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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 13

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013

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DJANGO UNCHAINED Z E R O DA R K T H I R T Y the

O S CA R S

Read our choices for who wins on Pages 6 & 7

LES MISÉRABLES L I F E

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE

COMPILED BY THE

WSN STAFF

MEET THE ULTRA VIOLET LIVE 2013 FINALISTS

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

AMY ZHANG Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN Deputy Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ CARLY ROBERG Singing an original song, accompanied by musicians Dillon Treacy, Adam November and Jesse Bielenberg What would winning UVL mean to you?: “Winning UVL would mean the world to me. Being recognized for something that you love to do always feels awesome, and it would affirm my decision in going to New York for music.”

SHUAN SIM GLOW-FLOW, a glow performance with glow-wands, fans and a unicycle What would winning UVL mean to you?: “Happiness.”

CLARE MOSES & JAY GAUNT Playing an original song accompanied by a band and Jay on harmonica When was the first time you performed?: “We have both been performing since we were very young, separately, but this will be the second time we will have performed together. It will however be the first time we’ve performed with Jake ‘dad’ Strauss, and Henry ‘helicopter’ Vaughn. They’re the greatest.”

Assistant Managing Editor

NICOLA PRING Creative Director

KALEEL MUNROE SENIOR STAFF

university TATIANA BAEZ city/state VERONICA CARCHEDI investigative NICOLE BROWN arts JOSH JOHNSON features KRISTINA BOGOS sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN copy MICHAEL DOMANICO,

WICY WANG foreign correspondent JULIE DEVITO senior editors GENTRY BROWN, DAN

HINTON, CHARLES MAHONEY, CLIO MCCONNELL, STEFAN MELNYK, LAVYA YALAMANCHI

DEPUTY STAFF

university KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR city/state EMILY BELL, ANDREW

KARPAN

SHIRISH SARKAR FROM SHIRISH AND HARRY PLAY MUSIC Performing original electronic music Biggest inspiration: “The world around me.”

WITH SNACK Members: Matthew Dunietz, Jono Stewart, Aviv Goldgeier, Chris Roderick, Evan Lane Five guys making music Do you get nervous when you perform?: “Never nervous, just hungry. Luckily we’re always With Snack.”

JACOB SCHMID Solo acoustic guitar and voice

books/theater OLIVIA GEORGE film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment ALEX GREENBERGER music ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE the highlighter blog SAM RULLO features HELEN HOLMES beauty & style MICHELLE LIM dining ANGEL CHANG sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia REBECCA CLEMENTI,

JOON LEE

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

SAMEER JAYWANT deputy opinion editors

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, RAQUEL WOODRUFF

ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER

RAVEENA AURORA FROM RAVEENA AND THE AURORAS Performing a folk song accompanied by dancers What would winning UVL mean to you?: “It would be so lovely to be validated for all the hard work my group put into this act, and an honor to be recognized amongst such great talent at NYU.”

EVELYN “EVITA” HAETTENSCHWILLER Singing an original song called “Curious,” a jazzy piece, accompanied by drums, keyboard, double bass and electric guitar Biggest inspiration: “I love hip hop and I love jazz, and I think that the fusion of the two is simply beautiful. As a lyricist and singer, I’m mostly inspired by artists like A Tribe Called Quest, Common, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill and D’Angelo.”

REBECCA RIBEIRO CIRCULATION MANAGER

KELLY MILLER Singing “O mio babbino caro” from “La Bohème” by Puccini. Do you get nervous when you perform?: “A little [but] it’s healthy to be nervous, I think it means that you’re still passionate about what you’re doing whether that’s singing or presenting a speech or anything else.”

CHLOE COFFMAN

UNIVERSITY SALES COORDINATOR

KAITLYN O’BRIEN SALES REPRESENTATIVE

ELLEN MCQUEEN SALES ASSOCIATES

ARIANA DIVALENTINO, CHRIS ELWOOD, ALISON LIZZIO, SAM WANDER CIRCULATION ASSISTANT

OMID GOLMOHAMMADI GRAPHIC DESIGNER

KALEEL MUNROE

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY

EMMA DAVIS Singing a song about a girl who moves into a new apartment building and gets acquainted with her new neighbors, called “The Girl in 14G.” When was the first time you performed?: “I used to do private performances of the death scene in ‘Beauty and the Beast’ when I was three for my family, but my first public show was in preschool. I was Little Red Riding Hood.”

MILK Members: Rachel Daugherty, Lindsay Heatley, Nancy Monahan Performing two original folk/ pop songs Biggest inspiration: “We were originally united by our love for music by the Civil Wars. We performed one of their songs for the preliminary round. Other than that our music has been inspired by a random collection of bands: Crosby, Stills & Nash, Pearl Jam, the Dixie Chicks.”

EDITORIAL ADVISER

KEITH LEIGHTY

ZNUGGLEZ Members: Benjamin Goh, Aviv Goldgeier, Noah Rauchwerk, Charlie Manoukian Performing a comical scene featuring a short skit and an original song What would winning UVL mean to you?: “It would be incredible to win while performing with a band of such close pals and with a supportive audience of friends! Also our grandmas would be very proud.”

MÁTÉ BEDE-FAZEKAS Playing “Rhapsody in Blue excerpt” and piano solo What would winning UVL mean to you?: “I can’t say, because I can’t imagine winning. I’m just a guy from Hungary who has never even been in the States until two years ago. And now I’m performing in New York. I’m already a winner and honored and happy.”

GOT AN EVENT? EMAIL US AT AGENDA@NYUNEWS.COM OR TWEET US @NYUNEWS. GOT SOMETHING TO SHARE? EMAIL US AT TIPS@NYUNEWS.COM.

EDITORS-AT-LARGE

MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Amy Zhang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

NYUNEWS.COM


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

Professors educate students on plagiarism By JACQUELINE HSIA

Plagiarism is an issue at every university, but at NYU, the most common cases result from misunderstanding rather than blatant cheating. NYU’s academic integrity policy defines plagiarism as “presenting others’ work without adequate acknowledgment of its source, as though it were one’s own.” In most cases, the acts of plagiarism are simply questions of misunderstanding. Freshmen in particular come in with incorrect assumptions about citing and paraphrasing that their previous teachers inadvertently helped establish. “A common problem is that students often mistakenly believe that as long as they change it into their own words, it’s not plagiarism, when in fact they are still stealing another individual’s ideas,” said Beth Weitzman, vice dean of the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. While records of plagiarism incidents that result in expulsions at NYU are not available, director of Public Affairs Philip Lentz said that the number of cases is not significant. LSP professor Nancy Reale stated that there could be discrepancies among different cultures. “I’ve talked to a fair number of students from Asia, for example, who tell me that there is a very different definition,” she said. Professors and the administration want to educate students so there is less confusion. Steinhardt and the Liberal Studies program in particular focus on educating incoming freshmen about the necessity of proper citation. They employ tools such as student orientations and rules of plagiarism tests to help students understand the distinct rules of what is and is not plagiarism. “Rather than focus on detecting instances of academic dishonesty, we try to prevent it,” said Fred

Schwarzbach, LSP dean. Reale recognizes two other reasons students may choose to plagiarize. Based on her experience, she finds that when students feel the assignment is not worth their time or do not think they will be able to complete the assignment, they are more inclined to plagiarize. But she encourages her students to come to her if they reach this point so she can either explain why it is worth their while to do the assignment or to help them start their work. “A case of plagiarism signals a breakdown in the education system that we want to fix and address,” she said. Because most cases are relatively minor, the professor usually decides the consequences. Records can enter the student’s file for disciplinary action, but expulsion is rare. However, there are occasionally cases when students deliberately plagiarize. “I once had a student whose mother wrote the entire paper,” said Elayne Tobin, a professor of writing in the Global Liberal Studies program. Students at NYU recognize similar instances of cheating. “I know some people who plagiarize, and some even buy online essays,” said CAS freshman Nakita Mortimer. While plagiarism and academic dishonesty are ongoing issues, NYU continuously tries to prevent and detect plagiarism when it does occur. “College is meant to be a place that supports students’ development of sound decision-making as well as their intellectual and analytic skills,” said Cybele Raver, vice provost for Academic, Faculty and Research Affairs. “Intellectual integrity is a hallmark value of a university education.” Jacqueline Hsia is a contributing writer. Email her at investigative@nyunews.com.

VIA FLICKR.COM

Professors determine punishments in student plagiarism cases.

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Expiring permit may force a move for Madison Square Garden By TANAY HUDSON

Midtown Community Board 5 is blocking Madison Square Garden’s permit renewal in an attempt to move the iconic concert venue to a different location in the city. The Garden has been operating for three weeks without a permit, and Community Board opposition may keep the permit away even longer. The World’s Most Famous Arena was granted a special permit 50 years ago by the New York City Board of Estimate to allow a new 22,000 seat venue to be constructed. This permit was necessary because the new arena exceeded the 2,500 seat limit imposed by the zoning rules of the time. On Jan. 24, that permit expired and the Garden has since been operating without one. On Feb. 14, Community Board 5 rejected the Garden’s application for an indefinite permit renewal, voting 36 to 0 with one abstention. Instead, the Board voiced its favor of moving the Garden to a different location in the best interests of local property owners and Penn Station commuters. According to a document provided by Wally Rubin, district manager of Community Board 5, Penn Station was designed for a capacity of approximately 200,000 people but is occupied by approximately 650,000 daily users and is outdated. The Board

also claims that because the Garden sits atop Penn Station, opportunities to make significant improvements are constrained. This also caused a loss of approximately $350 million in property tax revenue since 1982, due to a tax abatement. Madison Square Garden did not respond to a request for comment at press time. Yet many New Yorkers hope that the Garden can stay in its current location for the sake of tradition. “It’s convenient for me because I live in Long Island so getting off at Penn Station makes it much easier. But for as long as I can remember it’s been here. I remember coming to my first events at Madison Square Garden,” said Paul Edward, 45.

“I think it would make it easier [to keep it where it is now]. Plus, it is a landmark for Manhattan. I think [Penn Station] would be that busy anyway, like Grand Central,” said GSAS second-year student Katie Jagel. Community Board 5 also rejected the Garden’s request for a permit renewal because the arena wanted to increase its signage. The board fears more signs would be a blight on the neighborhood and would confuse tourists and commuters. It also wants to eliminate the Garden’s tax abatement, which cost the city $16.5 million in lost revenue last year. Tanay Hudson is a contributing writer. Email her at cstate@nyunews.com.

RACHEL KAPLAN/WSN

Madison Square Garden may move from its current location.

Stern triumphs in 2013 All-University Games By MARY JANE DUMANKAYA

Students representing 16 schools campus-wide gathered to showcase their athletic prowess last night at the 15th annual All-University Games. NYU students competed in events including basketball, volleyball and tug of war. The Games were the second event of the Violet 100, a series of NYU events that aim to boost school spirit. For the first time, students from NYU Abu Dhabi participated in the friendly competition. Students from the Polytechnic Institute of NYU competed for the second year and had a successful night with a first-place in tug of war. “We’re really honored to be here and this is one of the first real initiatives [where] there are a lot of NYUAD kids involved in an event that involves NYU, and we feel that it’s our responsibility to be part of the NYU community,” said Mohammad Omar, a junior at NYUAD. The Games also included less conventional options, such as rock-paper-scissors, fooseball and rock climbing. Leon Johnson, a second-year student in the School of Dentistry who placed second last year, shimmied to first place in a limbo competition. “It’s nice to do something with the rest of the other schools,” Johnson said. “We’re isolated up north with the med school, and we’re always really busy.” A significant part of the competition was dedicated to boosting school spirit. Each school was asked to contribute a mascot, a banner and T-

shirts. The Wagner School of Public Service was a crowd pleaser thanks its slogan, “Swagner. Do Good. Look This Good.” The School of Continuing and Professional Studies won first place with “Old School. We been there, done that. Do it better,” given the older average age of the students. Dodgeball, the last event of the evening, was met with enthusiasm. The rules were simple: don’t step out of bounds and don’t get hit. The final game of dodgeball between the undergraduate team from the Stern School of Business and SCPS determined the winner of the All-U Games. Stern undergraduates proved to be victorious in both dodgeball and the All-U Games with 80 points, closely followed by SCPS with 75 points. Third place was awarded to the College of Dentistry with 55 points. The previous reigning champs, the College of Arts and Science, were only able to place in rock-paperscissors and passed on the title and trophy to Stern. Malina Webb, chair of the Student Senators Council and one of the event’s organizers, hopes that future games can take place in both fall and spring semesters. “At NYU you don’t expect athletics to be on the forefront of everyone’s mind,” she said. “Tonight we just forget about what’s typical, and we just have fun and we just do it.” Mary Jane Dumankaya is sports editor. Email her at mdumankaya@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

FEATURES Tisch senior to explore science of sexual orientation in film By SANJANA KUCHERIA

An upcoming short film by Tisch senior Cyrus Toulabi explores how the world would react if a young scientist discovered a genetic source for homosexuality. On Feb. 5, Toulabi launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for his new 20-minute movie, “The Gene,” which is slated to be released in early 2014. Toulabi and his 20-person film crew have already raised $2,350 toward their $6,500 goal, which they hope to achieve before the film begins production in early April. Using the frame of a sci-fi thriller as a platform for social commentary, the story focuses on a scientist, Catherine Heyman, who finds the “gay gene” – genetic code that determines sexual orientation. But instead of embracing the new information, her lab partner Noah Cobbs sets out to find a genetic

cure for homosexuality. Despite the fantastic premise, Toulabi plans to focus on the emotional trials involved in coming to terms with having genetically determined sexual orientation. “It’s definitely about a very current issue that many of us have opinions on and know people that have opinions,” Toulabi said. “I really felt at this time in our [lives], adolescence, early adulthood, we’re all trying to figure out who we are and where we fit into the world.” Toulabi has always wanted to tell stories that would impact the community around him. “I often cover socially charged issues, or illnesses, or something that we all have a personal connection to,” he said. Tisch senior Ben Dewey, the film’s cinematographer, worked with Toulabi for the first time last year on the film “Passersby.” He likes “The Gene” for its represen-

tation of the characters’ honesty as they try to survive in a cutthroat social environment. “What was drawn out of the script were these characters and their really human conflicts in this scientific world,” Dewey said. Professor Barbara Malmet, recruitment and advisement administrator and adjunct professor at the Tisch School of the Arts, taught Toulabi and Dewey during their freshman year in her Sight and Sound Documentary class. She commended Toulabi for his craft. “Cyrus is an exemplary student for showing what it takes to be a director, which is mostly thinking on your feet because directing is so much about problem solving,” Malmet said. “He’s very good at distilling different characteristics and putting them up on the screen in a way that will have an impact on his audience.” Alexa Whiteside, an indepen-

dent film producer who is producing “The Gene,” describes the film as a corporate thriller and scientific drama that explores the deeper meaning of sexuality. “At its core, it’s a film of betrayal on both a personal and professional

level,” Whiteside said. “It is a story of when to draw the line both ethically and morally.” Sanjana Kucheria is a contributing writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF THE GENE FILM

Toulabi’s film focuses on homosexuality and genetics.

Gallatin alumna makes her mark on fashion with Walmart line By MARINA ZHENG

Join our Photo & Video team. Pitch meetings – Sundays at 7 P.M. Or email multimedia@nyunews.com

Gallatin alumna Shauna Miller is determined to transform the art of high fashion into an accessible platform for all women, regardless of budget or location. Miller, who graduated from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study in 2008, founded the fashion blog Penny Chic in 2010, aiming to give discount attire the credit it deserves. Using inexpensive items from stores like Walmart, Target and Kmart, Miller creates complete, fashionable outfits. “I decided to fool people and put head-to-toe outfits together using Walmart clothes,” Miller said. “It’s the biggest retailer in the world yet somehow there’s this disparity because nobody talks about it.” This year Miller is taking her blog to the next level. On Feb. 19, Miller debuted her first clothing line with Walmart. The line, Penny Chic by Shauna Miller, features five little black dresses designed in different styles. All dresses are priced at $20 and are available in regular and plus sizes. “It’s about taking something very simple that every girl needs and designing it in different ways for different girls,” Miller said. Miller’s popular blog became a business last September when the fledgling fashion mogul connected with Walmart and was asked to design a line of her own for the mass retailer. “We’re always looking for new and innovative products that will delight our customers at everyday low prices,” said Ravi Jariwala, director of media relations at Walmart. Miller’s experiences at NYU, from studying abroad in Paris to landing an internship with designer Emanuel Ungaro, taught her about entrepreneurship and enabled her to think outside of the box. “Even when I’m speaking the same language as someone, sometimes [I] have to be creative and communicate in other ways,” Miller said. “I have to be specific about what I want and work harder to get there.” Brittnie Adams, who operates brand outreach and social media at Penny Chic, sees Miller as a driven CEO and business partner. “On my first day [at Penny Chic] she gave me a

list of goals that she wanted to accomplish for that year,” Adams said. “She was very clear and specific about her plans and one year later everything that she had on that list has come true.” Marina Zheng is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF SHAUNA MILLER

Shauna Miller debuted her little black dress line at Walmart stores this month.


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EDITED BY KRISTINA BOGOS FEATURES@NYUNEWS.COM

Gallatin designers connect fashion, music at annual show By HILARY PRESLEY

The creative spirit of NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study was in full force Wednesday night at MusiCouture: The Gallatin Fashion Show, which explored the relationship between music and fashion. For Gallatin’s third annual fashion show, the event committee chose to look at how the two artistic fields have influenced each other throughout history. From delicate Paris ballet-inspired tutus to hippie tie-dye frocks, the show examined all genres of music with unbound creativity. The event was buzzing with the energy of a true New York Fashion Week moment, complete with luxe swag bags, a lit catwalk and a crowded venue. Nine designers, from Gallatin freshmen to alumni, presented their mini-collections to an eclectic musical beat. Gallatin senior Thulasi Sivalingam was inspired by Maurice Ravel’s classical rendition of the piece “Pavane Pour Une Infante Defunte” for her first collection, a blend of ’60s silhouettes in rich silks and decadent gilded embellishments. “I was imagining what [’60s

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ladies] would have worn to the philharmonic or the opera to listen to this song,” Sivalingam said. “I’m a magpie and a history nerd. It’s me in a collection.” Gallatin junior Priya Bhikha designed a dark and seductive collection inspired by Lana Del Rey. Bhikha’s favorite songs are mysterious and sexy. This aesthetic translated to black silks, metallic gold and her signature duct tape bodice. She said she works best under pressure, so she drapes and pins her garments seconds before the models step out onto the runway. “Your whole self is focused on one thing so you get the best part of you in it,” Bhikha said. Judy Harinarain, who graduated from Gallatin in 2012, drew inspiration from Euterpe, the Greek goddess of music. She infused Greek elements of goldbraid detail and draped silhouettes into her line — she loved her finished product. “It’s been cool to manifest your ideas into textiles and something you can actually touch,” Harinarain said. “It is a lot like art.” Alex Chernow, a Gallatin senior who has exhibited in all three of Gallatin’s fashion shows, said she hit her mark

this year with an all-black and on-trend collection suitable for a classical concert or punk rock fest. Executive producers Rachel Plutzer and Theresa Anderson, who are in charge of all Gallatin special events, could not have been more proud of the talent showcased last night. They began working on this year’s show during the summer in an incredibly collaborative process. “I love the way Gallatin people think magical unicorn things and then they pull it off,” Plutzer said. “I never would have been able to do that when I was their age.” Despite the fact that most designers had never designed a clothing line before, the show exhibited a kind of artistic creativity that can only be found at NYU. “I was very astonished at the level of talent,” Gallatin freshman and attendee Brennan Kilbane said after the show. “I thought it [had] more creative expression than what you see at Fashion Week, which I thought was a cool thing.” Hilary Presley is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

Heart-healthy dining hall choices

RACHEL CABITT/WSN

By JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU For many students, on-campus dining halls are convenient sources of daily meals. In honor of American Heart Month, we’ve investigated some of the heart-healthiest options available at NYU dining halls. Here are five, delicious NYU meals that are low in cholesterol, saturated fats and sodium. 1. VEGETABLE SOUP AT THIRD NORTH Although the soup at Third North Courtyard Cafe changes daily, it is generally a very healthy option. Most soups, which are located next to the salad bar, have no cholesterol at all. The options range from beef vegetable soup to spicy vegetable barley bean soup. The average amount of sodium in the soup is 200 mg with less than a gram of saturated fat.

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2. SUSHI AT PALLADIUM Palladium dining hall serves heart-healthy sushi regularly. Salmon rolls are often the healthiest, although any of the vegetarian offerings are an equally good choice. Make sure to ask for brown rice instead of white rice, as brown has more fiber and vitamins. Recent studies indicate brown rice can help prevent cardiovascular problems. 3. ORANGE CHICKEN AT KIMMEL While orange chicken is certainly not the heart-healthiest food at the Kimmel Center Market Place, it is definitely one of the healthier entrees. It’s cholesterol-heavy at 20 mg, but for the

meat-lover who wants to stay healthy, it’s low in sodium with about 180 mg, and it contains less than one gram of saturated fat. Make sure to try the jasmine rice at the same station, as it has no saturated fat or cholesterol. 4. CHEESE OR PEPPERONI PIZZA AT WEINSTEIN Weinstein’s downstairs dining hall has an interesting, healthy alternative for pizza lovers. A single slice of the pizza at Downstein has about 10 mg of cholesterol and 350 mg of sodium. That may not be ideal, but slices at pizzerias can be much worse. Avoid the calzones, however: a serving has over 1,000 mg of sodium. 5. SWEET POTATO AND CORN SALAD AT HAYDEN Although Hayden dining hall is most famous for its cookies, each one has about 7.5 grams of saturated fat and about 15 mg of cholesterol. For those who wish to balance out the cookie, the salad at Hayden is often a great choice. For example, the roasted sweet potato and corn salad has only 130 mg of sodium and no cholesterol. The salad choice changes daily, but the same options often rotate. If you are looking for vegan meals, take note of the dishes offered. While they are low in cholesterol, many are packed with sodium. Full nutrition information for several dining halls can be found at www.campusdish.com, which is supported by NYU’s dining website, www.nyudining.com. Jonathan Keshishoglou is a staff writer. Email him at dining@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ARTS

best

picture By JOSH JOHNSON and JEREMY GROSSMAN The lead-up to the 2013 Academy Awards has been one of the most suspenseful, intriguing and unpredictable races in recent memory. The confusion began when Ben Affleck and Kathryn Bigelow were snubbed for Best Director for their films “Argo” and “Zero Dark Thirty” respectively, seemingly eliminating any shot these movies had of winning the Best Picture award. The front-runner then became Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” However, since then, David O. Russell’s “Silver Linings Playbook” has gained an incredible amount of momentum, while “Argo” shockingly racked up a series of awards, including Best Picture at the Golden Globes and the Critic’s Choice Awards, as well as the Best Ensemble award at the Screen Actors Guild Awards. Now, the winner is anyone’s guess. “Argo” appears to be the front-runner, with “Lincoln” close behind. But there is no reason to believe “Silver Linings Playbook” and “Zero Dark Thirty” are completely out of the race. “Life of Pi,” while garnering a surplus of nominations and critical praise, seems to be on the outside looking in. Indie darling “Beasts of the Southern Wild” is a cherished film, but sees little chance at victory. “Django Unchained” has been respected more for its acting and writing than as an integrated film. Foreign nominee “Amour’s” best shot is in the Best Foreign Film category, while the crowd-friendly “Les Misérables” hasn’t made much noise in the race for Best Picture. So the award for Best Picture seems to be a four-way battle between “Argo,” “Lincoln,” “Silver Linings Playbook” and “Zero Dark

Thirty.” It all depends on whether the Academy wants to award the safer choices of Affleck’s and Spielberg’s films, or the riskier choices of Russell’s and Bigelow’s films. JOSH JOHNSON: The best film of the year was Kathryn Bigelow’s “Zero Dark Thirty.” The acting and writing were superb, and the depiction of the compound raid was one of the best-directed scenes of the past decade. However, the Academy will stick with the original front-runner and choose Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” Despite the film’s shortcomings, the Academy will be star-struck by the prestige behind the camera, as well as Daniel Day Lewis’ amazing performance. JEREMY GROSSMAN: It would be breathtaking to see a victory for “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” a film that manages to be so powerful by doing so little. However, the mere nomination is already a sign that the Academy is making bolder choices, and that is enough of an accomplishment. Against all odds, the Academy will give the award to “Zero Dark Thirty.” Ben Affleck’s snub is too harsh to be ignored, and “Argo” isn’t nearly the film that “Zero Dark Thirty” is.

ANNE HATHAWAY SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Jeremy Grossman is film editor. Josh Johnson is arts editor. Email them at arts@nyunews.com.

HUGH JACKMAN LEAD ACTOR

THE RACE FOR OSCAR GOLD: While you can read our picks for the major categories in print, there are other races to watch. To see our choices for “Best Supporting Actor,” “Best Adapted Screenplay” and more, check out nyunews.com.

best

director By SHAWN FLANAGAN Regardless of the Academy’s already infamous snubs of Ben Affleck and Kathryn Bigelow for their work on “Argo” and “Zero Dark Thirty” respectively, the deserving winner of the Best Director Oscar is Steven Spielberg, for his masterful direction in one of the year’s most honored films, “Lincoln.” Spielberg challenges the way we think about the democratic process while at the same time inspiring in the audience a new love for what our country has accomplished. His direction easily stands above that of the other nominees. There is also a lot of love in the

Academy for Benh Zeitlin and his courageous Sundance phenomenon “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” His daring choice to cast all non-actors, especially the revelation that is Quvenzhané Wallis, and to shoot on waterlogged locations on a very low budget may just earn him a victory. “Lincoln” is the only film honored in this category that is broad and epic in its themes and ideas. However, if the Academy leans toward the opposite end of the spectrum — small-scale and personal — Zeitlin could be the winner.

BRAVE

ANIMATED FILM

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Shawn Flanagan is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com. VIA FACEBOOK.COM


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EDITED BY JOSH JOHNSON ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN SUPPORTING ACTOR

best

actress By J.R. HAMMERER

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AMY ADAMS

The Best Actress category is crammed full of talent at this year’s Academy Awards. Naomi Watts has the weakest chance; “The Impossible” is sadly only her second nomination after 2003’s “21 Grams.” She also spent the whole movie stuck in physical pain rather than exploring the complexities of character other contenders have displayed in their performances. Quvenzhané Wallis’ explosive presence carried “Beasts of the Southern Wild” effortlessly, but she’s only the second child to receive a Best Actress nomination, and there’s a bias among the Oscar crowd in attributing stunning child to impressive editing. Jessica Chastain’s steely, staunch CIA tracker in “Zero Dark Thirty” won her a Golden Globe and a Critics’ Choice Award, and her unwav-

ering command would make her a safe bet in a weaker field. The best performance was arguably 85-yearold Emmanuelle Riva’s, whose BAFTA-winning embodiment of a dying woman in “Amour” was physically grueling, emotionally brave and hauntingly intimate. Having already picked up Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice and Screen Actors Guild awards as a grieving young widow falling for her bipolar friend, Jennifer Lawrence will surely win the Oscar because of her performance in “Silver Linings Playbook.” And it will not only be a breakout present for the rising star — it will reward a richly constructed, bitingly funny and devastatingly vulnerable performance that exceeded the actress’ 22 years. J.R. Hammerer is a staff writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

best actor By MARCUS JONES

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BRADLEY COOPER LEAD ACTOR

A FACEBOOK.COM | VIA FLICKR.COM

While 2012 proved to be a competitive year, the Best Actor Oscar race has become almost a sure thing. Denzel Washington as captain Whip Whitaker in “Flight” expertly demonstrates the insurmountable struggle of addiction coupled with survivor’s guilt. If politics were not a factor, Joaquin Phoenix’s performance as Freddie Quell in “The Master” would be a definite competitor. Regardless of whether he thinks the awards are ridiculous, Phoenix’s hard work shows onscreen, as his character struggles with alcoholism and the inner workings of a cult. Bradley Cooper entertains throughout “Silver Linings Playbook” as Pat Solitano, giving both an honest portrayal of bipolar disorder and a lighthearted take on the romantic lead. Hugh Jackman in “Les Misérables” pays homage to the past iterations of Jean Valjean from other interpretations while making the role his own and showing vulnerability in tears and song. Even though all of the nominees are fantastic, Daniel Day-Lewis’ portrayal of the 16th U.S. president in “Lincoln” is a shoo-in for Best Actor. Day-Lewis will win and should win the award for giving a rousing performance that is faithful to the historical figure and the legend Lincoln has become in American history. Marcus Jones is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

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EDITED BY MARY JANE DUMANKAYA SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Two of MMA’s top female fighters face off in anticipated match By ELI KURLAND

Feb. 23 is poised to be a pivotal night for the Ultimate Championship, as its arena, the trademark “Octagon,” will be graced by a female touch that has never been experienced before — one of pure, 24-carat violence. Female fighters are going to battle for the first time in the UFC’s history. Furthermore, they will be headlining the event, which takes place at the Honda Center in Anaheim, Calif. The fight will feature Ronda Rousey and Liz Carmouche. Rousey is probably the most striking combination of danger and beauty on the planet. The first American to medal in women’s judo at the Olympics, Rousey is ranked as the No. 1 pound-for-pound female fighter in mixed martial arts by the Unified Women’s Mixed Martial Arts Rankings. Her professional record is 6-0, and the total stretch of all six of her professional fights, plus her three amateur bouts, is an unprecedented nine minutes and twenty-eight seconds. When she isn’t hyper-extending peoples’ elbow joints, Rousey can be found posing naked on the front cover of ESPN Mag-

azine’s 2012 “Body Issue.” But Rousey’s beautiful external features hide a story of a little girl with a severe speech impediment who spent her childhood isolated from other kids. Additionally, after her father broke his back in a freak accident and his spine slowly deteriorated over the ensuing months, he took his own life instead of letting his children see him as a quadriplegic. Today, she walks the tightrope of balancing her title as the first women’s UFC champion, one of the most in-demand media attractions in the history of the sport, and still outworking all of her competition in the gym. As for Carmouche, it is no secret that she’s the underdog in this match. With a record of 8-2, she is ranked at No. 6 in the bantamweight division by the UWMMA Rankings. Carmouche gave No. 12 Marloes Coenen a brutal beating but made a slight mistake in the fourth round that Coenen capitalized on for a submission victory. Carmouche has never been a victim of a knockout or technical knockout in her career. But she’s already handed out five of them.

Although Carmouche is a top-level fighter, she is relatively unknown – she has never been a champion in another major organization and is not listed on the UWMMA Rankings’ top fifteen pound-for-pound list. “That’s who wanted to fight [Rousey]. People aren’t — believe me — people aren’t kicking the doors down to fight her,” said UFC President Dana White. Outside of the cage, the two women are equal in their individual journeys of struggle, determination and resilience. Carmouche spent five years in the U.S. Marine Corps where she completed three tours of duty in the Middle East. She has publicized thehardships of being a closeted lesbian throughout her active duty due to the military’s then “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” policy. She is now an outspoken advocate for LGBTQ rights, and is the first openly gay fighter in UFC history. Of all current female fighters, there are few more deserving of debuting female fighting on the world stage than Rousey and Carmouche. Eli Kurland is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

Sports scandals lead fans to question support for athletes

By NISHAAD RUPAREL

Athletes are our heroes — they have the perseverance to endure adversity, the passion and drive to claim success and the grace to do so with an air of effortlessness. We love them because we think they represent what we aspire to be. In recent years, however, it has become increasingly necessary to question this assumption. Most athletes aren’t who they appear to be during the peak of competition. It seems almost foreign now, but there was once a time when people thought Tiger Woods could do no wrong. There was a point in his career when Woods could charm audiences with his signature smile, and then proceed to ruthlessly cut through the competition on his way to the top of the leaderboard. We loved and lauded him for it. Then his success collapsed in an instant — we found out that Woods, the man who we thought stood for wholesome character and fierce competition, was committing adultery. The same is true for Lance Armstrong. We wanted to believe he recovered from cancer and won seven consecutive Tour De France titles without the help of any performance enhancing drugs. We bought into his charade, and how can anyone blame us? Who

wouldn’t love a decorated athlete-turned-philanthropist with a mission to cure cancer and raise health awareness? Then the truth was exposed, and all his fans hung their heads in disappointment and shame. In a cold and unapologetic interview with Oprah Winfrey, Armstrong confessed that he had cheated the sport and deceived his fans. Not only that, but Armstrong went to great lengths to preserve his facade. He destroyed families who were bound by law to confess what they knew about his involvement with drugs, and then, out of pure panic, he established the philanthropic organization Livestrong, which became his legacy. Now, our faith in athletes as paragons of human character has taken a turn for the worse. Last week, inside his home in South Africa, paraplegic Olympian sprinter Oscar Pistorius allegedly murdered his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. Just months ago Pistorius was being celebrated for his character and success. He has won six Paralympic gold medals in sprinting, and was the only Paralympic sprinter to compete against a group of ablebodied men in the Olympic games. Pistorius’s story garnered him respect from countrymen and fans and recognition from sponsors. He was honored with the privilege of carrying the South African flag during the closing ceremonies, and he has gained endorsements from

Oakley and Nike. Fans and companies were able to resonate with the story of a man they thought they knew, a man who is now an alleged murderer. The stories of these three great athletes illustrate a distinction between excellence in competition and in character, if nothing else. They encourage fans to ponder exactly what we should support — success on the stage of athletic competition, or responsibility and character off the field? The distinction has become clearer than ever. Nishaad Ruparel is a staff writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

VIA FLICKR.COM

Tiger Woods was caught in a major infidelity scandal in 2009.


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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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OPINION

EDITED BY SAMEER JAYWANT OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

PSYCHIATRY STAFF EDITORIAL

Society must treat root cause of suicide

By NIKOLAS REDA-CASTELAO

By the end of every 75-minute class, nearly six people in the United States will have committed suicide. Within the same time period, over 120 people will have attempted suicide, the third leading cause of death among people ages 15 to 24. Suicide ranks right behind homicide and unintentional injury. The media tries to blame external factors, like gun violence, in suicide cases such as singer Mindy McCready’s successful attempt or Aaron Swartz’s so-called martyrdom in the face of the Federal Pontius Pilate. However, these factors are merely distractions that mask more serious problems. The issues stem from cognitive disorders — clinical and manic depression, mood disorders, anxiety disorders and other abnormalities in the chemicals present in the brain. Of all suicides, 90 percent are committed by people with a diagnosed, treatable psychiatric disorder — emphasis on diagnosed and treatable. Most importantly, those with high IQs or creative capabilities are more prone

to suffer from such disorders. There is a taboo surrounding issues of suicide and psychiatric disorders in the United States. It seems the very idea that people kill themselves because of personal problems is not acceptable. Rather, it seems fit to target other, often unrelated, factors as root causes. Take the recent suicide of McCready, for example. Journalists have labeled the tool of her suicide as the cause, saying that guns are related to the nature of suicide in this country. This idea is ridiculous. Guns are not malevolent entities that spur people to take their own lives, but rather weapons mentally ill or depressed people use to kill themselves to ensure a painless ending. In the case of Swartz, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the federal government are not responsible for the young man’s suicide. The media sensationalizes the role of certain factors, frequently the least significant ones, to fit a current intellectual trend. If more people started dying because of auto-erotic asphyxiation, the nation would start a witch hunt targeted at the pornography industry in a second.

There is little public discussion about the true nature of suicide. People who are depressed often feel the need to repress their melancholy in public to avoid making others feel uncomfortable. They hold themselves accountable for their own actions when they are in a state where they cannot. It is evident in our language: we call psychiatrists “shrinks” and the psychologically ill “crazy” or “deranged.” We refer to depression as being “sad” even though it is not a mood but a mentality that causes complete hopelessness and drives destructive behavior in individuals. As a nation, we alienate the suicidal and depressed because we refuse to discuss the issue openly and acknowledge the psychologically ill as victims of their disease. It is not guns or the people who blame them but the individual who pulls the trigger. One cannot help but wonder whether a change would occur if we didn’t associate depression with weakness. Nikolas Reda-Castelao is a contributing columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

NUCLEAR WEAPONS

Iran victimized over nuclear weapons dispute By IAN MARK

In the aftermath of North Korea’s third nuclear test since 2006, Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast declared that Iran believes all nuclear weapons should be destroyed. Many Americans would say this makes Iran hypocritical. After all, they have nukes, don’t they? According to a CNN/Gallup poll last year, 71 percent of Americans believe Iran has nuclear weapons. But here’s the thing: they don’t, and even our government admits it. The poll was conducted last February, around the same time U.S. intelligence, Israeli intelligence and the International Atomic Energy Agency all reached the same conclusion on Iran — they do not have nuclear weapons and are not building nuclear weapons. Why is there such a discrepancy between the public’s perception of Iran and the reality of the situation? It is because media members and politicians constantly exaggerate the possibility of Iran obtaining or even wanting to obtain nuclear weapons. Every quote from Tehran is analyzed for any indication of a change in their nuclear plans. Take this recent state-

SUBMITTING TO

ment from Ayatollah Ali Khamenei: “We believe that nuclear weapons must be eliminated. We don’t want to build atomic weapons. But if we didn’t believe so and intended to possess nuclear weapons, no power could stop us.” While Iran clearly states that they do not want nuclear weapons, the media strips the direct quote out of its context. Here is a headline taken from the website of Fox News, the highest rated cable news network: “Ayatollah Khamenei: If Iran Wanted Nukes, U.S. Can’t Stop Us.” The misrepresentation is significant. The United States was not even mentioned in the Ayatollah’s statement, yet Fox frames it to seem as if we’re being taunted. Why did the Ayatollah include the ending, though? Surely he knew it was antagonistic. A fair guess would be that Iran is sick of being told what they cannot have. It is like when parents tell young children they cannot have vegetables in order to get them to want vegetables. The more we tell Iran what they cannot have, the more urgently they will assert that they can have them. This is why Secretary of State John Kerry’s suggestion that we should mimic North Korea by sending a message to Iran is preposterous.

In fact, it is the opposite of what we should do. Iran does not want nuclear weapons. They want everyone else to give them up. They have gone above and beyond the requirements of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Iran has been victimized several times by violations of that treaty, particularly when the United Nations Security Council attempted to freeze all uranium enrichment in the country. Continued efforts by the American media-congressional complex to demonize Iran will only hurt Iranian-American relations going forward. After all, who helped start the Iranian nuclear program in the first place? America. Ian Mark is a columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

RESPONSE TO LAST WEEK’S PIECE: “IRAN PRESENTS CONTRADICTORY NUCLEAR STANCE Check out Jessica Littman’s call for caution in the face of Iran’s nuclear ambition on nyunews.com.

MTA card charge helps environment but with cost

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced yesterday that riders are now able to fill their MetroCards with unlimited-ride time in addition to pay-per-ride dollars. A new $1 surcharge on new card purchases will quickly follow, going into effect on March 3. In addition, riders who carry unlimited cards will now be able to use them to take express buses and PATH trains, an added convenience for the everyday New York City traveler. The $1 green fee gives a monetary incentive for people to aid the environment, encouraging commuters to reuse the one or two MetroCards they have rather than waste paper and contribute to the increasing amount of litter in subway stations. For New Yorkers and NYU students especially, this change is good news. No longer do riders have to buy a new card when switching between pay-per-ride and unlimited. Even better, when the unlimited ride card expires, the remaining balance is left over towards the corresponding dollar value for individual swipes. However, MTA fare hikes will also be going into effect, to the dismay of many New Yorkers and students living in New York City. Prices of bus and subway rides will bump up to $2.50 at 2 a.m. on March 3. The public school system in New York City already subsidizes MetroCards for students in all five boroughs. Perhaps it would be too much of an economic burden for local city governments to extend this subsidy to college students, especially students at private universities. However, private universities like NYU should consider doing so for its students. Because of NYU’s unique and expansive campus, many students depend on public transportation and long commutes to get to class. The MetroCard fare increases will inevitably add to the hefty financial load NYU students will have when they graduate. While a majority of these MTA changes are flexible and more efficient, many NYU students may begin to feel a dent in their pockets. Although local city governments might not have the funds and resources to aid students in regards to public transportation, large private institutions such as NYU, with tuition as high as it is, should reprioritize its budget in order to best meet the financial needs of their students, starting with the most obvious one ­— New York City transportation.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Sameer Jaywant (Chair), Raquel Woodruff (Co-chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair)

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 150 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.



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