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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 42, No. 22

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

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TEDxNYU names student speaker

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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Students take sides in pipeline debate

By CLAIRE SCIMECA

Several members of NYU Divest were arrested last week while protesting outside the White House. PIPELINE on PG. 3

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Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in style Catch a parade in New York City and enjoy some traditional Irish food and music. TOP 5 on PG. 5

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Six NYU students competed to have their own TEDx Talk at the next TEDxNYU in April by giving a five-minute speech on March 7 in a competition called the Pitch. CAS sophomore Nia Cavazos won the competition with her discussion called the Contagion Behind Cultural Identity. CAS sophomore and TEDxNYU vice president Abhinay Ashutosh said this year was the first time a spot at the annual conference was partially decided by the audience. “It’s a great chance for the audience to get involved with the TEDx community and pick a talk and a speaker they’d like to hear more from,” Ashutosh said. “TEDx, at the end of the day, is all about sharing ideas and expanding your own understanding of the world.” The speakers’ topics included education, networking for career advancement and activism. SCPS sophomore Lina Yue said

Students had five minutes to present their topics to the audience on Friday.

Kathleen Hanna brings girl power By SAM DEL ROWE

Homosexual material comes under fire Banning literature is a backwards practice the U.S. must avoid. HOUSE on PG. 7

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Women’s basketball comes up short in NCAA tournament The team lost the first round of playoffs to the University of New England last Friday. NCAA on PG. 8

Musician and feminist activist Kathleen Hanna held a lecture at the Kimmel Center for University Life on March 6, attracting a large group of students that filled the room to capacity. Hanna is best known for being a member of the punk band Bikini Kill and an important figure in the riot grrrl movement. Recently, her ventures include being a part of the multimedia electronic group Le Tigre and her current band, the Julie Ruin. In her lecture, Hanna spoke about the importance of language in feminism and its role in female empowerment. She said by the end of the riot grrrl movement in 1996, the language of feminism had undergone a change. “I felt the language we had made to empower ourselves, for lack of a better phrase or word, was just stolen and cheapened and didn’t mean anything,” Hanna said. “I felt like I had

kind of lost language.” Hanna discussed how girl power has been appropriated by teen magazines that feature nearly naked female pop stars. Hanna said this loss of language is almost irrelevant because artists such as herself are constantly creating new language to voice their ideas, which she does with her musical projects. Hanna also spoke about her work at the Willie Mae Rock Camp for girls, where she mentors young aspiring female musicians. She explained that this work fulfills the riot grrrl goal of involving younger women in bands and the music world. Although the original riot grrrl movement ended, Hanna continues to voice her strength through her work in musical projects and the mentoring of young female artists. During the question-and-answer session, students asked

HANNA continued on PG. 4

PITCH continued on PG. 3

Skirball series celebrates Chinese visions, voices By JESSICA TIEN

The Skirball Center for the Performing Arts’ second annual cross-cultural event “Visions and Voices,” is highlighting China with a vibrant collection of performances and events throughout the month. The event, which started Feb. 20, showcases global cultures through dance, film, theater and music. Renowned groups, such as the Hangzhou Opera Company and the National Theater of China, are featured in this year’s productions. The series coincides with NYU Shanghai’s first year as a degreegranting portal campus. Michael Harrington, executive director of the Skirball Center, cited the opening of NYU Shanghai as a factor in choosing China as this year’s theme. “We want to celebrate the global network of NYU here at the Washington Square campus,” Harrington said. “Through Skirball’s ‘Vision and Voices’ series, students

can get a taste of international cultures, right here at NYU’s home campus.” On the first day of the series, the dancers of TAO Dance Theater moved fluidly across the stage of Skirball. Their bodies formed a dynamic, unified group that spun, evolved and transformed before the audience’s eyes. The loose folds of their grey and black tunics swirled around them as they danced to the staccato, chant-like rhythm of the accompanying music. The program’s organizers hope to present an intersection of past and present by displaying traditional Chinese culture through a modern lens. The next event in the series is a rendition of “Richard III” by the National Theater of China. Their version of Shakespeare’s dramatic, murder-filled classic will be performed using Chinese costumes, music and acrobatics. The performance is set to take place at Skirball from March 26 through March 30.

CHINA continued on PG. 5


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Students competed in the 11th annual Ultra Violet Live talent show at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts on March 6. A panel of judges, including Cynthia Germanotta, chose Steinhardt freshman Jonathan Evans for the $1,000 grand prize. Evans performed an original song.

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Acumen Jacqueline Novogratz, the CEO and founder of the nonprofit Acumen Fund, will discuss the connections between business, society and politics. Novogratz will speak at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 for NYU students and $10 for the public.

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Cybersecurity The Center on Law and Security is hosting Samara Moore, the director for cybersecurity critical infrastructure protection of the White House National Security Council, and other experts in the field. The event will take place at Vanderbilt Hall and begins at 6:30 p.m.

Affordable Care Act This week’s snapshot theme is warmth. Here is today’s interpretation.

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Sherry Glied, the dean of the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, will deliver a lecture on the Affordable Care Act and the future of behavioral health. The discussion starts at 5:30 p.m. at the Ehrenkranz Center.

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HANQING CHEN, JONATHON DORNBUSH, RACHEL KAPLAN, JORDAN MELENDREZ, JONATHAN TAN About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Michael Domanico at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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PITCH continued from PG. 1

THE GAZELLE IN FOCUS: SAADIYAT UPDATE Published on TheGazelle.org on March 8, 2014

By ALISTAIR BLACKLOCK More details about the move to Saadiyat Island were released in documents published by Public Affairs on NYU Abu Dhabi’s Student Portal on March 2. Students, staff and faculty can expect to find a range of new academic and recreational facilities The new campus will include yet-to-benamed buildings and courtyards, a 50-meter swimming pool, squash courts, a fitness center and other sports facilities. Along with academic spaces, dining halls and restaurants, there will be a sun-lit library, an art gallery and auditoriums “suitable for tap dancing,” according to the post. Following a closed-door information meeting for students in October and another in February, this has been the first such announcement on the Portal detailing the soon-to-be-opened campus. The post indicated that it was the first installment in an informative monthly series titled the Saadiyat Gazette. Prior to this announcement, information provided by NYUAD on the Saadiyat campus has been minimal. “We are aware that significant change brings uncertainty, and it is our aim over the coming months to provide you with information to make the move to the new campus as smooth and seamless as possible,” the post reads. The campus is situated in what will eventually be the Marina District of the island, “envisioned as a downtown area on an urban grid with a marina on the south side of the island,” the post reads. For now, however, the structure stands alone in a sea of sand.

New York City-based architecture firm Rafael Viñoly Architects PC designed the campus. Their past projects include the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Tokyo International Forum and the Princeton University Stadium. Under construction since 2010, the Saadiyat campus is a 4.7 million square foot project across 15.4 hectares of land and should accommodate as many as 2,200 undergraduate and 600 graduate students. There are currently roughly 1,500 construction workers finalizing the campus, according to another post on the Student Portal. The campus is split into two plots, according to the website of Al Futtaim Carillion, the project’s construction company. One is reserved for academic space, including roughly 117,000 square meters of teaching and administrative space, 34,000 square meters of car parking, 8,200 square meters of research areas, and another 142,000 square meters of housing for students, faculty and staff. The second plot will hold university sports facilities, such as a running track and tennis courts. Among the documents posted by Public Affairs regarding the new campus is a Q&A with NYUAD Deputy Vice Chancellor and Urban Studies Professor Hilary Ballon, who was active in designing the new project. She details the new campus’s guiding vision, elaborates on strategies to connect the campus with the city of Abu Dhabi, describes some of the environmental initiatives taken on campus and points to unique features of the new campus. “The Saadiyat campus was designed to promote interaction between living and learning,” she wrote. “Many features recall the traditions of Is-

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lamic architecture: the irregular geometry of the campus; the relatively narrow side streets cast in shade by their buildings; the use of water in falaj-like channels and the use of local plants,” she wrote. “I associate with New York the density of the [Saadiyat campus]; its rich variety of views; its pedestrian orientation and walkability; and the mixture of uses.” Ballon elaborated on this comparison between New York and Abu Dhabi, discussing the connection of the campus to the city. “The campus is physically open to the city; having no enclosing wall signals our desire to welcome the public on campus. In this respect the Saadiyat campus is like NYU’s New York campus.” The campus will have two primary outdoor levels: The first is a street-level area accessible through one of the seven entry points on the campus, surrounded by the main campus buildings that will include the academic spaces, research centers, an art gallery and a welcome center. Then above this first level is the High Line, named in reference to the elevated park in New York City. The Saadiyat campus’s High Line is an elevated outdoor area from where the residences can be accessed. “The two levels of circulation (ground level and High Line) allow us to combine vertical density with the intimacy of a traditional U.S. college quad,” wrote Ballon. Although there is no set date for when students will first be able to see the new campus, commencement for the class of 2014 is set to be held in the gymnasium of the campus on May 25. Alistair Blacklock is editor-in-chief at The Gazelle. Email him at alistair@thegazelle.org.

CAS sophomore wins pitch competition the competition was a good opportunity for students to showcase themselves to their peers at NYU. “Sometimes NYU doesn’t really have a community, so having this event, bringing everyone together, is an awesome opportunity for anybody to be heard and recognized for what you do,” Yue said. Stern senior and TEDxNYU president Griffin Dooling said the competition went well, and the speakers were impressive. “What I enjoyed was how real the talks were,” Dooling said. “I was really impressed by even the ones who stumbled, how well they were able to recover and keep with the story they were telling.” A student will be speaking at TEDxNYU for the first time this year. The organization is also reaching out beyond the Washington Square campus by bringing in the abroad sites to participate through live streaming. This year’s theme is Modern Mavericks, and the panelists were looking for a particularly innovative winner, said CAS junior Paris DeYoung, a student on the panel and curator for TEDxNYU. Next month, Cavazos is launching Newsican, a bilingual project dedicated to diversifying the perspectives of Mexican media, which she said is monopolistic. Cavazos said she might be censored by the Mexican government, but she is willing to take the risk because she wants to make a change in the media. Cavazos said she will promote her ideas and inform people about her initiatives. “[The TEDx talk] was like something extra, and I never thought I would win,” Cavazos said. “This is my passion. I just went for it.” Claire Scimeca is a contributing writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.

Keystone pipeline divides students on environment By KAVISH HARJAI

Seven NYU Divest students were arrested in Washington, D.C. on March 2 during XL Dissent, a protest against the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Police arrested 398 people at the protest, which began at Georgetown University and welcomed 1,200 people in total, including students from over 80 universities. Ten students from Georgetown attended the event.

VIA FACEBOOK.COM

“Protests can seem juvenile and pointless and very “Everyone who got rarely end up resulting in arrested, chose to get any sort of overall change arrested. We were getting or action, in my experience. arrested so that we could Protests such as this one have a news story, so that serve to keep people aware we could get people talkof the rapidly changing ing about these issues.” world around them when it would be so easy to just — Tisch senior and divest protester Blake Sugarman sit on your couch and chow down on the toxic wave of Activists also participated in biased misinformation.” a die-in, which involved people acting dead on a black tarp — CAS freshman that was meant to represent an Max Raderstorf oil spill.

“I’m suspicious of protests in a robust democracy where entire Congresses can be swept out because it seems like the sober practice of voting works much better. There’s a lot that should be exhausted before going into the street and shouting.” — CAS senior Ashok Deshmukh President Barack Obama has not given his final decision regarding the proposed pipeline, but his decision is expected soon.

COURTESY OF DOROTHY QIAN

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“The construction of the Keystone XL pipeline will inevitably halt the progress of transitioning into a clean energy economy and further exacerbate the effects of climate change. The health of our nation should be placed at top priority and that starts with more attention being focused on combating the impacts of global warming.” — CAS sophomore Dorothy Qian

“In a world where our competitors love to exploit our dependence on oil, it would be a refreshing dose of realpolitik if America were to pursue cheaper energy and energy independence in one fell swoop.” — Deshmukh

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Kavish Harjai is a news editor. Email him at kharjai@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 | NYUNEWS.COM

FEATURES

EDITED BY BRYNA SHUMAN FEATURES@NYUNEWS.COM

HANNA continued from PG. 1

Hanna encourages the redefinition of feminism

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Hanna advocates feminism around the country. Hanna about applying feminism in everyday situations, especially when faced with the sexism and misogyny prevalent in today’s society. As a response, Hanna discussed how people can find ways to incorporate feminism into what they love to do, as she did with music. She halfjokingly said if someone really loved gardening, they could find a way to combine feminism with gardening. Hanna’s point was that feminism can exist in many ways, not being constricted to a movement, medium or time period. Gallatin senior and Program Board co-chair Sara Intrator introduced Hanna, describing the activist as one of her personal heroes.

“I’ve seen her speak before, and every one of her projects can be a savior for these people,” Intrator said. Intrator was evidently not alone in her opinion, with many people lining up after the lecture to talk and take photos with Hanna. Tisch junior Kevin Patterson said Hanna’s lecture was impressive. “A lot of the topics [Hanna discussed] are still ignored in mainstream examinations of gender roles,” Patterson said. “It was [also] great to see the subjects and background on a lot of the art she makes.” Sam Del Rowe is a staff writer. Email him at features@nyunews.com.

Professors awarded fellowship for contributions to science, research By JULIANNE MCSHANE

Two NYU faculty members received fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for their research and contributions to the field of science. The two-year fellowships are awarded annually to 126 early-career researchers based on past performance and perceived potential to make important contributions to their fields. Nicholas Stavropoulos, professor of neuroscience and physiology at NYU’s Langone Medical Center and its Neuroscience Institute, and Roozbeh Kiani, professor at NYU’s Center for Neural Science are the recipients. For Stavropoulos, the research that led to his award involved experiments with fruit flies, which were used to help understand the basic mechanisms that cause sleep in humans. “It’s a great honor to be selected for this fellowship,” Stavropoulos said. “I’m excited that others are recognizing the promise and potential of our work.” He said the funds from the award — a $50,000 fellowship — would go to support his research, including paying for chemicals, DNA sequencing and the salaries of scientists in the lab. Stavropoulos received his doctorate in genetics from Harvard Medical School. Michael Young, Stavropoulos’ former supervisor and the head of the laboratory of genetics at Harvard, said Stavropoulos’ work also focused on gene effects on sleep during his time as a postdoctoral

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Professor Kiani’s work in neuroscience earned him a Sloan fellowship. fellow at Rockefeller University. Qiuling Li, a second-year student in the graduate program in neuroscience and physiology at the NYU School of Medicine who has been working in Stavropoulos’ lab since April 2013, said Stavropoulos has been an influential mentor. “He has taken an active role in my technical training and also continues to inspire my scientific thought and discourse,” Li said. In Kiani’s research, he explores the neuroscience behind decision-making processes and has monkeys to perform tasks using available evidence and stored knowledge. Kiani received his doctorate from the University of Washington and an M.D. from Iran’s Shaheed Beheshti University. “The award is highly competitive,”

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Professor Stavropoulos has conducted experiments with fruit flies.

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Kiani said. “I was happy and honored [to receive] it.” Kiani said he plans to use the award money for continuing his research. Braden Purcell, a postdoctoral associate in Kiani’s lab, said Purcell is an expert in developing computational models and using state-of-the-art techniques to monitor brain cell activity. “Dr. Kiani has a unique set of skills to address [decision-making] problems,” Purcell said. The Sloan fellowships have been awarded annually since 1955. Candidates for the Sloan fellowships must meet certain eligibility requirements, which include holding either a tenure-track or equivalent position at a college or university; a Ph.D. or equivalent in a math, science or computer-related field; and a Ph.D. awarded on or after Sep. 1, 2008. A department head or senior researcher must also nominate them for the award. The foundation, established in 1934 by Alfred P. Sloan Jr., is a notfor-profit grantmaking institution based in New York City. The foundation provides grants to support education and research in the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and economics. Julianne McShane is a contributing writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

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FEATURES

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Gallatin alumna discusses gentrification of NYC art at panel By KHALEELAH LOGAN

Gallatin alumna, author and art aficionado Ann Fensterstock spoke at a panel discussion hosted by Gallatin professor Emeritus Laurin Raiken on March 7. The panel focused on “Art on the Block,” Fensterstock’s book that explores the 50-year history of the gentrification of art in New York City. The book discusses the various neighborhoods that, at one point or another, were a site of the migration, gentrification, degeneration and decay of the art world.

COURTESY OF PALGRAVE MACMILLAN

The book highlights the work of artists like Jeff Koons.

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P O T

By BRYNA SHUMAN St. Patrick’s Day is next Monday and there are plenty of ways to celebrate besides a beer crawl through New York City. Learn a little more about Irish culture, explore the city and join the celebrations with these St. Patrick’s Day options.

Irish Music Put yourself in the Irish mindset this St. Patrick’s Day with

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Fensterstock started the discussion with a 25-minute presentation that summarized the content of her book, including a breakdown of each neighborhood, its history before it joined the art world and 10 key ideas that Fensterstock believes move the art community. Fensterstock considers the 10 ideas, including real estate, the migration of the art world, the economy, art fairs and the Internet changing the way we view art, to be the key themes that weave through her book. Gallatin committee member Josephine De Caro asked Fensterstock about the relationship between real estate and art. “There has to be some correlation between the evolution of real estate and where artists go,” De Caro said. “Artists always want to be in inexpensive places.” De Caro said the opportunities in New York City are shrinking and asked where artists would go instead. “The struggling artist, whether it’s the poet or the dancer, will always come to New York City, and they will always find a way

to survive,” Fensterstock said in response. “My worry is for the mid-level galleries … that is the cohort that is getting threatened.” The panel ended with a debate on the usefulness of galleries in the age of the Internet. “Now that we’ve got peripatetic art fairs that can go set themselves up on the piers, and we’ve got the Internet where you can do a virtual tour of the gallery and the installation, why have a gallery?” Fensterstock asked the crowd. Gallatin junior Devon Bussell said he learned a lot from Fensterstock. “For me, the economic and geographic parts of art are less obvious, less apparent than the philosophical and formal aspects of art production,” Bussell said. “So hearing someone, [such as] a well-researched professional, talk about these material dimensions of the art world is something I like to utilize as a guideline for me entering that world.” Khaleelah Logan is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

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Skirball’s China series brings culture to life in variety of shows NYU’s Symphony Orchestra will perform Academy Awardwinning composer Tan Dun’s “The Map” on May 12. The musical experience combines video, pre-recorded audio and live music. The piece represents Dun as a contemporary composer who draws inspiration from his traditional Chinese roots and the sounds of his hometown. Cel-

VIA FACEBOOK.COM

Members of the TAO Dance Theater give a performance.

ebrated cellist Wendy Sutter, Grammy-nominated conductor Andrew Cyr and pipa master Zhou Yi will be joining the orchestra for the performance. Following many of the events, the “Vision and Voices” series engages its audience by offering question-and-answer sessions with the performers, directors, playwrights and choreographers. This initiative invites the audience to directly interact with the artists in a way that most traditional performances do not. Harrington said these discussion sessions provide context for the performances and differentiates the series from other New York City arts programs relating to global cultures. CAS freshman Andre Tan said he is excited about the series. “I’m a big fan of the arts and the performing arts, but I’m not very in touch with my culture,” Tan said. “For that reason, I’d be interested in going so I can learn a little more about myself and my roots. This is a great way to make students more culturally aware.” Jessica Tien is a contributing writer. Email

Ways to celebrate St. Patrick’s with Irish flare some traditional music. Paddy Reilly’s Music Bar offers live music seven days a week, alternating between traditional Irish and Celtic rock, in addition to a full Guinness draught bar. For a different type of show, get tickets for “Once,” a Broadway musical set in Dublin that features stellar Irish music. (Paddy’s Reilly’s Music Bar, 519 Second Ave. Tickets for “Once” start at $49.50.)

Tenement Museum Jump into the past by taking a tour of the homes of Irish immigrants. The Tenement Museum offers visitors the chance to learn more about Irish immigrants by exploring the re-

stored home of the Moore family, which moved to America in the late 1860s. The tour takes an inside look at the Moore’s struggles, from anti-immigrant tensions in their neighborhood to family tragedies. (The Tenement Museum, 103 Orchard St. Irish Outsiders Tour, $20 with student ID.)

Scavenger Hunt Grab some friends and team up for the Amazing New York Scavenger Hunt: St. Patrick’s Day Edition. Decked head to toe in bright green, teams are sent on a three-hour quest through New York City, following a series of clues sent to them through a smartphone app. The teams will have to successfully complete various mental or physical tasks and return first in order to win the grand prize. (137 Ludlow St., March 16, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event costs $20.)

Traditional Food

VIA FOURSQUARE.COM

Paddy Reilly’s Music Bar has live music on St. Patrick’s Day.

Celebrate this St. Patrick’s Day with some traditional Irish food. McSorley’s Old Ale House has been around for over 150 years and offers a nostalgic atmosphere along with good food and cheap house brews. The Black Sheep offers traditional Irish fare like beer-battered fish and chips

VIA WIKIPEDIA.ORG

A parade is just one way the city celebrates St. Patrick’s Day. ($12), bangers and mash ($11) and shepherd’s pie ($12), in addition to a heaping of Irish luck, evidenced by the 25,000 pennies decorating the bar top. For a more hands-on activity, take a class and learn to cook your own beef and Guinness stew and traditional Irish sweet cake. (McSorley’s Old Ale House, 15 E. Seventh St. The Black Sheep, 583 Third Ave. Bowery Cooking Center, 95 E. Houston St. March 15, 2 to 5 p.m. The event costs $45.)

St. Patrick’s Day Parades Wear your green beads and shamrock hats and join the

party. The Bronx will celebrate with the 16th annual Throggs Neck St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 16, starting at noon near East Tremont and Lafayette avenues. Manhattan’s annual blowout bash will march down Fifth Avenue beginning at 11 a.m. on March 17, with a procession of honor guards, bagpipers and Irish step dancers. Brooklyn keeps the party going for an extra week, throwing its parade at 1 p.m. on March 23. Bryna Shuman is features editor. Email her at bshuman@nyunews.com.


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DOWN 1 Baldwin of “30 Rock” 2 Result of a concussion, maybe 3 “Double, double, ___ and trouble” 4 Binge 5 Air rifle pellets 6 ___ mater 7 Fashionable Christian 8 Gab and gab some more 9 Fourth of July and Veterans Day events 10 Aroma 11 Tidbit often served barbecuestyle 12 Co. head 13 Thatch-roofed dwelling, maybe 21 Pennant race inits. 22 Big name in ice cream 25 Set on fire TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 26 More cruel A R A B U S H B E E 27 Rap sheet listings V A L E N C E R R R I N A T I O N O I L 28 “Inside Llewyn Davis” actor D R A F T W A K E Oscar and others M O M M Y L E D S 29 Like wetland A M B A M A D C A P corsage D E X F O L I A T E 30 Common flower O L L L E A D S I N 32 Member of a N O L D E K I T E S Western tribe N T E X M E T 33 Checkout A F S T A R M E W counter staple … or, when K L E I N P I S A read as three Y O U R M A J E S T Y words, what 20-, 31-, 47- and O L I V E G A R D E N 55-Across have U N D E R E X P O S E in common

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56

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58 65

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PUZZLE BY SEAN DOBBIN

34 Helper 36 “Hold on ___!” 40 Zadora of “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians” 41 Like Joan of Arc 44 Vail in the winter, e.g. 46 Goods: Abbr. 48 Seeming eternity

49 Subtlety

59 Killer whale

54 Philosopher who said “Writing is the geometry of the soul”

60 Winter wear material

55 Popped topper 56 Corner piece in chess

61 Republicans, for short

57 “Eek!”

62 “Oh, I see!”

58 Shakespearean king

63 Paving material

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY PETER KEFFER OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

HARRY’S TAKE

U.S. military must invest in psychiatry By HARRY BROWN

Last week, the Journal of the American Medical Association released its initial findings on the psychological state of U.S. soldiers. The three reports stated that one in five soldiers suffered regularly from mental illnesses before enlisting, including ADHD, depression and panic disorder. These findings present a damning indictment on the Pentagon that for too long has failed to tackle the long-term increase in military suicide caused by preventable mental health disorders. It is time for the military to invest in psychiatrists, not tanks. The reports stated that the most commonly found psychological disorder among enlisted troops is “intermittent explosive disorder” — a phrase used by medical professionals to describe an unexpected outburst of rage, most commonly seen in posttraumatic stress disorder sufferers. Indeed, the American Psychiatric Association found that one in five veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars has PTSD. Even more worrying, during the course of the research for the report the suicide rate doubled among

military service personnel from the civilian average in 2004 to an unprecedented 23 people per day in 2009, before decreasing to 22 people per day since 2013. The researchers found that the military recruiting process is the main culprit in the rising suicide rate. They find the process to be completely inadequate in rooting out those who would be at-risk from increased levels of stress associated with the military regimented lifestyle and, furthermore, deployment. Over 8 percent of soldiers surveyed had suicidal thoughts before joining the military and 1.1 percent had previously attempted suicide. As Richard Kessler, a Harvard professor who led one of the studies, told the Los Angeles Times, “The question becomes, ‘How did these guys get in the Army?’”

The U.S. military has been simultaneously fighting two major wars and countless other operations in the last decade. It comes as no surprise that there had been an emphasis on meeting troop quotas regardless of their mental capacity. This neglect of mental health was a grave mistake, putting other servicemen in harm’s way and resulting in unnecessary fatalities. As the War in Afghanistan draws to a close, the U.S. military must refocus its attention away from the battlefield and toward the homefront. The power of the U.S. military is not in the number of warships it possesses, but in the physical and mental strength of its personnel. In a virtual town hall meeting last year, Gen. Ray Odierno, chief of staff to the army, said to the participants, “We remain committed to our families’ and soldiers’ quality of life and are dedicated to building and sustaining resilience of every soldier and family member.” He must now honor that commitment. Harry Brown is a staff columnist. Harry’s Take is published every Monday. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

CHRISTINA’S CASE

Pornography industry lacks privacy

By CHRISTINA COLEBURN

The New York Times published an editorial on privacy as it pertains to individuals with careers in pornography. The article is in response to the media commotion surrounding the Duke University freshman who recently revealed details of her life as a porn star. Written by Stoya, another adult film actress, the piece poignantly asks whether the general public can learn about privacy from porn stars, a question prompted by the somewhat confusing course of action the Duke student has taken in the past weeks. After initially giving interviews under a pseudonym and refusing to reveal her true identity, the freshman ultimately chose to reveal her face and release her stage name: Belle Knox. She recently appeared on CNN’s “Piers Morgan,” where she discussed the reaction to her disclosure, sexual autonomy and the hostile treatment of adult entertainment performers. While Knox raises significant points about society’s often disingenuous relationship with the porn industry, it seems that the crux of Stoya’s argument about privacy is

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lost on her. As Stoya notes, whether one is a sex symbol or a member of the Parent Teacher Association, selfbranding has reached a new magnitude with the growing presence of social media. In this increasingly digital age, few are unaffected by social media’s prevalence. As such, privacy has become a rare commodity for the average person. For those whose professions involve performing sexual acts on camera, privacy is even more scarce. Knox never could have reasonably expected her porn career to remain a secret, and believing otherwise indicates a serious lack of insight. Knox should not be ridiculed or harassed for participating in adult films. What Knox does with her body is her prerogative, and if performing is as satisfying and empowering to

Knox as she claims, a bystander has no place to force his views on her. Furthermore, any threats against her are wholly unacceptable. Although the transgressions against Knox are deplorable, it was insensible to anticipate that the response would be neutral or nonexistent given the highly charged nature of pornography. More so, Knox’s ironic attempt to preserve her identity in the aftermath of the reveal — disclosing her stage name while saying she was committed to her anonymity — was likely to be ill-fated. While it is understandable that Knox tried to gain control of the conversation, these personal details would have ultimately come to light. Knox’s predicament speaks to a harsh truth. Privacy, which is meager for the general populace, has become an unreasonable expectation for those who exist in the public eye. Porn actors, despite glamorous stage names, are included in this category. Christina Coleburn is a deputy opinion editor. Christina’s Case is published every Monday. Email her at ccoleburn@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Homosexual literature should not be censored

Legislators in South Carolina have proposed a bill that would reduce the funding of two state colleges because they had assigned material to students that dealt with homosexual themes. These proposals have arisen in response to letters of concern from parents of students at these universities, who have expressed their disapproval of material they deem offensive and contrary to their “feelings and beliefs.” The budget cuts have already passed the Higher Education subcommittee as well as the House Ways and Means Committee. If the bill passes the House, state Senate and Gov. Nikki Haley’s desk, it will mark a dangerous step backwards in the battle to eliminate literary censorship and homophobic laws. What the legislators failed to consider is that so much of the world’s best literature has ties to homosexuality. There is a long history of censorship in U.S. schools, especially in cases involving openness toward sexuality — both gay and straight. The list of banned books is lengthy and includes modern and familiar classics including “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” “Leaves of Grass,” “The Catcher in the Rye” and “The Color Purple.” None of these titles are still prohibited from being taught in classrooms, but a future generation of novels may lose the accessibility they deserve if legislators in South Carolina pass this bill. Walt Whitman, Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, Virginia Woolf, Gore Vidal, Truman Capote, Plato, Allen Ginsberg and James Baldwin, among others, are gay, thought to be gay or focus heavily on gay themes in their work. Their works have left an indelible mark on the literary landscape — a journalism class cannot be taught without Capote nor a philosophy class without Plato — so to withhold funding to universities that advocate for the inclusion of such novels, essays and poems in their curriculum negatively affects the students seeking a holistic education. The breadth of great literature that contains gay themes is immense. To censor work with homosexual subjects is an injustice and counterproductive to the academic aspirations of these universities. Furthermore, the criteria that make materials too obscene for college students are very unclear. The line is murky and there is no objective definition that can bolster any justification for these budget cuts. This potential law follows an unsettling surge in controversial anti-LGBT legislation. Most recently, the Arizona legislature passed SB 1062, which would have allowed businesses to refuse service to gay customers, a bill Gov. Jan Brewer ultimately vetoed. Haley, the South Carolina House and state Senate should follow Brewer’s lead.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Peter Keffer (Chair), Christina Coleburn (Co-chair), Omar Etman (Co-chair), Nina Golshan (Co-chair)

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY FRANCISCO NAVAS SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Knicks’ pursuit of Jackson marks act of desperation By CHARLES SURETTE

It is now time to christen the New York Knicks’ 2014 campaign an unmitigated disaster — the tenants of Madison Square Garden sit at 24-40 on the season, 10th in the NBA’s beleaguered Eastern Conference and four games out of the playoffs. The Knicks have suffered separate ninegame and seven-game losing streaks, including a 41-point loss to the division rival Boston Celtics on their home floor on Dec. 8. For a team that began the season as the favorites to once again win the Atlantic Division, led by scoring champion Carmelo Anthony, and filled with on-paper talent, the very notion of missing the playoffs is shocking. Not so shocking are the rumors of the Knicks’ pursuit of former Chicago Bulls and L.A. Lakers head coach Phil Jackson for a position in the front office as president of basketball operations. Jackson, an 11-time NBA champion head coach and former coach of the year, is no stranger to success. Jackson helped shepherd Michael Jordan’s Bulls to six NBA championships in the ’90s and Kobe Bryant’s Lakers to five titles in the 2000s. Jackson’s ability to manage superstar egos and

VIA FLICKR.COM

Jackson previously coached the Bulls and the Lakers.

curb locker room infighting is nearly unrivaled, giving him the nickname “Zen Master.” By bringing in Jackson to oversee head coach Mike Woodson and his players, the Knicks are hopeful that this season can be saved and that another run at an elusive NBA title can be mustered. Despite Jackson’s prowess as a leader and tactician, not even he can salvage the sinking ship that is this year’s Knicks. The Knicks are certainly talented, but they suffer under Woodson’s coaching. Anthony, while indeed a prolific scorer, has shown an utter lack of willingness to make his teammates better. Moreover, his lackadaisical defense puts pressure on the rest of the team to keep up with opponents’ ability to score at will. To make matters worse, shooting guard J.R. Smith’s complete disregard for anything related to the idea of a “team” has doomed the Knicks from the outset. His highly questionable shot selection and childish on-court and offcourt antics have only lent credence to the media image of Smith as a poor man’s Anthony, a volume scorer with little else but a toxic attitude. While Anthony and Smith’s gameplay epitomizes the Knicks’ failings in 2014, the responsibility must be shouldered by the entire roster. Injuries are to blame as well, as the Knicks have gone stretches without center Tyson Chandler and power forward Amar’e Stoudemire, who are both keys to their interior defense. That being said, the damage has been done to the Knicks. This season might as well be written off as a lost cause that Jackson’s greatness cannot revive. Any move by the Knicks to procure him amounts only to an act of desperation to appease an increasingly discontented fan base angry at decades of front-office debacles and on-court failings. Charles Surette is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

Despite playoff loss, women’s basketball has bright future By BRITTANY YU

The Violets were knocked out of the first round of competition in the NCAA Division III Women’s Basketball Tournament on March 7 after losing to the University of New England Nor’easters by a score of 80-77. Despite the disappointing end to the season, the Violets proved themselves to be a competitive team after a fantastic turnaround season. Under second-year head coach Lauren Hall-Gregory, the Violets finished the regular season with a 20-6 record, including a 9-5 record in UAA play, doubling their wins compared to the 20122013 season when the team posted just a 10-15 overall record. This year’s record is the best the team has registered since the 2008-2009 season, which was also the last time the Violets made an appearance in the NCAA tournament when they made it to the Sweet 16 round. While the Nor’easters, who finished the regular season with a 27-2 record, led for the majority of the game, the Violets were relentless in their play and kept the score close. At the start of the second half, UNE was ahead 36-32. The Violets managed to take a brief 5452 lead with 9:41 left in the game, but the Nor’easters regained the lead with two three-pointers over the next 90 seconds. With five minutes remaining in the game and the Violets trailing 69-60, CAS freshman guard Kaitlyn Read scored two baskets to pull the

VIA GONYUATHLETICS.COM

The Violets have high hopes for next season. team back within reach. UNE held off the Violets with the help of junior Kelly Coleman matching her career-best of 32 points and sinking two three-pointers in the last three minutes of play. The Nor’easters led 76-68 with 1:24 left on the clock, essentially claiming the victory. Read led the team with 25 points, while also adding five rebounds and four steals, and CAS sophomore forward Megan Dawe registered 15 points. Coming off the bench, Tisch sophomore guard Riley Wurtz scored 14 points, recorded three rebounds and three assists, and CAS freshman forward Lindsey Oldshue contributed a team-high nine rebounds. Given this season’s improvement over previous years, the NYU women’s basketball team has made itself a force to be reckoned with over the

coming seasons. SCPS junior guard Melissa Peng said the team valued the experience of participating in the tournament. “The opportunity to get a bid and be a part of the NCAA [tournament] was incredible and a great step forward for our program,” Peng said. “We’ve set a new bar within our team, and it was a great experience for us.” The success of this season given such a young roster — with six freshmen and three sophomores out of 13 players — is a sign of good things to come. The future remains bright for the program, as this tournament appearance can be used as a launching pad for greater success starting in the fall semester. Brittany Yu is a contributing writer. Email her at sports@nyunews.com.

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