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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 36

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

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Students organize against university expansion

CHUCK KUAN FOR WSN

By FAY LIN Student opposition to NYU 2031, the plan to expand the university by as much as six million square feet, flared yesterday as the student group’s first public protest stopped pedestrian traffic outside Bobst Library. With signs and flyers in hand, the members of the student-run group NYU Students and Alumni Against the Sexton Plan expressed concerns about the plan’s size, cost and possible impacts on tuition. Protest organizer and CAS sophomore Kristina Mayman said that students need to take more action if they have problems with the administration. “I’ve been seeing how the faculty is getting involved and doing a great job fighting NYU President John Sexton’s leadership, and I was just surprised that there wasn’t student involvement already,” Mayman said. “This issue is a student problem, and we should be out in the streets to do something about it.” Signs used during the protest brought attention to financial issues and concerns about the university’s leadership. Students and Alumni Against the Sexton Plan has received some guidance and support from NYU faculty, including members of the Faculty Against the Sexton Plan group. CAS professor Adam Becker said students should voice their opinions, and that successfully fighting the administration entails collective effort. “This isn’t something where we have a vote and then Sexton loses the vote, he steps down and everything’s great,” Becker said. “It’s a long-term project, and it will require faculty, it will require students and, with regards to 2031, it has so

Students and Alumni Against the Sexton Plan rallied outside of Bobst yesterday, raising its voice against NYU 2031.

PROTEST continued on PG. 3

Malick delivers cinematic Iconic sushi rolls out scavenger hunt ‘Wonder’ in romance film By LILY CHIN

By ALEX GREENBERGER

The stars of Terrence Malick’s “To the Wonder” are quite accustomed to mainstream entertainment. Olga Kurylenko and Javier Bardem have both played characters in James Bond films, Rachel McAdams starred in a Nicholas Sparks adaptation and Ben Affleck’s latest film won Best Picture at the Oscars. Perhaps “Wonder” is fascinating because it is the most cinematically ambitious work associated with these actors to date. Some viewers may come to expect that filmic boldness in a Malick film by now, but “Wonder” is esoteric, even by the standards of Malick’s filmog-

raphy — this is about as far from streamlined narrative storytelling as film gets. There is a story to be had in “Wonder.” The basic gist is that Neil (Affleck) escapes a torrid relationship with Marina (Kurylenko) and then questions whether he’s done the right thing when he begins another passionate relationship with Jane (McAdams). Neil’s philosophical quest is paralleled by Father Quintana (Bardem), a priest undergoing a crisis of faith and living in the same Oklahoma town. But watching “Wonder” for its narrative is pointless. In fact,

WONDER continued on PG. 5

Iconic Hand Rolls, an East Village temaki shop, will begin its hand roll hunt April 15. The restaurent will place 50 Iconic logo stickers within a five-block radius of the store between Third and 13th streets and Third Avenue and Avenue B. Clues on the whereabouts of the stickers will be posted on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Those who find the stickers can use them to redeem a free temaki roll, a cone-shaped and hand-rolled sushi, from the store. Founded by Stern alumnus David Ravvin, Iconic

Hand Rolls recently hosted a question and answer session at the Stern Entrepreneurs Exchange, a club that helps students, alumni and affiliates explore aspects of entrepreneurship and earlystage investing. Before Ravvin arrived at NYU, he spent a month traveling in Brazil, where he was inspired by temaki shops. Instead of eating pizza after going to a bar, Ravvin remembered joining Brazilians in sit-down shops and eating a waffle cone-sized temaki. “I saw this idea there, and I thought it was so

ROLLS continued on PG. 6

CHUCK KUAN FOR WSN

Iconic Hand Rolls will offer free sushi to contest winners.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS By JONATHON DORNBUSH and NICOLA PRING While most television shows end their seasons in May, several new shows are either about to take their place or have already done so. Here are a few to help you procrastinate working on your paper just one more night.

“HANNIBAL” The latest show from “Pushing Daisies” creator Bryan Fuller is a visual feast. Having premiered last week, the show reworks the history of famed villain Hannibal Lecter — he now aids the police investigating murders. But the true star, Hugh Dancy’s Will Graham, is a fascinating, complex character. As his counterpart, Mads Mikkeilsen plays an understated Lecter who is every bit as captivating as Dancy and their co-star, Laurence Fishburne. While the violence pushes network TV limits, the stunning cinematography and impressive performances will leave you hungry for more. “ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT” While I still will not believe more episodes exist until they actually debut online, Netflix has promised that new episodes of the beloved comedy series will hit the streaming service on May 26. Each of the 15 episodes will focus on a different character, with only Jason Bateman’s Michael Bluth appearing in each episode. This season is meant to catch fans up on what the entire Bluth clan has done since we last left them in 2006. It’s as Ann as the nose on plain’s face that fan fervor has reached a fever pitch, so be sure to clear your calendars to marathon the new batch of episodes in May. “VEEP” This Sunday, Julia Louis-Dreyfus returns to HBO as the foul-mouthed, image-obsessed, gaffe-prone Vice President Selina Meyer. While some critics called the first season the network’s second most overrated show after “Girls,” “Veep” is a funny look into the private lives of fictional political heavyweights and their staff members. It also offers a nice reprieve from more serious programs that deal with politics like “The Newsroom.” Given the ridiculous situations the veep found herself in the last season, season two, which will feature Meyer on the stump speech circuit during midterm elections, should be a good time.

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IN AND OF

THE CITY

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It’s a big city and a widespread university. Catch up with our daily updates on university and city/state news headlines other publications are covering.

LOCAL POLITICIANS RESPOND TO MEZUZAH BURNING Several politicians publicly supported the Jewish community in response to an incident in which a vandal burned religious artifacts hanging on the doors of nearly a dozen residents of a public housing building in Williamsburg. The vandalization occurred on Holocaust Remembrance Day, on Monday. Mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio and Councilwoman Tish James were among those who spoke out against hate crimes in response. — NEW YORK OBSERVER QUESTLOVE PLAYS SURPRISE CONCERT ON LAFAYETTE STREET Former Roots drummer Questlove hosted an impromptu concert in SoHo yesterday afternoon, quickly gaining an audience as this band played from atop a car lift. Questlove’s former bandmate Rahzel sang and beatboxed a rendition of “The Murder She Wrote.” — DNAINFO OWS WINS LAWSUIT OVER LIBRARY SEIZURE The Occupy Wall Street movement’s library, much like the movement itself, had been forcibly removed from its Zucotti Park home. But on Monday, persistent protesters won a court case demanding compensation for the 3,000 volumes of books that were seized by the city during the dismantling of the original library. — THE NEW YORK TIMES

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university TATIANA BAEZ city/state VERONICA CARCHEDI investigative NICOLE BROWN arts JOSH JOHNSON features KRISTINA BOGOS sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN copy MICHAEL DOMANICO,

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TOYS DONATED TO NEWTOWN MAKE IT TO SANDY VICTIMS Thousands of children’s toys donated to Newton, Conn., in the wake of last year’s tragedy have made their way to victims of Hurricane Sandy. Toys were also sent to children in hospitals and mental health programs in New York and Connecticut. — NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

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MAYOR ANNOUNCES PARKING APP Mayor Michael Bloomberg unveiled a new parking application for smart phones yesterday. Users will be able to add time and value to their parking meters remotely, either by telephone, Internet or smartphone app. The app will also allow users to search for open parking spaces around the city more easily. — CBS

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MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods.

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PROTEST continued from PG. 1

Students protest NYU expansion plan

far required the community members as well.” Mayman hopes the protest clearly establishes a student voice on NYU 2031. “This is our attempt to introduce ourselves, and hopefully people will hear the message and join in,” she said. SASP handed out flyers stating their claims, such as the amount of real estate NYU gave to four employees and the amount of money adjunct professors, who constitute approximately 50 to 70 percent of NYU’s faculty, typically earn. However, the NYU administration maintains that the university has enough money to support endeavors like the expansion plan. “It should be understood that this project has a sound financial plan, is well within the university’s financial means and is critical to maintaining NYU’s extraordinary academic trajectory and fulfilling our academic and educational missions in the years to come,” said NYU spokesman John Beckman. Omar Clark, an NYU-Poly second-year graduate student who protested, said there are problems with the administration aside from the expansion. “It’s not really only about the expansion. It’s about NYU’s different ventures in respect to our divestment from fossil fuels in Abu Dhabi and countries like that,” he said. “We just need a whole system change in respect to NYU schools.” Additional reporting by Billy Richling. Fay Lin and Billy Richling are staff writers. Email them at university@nyunews.com.

Stern competition judgments challenged By NICOLE BROWN

Part II: Students claim partial ruling in popular Stern competition. Two venture competition teams question the judging process. In January, the Palkas, members of the Cobalt team, received the email sent to all the participants who were eliminated from the competition, which also included the judges’ feedback on their project. After reading the comments, the Palkas noticed that the judges had misquoted and misunderstood their material. For example, one judge questioned the team’s choice of target demographic, which he identified as New Yorkers ages 22-40, even though the materials did not specify an age for target demographics. “It was pretty clear that they only glanced through the documents,” Isaac Palka said. The Palkas said they do not think the judges wronged them purposefully but think the whole judging process was very disorganized. They pointed out the misquoted material and asked Loretta Poole, associate director of the Berkley Center, why they were disqualified. In response, Poole emphasized the competitiveness of this year’s entries and later sent the Palkas a full page of feedback from another judge that was positive overall. A few weeks later, the Palkas met

with the director of the Berkley Center, Luke Williams, and the senior associate director of the Berkley Center, Cynthia Franklin, to discuss the issue. “They kept assuring us that our business was reviewed fairly, but they were unable to explain why the comments did not match our documents,” Isaac Palkas said. Shortly after, the Palkas found out that another team had a similar experience. After receiving no feedback when it was eliminated in the first round of judging, the Laos team reached out to Poole on Jan. 8. Poole responded with feedback that discussed their insect repellent pitch, an idea they scrapped before the first round of judging. The three documents they submitted to the first round of judging detailed a plan for a laundry detergent. The Laos team also saw on its Activity Stream that the first time any judge downloaded its three-page concept summary was on Jan. 8, the day the team had requested feedback. Poole admitted to the team that the feedback was on the wrong documents and said that a reviewer had notified her that he or she was having difficulty viewing the team’s documents during the review period. Although the team was re-evaluated, it was not allowed to re-enter the competition. “We do not need to rely on teams to tell

New York City gears up for bike-share program By BILLY RICHLING

The New York City Department of Transportation is set to launch Citi Bike, the nation’s largest bike-share program, in May. The initiative will place 5,500 bikes at 293 docking stations throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. The launch comes despite damage to bikes and related hardware caused by Hurricane Sandy last fall. “The Department of Transportation has worked around the clock to restore vital transportation links following the storm and that includes putting Citi Bike on the road to recovery,” Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan said in a press release. The bike-share program is named after its official sponsor, Citibank. The system will cost $95 for an annual membership, $25 for a seven-day pass and $9.95 for a 24-hour pass. A special $5 one-day membership will be available for the first few weeks after its launch. Private sponsorship, combined with user fees, means that no taxpayer dollars will be used to operate the system. Sarah Kaufman, a professor of planning at NYU’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, said a bike-share program would be a good addition to the city’s transportation system. She cited the Vélib program in Paris and Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C., as examples of successful programs in other cities. “It contributes to our ease and efficiency of travel, the health of bike riders and the public health from reduced car emissions,” Kaufman said. “It’s an exciting program for New York City.” However, CAS freshman and Washington, D.C. resident Nick Kirsch said he was not satisfied with his hometown’s program. “Once you hit about 12 hours on the bike, it becomes cheaper to just buy a bike,” Kirsch said. “So it’s only feasible for tourists who are staying for under a week.” The Citi Bike program will cost more than

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COURTESY OF NYU

Brooklyn and Manhattan will implement Citi Bike, a bike-share program, in May. Washington, D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare, which costs $75 for an annual membership and $25 for a 30-day pass. To compare, NYU’s own bike-share program operates 75 bikes at 13 docking stations and is free for students and faculty. Chris Roderick, a CAS freshman, said he thought the citywide program was still a good idea. “With a bike, I can skip paying for taxis or the metro, and I’m reducing my carbon footprint,” he said. “I love riding my bike because I see the city in a unique way.” Some New Yorkers are less enthusiastic. In January, a caller to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s weekly radio show on WOR 710 said cyclists who do not obey traffic laws are “menace[s] to pedestrians.” Others are concerned about how much space docking locations will take. Kaufman said the program was designed in the fairest possible way. “Although some locations may not be ideal, the Department of Transportation has done a good job of choosing potential high-use locations,” Kaufman said. Billy Richling is a staff writer. Email him at cstate@nyunews.com.

us whether or not their ventures have been viewed and evaluated,” Franklin said. “We actively monitor which evaluators have submitted their feedback.” The Berkley Center also stated that although downloads did not appear on the teams’ Activity Streams on gust.com, their documents could still be viewed, a functionality that was confirmed by a Gust representative. However, the Palkas do not think this explains why their feedback did not accurately reflect the documents. They said they wondered why the judges downloaded the materials after both teams notified Poole if they had already been viewed. However, Franklin defended the judges. “The judges stand by their evaluations and encourage those teams who did not advance to the next phase of the competition to continue to learn from the workshops and feedback,” she said. The teams who say they didn’t receive a proper review encourage the remaining teams to check up on their projects to ensure a fair assessment in the competition. “With $200,000 awarded annually and the chance for entrepreneurs to start a real business, there needs to be a clearer and more rigorous judging process,” Isaac Palka said. Nicole Brown is investigative editor. Email her at nbrown@nyunews.com.

Experts debate US-Russia relations at NYU panel By KEVIN BURNS

When the Soviet Union dissolved in December 1991, American and Russian diplomats agreed upon a mutually beneficial and even friendly relationship. But today, no such relationship exists. Indeed, U.S.-Russian relations have declined sharply over the last five years. A talk at the Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life yesterday focused on this decline and explored the complicated nature of America and Russia’s relationship. The event, which was hosted by the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and the Alexander Hamilton Center for Political Economy, featured five experts on U.S.-Russian relations. The panelists offered differing perspectives concerning both the deterioration and the potential for recovery of these relations, though they all agreed to some extent that American foreign policy has failed to live up to the notion of a mutually beneficial partnership. Former ambassador to the Soviet Union Jack Matlock said the United States and Russia have congruent interests and most of their disputes are not fundamental. “It is the hangover of Cold War attitudes coupled with a misunderstanding of what happened at the end of the Cold War,” Matlock said. Matlock argued that American policy was shaped by the myth that the United States won the Cold War, when in fact the end of the Cold War was beneficial to

both countries. This myth created a world in the minds of policymakers in which America is the sole remaining superpower, which caused policymakers, particularly during the George W. Bush administration, to act unilaterally in ways that hurt relations with Russia, Matlock said. Former New Jersey Sen. Bill Bradley also talked about the harmful effects of this misconception. “American policymakers bask in notions of Cold War victory or the idea that we could remake Russia in an American capitalist image,” Bradley said. NYU Professor Emeritus of Russian and Slavic Studies Stephen Cohen argued that the American policy of selective cooperation played a role. He said the policy, adopted by the Clinton administration, focuses on obtaining major concessions from Russia without giving anything back. Aksinia Sorokina, a second-year student at the Graduate School of Arts and Science who is from Russia, said she was most swayed by the opinion of Boris Jordan, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, who spoke on the panel. Jordan said Russians are pragmatic and that relations can be improved through business. “Business cooperation and technology will help to bring these nations together and break down the stereotypes,” Sorokina said. Kevin Burns is a deputy university editor. Email him at kburns@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ARTS Bugg makes impressive debut on self-titled album By ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE

Having already garnered praise in his native United Kingdom, 19-year-old Jake Bugg is ready to take on the States with the release of his eponymously titled debut album. The record features 14 tracks, ranging from bluesy rock ‘n’ roll to acoustic folk, and indicates that the young artist is wise and talented beyond his years. The album opens with a rousing guitar riff on “Lightning Bolt,” and it showcases Bugg’s vocal versatility with an impressive range of notes. The young artist’s lyrical talent is also apparent on subsequent tracks like “Broken” and “Ballad of Mr. Jones.” While Bugg’s style has drawn comparisons to artists like Bob Dylan for his use of the acoustic guitar and his distinctive voice, he uses his experiences to distinguish himself from former musical icons. Songs like “Two Fingers” and “Seen It All” recount troubling tales of growing up in a less-than-pristine neighborhood. His music exudes an air of melancholic determination in rising above unfavorable circumstances. A strong theme of wanderlust

permeates many of his songs, which express a desire to escape to somewhere new and unknown that likely mirrors Bugg’s real feelings toward his hometown. Young music fans will recognize Bugg as a voice that speaks for the trials of youth in all its isolation. But Bugg’s outlook is not negative — the album offers the hope of reaching a better place. However, the album lacks balance between mid- and lo-tempo songs and starts to drag soon after its halfway point. Melodies begin to blend into one another, and Bugg’s charming drawl soon becomes repetitive and tiresome. While that’s not to say the songs themselves aren’t excellently produced and polished, the album as a whole could do with more variation in tone and pacing. Regardless of its shortfalls, it’s hard to ignore the talent and potential demonstrated on “Jake Bugg.” The young Bugg can be sure to look forward to a long and fruitful career ahead of him. Alexandria Ethridge is music editor. Email her at aethridge@nyunews.com.

Songwriter’s Portrait: Craig Finn By JOSH JOHNSON

Craig Finn, best known as the frontman for the Hold Steady, doesn’t really sing. Rather, he talks, yells and spits his way through songs about getting high, the Mississippi River and getting high by the Mississippi River. Luckily, these songs contain lyrics that sound straight out of James Joyce’s “Ulysses.” This installment of our Songwriter’s Portrait column takes a look at Finn’s five best lines. “You came into the ER/Drinking gin from a jam jar” — “Stevie Nix” Apart from being a great image, this line from “Stevie Nix,” which doesn’t mention the Fleetwood Mac singer but does name-drop Rod Stewart, includes an amazing use of alliteration. Jam gin should definitely be a thing. “They started kissing when the nurses took off their IVs/ It was kind of sexy/But it was kind of creepy” — “Chillout Tent”

Young love — is there any better way to describe it than kind of sexy but kind of creepy? With this line, Finn not only proves himself as the maestro of hospital imagery but also a master of describing teenage relationships.

complex social constructs and boil them down into one clear thought. Case in point: this fantastic line from “Sequestered in Memphis,” which perfectly summarizes the despondency and despair of the late-night bar scene.

“I guess I heard about original sin/I heard the dude blamed the chick/I heard the chick blamed the snake/I heard they were naked when they got busted/And I heard things ain’t been the same since” — “Cattle and the Creeping Things” The Bible offers some of the most vivid images in literature, but, for the most part, Christian rock is incredibly boring. Take note, Scott Stapp — this is how you make Christian rock interesting. Less “take me higher,” more talking snakes.

“The theme of this party is the industrial age/And you came in dressed like a train wreck” — “The Weekenders” If any incoming freshmen are reading this, then your search for a yearbook quote is over. Once you finished 11th grade, you probably never imagined you’d be thinking about the industrial age again. However, here is a line that not only mentions that oh-so-important period in American history but also contains a metaphor that is almost too good to be true. Both your English teacher and your social studies teacher will be very impressed.

“In bar light/She looked all right/In daylight/She looked desperate” — “Sequestered in Memphis” One of Finn’s greatest talents is his ability to take

Josh Johnson is arts editor. Email him at jjohnson@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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EDITED BY JOSH JOHNSON ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Fox splits comedy, drama programming with FXX channel

WONDER continued from PG. 1

‘Wonder’ challenges, entices viewers with visuals

“Wonder” is less of a narrative film than it is a tone poem, one that is both rich with emotionally fused voice-overs and engrossing in its difficulty. Much like the many forms of romance shown on screen, the voice-overs are transcendent, if not somewhat obvious in their emotionalism. The voice-overs verbalize emotions that are internalized — feelings that would otherwise never leave the minds of the film’s beautifully realized characters. They depict raw emotion, and Malick’s direction, so complex

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Ben Affleck and Rachel McAdams “Wonder” about love.

in its style, helps to mine amazing performances — particularly a brief but noteworthy one from McAdams. Malick’s direction, radiant as always, is especially skillful in helping these voice-overs tell a melodramatic story in a few lines of dialogue. The images say everything the actors cannot — Marina gracefully twirls against a colorful sunset to show the pure ecstasy found in love. Jane appears in a red dress and is lost in a golden wheat field to suggest that she must hide her passion from Neil, for she knows that he does not love her equally. The aesthetic is so meticulously rendered that it even lends the film a musical, rhapsodic feel rarely found on screen. “To the Wonder” is all about Malick rather than the actors, and for a personal filmic essay that supplies answers for many theoretical questions about love, that is perfectly acceptable. It’s a philosophical journey more than anything else, and resultantly, it should be a tough experience. “To the Wonder” isn’t simply entertainment. This is pure art, and this is passionate filmmaking. This is what love feels like. Alex Greenberger is entertainment editor. Email him at agreenberger@nyunews.com.

By MARCUS JONES

Last week, Fox announced that FX’s tentpole comedy, “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” will move to FXX, a new comedy network that will replace the sports network, Fox Soccer Channel. “Sunny” will be joined by fantasy football comedy “The League” and talk show “Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell.” The creation of FXX may come as a surprise, but it certainly shakes up the television landscape. This programming strategy raises the question of whether FX’s critical darling “Louie” — a show that refuses to be exclusively classified as a comedy or a drama — will shift over to the new network as well. Fox has not disclosed whether FXX will offer dramatic programming, or if it exists exclusively for comedies. This move is not without precedent, as network splits have proven successful in the past. While not normally contenders at the Emmy Awards, TBS and TNT still have developed strong followings by sticking to comedy and drama, respectively. FX is a beloved basic cable network, but, unlike AMC — another much respected basic cable network — FX has been able to balance comedy and drama programming in recent years. This doubling down on FX’s

part will supposedly allow for 25 more scripted shows on the channel. This rush of additional programming might give FX the opportunity to finally edge out AMC in the ratings. FX is home to programs that are equal in quality to those on AMC when it comes to drama, but even John Landgraf, the president of FX, has admitted that their dramas are all variations of the anti-hero story. With comedies out of the way, FX can focus on broadcasting the dramas that give the network a more diverse appeal. In a way, FX has segregated its shows between comedies and dramas already. Comedies are mostly relegated to Thursday, and the network tries to spread out their dramas throughout the week. This has already created a split-view effect on FX. When fans think about “Sunny,” for instance, viewers can easily relate it to “League” and “Legit.” But if they consider the gun-toting “Justified,” the motorcycle drama “Sons of Anarchy” comes to mind. Rarely are the comedies associated with the dramas, making it hard to recall that “Louie” airs on the same channel as “American Horror Story.” This news should be exciting for FX fans. The channel has thus far only built on its qual-

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Mac, Charlie and the gang will find a new home at FXX. ity since being known solely as the home of “The Shield.” Even the syndicated shows on FXX are appealing, with reruns of “Parks and Recreation” and “How I Met Your Mother” already scheduled to air. This move may have come at a random time, but FXX certainly has a shot at success based on what the network promises to offer. Marcus Jones is a contributing writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

‘Happy Endings’ marketing strategy insults viewers By JOSH JOHNSON

When the critically adored but ratings-challenged comedy “Happy Endings” returned to ABC after a hiatus that began at the end of January, the show found itself not just in a new time slot but with a new slogan as well. Commercials promoting the return of the show implored viewers to “Save ‘Happy Endings.’” This new promo is troubling for two reasons. The most obvious is that ABC is essentially admitting that “Endings” has garbage ratings, and any hope for its renewal is gone. However, the other reason is far more irritating. By telling viewers to “Save ‘Happy Endings,’” ABC is implying that it is the fault of the viewing public that “Endings” needs saving. ABC could easily save “Endings,” and the network would be completely validated in its choice. “Endings” is a critically acclaimed show in an era where television criticism has never been more ingrained in our culture. ABC could also cancel “Endings,” and it would be well within reason. The show’s low ratings more than jus-

tify its cancellation. Hence, the implication that the fate of “Endings” rests solely in the hands of the viewer is false. Moreover, it’s also incredibly insulting. One only needs to take a quick look at the show’s time slot on ABC to realize that the network bears much more blame for its low ratings than the viewer does. Does ABC not remember when it repeatedly aired episodes of “Endings” out of order? The network aired a season 2 episode in the middle of season 3, despite having aired the series chronologically in the United Kingdom. ABC has probably also conveniently forgotten how it played musical chairs with the show’s scheduling. During its third season alone, “Endings” has been moved from Tuesday, to Sunday and Tuesday, then back to just Tuesday and, finally, to Friday — aka television’s graveyard. The especially egregious Sunday and Tuesday experiment paired “Endings” with the now-canceled “Don’t Trust the B---- in Apartment 23,” which, unsurprisingly, failed to significantly help either show gain ratings traction. ABC has seemingly done every-

thing in its power to sabotage “Endings,” and yet, its newest marketing strategy is commanding viewers to save the show? Even NBC’s “Community,” the poster child of network mistreatment, wasn’t dealt with this poorly. A show’s continuity hasn’t been this blatantly disregarded since Fox aired the intended pilot of “Firefly” as the show’s season finale. After all of the scheduling and airing mishaps, ABC should be thankful that “Endings” has any semblance of an audience. At this point, it seems preferable to let the show die gracefully or move onto another network instead of giving ABC the impression that its inane marketing plan may have worked. The “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter project proved that fans are willing to financially support the shows they love. But the “Mars” Kickstarter gave fans a clear, tangible objective. Fans of “Happy Endings” have no idea how many viewers it will take to save the show, and, when it inevitably is canceled, ABC will only have itself to blame. Josh Johnson is arts editor. Email him at jjohnson@nyunews.com.

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The talented cast of “Endings” may soon be out of a job.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

DINING ROLLS continued from PG. 1

Iconic Hand Rolls serves up Brazilian-inspired sushi

cool,” Ravvin said. “There was nothing like [a temaki shop] in the United States. It was a way of serving sushi that I thought was so creative and fun. So when I came to NYU, I wrote a business plan to bring this here for one of my classes at Stern.” Within the apple-green interior of the restaurant, the ordering station offers an array of sushi fillings and sides for customized hand rolls. “Their rolls are like Asian tacos,” said Stern junior Romel Gutierrez. Customers who order the lunch combo ($9) will get the salmon or spicy salmon roll ($5.50), with a roasted cauliflower or miso soup ($3) and a black mango or mint lime green tea. The salmon temaki is dressed in Iconic’s aioli made from fresh Greek yogurt, and it has a sweet taste with a firm texture. For vegan and vegetarian options, customers can pair a veggie avocado temaki with a kale salad. “A very healthy and low-calorie lunch,” Ravvin said. “It’s hard to get fresh food like this.”

One of the core values at Iconic Hand Rolls is sustainable sushi. As a result, ingredients like Scottish salmon, Atlantic deepsea red crab and Marine and Stewardship Council-certified skipjack tuna are all meticulously sourced. “A lot of people come in and ask for eel. We hate to disappoint people, but we have to stick to our values,” Ravvin said. “We haven’t been able to find a sustainable source for eel. It can be overfished, and the methods used to catch it can be unsafe.” Iconic offers a selection of delectable rolls, including the new smoked salmon hand roll and the spicy mango shrimp hand roll, which is made of sweet iki jime shrimp wrapped with mango puree, pickled cucumber and avocado. Iconic Hand Rolls is located at 135 First Ave. Lily Chin is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

Delicious breakfast spots offer scrumptious ways to start day By NICOLE DEL MAURO

Some mornings, a dining hall breakfast just doesn’t cut it. Start your day in a tastier way by making a morning pit stop at one of these breakfast joints — sure to satisfy any food craving. CAFÉ ANGELIQUE Enjoy the quaint atmosphere with a signature mighty leaf latte ($2.15) paired with anything from a small, sweet morning treat like a mixed berry or apricot scone ($2.75) to a specialty breakfast sandwich, like a rolled mushroom omelet and arugula on mini ciabatta ($5.10). 68 Bleecker St. DI FIORE MARQUET CAFE With its vast windows painted with branches and blossoming flowers, this cafe is so inviting that some might say it’s worth the higher price tag. Try the orange zest brioche French toast topped with fresh fruit and whipped cream ($14). 15 E. 12th St. NEWS BAR This is a great place for a quiet, solo meal and a chance to relax and read one of the publications lining the walls. Their egg and cheese croissant sandwiches ($5.50) are a delicious combination of breakfast favorites. 107 University Place PETITE ABEILLE This traditional Belgian restaurant serves large, authen-

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tic Belgian waffles drenched in different toppings, like the waffle Chantilly, served with whipped cream and strawberry sauce ($7). 44 W. 17th St. THE GREY DOG’S COFFEE Enjoy breakfast served until 3 p.m. Try the hearty Grey Dog’s Breakfast ($12.95), served with home fries, eggs, French toast or pancakes topped with fresh fruit, bacon, sausage or ham. If you want a simpler breakfast, try the Irish ($5.50) or Delaware baked ($8.95) oatmeal. 90 University Place CORNELIA STREET CAFÉ The $20 prix fixe brunch special at this darling cafe covers two food items and one hot and cold drink. Options include warm chocolate bread, eggs Benedict and huevos rancheros. 29 Cornelia St. SULLIVAN BISTRO This tiny shop serves delectable Dutch crepes and has options like Nutella, banana and strawberries ($12) or Swiss cheese and wild mushroom ($10). 169 Sullivan St.

LA COLOMBE TORREFACTION The ambience is the definition of hip — there is no menu in this cafe. Go to the register and confidently order a legendary chocolate croissant and their signature coffee ($2) or a specialty latte ($4.50), elegantly served in black and white china. 400 Lafayette St. GROUNDED A Café Aloha, espresso with steamed coconut and regular milk ($4.25), along with a bagel with smoked salmon, capers and cream cheese ($6) and the bright yellow walls make this coffee joint the perfect spot for a morning pick-me-up. 28 Jane St. BLUEBELL CAFÉ This quaint French and American cafe offers delicious classic breakfast dishes in its homey atmosphere. Sit down at hand-painted wooden tables and try the banana walnut or chocolate chip pancakes ($9) or the brioche French toast with berry compote and lemon curd ($10), a Bluebell favorite. 293 Third Ave. Nicole Del Mauro is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

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NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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EDITED BY ANGEL CHANG DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

Smorgasburg 2013 satisfies appetites in Brooklyn By CAITLIN SCHNACK

CAITLIN SCHNACK FOR WSN

Crowds of hungry New Yorkers flocked to East River State Park in Williamsburg on Saturday to welcome back Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg for its third outdoor season. This year, nearly 100 returning and new local food vendors occupy the space overlooking the East River. Vendors are serving everything from fried anchovies to pulled pork sandwiches to s’mores to French macarons. Some vendors are offering products to take home, like The 3 Nuts’ gourmet nut butters, such as salted caramel peanut butter, and MOMO, which sells Japanese-style salad dressings. According to Brooklyn Flea and Smorgasburg co-founder Eric Demby, the SmorgasBar, which debuted last year, will be making its return around Memorial Day with Brooklyn-made beer, wine and spirits. Competition for a spot at the market is tough, so visitors know that the vendors are Brooklyn’s best. “Folks apply, we try their food at our office,” Demby said. “And if they’re good, they get in.” Passing the Smorgasburg team’s taste test is no easy feat. Some sellers have applied each year since the market began and have been rejected every time. One of the new entrepreneurs

at Smorgasburg is Kalypso Greek Yogurt, which offers traditional, creamy Greek-style yogurt in a variety of flavors, like fig and chocolate. The yogurt is packaged in individual terra-cotta containers — “Just like [the yogurt] back home,” owner Nikolas Trastelis said. “[Smorgasburg] features a mix of different cuisines, new entrepreneurs and well-known companies,” said Steinhardt freshman Annamaria Louloudis, who visited Smorgasburg on its opening day. “People of all ages coming together to experience the best of New York City.” The Brooklyn-based food market is a perfect weekend trip for students — from Union Square, it’s only about a 10-minute subway ride to Bedford Street and less than a five-minute walk to East River State Park. The food is also fairly priced, and many vendors offer free samples. It’s best to arrive early, though. On opening day, demand was so high that a few vendors were sold out by early afternoon. The food market is open at the East River location on Saturdays and at the Tobacco Warehouse in DUMBO on Sundays. Both locations are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. until November. Caitlin Schnack is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

Barn Joo offers Korean dishes tailor-made for Western palate By DANIEL YEOM

Barn Joo, a new Flatiron gastropub that opened March 4, takes patrons on a guided tour of Korean cuisine with a fresh, Westernized take on traditional Korean food. Sitting on the ground level of Hotel Verite, Barn Joo is located on Broadway between 19th and 20th streets — just far enough to escape the crazy hustle and bustle of Union Square for its own peace of mind. The restaurant is minimalistic yet cozy, decorated with sleek wood panels and chandeliers. “Barn Joo is not a typical appetizerentree-dessert restaurant,” general manager Raymond Park said. “It is based around the concept of tapas.” However, unlike typical small dishes served at a tapas restaurant, the portions offered at Barn Joo are rather large, successfully tackling both quality and quantity. “Barn Joo’s goal is similar to what I’ve been trying to do for a long time,” chef David Lee said. “I’m trying to accomplish Korean flavor, not Korean food, using fresh, local ingredients.” As Lee stated, most of Barn Joo’s dishes are not authentically Korean. But by using traditional ingredients such as doenjang (Korean miso) and gochujang (hot pepper paste), Lee recreates Korean flavor in a less intimidating fashion — a friendly gesture that invites New Yorkers to try Korean food without fear. The restaurant’s rendition of ddukbokki, traditionally defined as rice cakes and vegetables cooked in gochujang, is a perfect example of the understated Korean influence. To accommodate American tastebuds, Lee mixes ground chicken with rice cake bits and shapes it into little balls that resemble meatballs. It is accompanied by a gochujang-based dip-

ping sauce, so customers can adjust the spiciness of the dish. Customer favorites include “Fly the Coop” wings ($13) — fried chicken glazed with garlic-infused soy sauce — and steamed pork belly glazed with Korean miso ($18), served with a refreshing salad made with onion and perilla leaves topped with a soy sauce-based dressing. Barn Joo will soon premiere items such as bai-top shell (sea snail) salad. Alongside small dishes, Barn Joo offers an eclectic mix of innovative and original cocktails such as the bubbly cloud ($12), a champagne-based concoction topped with fluffy cotton candy, and orange blossoms ($14), a sweet mixture of cucumber gin and pulpy tangerine juice. “Barn Joo is an entertainment complex,” Lee said. As the restaurant’s slogan “Eat, Drink, Play” suggests, Barn Joo aims to surpass traditional restaurant expectations. In mid-April, Barn Joo will open its underground lounge, equipped with a full bar and stereo system for private events and concerts. GLS freshman Susan Lee said the miso-glazed pork belly from Barn Joo is delicious. “Although everything tastes amazing, pork belly is definitely my favorite,” she said. “That is saying something [because] I don’t even like pork.” In the past, Korean cuisine has been overshadowed by other Asian cuisines like Chinese and Japanese food. However, Barn Joo’s bold attempt at reintroducing Korean flavors will surely go a long way in bringing Korean cuisine to the forefront of the New York City culinary scene. Barn Joo is located at 893 Broadway. Daniel Yeom is a contributing writer. Email him at dining@nyunews.com.

CHUCK KUAN FOR WSN


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Crossword Across

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE M A T C H

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puzzle by richard chisholm

36 One-for-one 

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49 Stick’s partner, 

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


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