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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 19

Shanghai campus to extend global vision By FAY LIN

NYU Shanghai, the university’s third degree-granting portal campus, continues to prepare for its inaugural class entering next semester. The campus will welcome a class of approximately 300 students in the fall. Assistant Vice President for Admissions Shawn Abbott said 51 percent of enrolled students will be citizens of China. This decision was made as a result of NYUSH’s partnership with the Ministry of Education in China. “This expectation is really no different than how many public universities in the United States reserve spaces in their freshman class for in-state residents,” he said. This number is not an indication of easier admission for Chinese students. Abbott explained that admissions will be selective for all Chinese and international students, as the class size is very small. The idea of being a foreigner in a strange land appealed to some applicants, like New Jersey high school student Alex Opanasets, who was accepted through early decision and said she was pleased to hear that every international student will room with a Chinese student. “There can’t really be effective exposure to global ideas and perspectives without ample representation from the country,” Opanasets said. According to Opanasets, the current group of about 15 early decision acceptances are already in contact with each other and include students from 10 countries on four continents. Joanna Waley-Cohen, dean of Arts and Sciences at NYU Shanghai, expects the interaction between the groups of students on the portal campus to extend to students studying abroad in Shanghai, as they will likely have overlapping elective courses. “It’s a wonderful thing for these Chinese freshmen to meet the students from New York,” WaleyCohen said. “These students will

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TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013

nyunews.com

NYU sees 12 percent spike in applications TOTAL NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS 48,606

50,000 45,000

CAMPUS BREAKDOWN

43,728

40,000 35,000

9%

30,000

11%

25,000 20,000

94% CLASS OF 2016

CLASS OF 2017

NEW YORK 45,452

SHANGHAI 5,145

ABU DHABI 4,289

*Students can express intrest in multiple campuses

GRAPHICS BY MEGHAN POOLE/WSN

NYU received a total of 48,606 applications for the incoming freshman class of 2017. Of these perspective students, 5,145 expressed interest in NYU Shanghai, the university’s newest portal campus. NYUSH is scheduled to welcome its inaugural class in fall of 2013.

STORY ON PAGE 3

Kate Nash strengthens sound on fervent new LP By ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE

British singer-songwriter Kate Nash is whatever she wants — everything a girl should be. In her third album, “Girl Talk,” the BRIT award-winning musician presents 15 tracks ranging from punchy to pensive and demonstrates an audible shift in her sound toward a grittier feel. After the success of her first two albums, Nash became known for the bright melodies and charmingly uncouth persona heard on hits like “Foundations” and “Do-Wah-Doo.” However, despite what its title suggests, “Girl Talk” is not to be taken lightly. Nash blends feminist ideology and riot girl aesthetics throughout the album, and this mixture becomes evident immediately on the Runaways-esque opening

COURTESY OF HAVE 10P RECORDS/FONTANA

Singer Nash puts her pesonality on display with “Girl Talk.” track “All Talk,” which challenges society’s narrow expectations for female musicians. It appears that Nash isn’t the least bit afraid to get nasty, as her voice rapidly shifts from a silky croon to a gut-

tural wail on multiple tracks to produce an utterly thrilling result. The album stumbles, however, when Nash breaks her energetic stride to slow down on tracks such as “Labyrinth” and “Lullaby

For An Insomniac.” “Labyrinth” is still an interesting product, but it doesn’t mesh with the rest of the album. “Lullaby” is hurt by its awkward structure — the first two minutes feature stripped vocals but the song ends with a symphony orchestra. The majority of the tracks is carried by a strong, steady bass line and decorated with gritty guitar riffs, punchy drums and lo-fi distortions. “Rap For Rejection” is a pleasant surprise — the perceptive singer calls out double standards and sexshaming tactics in today’s society that claim sexism is over, all while rapping along to a catchy, bass-heavy rhythm. Nash’s impeccable lyrics prove to be her greatest strength yet

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE STAFF PLAYLIST By JOSH JOHNSON Somehow, the monstrosity that is Mumford & Sons has become the face of folk music. To right this wrong, here is a playlist of overshadowed gems that make up the contemporary folk scene.

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IN AND OF

THE CITY

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It’s a big city and a widespread university. Catch up with our daily updates on university and city/state news headlines other publications are covering.

COMPILED BY THE

WSN STAFF

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

AMY ZHANG Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN Deputy Managing Editor

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university TATIANA BAEZ city/state VERONICA CARCHEDI investigative NICOLE BROWN arts JOSH JOHNSON features KRISTINA BOGOS sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN copy MICHAEL DOMANICO,

WICY WANG

“Bugs” — O’Death

foreign correspondent JULIE DEVITO senior editors GENTRY BROWN, DAN

“In Sleep” — Lissie

HINTON, CHARLES MAHONEY, CLIO MCCONNELL, STEFAN MELNYK, LAVYA YALAMANCHI

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university KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR city/state EMILY BELL, ANDREW

KARPAN books/theater OLIVIA GEORGE film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment ALEX GREENBERGER music ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE the highlighter blog SAM RULLO features HELEN HOLMES beauty & style MICHELLE LIM dining ANGEL CHANG sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia REBECCA CLEMENTI,

“Little Rock” — Hayes Carll

JOON LEE

OPINION PAGE “Play a Train Song” — Todd Snider “Birmingham” — Shovels & Rope “Goodbye Midnight” — The Spring Standards “Fingers To The Bone” — Brown Bird “Tight Like That” — Asylum Street Spankers “Black River Killer” — Blitzen Trapper “Jackson” — Lucinda Williams “Winter Trees” — Tallahassee “Whales and Roses” — We Are The Woods COURTESY OF ERNEST JENNING RECORD CO. | COURTESY OF FAT POSSUM RECORDS | COURTESY OF LOST HIGHWAY RECORDS

SNAPSHOT

opinion editor

SAMEER JAYWANT deputy opinion editors

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, RAQUEL WOODRUFF

POTENTIAL POPE HAILS FROM THE BRONX The Bronx community of St. Margaret Mary Church is pulling for the Ghanaian cardinal, Peter Turkson, to become the first black pope. Turkson graduated from St. Anthony-on-Hudson Seminary in Rensselaer. – NY Daily News BUILDING A NEW BROOKLYN SKYLINE Plans for the future Brooklyn skyline have been presented and feature the historic Domino Sugar building with a new tech-hub in the center of the defunct factory. Architects have also allotted space for a school, a park and housing next to the Williamsburg Bridge. The $1 billion project will take 15 years to complete. – NY1 ICHIRO SUZUKI WILL RETURN TO THE PLATE The Yankees outfielder Ichiro Suzuki is uninjured after his SUV was struck in the middle of an intersection after Sunday night’s spring training game in Detroit. Team manager Joe Giradi said he expects Ichiro to play in Tuesday’s exhibition game against the Atlanta Braves. – NBC NY BROOKLYN RALLIES TO SAVE INTERFAITH MEDICAL CENTER On Saturday, Brooklyn residents rallied together in hopes of saving the Interfaith Medical Center of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. The hospital filed for bankruptcy last year, and Long Island College Hospital nearby is already in the process of closing. – NY1

The New York City skyline glimmers in vibrant golden lights on a frosty February night.

PHOTO BY WILLIAM MARTIN

SOMEONE HAS THE “JAILHOUSE BLUES” Matthew Matagrano sneaked into New York City jails, including Rikers Island, using phony credentials to pose as an employee. Matagrano reportedly spent his time communicating with other inmates and stealing walkie talkies and other items. He was charged with burglary, possession of forged instruments, and other crimes. – NBC NY

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MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Amy Zhang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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SHANGHAI continued from PG. 1

China portal brings New York, Chinese exchange

learn a lot from each other culturally and within the classroom.” NYUSH faculty will also hail from both China and the United States, underlining NYUSH’s value in an integrated global network. Waley-Cohen explained that a cohort of professors from NYUNY will be going to NYUSH to teach. The NYUSH class of 2017 will have required courses that emphasize a global perspective by exploring Chinese culture, including social and cultural foundations, writing, language, English for Chinese students and Chinese for non-Chinese students. After completing this program, students will have a choice of majors in the humanities, social sciences and STEM fields. Emily Flippen, a high school student from Texas whose early decision application to NYUSH was accepted in Decem-

ber, said she was disappointed she could not immediately start classes in her desired major of finance but thinks the core program will ultimately strengthen the university. “Living alongside Chinese students, going to the same classes and experiencing the same city offers an invaluable opportunity, one that I could not turn down,” she said. “Making strong and challenging courses in these required area is going to be what allows NYUSH to grow and attract more students internationally,” she said. All information regarding housing or athletic programs at NYU Shanghai can be found at www.shanghai. nyu.edu/resources. Fay Lin is a contributing writer. Additional reporting by Nicole Brown. Email them at investigative@nyunews.com.

Bill preventing discrimination for the unemployed vetoed By ADJOA HACKMAN

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg recently vetoed a jobless-discrimination bill that would prevent employers from discriminating against people with little to no previous work experience. In addition to outlawing jobless discrimination, the proposed bill would have banned job postings from stating that current employment is a requirement. The bill would also allow applicants to sue employers for damages if plaintiffs could prove they were turned down due to their unemployed status. However, speaker of the New York City Council Christine Quinn expects the Council to overturn the veto sometime this month. “We cannot, and will not, allow New Yorkers who are qualified and ready to work [to] have the door of opportunity slammed in their faces,” Quinn said in a public statement. “The long-term unemployed face some of the greatest challenges in their job searches.” New York City’s current unemployment rate is 9.4 percent, which exceeds both the state and national averages of 8.8 percent and 7.8 percent, respectively, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, Bloomberg recently created several job stimulus programs. On Feb. 21, the day before the veto, he announced

the creation of the Individualized Correction Achievement Network, a community re-entry program that would help criminal offenders find jobs. In the past month he also created the Made In NY initiative to bring tech-related jobs to the city. However, this bill did not satisfy the mayor’s requirements. In a letter explaining his decision, Bloomberg explained that although the measure meant well, it was a misguided effort because it would lead to more lawsuits than jobs. “Hiring decisions frequently involve the exercise of independent, subjective judgment about a prospective employee’s likely future performance,” he said in the letter. “The circumstances surrounding a person’s unemployment status may, in certain situations, be relevant to employers when selecting qualified employees.” Supporters of the bill, such as CAS sophomore Jessica Cole, said the hiring process is sometimes unfair to those who have previously been laid off because of their company’s economic problems instead of being fired. “Not all unemployed citizens are in this situation due to being fired,” she said. “Layoffs occur all the time. Shouldn’t these people be protected, especially when they’re actively pursuing further employment?” Adjoa Hackman is a contributing writer. Email her at cstate@nyunews.com.

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Growth in applicant pool increases competition for incoming class By HANQING CHEN

Undergraduate applications rose 12 percent this year, a surprising increase that is “unusual for any college or university in any one year” according to assistant vice president of admissions Shawn Abbott. This represents a major growth compared to the three percent increase in applications between the 2011 and 2012 admission seasons. It also marks a six-year streak of record-breaking application seasons for the university since 2008. This year also marks the first wave of applications for NYU’s newest global campus in Shanghai, the portal campus that is scheduled to open in fall of 2013. The university received approximately 48,600 applications for the undergraduate class of 2017, up from about 43,700 for the class of 2016. Because of the high number of applications, Abbott expects a decrease in the acceptance rate for the incoming freshman class. “The New York admissions committee will likely employ a more selective admission process,” he said. The application process also became more rigorous as applicants were required to submit separate writing samples for each portal campus and Liberal Studies Program

global academic centers, resulting in a total of eight different samples. Approximately 45,450 people expressed interest in the main New York campus, and they will be vying for approximately 4,800 available seats.

NYU SHANGHAI Slated to open in the fall of 2016, NYU’s newest portal campus received a total of 5,145 applications. This inaugural class will be at least 50 percent Chinese nationals, and many applicants have undergone the Chinese Gao Kao college entrance exams, according to NYU spokesperson John Beckman. “We are very pleased with the applications we have received and the quality of the applicants,” said Beckman. Although Beckman said that it was difficult to draw parallels between the launch of the university’s first portal campus in Middle East, the university is trying to welcome its first class at the Chinese campus in a familiar way. “There was a recent candidates’ weekend — a feature of the admissions process that we first introduced in Abu Dhabi — in Shanghai that we think went very well,” Beckman said. All candidates, whittled down to 500 in early February, will be competing for approximately 300 seats, according to Abbott.

NYU ABU DHABI NYU Abu Dhabi, now in its sixth year as one of NYU’s global portal campuses, saw around 4,280 applications indicating interest in attending the Saadiyat Island campus. The Abu Dhabi campus has traditionally been highly selective, with an admit rate of 1.3 percent last year. However, the applicant field has become even deeper this year. “NYUAD applicants have made life exceedingly difficult for our admissions team — the overall pool of applicants was extraordinary,” said Josh Taylor, a spokesperson for NYU Abu Dhabi. According to Taylor, SAT scores for the perspective 2017 class had a median score of 1,950, up from 1,850 for the Class of 2016, approximately a 5 percent increase. Meanwhile, the median ACT score was 29, up 7 percent from 27 in last year’s applications. Although this year’s applicants will be vying for 150 seats at the downtown campus, Josh Taylor said that the portal is looking to expand within the next decade once the campus moves to Saadiyat Island. There, Taylor expects to grow its class size to about 500 to 550 students per year. Hanqing Chen is web managing editor. Email her at hchen@nyunews.com.

Professor offers optimistic view of climate change in new book By SU SIE PARK

The intersection of policy and climate change led the conversation at the NYU Bookstore’s author reading yesterday. Adjunct professor William Hewitt, who teaches climate change, sustainability and energy, introduced his book “A Newer World: Politics, Money, Technology, and What’s Really Being Done to Solve the Climate Crisis.” Working on the book for two and a half years before “A Newer World” hit the shelves in December, Hewitt has dealt with international relations and global affairs for almost 30 years. The book is mostly about how we can help improve the climate crisis and promote sustainability. Hewitt was inspired to write a book when he realized that the problems of controlling climate change were not due to the lack of technology in renewable energy, green building or sustainable culture, but rather by not having enough policy regulation supporting the technology. “We need money for technology. We need finance ... from the private sector to help to move that technology forward,” Hewitt said. The bookstore usually tries to open events for books published in the last six months. Community Relations Manager at the NYU Bookstore Yael Yisraeli said that Hewitt’s book is important

to the community because it is about the environment, which is highly significant for everyone. “The environment is the air we breathe, the water we drink, it is everything around us. We cannot ignore it,” Yisraeli said. “When we destroy the environment, it is like destroying ourselves. We need to have a good relationship with the environment, too.” CAS junior Kyle Viola said that he was pleased to hear a new and encouraging view instead of a negative perspective about climate change. Viola is used to hearing about global warming and not about the change that

can be brought by activists. “It is a very optimistic topic. It influences me to take an optimistic perspective too.” Throughout the discussion, Hewitt discussed the general problem of climate change, why we are experiencing climate change and the impacts of these effects. “I teach international relations, global affairs, and so I want to let other people know that this is an issue being looked at. It’s being addressed,” Hewitt said. Su Sie Park is a contributing writer. Email her at university@nyunews.com.

JON PACKLES FOR WSN

William Hewitt stressed a positive outlook on global warming.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

BEAUTY AND STYLE

EDITED BY MICHELLE LIM BSTYLE@NYUNEWS.COM

Transitional pieces bring student wardrobes from winter to spring

CROPPED TROUSERS It’s not yet time to break out the jean shorts but also no longer appropriate for heavy-duty denim. The perfect compromise? A pair of classic cropped trousers. Style the versatile piece with a pair of leather oxfords for warmer days and opt for a pair of short booties for cooler ones.

LEATHER JACKET The winter to spring transition period is the perfect time for this wardrobe staple to be dusted off and worn. When it’s too hot for a wool coat but too cold for the light cotton jacket, this option offers the best of both worlds. One can never go wrong with a perfectly broken in leather jacket. Pair it with a feminine blouse for an edgy contrast or a thin knit for a classic cool look. ANKLE BOOTS While our trusted leather boots got us through the slushy streets of winter, it’s time to trade those in for something a bit less functional and a bit more trendy. Ankle boots are the perfect choice — they still cover enough to ward off

The weather has become bipolar as spring approaches. While this winter to spring transformation period makes picking out an outfit painstakingingly difficult, there are some key items that serve as practical options for both seasons that offer the warmth without the bulk. Here are five musthave transitional pieces for men and women to segue smoothly into spring.

the cold without the extra weight. For the ladies, bare some legs by pairing ankle boots with your favorite dress. As for the lads, try them out with a pair of cuffed pants.

VIA TRASHNESS.COM | VIA LELUFF.WORDPRESS.COM | VIA EMBRACINGSTYLE. CO.ZA | VIA WAYNETIPPETTS.COM | VIA TUMBLR.COM

CHUNKY CARDIGAN There is nothing cozier than a fuzzy sweater to snuggle up in. Chunky cardigans are a great option because they are easy to take off and put on, so you can throw one on as you please. Wear it over a pair of skinny jeans and simple tee for an effortless chic look — perfect for that walk to class in the chilly morning.

By MARINA ZHENG

OVERSIZED SCARF The bigger the better. The perfect transition scarf is one that’s light in material but large in size. It’s convenient to wrap it around a number of times for some added cozy warmth during chillier nights, but it’s equally as easy to drape it over your neck as the perfect accessory for sunnier days. Opt for scarves featuring popular spring trends such as stripes and colorful graphic patterns.

Marina Zheng is a staff writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

Face gems add flair to evening ensembles By DANA RESZUTEK

The transition from runway trends to real life can be tricky at times, but not impossible. One of the most recent moves has been face gems, appliqués used as decoration around the eye region of the face. High-end designers, including Chanel and Jeremy Scott, have used face gems in their runway shows. In Chanel’s look, the models placed patches of gems over their eyebrows, while Jeremy Scott took a simpler approach and added gems around the eye and above the eyebrows in a curved pattern. Celebrities such as Ke$ha and Khloe Kardashian have been seen sporting this look, and musicians Pixie Lott and Grimes use gems onstage. There are many types of face gems to choose from. Make Up Forever’s Strass Face Jewels ($21), available at Sephora, come in a wide variety of colors and can be easily applied with lash glue, which allows these gems to be used multiple times. Alyse Anderson, a sales associate at Sephora, described these face jewels as something she would recommend and offered ways to style them as well. “Another product to apply these jewels with is Too Faced Glitter Glue, which is a great binding agent that comes in many different colors, and adds even more sparkle to your look,” said Anderson. When asked if this trend could cause any damage to the skin, Anderson replied that face gems won’t clog your pores, since the glues used as adhesive are generally non-comedogenic. This ensures that these stickers won’t cause a breakout. If you believe the small rhinestones are too pricey, a trip to the closest Ricky’s

Shop smart at thrift stores with these helpful tips By MARINA ZHENG

Thrift stores, with their mountains of disheveled clothing, racks of disorganized garments and mobs of aggressive shoppers, can seem like war zones. However, this retail therapy can be simple and easy with some tips and tricks to keep in mind about each neighborhood’s star thrift shop.

VIA FREEPEOPLE.COM

Wearing face gems is now popular both on and off the runway. will offer a large selection of face gems, ranging in colors and styles, from $4.99 to $9.99. These gems are self-adhesive, creating a quick and easy alternative. Other low-cost face gems can be found online from reliable brands like Free People and Urban Outfitters with prices ranging from $5.00 to $9.95. These options are especially ideal for those looking for a one-time use that doesn’t break the bank. Although any fashion trend can be seen on the streets of New York City, it seems that the face gem craze will be saved for only certain occasions. GLS freshman Chloe Chong said, “I’ve worn them out to a Brooklyn warehouse party. They’re definitely cool for going out, but I wouldn’t wear them every day.”  Face gems can accessorize a fun night out, but this jeweled look can also make appearances at other events such as summer music festivals. One thing is for sure: wherever this trend is worn, it is sure to stand out. Dana Reszutek is a contributing writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

WEST VILLAGE Housing Works Thrift Shop | 130 Crosby St. Examine the items carefully at this store to make sure there are no standout stains, large holes or other serious flaws. Housing Works is less selective about the items they sell so be extra careful. There’s nothing worse than paying money for a defective item, even if it is inexpensive. Also, don’t be close-minded; some of the items in this store are not exactly what one would consider trendy. Give things a chance even if they look silly on the hanger. Creativity can make them work! EAST VILLAGE Buffalo Exchange | 332 E. 11th St. Bring a bag full of pieces you don’t want anymore and fill it up with new pieces to love. At Buffalo Exchange, shoppers get the opportunity to sell their clothes for store credit. Don’t forget to try on items before you purchase them. Dress in clothes that are easy to take off — t-shirts, leggings and flats — just to make your fitting room experience easier.

BROOKLYN

Beacon’s Closet | 92 Fifth Ave. Go in with a plan because Beacon’s Closet is known for its abundant selections. Think of a particular color or style you want to stick to and don’t get sidetracked. It will be easy to lose focus and leave with nothing. Don’t be impatient. With so many racks, be ready to spend hours browsing. SOHO Amarcord Vintage Fashion | 252 Lafayette St. Keep a budget in mind as prices are a little high at this Soho location and it’s easy to overlook prices with the sea of amazing options. Keep your shopping focused and wallet-friendly. Don’t be too shy to ask for help from staff. Workers at Amarcord Vintage are helpful, friendly and will help you pick the perfect pieces. NOLITA INA | 21 Prince St. INA is the place to go for that one specialty item. Don’t make it your goal to buy a ton of average items when you can score with one piece of treasure. However, don’t buy something because it’s cheap. Quality over quantity could not be more relevant when it comes to shopping here. Remember, the extra money could be better spent on a piece you adore. Marina Zheng is a staff writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF BUFFALO EXCHANGE | COURTESY OF BEACON’S CLOSET | VIA YELP.COM

New York City offers an excellent selection of thrift shops in every neighborhood.


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

ARTS

EDITED BY JOSH JOHNSON ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

‘Silence’ deprives viewers of happy resolution

‘Community’ stars offer behind-the-scenes peek

American audiences are typically quick to dismiss foreign films. The unhappy ending and grim subjects at the core of German film “The Silence” only serve to hinder the film’s already bleak prospects. But the feature debut of German writer and director Baran bo Odar cannot be ignored. The stunning adaption of Jan Costin Wagner’s novel of the same name is brought to life by understated performances set against the backdrop of striking cinematography, courtesy of director of photography Nikolaus Summerer. In 1986, young Pia rides her bicycle into a field of wheat where she is followed by Peer and Timo. Peer rapes and kills Pia, a horrific scene skillfully filmed through Timo’s perspective. He then drives off with Pia’s body in the trunk of his car and she is declared missing. On the 23rd anniversary of Pia’s disappearance, the detective assigned to her case, Krischan, celebrates his retirement, as another young girl, Sinikka, disappears from the same spot where Pia had been taken. Brilliant ensemble cast members portray the characters that compose “Silence.” Sinikka’s parents wait in agony for her to be found, as Pia’s mother struggles with her own daughter’s disappearance for a second time. Krischan aids detectives David, a recent widower, and Janna, an expectant mother, as they search for the murderer of Sinikka and Pia. Timo reflects on his friendship with Peer and the secret that united them. Odar delivers a thrilling film,

Few shows face as much adversity as “Community” has in the leadup to its fourth season. Previous showrunner Dan Harmon was fired, Chevy Chase created several problems on set and a prolonged hiatus kept the show away from its dedicated fans. Despite these complications, the show has finally returned for a truncated 13-episode run. And while “Community” may no longer be too clever for its own good, it remains faithful to the characters and storylines that have developed over the past few years. In a conference call, “Community” stars Alison Brie and Danny Pudi talked about the future of the show and how fans can expect to see the show progress in the coming months. Though perhaps inevitable, Dan Harmon’s name came up almost immediately in the conversation. “I think we were a little nervous and didn’t know what to expect, but that’s not really a new feeling, having worked on our show for four years now,” Brie said. “So I mean when we met the new guys, they really stressed a lot how much they loved the show and wanted to keep it the same.” “I think [Harmon] created something that’s pretty amazing and we’re forever thankful for that,” Pudi said. Brie and Pudi, known for portraying Annie and Abed, respectively, addressed the show’s legacy and how fans and new watchers will come to appreciate the show. “It will take people some time to catch up with [‘Community’] because it’s something you’re not used to see-

By MARISSA ELLIOT LITTLE

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despite revealing Peer’s identity as the killer at the beginning. While “Silence” is marketed as a thriller, it is also a psychological melodrama centered on the tragedy propelled by pedophilia and murder. Instead of using explosive anger and exaggerated weeping to convey overwhelming emotions, the characters of “Silence” are repressed and vacant. The actors successfully communicate their characters’ emotional states, using their faces to convey what words cannot. The reality that consumes their lives has left them devoid of feelings and causes the characters to disappear into their own misery. Few films have examined pedophilia to the extent that “The Silence” does. It dares to create discomfort. At one point, Peer shows Timo a video in which a barely-clothed girl sits on a bed, being touched by an older man who wears an animal mask, before Peer begins to unbutton his shirt. Although it is not a full analysis of pedophilia, it explores the multiple angles and layers that comprise the illness, contrasting Peer’s unapologetic twistedness and the guilt that Timo grapples with and eventually succumbs to. Contemporary audiences enter a movie theater with the expectation that they will exit feeling satisfied, a reaction usually contingent on the ending of a film. “The Silence” deprives its audience of such a conclusion, but offers exceptional storytelling that depicts an unsettling reality. Marissa Elliot Little is a contributing writer. Email her at film@nyunews.com.

By JEREMY PICK

ing. It’s a little bit of a scary thing,” Brie said. “Sometimes I wonder though, on the other hand, about how the show will age just because so many of our references are current.” Pudi elaborated on Brie’s response by bringing up the fanaticism surrounding “Arrested Development,” one of his favorite shows. “I think that part of the reason why I was able to also buy into [‘Arrested Development’] and its [comedy] is because I was able to watch it in bunches,” he said. “It’s a word-of-mouth show, and I was able to kind of go in being like, ‘I’m going to give this show a full chance. I’m going to watch all three seasons right now.’ And immediately I had a common language with a bunch of people who watch [‘Arrested’], and I think there is an amount of that within Community as well.” In terms of what fans have to look forward to for the rest of season four, Brie spoke enthusiastically about this season’s Christmas episode, which she described as an homage to Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rope.” In addition, both Brie and Pudi praised the season finale, written by longtime “Community” writer Megan Ganz. “I think the finale is such a special treat,” said Brie. “It’s one of my favorite episodes this season and I think that it has a lot of elements in it that [are] really just made for the fans.” Since this episode may in fact be the show’s last, Pudi added, “In some ways [the finale] is a little bit of a love fest.” Jeremy Pick is a contributing writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

NASH continued from PG. 1

‘Girl Talk’ features passionate lyrics, gritty sound again, with verses that capture the essence of the many struggles women face without trivializing them. “Part Heart” and “Sister,” two of several standout tracks on the album, explore two different aspects of rejection: one from a lover and one from a friend. The latter’s verses are especially engaging, featuring lines such as, “She wanted to be my lover but my heart was with another/ Yeah, I really wish that we could be friends but I know I’m never gonna get you back again.” Using her voice and words to embody multiple facets of the female perspective on “Girl

Talk,” Nash is the heartbroken ex, the confused friend and the frustrated feminist all at once. From her disinterested drawl on “Death Proof” to her unapologetic shrillness on “Conventional Girl,” Nash’s “Girl Talk” is a perfectly executed response to critics of her previous efforts. She demonstrates the complexity and perceptivity female artists can convey when given the opportunity to fully express themselves. Alexandria Ethridge is music editor. Email her at aethridge@nyunews.com.

Bedlam’s ‘Hamlet’ reaches new heights By DYLAN JARRETT From the instant the first line is uttered in the pitch-black theater to the moment the lights go down on a stage of corpses in the final act, Bedlam’s production of “Hamlet” never fails to be one of the most thrilling theatrical experiences to come along in recent memory. The audience is sucked into the protagonist’s world of madness and betrayal with no hope of escape. This particular production of the Shakespeare classic stars four actors who take on numerous roles throughout the play. Ted Lewis, for example plays an excellent Polonius, with the perfect mix of fatherly guidance and exasperation. He also portrays an angst-ridden Laertes, among other roles. Andrus Nichols’ Gertrude, constantly torn between her husband and son, forces the audience to empathize with a character often seen as incredibly cold, rather than as a commanding personality. Her Ophelia is equally deserving of sympathy. When driven mad by the loss of her father, it is almost too painful to watch her in torment. Claudius, played by Tom O’Keefe, is shockingly benevolent for a villain, causing the audience to doubt his guilt. Even when he is plotting to kill Hamlet, it is impossible to wholly dislike him. Eric Tucker, who also directs the production, is the Hamlet by which all other Hamlets should be defined. His performance is an impressive feat, as the actor constantly bounces between the protagonist’s cruel sociopathic tendencies and raving lunacy. Even those familiar with the play will be kept on the edge of their seats, unsure of what his next action will be. Tucker’s direction is brilliant — he utilizes the shortage of space to highlight the story’s intensity. The lack of sets allows the production to spotlight staging and the performances. What the company accomplishes with just a few swords and a bag of dirt is amazing. The fast pacing and constant action, punctuated by dozens of Shakespeare’s most famous lines and speeches, ensure that audiences will come out of this play thinking of nothing but the next time they’ll be able to see it again. Bedlam’s “Hamlet” is a production and an experience that should not be missed. “Hamlet” runs through April 7 at the Access Theater, located at 380 Broadway. Dylan Jarrett is a contributing writer. Email her at theater@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

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Crossword Across

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY SAMEER JAYWANT OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

LETTER TO THE EDITOR STAFF EDITORIAL

Social Security can be strengthened

By MATTHEW W. BRAMAN

If we make an investment, then we expect to have a return on that investment. Social Security is not wasteful federal spending. It is the most successful anti-poverty public investment policy enacted in U.S. history. Rhetoric posits that the immediate future of Social Security seems as ugly as sequestration or the situation in Detroit, Mich. But Motown and the United States are both singing the same sad song. We need some R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Many share the fear that Social Security is insolvent. However, Social Security insurance is solvent until 2033. We can increase protection of beneficiaries through adequately stabilized cost-ofliving adjustments, also known as COLAs, without a harmfully chained-down Consumer Price Index to manage the onslaught of crises — substantial increases in prices, inflation and unemployment in addition to sequestration. The National Academy of Social Insurance helps us understand the facts: A large majority of Americans across party lines and

age groups want to preserve and strengthen the safety net. The cost for the retirement of baby boomers is affordable, and careful planning and funding indicate that it is mostly already paid for. Less than one penny of every dollar put into Social Security is spent on administrative costs while the rest is distributed to the 55 million beneficiaries. The average Social Security beneficiary receives approximately $14,760 per year. We should end offshore tax havens. American corporations should return revenue and jobs to American shores. They should support the Corporate Tax Fairness Act, as introduced in both houses of Congress last month. This legislation would repatriate approximately $590 billion in federal revenue by 2024. It would allow our government to strengthen vital programs like Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and services for American veterans. Imagine the chagrin of an elderly, retired and bereaved widow who contributed hundreds of dollars each month into a system for 65 years to receive $30,000 per year in Social Security benefits.

She also pays for Medicare. She needs knee surgery with overall costs reaching nearly $60,000. Her Social Security income pays for the first $1,100 of Medicare costs. The most recent COLAs enacted to her benefits only add about $9.00 per month, which may help purchase an extra two gallons of gas. It’s a measly adjustment that also raises the cost of her Medicare. She is my grandmother. She is 87 years old and lives in Michigan, which is home to many cities in a financial state of emergency. She says, “You can’t win here.” We deserve fair solutions. But, shameful cuts balance budgets on the backs of vulnerable Americans like her. Social Security is an active participation game. Send emails to your elected officials. Help them understand why we must carefully invent dignified solutions without deceitful reforms. Tell them to use their power and privilege with integrity. Matthew W. Braman is a candidate for a master of social work degree in the Silver School of Social Work. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

SOCIAL ISSUES

Students should march with SLAM

By CAITLIN MACLAREN

In the early 1900s, NYU’s Brown Building was home to a sweatshop where a group of mostly immigrant women — many the same age as students who attend classes there today ­— made garments for the Triangle Waist Company. In 1909, 20,000 women of New York’s garment industry, among them the workers of the Triangle factory, went on strike, ultimately winning a 52-hour workweek, four paid holidays and union recognition. Only two years later, 146 workers died, trapped behind locked doors, in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. The episode ignited a movement for workers’ rights and factory safety. The struggles of these and other working women in the United States inspired labor activists across the world to begin celebrating International Women’s Day on March 8. Today, women workers both in the United States and internationally continue their pursuit of justice on the job. A few blocks away from the Brown Building stands the Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law and Justice, funded by over $1 million in annual donations from NYU School

SUBMITTING TO

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of Law trustee Daniel Straus, who makes his money as the owner of a nursing home empire. In September, 100 of Straus’ (mostly female) employees were confronted by paid thugs in front of the Straus Institute as they protested the unfair contract illegally forced upon them by Straus’ company, HealthBridge. The contract HealthBridge imposed eliminated half the workers’ paid sick days, their pensions and their lunch breaks. As students and workers protested together, dozens of burly men hired by Straus’ company hurled insults at them, a public reminder of the kind of disrespect the workers faced daily on the job. Thousands of miles away, in Indonesia, workers who once sewed collegiate apparel for Adidas are fighting for their legally enshrined right to severance. Adidas owes 2,800 workers $1.8 million which the company has refused to pay, claiming they have no responsibility for the fates of their subcontracted employees. The geography of exploitation is complex and murky. Companies like Adidas hide behind subcontracting in factories across the globe, while the Daniel Strauses of the world hide behind law schools and universities to disguise their

criminal behavior. This is why over a hundred years after the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, factory workers continue to be burned alive in places like Bangladesh. There is no reason why these tragedies must continue to happen. But corporations will not hold themselves accountable, which is why we must do so. Student Labor Action Movement is celebrating International Women’s Day on Friday in honor of workers everywhere who carry on the fight for work with dignity. This is why we will ask NYU to hold its trustees accountable and to follow seven other schools in cutting its contract with Adidas. Everyone who wishes to support these struggles is welcome to join our march from Bobst Library to the Straus Institute, which begins at 12 p.m. on March 8. Although courageous women of the 20th century made incredible gains, the issues raised by the Triangle Shirtwaist fire still have their echoes on NYU’s campus, and there is much work to be done in carrying out their legacy. Caitlin MacLaren is a Gallatin junior and an organizer of the Student Labor Action Movement. Email her at opinion@nyunews.com.

NYU severance packages raise ethical questions

The recent nomination and subsequent confirmation of Jack Lew as Treasury secretary has brought to light startling evidence of inordinate severance payments made by NYU to its most prized administrative officials. A recent article by The New York Times highlights several instances in which NYU paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to departing officials, some of whom were leaving voluntarily and did not warrant a severance package — including Lew, who received a $685,000 bonus. It’s hard to imagine the rationale behind such generous gift-giving to someone voluntarily leaving an institution — most people simply receive a signed card from their co-workers. Perhaps NYU expects Lew, and others who were similarly rewarded, to eventually return to its administrative team, since it’s normal for upper-level employees to have short-term contracts lasting only a few years. Maybe NYU believes that former executives will somehow help the university when directing the companies they end up working for. Or it might simply be a grandiose way of saying thank you. Nevertheless, this raises several questions for university officials to answer. Students at NYU, one of the most expensive schools in the United States, expect their tuition to be allocated to the continual improvement of their educational environment. Qualified faculty, of course, is a basic essential for any university, but how far can these rewards go before they become unjustifiable? The promise of stability from any employer is necessary to attract candidates for a position, but it seems unnecessary to hand out bonuses to already well-paid employees. Even more difficult to comprehend is the idea of providing severance packages to those who choose to leave voluntarily. We cannot rush to judge the university’s actions before all the relevant facts are known. At the end of the day, NYU is a private university and thus a business. Its fiscal decisions can often seem profit-driven, like any enterprise. However, the university is officially listed as a nonprofit institution. Where, then, does the money for these parting paychecks come from? To us NYU students, paying 10 years worth of NYU tuition to an individual who voluntarily left to work at a major bank, and who is now in charge of our nation’s finances, just does not seem fair.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Sameer Jaywant (Chair), Raquel Woodruff (Co–Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co–Chair), Nickhil Sethi, Matt Luo, Nina Golshan, Ian Mark, Jess Littman, Marcelo Cicconet

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY MARY JANE DUMANKAYA SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Champions League playoffs promises exciting matchups By FRANCISCO NAVAS

The Union of European Football Associations’ Champions League is undoubtedly the most exciting club level soccer competition around. Every year, Europe’s best squads are pitted against each other in a round-robin of group play and then four rounds of two-legged knockout rounds. The world’s best players populate these teams, making for the most exciting set of matches every year, as well as the best and most meaningful goals. Expect to see some of the action on ESPN’s top 10 plays videos. If the matches are not on television, use rojadirecta.tv. MANCHESTER UNITED VS. REAL MADRID: MARCH 5, 2:45 P.M. The first leg at the Santiago Bernabeu stadium in Madrid ended in a 1-1 tie. Danny Welbeck and Cristiano Ronaldo each scored off headers for Madrid and United, respectively. This tie gives United a one-point aggregate advantage, so it will be as United manager Sir Alex Ferguson

once said, “squeaky bum time,” at Old Trafford Stadium. United goalie David de Gea and a strong defense will be instrumental at keeping former United star turned Galactico Ronaldo from giving his former team the boot. PARIS SAINT-GERMAIN F.C. VS. VALENCIA C.F.: MARCH 6, 2:45 P.M. All the money in the world, or from Qatar Investment Authority, couldn’t give the star-studded French squad an easy win over Valencia in the first leg, and they won’t have an easy victory in this game either. The Spanish side kept pushing and challenging PSG until the final whistle of the 90 minutes. Valencia will have to come up big in Paris, as the 2-1 loss at home makes the aggregate score an unfavorable 4-1. But be sure to watch as the players’ performances are unpredictable. F.C. BARCELONA VS. A.C. MILAN: MARCH 12, 3:45 P.M. The surprise of the round was more Barcelona’s loss 0-2 rather than Milan’s 2-0 win at their home pitch, San Siro

Stadium. It was undoubtedly a shocking upset, but can Milan repeat? They will need a second stellar performance from Kevin-Prince Boateng to stay up in the aggregate, as Milan should expect to be scored on at least twice at Camp Nou. If Barcelona turns their possessive midfield to an attacking force, expect a high scoring game.

MALAGA C.F. VS. F.C. PORTO: MARCH 13, 3:45 P.M. Although these two are not internationally recognizable teams, their match may be the closest, most competitive match of the round. The first leg was a tight match with few scoring chances, which ended by the minimum score for a victory: the Portuguese side won 1-0. Porto’s offensive midfield, comprised of Lucho Gonzales and James Rodriguez, will be a test for the older Malaga side. Expect another 1-0 home win and thus a penalty shootout to decide who advances to the quaterfinal round. Francisco Navas is deputy sports editor. Email him at fnavas@nyunews.com.

VIA FACEBOOK.COM

Cristiano Ronaldo will play Manchester United, his previous team.


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