DREAM Team has similar goals. Founded in 2011, the DREAM Team aims to call attention to challenges undocumented students face. Right now their biggest focus is asking NYU to provide financial aid to undocumented students. This was the first year that the DREAM Team’s initiative was incorporated into NYU’s Ally Week.

“We’re really happy to be included and its great that conversations about allyship are becoming more inclusive of different communities,” Putterman said. The DREAM Team also helped organize DREAM Zone, an interactive training session that aims to explore issues surrounding the undocumented community. This training follows in suit with the other NYU “Zone Trainings” featured during ally week: Safe Zone, Diversity Zone, Faith Zone, and Action Zone. These workshops focus on teaching students about the issues that affect certain marginalized groups and on how they can help. “The Zone trainings are really our staple programming during Ally Week,” Director of NYU’s LGBTQ Student Center Celiany Rivera-Velázquez said. “Because in order to be an ally, you need to know how to be an ally.” Rivera-Velázquez explained that Ally Week was created four years ago with the goal to give students the resources and education to enter allyship as well as rejuvenate people who have been working to be an ally for a long time. Jumarali encourages students to come to these centers, step out of their comfort zones, expose themselves to different cultures and communities and help student centers like CMEP and the LGBTQ student center create a better platform to assist more students in becoming allies. Kristina Thomason is a contributing writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.

President before Sexton leaves legacy By KAVISH HARJAI

L. Jay Oliva, 14th president of NYU, played an integral role in developing the NYU community by encouraging school spirit and introducing the Martin Luther King Scholars Program. He passed away on April 17 at the age of 80 due to undisclosed causes. Martin Lipton, the chair of the Board of Trustees, sent a university-wide email the day of his passing. Oliva joined the NYU community in 1960 as a Russian history professor, teaching classes such as Topics in the History of the Russian Empire. Along with his academic position at the university, Oliva served various administrative positions including vice president for Academic Affairs and provost. He became chancellor in 1983. Oliva served as president before John Sexton from 1991-2002. His legacy includes co-founding the George H. Heyman Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising. Oliva helped form the UAA, and he led NYU’s first $1 billion fund-raising campaign. He also served as the executive producer and chair of the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts and integrated NYU Florence into the university’s global network. Patricia Carey, associate dean for Student Affairs, said she thanks Oliva for his innovation. “Part of [his] legacy is having furthered the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by establishing in 1987 the all-University Martin Luther King Jr. Scholars Program,” Carey said. “On behalf of the inaugural class of 16

Chinese intelligence officials revealed that they are building a complex network of spies at institutions of higher learning to keep watch on Chinese students studying abroad in Sydney. Sydney University has 90,000 students from mainland China. — THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD TEL AVIV

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The NYU community remembers L. Jay Oliva’s contributions. MLK Scholars and the now over 600 who have followed, thank you for your vision, thank you for your leadership.” The MLK Scholars Program was developed to celebrate students of various ethnic backgrounds who have proven to further the values of King. Marc Sully, an NYU alumnus who graduated in 1989, said Oliva helped create a sense of spirit around campus. “He used to say that when he first visited Coles, students would be wearing gray athletic t-shirts from different schools: Stanford, Pennsylvania, Wake Forest, etc.,” Sully said. “By the time his presidency was finished, Dr. Oliva could look around Coles and around the Village to see students proudly wearing NYU.” Kavish Harjai is a news editor. Email him at kharjai@nyunews.com.

A carousel broke down in a Tel Aviv amusement park called Luna Park. Twenty-one children were injured and 11 were sent to the hospital. The park was particularly crowded while children were on break for Passover. — JERUSALEM POST WASHINGTON, D.C.

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People dressed as their favorite superheroes and villains assembled in the National Mall to attempt to break the record for largest gathering of people dressed as comic book characters. However, the attempt fell short of breaking the 1,531-person record previously set in China. — NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Visit nyunews.com for full articles.

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DAY IN THE LIFE By KARI SONDE LS freshman Avni Parikh has been interested in global education since she was in middle school. By ninth grade, she started an organization called Let’s Hope International which raised money through jewelry sales. The accessories were designed by Parikh and other volunteers. The money raised was for educational and sanitation purposes in Kenyan and Indian schools and orphanages. Now, Parikh is working on a platform advocating for civics education around the world. She focuses on speech and debate skills and may combine this project with Let’s Hope or start a separate organization. 10 a.m.: Parikh wakes up and heads to Downstein to have coffee, eggs and bacon before going to her first class of the day. 12:30 p.m.: Parikh attends her Social Foundations class. She particularly enjoys this course because it explores how ideas spread, which she said links well with her efforts to spread her own message about civics education. 2 p.m.: Parikh goes to Think Coffee and reads for one of her classes while drinking coffee and eating a grilled cheese sandwich. She chooses Think Coffee as her study spot because of the outreach work the company does in other countries, which she finds inspiring. 3 to 5 p.m.: Parikh has a meeting

with her mentor and co-founder of the foundation There is No Limit Mariama Mounir Camara-Petrolawicz. Parikh met Petrolawicz at a teen leadership conference called Three Dot Dash which aims to bring together teens around the world who are working on global issues. They discuss Let’s Hope and talk about extending Parikh’s current civics education program to the Republic of Guinea, where Petrolawicz is from. 8 p.m.: Parikh studies for her Education and Globalization class, which gives her a great perspective on her own interest in global education. “It helps [me] process this fastpaced world we live in and what education can do to help people make more sense of it,” Parikh said. 9 p.m.: Parikh heads back to Think Coffee to meet up with a friend. Parikh trades coffee for Chicken Tikka Masala that her friend bought her and they talk about collaborating on Parikh’s speech and debate work in India. 11 p.m.: Parikh heads over to Third North residence hall with her friend to speak with other collaborators across the United States and in India. After the discussion, they wind down by eating Oreos, listening to music and going on Facebook. Kari Sonde is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

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Tisch announces Cinema Research Institute fellows “I think in film there is a lot of space to reinvent and keep us busy for many, many years,” Whitlow said. All of the fellows’ research during the year will challenge film’s current creative and business horizons. “[Film] people have found ways to make things work [by] doing the same thing over and over again, so that they are scared to do other things and that leaves no room for experimentation,” Conner said. “But influence from the technology side is changing that and allowing people to experiment with their films, and I think CRI is a big part of expanding that.” Conner’s research is about improving film marketing by using analytics to offer filmmakers and producers a better understanding of their potential audience. Through different approaches, the four projects will revive the discussion between films and consumers as they recognize the industry’s areas of opportunity.

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Tisch supports students in their film and media projects. “What we are researching is not just ways to make money, but ways of expanding the knowledge of what is possible within the industry — to open up a million and more ideas for the industry as a whole,” Conner said. Lorena Tamez is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

Student bikes across America to support homeless

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Abigail Donahue trains for her cross-country journey. me about myself,” Donoghue said. “I also love traveling and have always wanted to do a cross-country trip. Bike & Build sounded like the perfect opportunity.” When Stern sophomore Lydia Guo, a participant in last summer’s Bike & Build, told Donoghue about the organization, Donoghue knew it was some-

thing she had to be a part of. “She hadn’t even finished describing it and I was already mentally committed,” she said. Riders — most of whom are college students — are required to raise $4,500 each and ride at least 500 training miles before starting. Donoghue has raised over $5,000 to date, but she said she wants to

continue to raise as much money as possible until the start of her ride. As part of Donoghue’s fundraising campaign, she sent letters to family and friends in New York and back home in Barrington, Ill. “I have been amazed by the generosity of my friends and family,” Donoghue said. “I am in awe of the contributions and I am determined to make them count when I am on the road this summer.” Donoghue also plans to host a fundraising event in New York before she leaves. The funds will go toward the group’s building projects and the leftover money can go toward sponsoring a local housing organization in New York or Illinois. Bike & Build was founded in 2002 by Marc Bush, a Yale University alumnus and participant in the Yale Habitat Bicycle Challenge. Around 240 people do the ride every year on eight different routes across the country. Since its inception, the organization has raised over $4.5 million for affordable housing charities. Julianne McShane is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

FEATURES

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Shops for finding used books around campus

By BAILEY EVANS As the school year winds down, students can finally think about something that has been hard to fit in their schedules for the past months: recreational reading. Thankfully, there are used book stores all over the city that have plenty of affordable options for summer reading.

The Strand The Strand is a classic favorite for recycled book readers. Located on the corner of Broadway and 12th Street, The Strand has everything from newly released novels to obscure non-fiction published decades ago. The top floor is filled with classic literature, banned books and an extensive fiction section, while the basement is packed with non-fiction books from all subject areas. The Strand has far cheaper prices than retail costs for popular novels, and you can also pick up a lesser known novel for only $5 to $7.

St. Mark’s Bookstore You’ve probably passed this little bookstore on Third Avenue multiple times and thought about how cute it looked, but

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then you kept walking to the dollar pizza you were after. It is time to go in and check it out. While not necessarily a used book store, St. Mark’s has a wide selection of the newest novels and fair prices on the paperback versions. It also has monthly readings from both popular and up-and-coming authors.

East Village Books This tiny bookstore on St. Marks Place between First Avenue and Avenue A is the perfect representation of the East Village. It is quirky and filled with strange finds, but it may take time to find exactly what you are looking for. Most paperbacks are priced at around $5. This is the quintessential used bookstore for anyone who has no specific title in mind and hopes to stumble across what may become his new favorite book.

Housing Works Bookstore Housing Works Bookstore is a non-profit source of funding for an organization that provides housing and medical assistance to people in New York City. This SoHo bookstore is mostly run by volunteers, and all of its proceeds go toward Housing Works’ cause. Most of the books have been donated, and the prices are relatively cheap especially con-

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The Strand, located on Broadway, is a go-to for students because of its wide selection. sidering proceeds go to charity. It also has a space on the second floor for reading and studying.

Mercer Street Bookstore If the words Mercer Street bring up bad memories of Writing the Essay, create a new, pos-

itive connotation for the phrase by checking out Mercer Street Bookstore. This bookstore has plenty of used books with paperbacks as low as $2. It contains old and rare books and is the perfect place to spend an afternoon browsing. As an added

bonus, Mercer Street Bookstore also sells records, so you can engage your inner bookworm and audiophile in one charming location. Bailey Evans is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

Museum displays Nazi-era paintings

By SARAH MYERS

Classical Apollonian artwork from Adolf Hitler’s Great German Art Show and Adolf Ziegler’s 1937 “Entartete Kunst” exhibition is on display on the Upper East Side. “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937” is a new exhibition at the Neue Galerie that runs until June 30. Hitler commissioned Ziegler, a painter, to collect work he deemed degenerate from German museums in 1937 to curate an exhibition devoted solely to displaying and mocking the artwork. “Entartete Kunst,” or the “Degenerate Art” exhibition, opened a day after Hitler’s Great German Art Show at the Haus der Deutschen Kunst, which displayed artwork revered by those in Hitler’s regime. “Entartete Kunst” reflected the contempt with which such art was regarded by Germans at the time — artwork was sloppily hung and crowded by degrading and slanderous texts. Now, curator Olaf Peters has constructed an exhibition that unites and contrasts these two 1937 German art shows, giving viewers a glimpse into a darker time in art history. When first entering the exhibition, visitors are guided through

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Historian Simon Schama shows the art to CNN’s Amanpour. a narrow hallway with a photmural of the line outside “Entartete Kunst” in 1937 on one wall and a photomural of a line of Jews who have just arrived to AuschwitzBirkenau on the other. Throughout the rest of the exhibit, the haunting dichotomy is continuously highlighted. The first of the exhibit’s four rooms is divided in two. Half of the room is painted pure white and displays the great German artwork, while the other half is

painted off-white and displays the degenerate artwork. The curatorial influence is heavy handed but helps unite the opposing aesthetics and politics of the time. The demonization of art echoes the horrific rise of Nazi Germany and reminds viewers of the toxic nature of propagandist ostracism. “I really like how there was a clear comparison between the degenerate artwork and the great German artwork that Hitler handpicked,” LS freshman Er-

ica Lee said. “It was easy to walk through the exhibit and be able to grasp the absurdity behind branding Modern art, like that of Paul Klee, degenerate.” Comparative pieces are aligned on both sides. Max Beckmann’s dark and sadistically allegorical painting “Departure” is a reactionary piece to Hitler’s Germany and is now displayed in close proximity to Zeigler’s painting “The Four Elements,” which hung over Hitler’s fireplace. Viewers are challenged to strike a balance between a purely aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of the pieces and one that is formed by the historical context and the pieces’ histories. The irony of Hitler and the Nazi party’s agenda is not lost in this exhibit. The majority of the artists represented in the show was not Jewish. The exhibition focuses on the arbitrariness behind the exclusivity — Emil Nolde, who was a Nazi party member and sympathizer, was also labeled as a “degenerate” artist. Hitler, the Nazi agenda and “Entartete Kunst” ultimately played a critical and ironic role in the success of the modernist movement. Sarah Myers is a contributing writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.


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50 “I give up!”

60 Up to, briefly

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NYUNEWS.COM | MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY PETER KEFFER OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

HARRY’S TAKE

Bookstore closures detract from NYC vitality By HARRY BROWN

Cutthroat competition and surging rent prices have forced many of New York’s booksellers to abandon shop. For local bookstores, the price of rent has reached a level that is unsustainable. Despite residents who choose to buy their latest novels from local bookstores instead of online behemoths, increasing rent prices have outstripped any improvement to sales. Last week came the news that Shakespeare & Co. will be added to the growing list of bookstores forced to close shop this year. Under a wave of gentrification and these increased rent prices, the very face of New York is disappearing. Shakespeare & Co. is not the first bookstore to succumb to the cost of New York rent prices, with the monthly rental price for the small Broadway location being pegged at over $50,000. Rizzoli Bookstore, a landmark on 57th Street, was also forced to close despite its cultural and architectural history. As The New York Times recently reported, surviving bookstore owners are choosing to open shop in Brooklyn and Queens rather than face the anx-

ieties of Manhattan real estate. With the impending closure of Shakespeare & Co., we are saying goodbye to a friend of the NYU community. It is not the obligation of NYU to save the local bookstore. It is unlikely that even if Shakespeare & Co. reached a mutual agreement with the NYU Bookstore located just a few doors down, the additional revenue would offset the surge in rental prices. So what can be done to keep bookstores from collapsing? Residents should press their local representatives to pass The Small Business Survival Act that would protect local businesses from sudden hikes in rent prices. Moreover, bookstores must diversify and modernize to help bear the brunt of higher rental prices. For example, Strand Bookstore on Broadway has been notably successful in

forging social media campaigns to engage with the local community As a society, we have always held libraries as monuments and testaments to our collective knowledge. We should hold our bookstores in the same regard. The shops of the early immigrant population — stores that had family dynasties and were representative of their particular community — once etched the elusive character of New York. That New York has been slowly replaced by something shinier and less unique, something appealing to tourists seeking out the myth of the real New York. Baristas have replaced booksellers, and high-end fashion boutiques have supplanted bookstores. Institutions such as Shakespeare & Co. and Rizzoli once shaped the New York which many still remember. Those remnants are slowly eroding under the weight of gentrification. If we wish to keep the New York character and soul alive, Shakespeare & Co. should not be left to simply close. Harry Brown is a staff columnist. Harry’s Take is published every Monday. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

CHRISTINA’S CASE

University needs plan to prevent drug abuse By CHRISTINA COLEBURN

Final exams are fast approaching for college students across the nation. For NYU students, the dreaded week — complete with arduous term papers and strenuous tests that can account for over half of the overall semester grade — is slated to begin on May 13. The extreme pressure can provoke an equally extreme response from some students, who may resort to self-medication with prescription drugs. Our university should take an active role in dispelling the false notion that the misuse and abuse of prescription medication is not dangerous and rarely reap serious consequences. The 2009 report from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that college students were twice as likely to have used Adderall nonmedically than those aged 18 to 22 who were not full-time students. According to a University of Kentucky study, 34 percent of participants reported the illegal use of ADHD stimulants, most users claiming to use the drugs “primarily in periods of high academic stress.” Other research suggests that the most common reason for stimulant use was to focus and

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concentrate during studying, while a recent survey discovered 81 percent of students believed that illegal use of ADHD stimulants was either “not dangerous at all” or “slightly dangerous.” This statistic is indicative of college students’ exposure to misinformation about nonmedical prescription stimulant use. The NYU website states that the university intends to reach its 2017 target of reducing the number of students who take non-prescribed prescription drugs from 13 to 11.7 percent. Despite this relative success, more must be done to effectively combat the problem. Although an NYU panel featuring former President Bill Clinton and former police commissioner Raymond Kelly brought attention to the issue, students still need bold reminders about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. It has been recommended

that NYU develop a “university-wide strategy” to help prevent the growing epidemic. This strategy would involve focusing on reducing the amount of inappropriate access to medications and developing educational campaigns about safe use and disposal. Although these initiatives will not completely eradicate the problem, they would further demonstrate NYU’s commitment to student safety and serve as a welcome addition to our Health and Wellness centers. The hazards of misusing and abusing prescription drugs should be most aggressively communicated in the weeks preceding midterms and final exams. For many students, the stress surrounding these tests is overwhelming, and the temptation to use an illicit study aid can seem impossible to resist. It is imperative that students understand that the consequences of these seemingly harmless boosts can extend beyond testing day and prove far worse than performing poorly on an exam. Christina Coleburn is a deputy opinion editor. Christina’s Case is published every Monday. Email her at ccoleburn@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Columbine anniversary should spark gun debate

On April 20, 1999, the mass shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado shocked the nation and ignited a fierce debate about the Second Amendment that has raged in Congress and state legislatures ever since. Fifteen years after two armed students took 13 lives and then their own, this country continues to grapple with the politics of gun control. The long history and place of guns in American culture has all but ruled out a ban on handguns or assault weapons. However, lawmakers have not implemented appropriate measures that coincide with general public opinion. During the past year, a mass shooting took place about once every two weeks. The shootings became so commonplace, in fact, that the mainstream media did not cover all of them. In the highly politicized months following the killing spree in Newtown, Conn., that left 20 children dead, there were moments in which the nation believed that Washington would finally deliver the gun reform it deserves. But hope was quickly lost, leaving President Barack Obama and proponents of stricter gun control — the majority of Americans — empty handed. As the death toll caused by gun violence continues to rise, Congress should commit itself to gun reform before more Americans are harmed by inaction. A poll conducted in the first two weeks of April shows that 79 percent of Americans support “criminal and mental background checks for all those buying guns” and 49 percent favor “more strict” gun laws. Although “more strict” is vague, and there is disagreement about how legislators should approach reform, the statistics point toward a rising consensus that some federal, wide-sweeping action must be taken to decrease the possibility of repeating past tragedies. Columbine was the tragedy that focused the nation on the amount of damage and grief that can be wrought from strict adherence to a conservative reading of the Second Amendment, but since then, lawmakers have shown little devotion to serious gun reform initiatives that most Americans support. Last year, the Senate rejected a bill that would have forced stricter background checks for gun buyers. The reintroduction, and hopeful passage, of similar legislation would ensure that the lessons learned from Columbine and subsequent shootings are not forgotten.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Peter Keffer (Chair), Christina Coleburn (Co-chair), Omar Etman (Co-chair), Nina Golshan (Co-chair)

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY FRANCISCO NAVAS SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Despite setbacks, Yankees show promise

WEEKEND WRAP-UP

By BENJAMIN VOGEL

By MICHELLE TRAN

Coming off a whirlwind season, the Yankees narrowly missed the playoffs for only the second time since 1996 while battling injuries last season. Short-stop Derek Jeter, who was nursing a broken ankle suffered in the 2012 American League Championship Series against the Detroit Tigers, played only 17 games in the 2013 season. First baseman Mark Teixeira also injured his wrist and played only 15 games. As if things could not get any worse, outfielder Curtis Granderson fractured his finger and missed more than half of the season. This past offseason, the Yankees lost a strong majority of their roster. Fears of missing the playoffs loomed in fan’s minds. Hall of fame closer Mariano Rivera retired alongside pitcher Andy Pettite. A couple of players opted to sign elsewhere. All-Star second baseman Robinson Cano left for Seattle, and Curtis Granderson left for the Yankees’ crosstown rivals, the Mets. Third baseman Alex Rodriguez was suspended for the 2014 season. The added blow of Jeter announcing his retirement did not help morale. But they are still undoubtedly a play-off contender. Instead of wallowing in their losses, the Yankees did what they do most winters — they went out shopping. The team reeled in big name players such as outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury, outfielder Carlos Beltrán, second baseman Brian Roberts, catcher Brian McCann and Japanese sensation pitcher Masahiro Tanaka. The whopping $465 million they spent is looking like a wise investment. The Yankees are in first place of the American League East division, and they are also proudly topping other categories. Ellsbury is among the American League leaders in batting average with a .365, and he also has eight stolen bases to his name. Fellow outfielder Beltrán has the thirdmost home runs in the league. Journeyman Yangervis Solarte has been making a name for himself filling in Cano’s cleats at second base. He has

This past weekend, the NYU track and field team competed at the Widener Invitational in Chester, Penn. On the men’s side, CAS freshman Budd Brown shined in the 400-meter dash, grabbing a first-place finish for the Violets with an impressive time of 49.73 seconds. Gallatin junior Zac Kish competed in the 800-meter outing and finished in second place with a time of 1:55:11 minutes. In the 200-meter race, LS sophomore sprinter Matthew Powers grabbed a third-place finish with a time of 22.38 seconds. In the 4x400-meter relay event, Brown, Kish, Stern sophomore Max Avila and CAS sophomore Gerald Gorman teamed up to claim a third-place finish with a final time of 3:23:53 minutes. The weekend was filled with new personal records for many members on the men’s side, from steeplechase to hammer throw to 800-meter and even 200-meter events. On the women’s side, the 4x400-meter relay team comprised of Stern sophomore Lydia Guo, Steinhardt junior Caroline Spring, CAS sophomore Sarah Sisk and SCPS sophomore Drew Washington finished in first place, ending with a time of 4:00:47 minutes. Guo and Spring went on to compete in the 200-meter event, both placing in the top 10 for the Violet women. LS sophomore Lily Corsaro placed second in the long-distance 1,500-meter race and set a new personal best time for herself with 4:36:91 minutes. Two Violets also placed in the top five long jumpers, with LS sophomore Rebecca Shimonov placing fourth and Steinhardt freshman Katie Kupferschmid placing fifth. CAS freshman Jillian Edwards represented NYU in both the javelin and shot put event, placing

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Pitcher Masahiro Tanaka has proven his spot on the team. been hitting with a batting average of .351, and he hit his first career Major League home run three days ago. On the pitching side, the starting rotation has proven in top shape. Michael Pineda, who was acquired by the Yankees in a trade in 2011 but has been derailed due to shoulder injuries, finally pitched for the Yankees and has not disappointed, going 2-1 with a 1.00 ERA. Tanaka, the anticipated pitcher from Japan who went a remarkable 24-0 with the Rakuten Golden Eagles in Japan, posting a 1.27 ERA, has flourished. So far, he has a 2-0 record with a 2.05 ERA. Tanaka’s strikeout to walk ratio is 14 to 1. Teixeira gave Yankee fans quite a scare when he injured his hamstring early in the season, but he was back going 2-4 against the Rays on Sunday. Outfielder Brett Gardner, who signed a new five-year contract with the Yankees over the winter, has also shown some life. The speed and power that he has shown over the past couple seasons have proven that he is the five-tool player the Yankees need. If these sample stats are any indication on how the rest of the season will turn out, Yankee fans have nothing to fear. Benjamin Vogel is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com

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Members of the track team push for the finish line. eighth and seventh, respectively. Both the men and women teams will be competing in the UAA outdoor championship next Saturday hosted by the University of Chicago. The NYU men’s golf team travelled to Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. on April 18 to compete in their final match at the Palamountain Invitational. After the two-day event, the men’s team finished in fifth place with a overall team score of 630 — 314 on Friday and 316 on Saturday. NYU’s performance was led by CAS junior Matthew Gjonaj who finished five over 77 the first day and just one over 73 in the second round, claiming sixth place in individual performances. The women’s golf team also

competed this past weekend in the Jack Leaman Invite hosted by Amherst College in South Hadley, Mass., shooting an overall team score of 333 over 37 for a seventhplace finish in the tournament. Steinhardt senior Kristina Shalhoup and LS freshman Paridhi Bhargava both tied for 12th-place individual finishes. Bhargava shot an impressive front nine, shooting a score of 36 and tying with the second-best front nine score of the tournament. The women will compete in their last tournament of the year at the Liberty League Championships in Sutton, Mass., next weekend. Michelle Tran is a staff writer. Email her at sports@nyunews.com.

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Washington Square News April 21, 2014

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