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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 9

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013

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Joshua DuBois to teach at NYU

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

By MICHAEL DOMANICO

DRUG LEGALIZATION POLICY IN DEBATE: Opinion columnists Ian Mark and Robin Huang present two sides of the contentious discussion on national drug regulation policies, weighing the liberties of American citizens against the dangers of drug abuse. OPS on PG. 7

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ONLINE CLASSES GIVE STUDENTS REBATE:

An agreement between American National Standards Institution and NYU-Poly allows members a 10 percent discount to take online courses. REBATE on PG. 3

MAGNET THEATER PROVIDES IMPRESSIVE IMPROVIZATION This New York City theater offers everyone comic relief. MAGNET on PG. 5

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CHUCK KUAN FOR WSN

Traditional Colombian flavor meets American staples Los Perros Locos recently opened its first store in the Lower East Side. Offering its clients a late-night meal, the new exterior and bar-styled seating paired with the welcoming atmosphere make it a perfect midnight snack location.

The White House announced on Thursday that Joshua DuBois is moving from Washington, D.C. to the Big Apple. DuBois, who was appointed by President Barack Obama as the director of the Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, is now pursuing a part-time teaching career at NYU and is expected to start later this year. According to Philip Lentz, NYU’s director of public affairs, DuBois will begin his time at NYU in either the summer or fall. He will teach students who are pursuing a minor in multifaith leadership through a program sponsored by the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Silver School of Social Work. “We have a very vibrant multi-faith community at NYU, and we are excited that DuBois has made the decision to join this active community of scholars,” Lentz said. Born in Nashville, Tenn., DuBois holds degrees from Boston

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Tisch graduate Patrick Fischler details new short film By ISHAN SETH

Viewers may be most familiar with Patrick Fischler as the insult-prone comedian Jimmy Barrett on AMC’s “Mad Men,” but the Tisch School of the Arts graduate has been up to a lot more than just berating Don Draper. In addition to acting, Fischler has recently ventured into directing. Fischler and his wife, Lauren Bowles, recently debuted their short film “The Test” at this year’s Santa Barbara International Film Festival. The film revolves around a couple taking a pregnancy test at a major turning point in their lives.

“You know, it really just came to me,” Fischler said of the idea for the film. “I’m not kidding. It is kind of how I get ideas.” Both Fischler and Bowles have such illustrious careers in the industry — Fischler in “Lost,” “Mulholland Drive” and “Speed,” and Bowles in “Ghost World,” “Seinfeld” and “Arrested Development” — that fans may be surprised by their foray into the short film format. But Fischler explained that the creative control they had over the production process enticed them. “I love being an actor,” he said. “But really the one thing I will say is that you get hired,

and you get told where to go and told what to do. I love that, but at a certain point it becomes this urge for us to just create our own thing.” Fischler explained that the couple worked so well together while making a short was because of everything they learned on television and film sets. “You learn a lot,” he said. “You watch all these people work, and you pick their best traits and you apply them to your own work.” The actor’s dedication to watching is admirable, especially considering it is becoming a dying practice.

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COURTESY OF PATRICK FISCHLER

Patrick Fischler has explored many roles during his career.


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LAMB OF GOD? Last Thursday a goat ran loose around the Interfaith Medical Center in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Police and security guards worked together to corral the animal and then delivered it to an animal shelter. The goat’s origin is unknown but may have been a slaughterhouse. SOUTH BRONX AND CENTRAL BROOKLYN, HARDEST PLACES FOR KIDS TO GROW UP IN NEW YORK CITY A report for the Citizens’ Committee for Children ranked New York City neighborhoods for safety based on indicators of childhood success and happiness. Areas in the South Bronx and Central Brooklyn were among the lowest. SAKS FIFTH AVENUE TAKES A HIT On Tuesday morning an SUV slammed into the Saks Fifth Avenue flagship store after it struck another vehicle and then jumped over the 49th Street curb. SMELLY VALENTINE’S PLANS BACK ON TRACK Those looking for an unorthodox Valentine’s Day date may want to take their sweetheart for a stinky romp through the Brooklyn sewers. With another tour added by popular request, the Department of Environmental Protection provides three chances to get down and dirty on Thursday. ORDERING TAKEOUT JUST BECAME TRICKIER Mayor Michael Bloomberg has come out in support of the Sanitation Department’s request to implement a citywide ban on Styrofoam. The ban would target businesses that use Styrofoam and leave customers responsible for disposing of the waste.

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“LIFE IS BUT A DREAM,” BEYONCÉ DOCUMENTARY To us mere peasants, Beyoncé remains a perfect, distant mystery, like the pyramids of Egypt or Cher’s Twitter account. Now, for the first time, all this is about to change. On Feb. 16, HBO will air “Life Is But a Dream,” Queen B’s autobiographical documentary. We’ll be treated to raw footage of her personal life, pregnancy and creative process. Who runs the world? B. –Helen Holmes, Deputy Features Editor

KARPAN books/theater OLIVIA GEORGE film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment ALEX GREENBERGER music ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE the highlighter blog SAM RULLO features HELEN HOLMES beauty & style MICHELLE LIM dining ANGEL CHANG sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia REBECCA CLEMENTI,

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LANOLIN-AGG-TVAL SOAP The Lanolin-Agg-Tval bar soap is perfect to soften your dry winter skin. This Swedish brand’s formula, which contains egg whites, is a favorite natural product among the cosmetics community, as it helps minimize pores and brighten skin. The gentle formula is great for a daily face wash, but when left on for five minutes, the soap tightens on your face as a mask to rinse off. You can find it online through Amazon ($20 for six bars of soap). –Michelle Lim, Beauty & Style Editor

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TORTILLERIA NIXTAMAL When craving Mexican grub, don’t settle for a Dos Toros burrito. Although Nixtamal is in faraway Corona, the restaurant makes excellent tacos and the most phenomenal nachos topped with Oaxaca cheese, pico de gallo, avocado, crema and Jalapeños. Try the carnitas and Al Pastor tacos, which are filled with pineapple, cilantro and onion, and pair those with a sidra de manzana (apple cider). 104-05 47th Ave., Corona, Queens –Angel Chang, Dining Editor

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MCNULTY’S TEA & COFFEE CO. Coffee connoisseurs, it’s time to carve a spot for McNulty’s Tea & Coffee Co. on your must-see list. Nestled on Christopher Street in the West Village, McNulty’s Tea & Coffee Co. has been offering hundreds of flavors of coffee and tea from around the world for the past 115 years. Try the Colombian Old Crop, aged eight to 10 years, or the Tanzanian Kilimanjaro. 109 Christopher St. –Kristina Bogos, Features Editor

A New York City taxi races through the rain-slicked streets at night in search of a fare.

PHOTO BY MERYLL PREPOSI

TU DO The traits of Vietnamese food are often insensitively jumbled with those of Chinese and Thai cuisine. Chinatown’s Tu Do offers a lot more than pho and banh mi, featuring appetizers such as table-grilled beef and steamed rice crepes, as well as various rice noodle soups. Forget the boring fried rice, and go for crab meat rice vermicelli. 119 Bowery –Angel Chang, Dining Editor

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MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Amy Zhang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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PASTOR continued from PG. 1

Special assistant to President Obama to arrive at NYU

University and Princeton University, and he was the religious affairs director for Obama’s first presidential campaign. Obama named DuBois the director of the faith-based office following the 2008 election, and DuBois often served as an unofficial pastor to the president. In addition to teaching at NYU, DuBois is reportedly penning a book about spirituality for leaders and launching an organization that will seek to resolve social issues through religious groups. Calvin Sung, a CAS sophomore and the vice president of the NYU chapter of the Newman Catholic Fellowship, expressed his excitement over DuBois joining the university’s faculty. “DuBois offers a unique perspective integrating faith directly into his career and is a strong role model for those seeking to make faith a regular and relevant part of their daily lives,” Sung said. “In light of recent disappointments among Church leaders, students need honest inspiration now more than ever.” The faith-based office was established by President George W. Bush in 2001 to foster communication and coordination between the U.S. government and nonprofit organizations, both secular and religious. Critics have attacked the federal government’s decision to sponsor institutions that discriminate in hiring, and some have questioned the apparent violation of the separation between church and state. Professor Guillermina Jasso, who teaches sociology at NYU,

agreed that any agency that blurs the line between church and state could be dangerous. “One of the glories of this country is the wall between church and state. Any erosion of that wall is troubling,” she said.  “Remember, church and state have very different objectives ... The state is blind to personal characteristics and ideally treats everyone the same. Not so [in] the church.” Lentz added that NYU is an appropriate forum for discussing controversies regarding religious life. “As an academic community, we invite vigorous debate and open dialogue about all topics, in and out of the classroom,” Lentz said. Michael Domanico is co-copy chief. Email him at mdomanico@nyunews.com.

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DuBois will teach multi-faith leadership classes at NYU.

Stern students take Harlem Shake viral By AMY ZHANG

Around 40 students filled Stern’s Tisch Hall Monday night to film Gould Plaza Shake (Harlem Shake), otherwise known as NYU’s version of the Harlem Shake. Called to arms by Stern’s senior class president Jacqueline Serame, 39 students brought props ranging from gold pants and face masks to Santa hats and NYU sweaters as they prepared for filming. Starring Stern senior Andrew Terry Rosenbaum, the video features a group of motionless students as lone dancer Rosenbaum jerks left and right, performing the Harlem Shake. According to Serame, the whole process was short and organized, requiring only one hour to shoot and three hours to edit before being posted at midnight. After YouTube user SomeHappenings uploaded the Gould Plaza Shake, the video quickly moved across Stern’s social media sites and between NYU students. At press time, the video had over 2,500 views. Serame’s campaign to raise awareness of the school’s Facebook page Stern Legacy sparked her interest in the series of Harlem Shake videos taking YouTube by storm. According to the website Smosh,

ANSI and NYU-Poly partnership gives students class discounts By NEELA QADIR

A money-saving partnership between the American National Standards Institute and NYU Polytechnic Institute was announced last week. The partnership will allow full ANSI members to receive a 10 percent rebate when taking an online course through NYU-Poly. Lisa Ann Bellantuono, program coordinator of Enterprise Learning at NYU-Poly, said that the partnership would help to raise more awareness of NYU-Poly’s online graduate program, NYU e-Poly. “[The program] provides 17 online master’s degrees and advance certificates,” said Bellantuono. NYU-Poly, which maintains partnerships with the Associate for Computing Machinery, the Associate of Information Technology Professionals, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the New York Academy and The Wall Street Technology Associate, is the first local school to partner with ANSI. “Our NYU-Poly Enterprise Learning Department is in charge of locating such societies with similar interests in technology, science and engineering. These agreements are a key marketing strategy for our online graduate program,” said Bellantuono. Although NYU-Poly has agreed to the partnership, ANSI took the opportunity to announce the partnership without consulting NYU-Poly, and without allowing the school to issue its own press release or participate in a joint statement.

the original Harlem Shake dance originated in Harlem, N.Y. in 1981. A music producer named Baauer released an electronica version of the song last May. Since then, meme dance videos have proliferated on YouTube, but the most recent surge flared when a Harlem Shake video was posted one week ago. Hundreds of different versions have followed, and NYU’s includes its own surprises. Rosenbaum revealed that at one point, a building crew member dropped his broom to join the team. “It was very much a bonding experience,” Rosenbaum said. “The best thing about the Harlem Shake is that you don’t need to know everyone. A flash mob at its finest. All of these Sternies came together to actually break the stereotype and have some fun.” When asked whether Stern Legacy would have more videos released soon, Serame said attempts would be made. “I think everyone should watch for [Rosenbaum] though,” Serame said. “There’s definitely going to be more legacy videos there.” Amy Zhang is managing editor. Additional reporting by Hanqing Chen. Email her at azhang@nyunews.com.

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“While it is indeed great that the account has generated such an active PR, we would ourselves not have considered it special news. The Institute, on the other hand, did,” said Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, NYU-Poly’s provost and acting president. According to Elizabeth Neiman, senior director of communications and public relations at ANSI, the institute wanted to connect with NYU-Poly so that it could branch out to students with varying interests. She noted that among the graduate degrees offered by NYU e-Poly are bioinformatics, cybersecurity, manufacturing engineering, project management and wireless innovation. “ANSI is focused on outreach to students of all types — whether they are part of an undergraduate or graduate program, whether they are taking continuing education courses or whether they are focused on earning workforcerelated credentials like certifications or training certificates,” said Neiman. However, Neiman stressed that the tuition rebate is reserved for full members of the institute and does not apply to the general public

or non-ANSI members. She hopes that the rebate would allow students to save some money while getting their education. NYU-Poly freshman Tahsina Islam said that although students might save money by taking an online course, the experience is different from one in a classroom with a live professor. “I personally would not take the online course because I prefer having a teacher in front of me teaching and to be physically interacting with the students around me,” said Tahsina. “I feel that being at an engineering school, having student-student interaction is really essential.” Online courses are also available to NYU undergraduate and graduate students, pending their adviser approval. This year, NYU-Poly came in ninth place for best online graduate engineering program by U.S. News and World Report’s rankings. The school also received the Outstanding Online Program distinction from Sloan Consortium. Neela Qadir is deputy university editor. Email her at nqadir@nyunews.com.

President Obama addresses college students’ interests By NICOLE BROWN and VERONICA CARCHEDI

President Barack Obama addressed several issues related to college students while underlining job creation and bipartisan agreement during last night’s State of the Union Speech. Although tax credits, grants and better loans have made schooling more affordable, Obama said taking the burden away from taxpayers to fund higher education could further decrease costs for students. To maintain the value of their education while increasing affordability, Obama also proposed reforms to the Higher Education Act that will put pressure on colleges. Additionally, the president announced the “College Scorecard,” which will give parents and students the opportunity to rate a college based on its cost and quality of education. “Today, skyrocketing costs price way too many young people out of a higher education, or saddle them with unsustainable debt,” Obama said. “Colleges must do their part to keep costs down.” College students looking for part-time jobs may be pleased to hear that Obama wants to increase the federal minimum wage to $9. The president said the idea of tying minimum wage to the cost of living was one that he and Gov. Mitt Romney agreed on last year. Technology and STEM programs were also emphasized. Obama highlighted the collaboration between IBM, New York Public Schools and the City University of New

York, which allows high schoolers to graduate with a technical degree. He said this program should be a model for the nation. He also stressed the importance of a bipartisan agreement to protect future generations from the harmful effects of climate change. “We can choose to believe that Superstorm Sandy, and the most severe drought in decades, and the worst wildfires some states have ever seen were all just a freak coinci-

Colleges must do their part to keep costs down

dences,” he said. “Or we can choose to believe in the overwhelming judgment of science and act before it’s too late.” Obama added that investing in renewable energy would help create jobs and revive the economy. Although the main focuses of this year’s State of the Union were job growth and bipartisanship, the president has not forgotten the interests of college students. Nicole Brown is investigative editor. Veronica Carchedi is city/state editor. Email them at cstate@nyunews.com.


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Alumnus discusses storied film career, transition to directing “Now we can just sit with our iPhones and surf the web [while on set], but back in the day we couldn’t do that,” he said. “That is important to me when I’m on set. I really like to watch people doing their job.” Fischler also reminisced about his time at NYU, where he met his future wife when he was a freshman. But Fischler took more than his spouse away from his time at NYU — he also had advice for the aspiring actors and filmmakers of his alma mater. “Number one, don’t give up,” Fischler said. “Number two, if there’s something else you love to do, then do that.” This strict advice can, and should, only come from one of the most versatile actors in the business. As Fischler has taken on a number of unique roles during his career, the question of how he can balance such varied roles is raised. “I can’t imagine it any other way,” he said. “I don’t want to get stuck in playing the same thing. Every time I get a job, I want to look at it and think how it could be different from the last thing I did. Not everything I can do can be different, but I’m always willing to try.” Ishan Seth is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

For continuing coverage of New York Fashion Week, including reviews, video interviews and photos, be sure to check nyunews.com

Auteurs highlight television creativity, shatter expectations By ROTEM EITAN

Television was initially bound by the power of censorship, ratings and producers, but as is the case with most art forms, the rules were not written in stone. Now, television is in the age of the “TV auteur,” a show runner who has complete creative control of the program. One such auteur is Lena Dunham, Hollywood’s new “It” girl, who has received acclaim for her HBO dramedy “Girls.” In addition to frequently directing, Dunham is also the head writer and the star of the show. “Girls” has reached its current level of success because of Dunham, who disregards societal taboos and explores sex, love and drugs in more innovative manners. She enjoys creative control, which allows her to control a specific vision for the story, write it and then have the episode made exactly how she wanted. The same can be said of Louis C.K.’s “Louie.” The FX show, starring, written and directed by C.K., has a per-episode budget of $300,000, a miniscule price compared to other programs. As part of a deal with FX, C.K.’s meager budget also grants him full control over the show. This kind of liberty is refreshing for the medium. Without any restraints, C.K., like Dunham, is given more power, which translates to a successful, entertaining and unusual show. TV auteurism is not limited to just specific individuals but is becoming the way entire networks operate. AMC prides itself upon giving complete control to its show runners.

With shows like “Mad Men,” “Breaking Bad” and “The Walking Dead,” it’s easy to see how auteurism benefits television. AMC provides an enormous amount of leeway in the production process while other networks have yet to follow the trend. In “Breaking Bad,” for example, creator Vince Gilligan is also the producer, writer and director of some episodes. Much of the behind-the-scenes creative heavy-lifting is undertaken by Gilligan, and the amount of awards “Breaking Bad” has won since its inception is a testament to AMC’s method. With the success of TV auteurism, it is clear that we have launched ourselves into a new era, one in which creativity triumphs over network limitations and where the voice of one person is not only acknowledged but placed at the forefront of the production process. So why is this trend happening now? The answer to this lies in film,

which started as a substitute for theater and quickly became a cheaper source of good entertainment. Soon, filmmakers became more concerned with crafting the best and even the most controversial films. In a way, television is an extension of film, representing an even cheaper and more accessible outlet. Initially, censorship and ratings limited TV, but now, with pay cable, many shows are freed from those weights. With cable networks less concerned with ratings, show runners have pushed television’s boundaries and encouraged more risk taking. Television auteurism has yet to fully experience its renaissance, but, with the public’s growing fascination with edgier programming and proven successes, its arrival is only a matter of time. Rotem Eitan is a contributing writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com.

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Lena Dunham, Louis C.K. and Vince Gilligan are a new kind of TV auteur.

‘Dahmer’ tests limits of documentary format By CHARLIE SPECTOR

To his neighbors in the Oxford Apartments of Milwaukee, Wis., Jeffrey Dahmer was a quiet man — a quiet but polite man who kept to himself, did not really go out much and preferred to bring guests back to his place. However, that seemingly idyllic facade

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A new film explores Jeffrey Dahmer’s past.

quickly disappeared on July 22, 1991. On that night, a tip led police to an apartment filled with refrigerators containing severed heads, boxes full of genitalia and piles of limbs. By the time the apartment was painstakingly cleared and the suspect charged, the entire country knew Dahmer’s name. Blending police archival footage and interviews with dramatizations of the notorious serial killer’s everyday life, “The Jeffrey Dahmer Files” takes a radical approach to Dahmer’s story — turning down the whodunit aspect of the piece to tell the story in cinema verite. The dramatizations within director Chris James Thompson’s documentary are not those one would typically expect from crime re-enactments. They are arresting in their own fashion and a tiny wonder to behold. Andrew Swant portrays the in-

famous serial killer with a performance so subtle and naturalistic that it may shock some viewers when they remember it is only a performance. Tied in with stories of Dahmer’s everyday life are the stories of three crucial figures in the case: medical examiner Jeffrey Jentzen, retired Milwaukee police detective Pat Kennedy and, most fascinatingly, Dahmer’s former neighbor, Pamela Bass. While Jentzen’s role exists to provide the traditional myster story as the examiner taking a scientific approach to identifying bodies, in the end it is Kennedy whose story ends up capturing the audience. Kennedy quickly rose to fame after Dahmer’s arrest. He was praised as a hero but simultaneously speculated about because of his ability to coax information out of Dahmer. However, Kennedy coun-

tered these accusations by presenting a vibrant and truthful retelling of the events of that summer. While Kennedy’s story captured public interest in a positive way, it is the story of Pamela Bass that proves to be the most devastating. Her retelling of the events immediately after Dahmer’s arrest portray Oxford Apartments as a quiet, unassuming building complex thrust into the spotlight — for better or worse — as the most recognizable apartment complex in the country. Bold in realization but startling in effect, “The Jeffrey Dahmer Files” proves to be more than just a simple whodunit ­­— it valiantly attempts to explore the psychology behind Dahmer’s crime. Charlie Spector is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.


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Magnet Theater showcases organized chaos of improv By NIKOLAS REDA-CASTELAO

Improv is a daunting form of theatrical performance, both for performer and audience. When even the actors are not sure what will happen next, every performance becomes an exciting adventure if the audience is willing to tag along. In its back-to-back comedy shows, “The Weave” and “Kiss Punch Poem,” the Magnet Theater delivers 45 hysterical minutes that demonstrate a promising future for New York City improv. The show begins when a member of the small, intimate audience prompted the cast with the word “fermented.” From the start, they hook you to their vehicle of hilarity and drive us through the dazzling world of improv comedy. According to the Magnet Theater’s overseer, Pete Sanders, the goal of improvisation is to “make things seem scripted.” There is rarely a moment when the performance’s controlled chaos seems unscripted. Most impressive is the interweaving of skits and transitions that backtrack to earlier scenes. The performance never loses steam, only becoming funnier and more self-referential. Short dry spells sporadically occur, but the

totality of colorful scenes makes up for these momentary lapses. Sanders expressed a desire to “spread improv [as] valuable and good theater.” This goal is made clear in the myriad classes the theater offers to the general public and professional performers. Improv at the Magnet Theater intends to teach group camaraderie and takes the pressure off both audience and performer. “There are no mistakes,” Sanders said. Improv fuels itself on positive energy and teamwork among not only performers but also the audience. The Magnet Theater offers eight-week beginner classes, but if you just want to test the water, the theater also offers free “Intro to Improv” classes 10 times a month. The shows at The Magnet Theater are wildly sporadic and hilarious, and the theater is founded on a principle of spreading the joy of watching and creating to everyone. The Magnet Theater is located at 254 W. 29th St. More information is available at magnettheater.com. Nikolas Reda-Castelao is a contributing writer. Email him at theater@nyunews.com.

MillionYoung finds emotional resonance with third album By NICOLE DEL MAURO

With “Variable,” Mike Diaz, the sole member of the alternative-electronica musical act MillionYoung, manages to create an album of love-inspired songs that even when released a mere two days before Valentine’s Day will not depress your single self nor send you spiraling into a chocolate-induced coma. It might, however, make you get up and dance. The album consists of Diaz crooning 10 tracks that explore the many facets of love, but the sap ends with the subject matter. MillionYoung’s sound includes a wide range of tempos and a unique mixture of digitalized keyboard elements, as well as traditional instruments, while never straying from its electric-pop feel. The act’s previous two albums, 2011’s “Replicants” and 2012’s re-release

“Amanecer,” include similar combinations of digital sound. But the majority of the songs in those albums contained minimal, muffled lyrics and, instead, were devoted to emphasizing beats on each track. Now, Diaz’s soothing, caramelized voice belts out the pages of his diary to his listeners. Diaz has never been more sure of his feelings. “Lovin,” the second track on “Variable,” begins with, “Oh I can’t forget you / You are always on my mind / And every time I see you / I lose all track of time.” The lyrics’ sweet nature is accompanied by a relaxed electric guitar, adding an unsurprising beach vibe to the Florida native singer’s track. While the first four lines repeat themselves throughout the song, its simplicity generates an equal appreciation for the sound and lyrics, which is noticeable in tracks such as “Nao” and “Swish.”

The album’s tone brightens with the final dancier, more upbeat tracks. Diaz continuously asks, “Is this love?” throughout the song “It’s Fun to Remember,” as a steady but playful techno beat pulses with alternating bursts of sound. Tracks like “Reciprocal” and “Swish” show a striking contrast between the more obvious dance-floor numbers, centered around slower, heavy keyboard tracks and sound effects, which further prove the act’s versatility. On its third album, MillionYoung has evolved from its previous sound without losing authenticity in delivering a new kind of love song. With its willingness to balance levels of natural with energetic rhythm, “Variable” is pleasantly refreshing. Nicole Del Mauro is a contributing writer. Email her at music@nyunews.com.


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Did or didn’t perform a New Year’s ceremony? Butt out? Org. based in Langley, Va. Fox talent show, for short Did or didn’t surpass a D.J.’s mark for accident-free days? Set, as a price Pal Earns the booby prize Part of a terza rima rhyme scheme Corner Monopoly square Gem for some Libras Did or didn’t play a good round of golf? Did or didn’t participate in the Boy Scouts outing?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE B O W L S

A W A I T

V I I N A S P S E I C S T T O A R

N E R D Y

E N D O R S R E O T A A C T S I O R N K S O

T E C S H O N H O O D I K A I N D E M A N

A C L U

C H E F

U S I N G

L A R G E

C H U G

K A R O

H O O F L E D E A R T Y E D E I O F L F G E A L

R A T E D R

T A L C

E H A B M A R E O N G A G E R M O N D C U T Q T I P A N O A T A R L L B E T A R D S G A G A E V E R S O D S

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64 65 66 67 68

Dinero With 44-Down, features of some Greek architecture Pro vote Zaps, in the kitchen Ream unit Ready for war High, pricewise

Edited by Will Shortz 1

of pumice 2 In the thick of 3 Tight spot 4 In a past life 5 Item in a gas station kiosk 6 Pakistan’s chief river 7 Works on socks, say 8 Design detail, briefly 9 Disco ___ (1970s) 10 Woody tissue 11 Reply of confirmation 12 E-mail command 13 Long basket, in hoops lingo 19 “This or that?” 21 Orange juice option 25 Cow or sow 26 Landfill emanations 27 Shepherd’s aid 28 Honky-___ 29 Sirius, e.g. 30 Core group 31 Moves laboriously 32 Detergent brand 34 Lover of Narcissus

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29 34

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22 24

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60

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51

9

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DOWN

1 Source

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No. 0109

54

50

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Puzzle by DAVID BEN-MERRE

35 36

37 41 42 43

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Thing with pips Head shot accompaniers, maybe Wall St. hire Fall back Wreck, as a hotel room Bush 41 and Bush 43, for two See 63-Across

48 49 50 51 52 53 55 56 57

DTs sufferer, for short One of a deck pair Mr. T TV group Singer Redding Milne’s bear Super-duper Casual greeting Ring contest Elbow

58

On the sheltered side

59

Stereotypical mobster’s voice

61

Insincere display

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

7

OPINION

EDITED BY SAMEER JAYWANT OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

DRUG POLICY

Legalizing drug liberates society, boosts economy By IAN MARK

Governments exist to regulate interactions between people, often strangers, and prevent one party from injuring the other party in any way. What governments are not supposed to do is control individuals. The government has no right to tell citizens what they can put into their bodies. This is not an argument for marijuana legalization — this is an argument for the legalization of all drugs. I am not saying that drugs should be available to children or that people should be allowed to shoot up in the streets. I am simply arguing for the right of adults to, in the privacy of their own homes, control what substances enter their bodies. The philosophical part of my argument is as simple as stated above. As for the practical side, the effects on the economy would be incredible. According to the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the federal government spent $15 billion fighting the war on drugs in 2010 alone, while state and local governments spent $25 billion more. That doesn’t even count the average $50,000 it costs to incarcerate one prisoner per year. Since 1995, about 25 percent of the average 43,000 new inmates every year have been arrested for drug-related crimes. And all that money (and resources like police officers who could focus on preventing violent crimes instead of drug use) is nothing compared to the amount of money spent by users in the United States, estimated at about $60 billion a year, according to

PBS Frontline. Where does that money go? Gangs and drug lords. Legalizing drugs would send that money to business owners instead, not to mention the billions the government would make from sales taxes. The biggest fear I believe people have about legalization is that it would dramatically increase drug use. But this is not backed up empirically. Consider Portugal, which decriminalized all drugs in 2001. Eleven years later, the Cato Institute reported that drug usage in Portugal was half what it had been, and was actually among the lowest of EU member states and that drug-related diseases like STDs and addiction had also decreased. It makes sense why this happened. I am an underage college freshman. I assure you, I could get almost any drug I wanted within a week. The reason I don’t is not because it is illegal, but because I don’t want to do cocaine or PCP. And I believe the opposite is true as well: anyone who wants to do these drugs doesn’t care if they are illegal. Part of the allure of drugs is their illegality. Legalizing them removes this and makes it easier for addicts to find help. Legalizing drugs would help the country financially, while also not drastically worsening usage rates. As long as it is regulated like alcohol and cigarettes, there would be little to worry about. Legalization would make us a freer society, which should be the ultimate goal of any government.

By ROBIN HUANG

VS

Ian Mark is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Obama evades military plan

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Sameer Jaywant (Chair), Raquel Woodruff (Co-chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Nickhil Sethi

SUBMITTING TO

Ban on illegal narcotics avoids various dilemmas

In yesterday’s State of the Union address, President Obama laid out his vision for his final term in office. Although the primary focus of the speech dealt with broader economic initiatives, including tax hikes and other spending changes, perhaps the most striking aspect concerned his plan to withdraw 34,000 troops from Afghanistan by this time next year. The Obama administration also plans to shift total responsibility to the Afghan security forces by the end of 2014. Currently, about 66,000 soldiers are stationed in Afghanistan. Reducing the number of troops overseas is a bold step, but by no means does it live up to Obama’s ambitious 2008 and 2012 campaign platforms. Thus, it is not clear if

While I am all for the legalization and regulation of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana — and of course, caffeine — I strongly disagree with the idea of legalizing the rest of the illegal drug family. Marijuana is not addictive. And although alcohol and tobacco are, they are too widespread to ban. We know from Prohibition that such a ban is not effective. The Netherlands’ approach to drug regulation differentiates between “hard drugs” and “soft drugs” by their degree of addictiveness. With all of the success the Netherlands has had with its legalization of marijuana, why not move on to cocaine, heroin and crystal meth? The above-mentioned drugs are notoriously addictive and harmful. The science is simple: cocaine causes dopamine to build up in the brain synapses which results in a high. Even 10 percent of a country using cocaine once it is legalized, which means 10 percent of the population incapacitated by cocaine withdrawal, is unimaginable. Whatever economic benefit gained by taxing the consumption of such drugs is evened out by the reduction of productive human resources. For instance, in 2011 tobacco was the largest cause of preventive deaths and resulted in $97 billion of loss in productivity. What draconian tax must the government collect to make up for that? And if you are to be fooled by

the war will necessarily end by 2014, even if most of the military control will be transferred to the Afghan forces. Other questions persist as well — Obama’s proposal lacked many specifics. For example, the number of soldiers who would remain after the security responsibility handoff remains uncertain, but we predict that the numbers will still be in the thousands. The timeline of troop withdrawal is also unclear, and the White House’s sole comment was that it would be “phased out.” There has been some speculation that this plan was a result of a compromise between the president and various U.S. military leaders, some of whom fervently wanted to see increased military support

the fact that taxation can discourage drug use, don’t be. Taxation does little to hold down drug usage rates. For instance, the rise of an exorbitant U.S. cigarette tax in the last decade hasn’t effected the percentage of smokers in the United States, which hovers around 20 percent. Even if we disregard health detriments of drug use, what about the moral aspect of it? For this, I have thought long and hard. There isn’t a moral argument against drug use — it’s a matter of personal choice. But, if an individual is truly addicted to a drug — which is astonishingly easy with the likes of cocaine, heroine and methamphetamine — then he is a slave to it. It is like hunger. A person cannot choose to be hungry or not. Drug addiction is akin to violating a basic human right — no one should be held in slavery or servitude. Thus, the competing interests at play here are personal liberty and societal morality. When these interests come into conflict, you have go with the one that produces least harm. The legalization of such dangerous drugs condones the existence of a parasite upon society, and produces more harm than good. I cannot pretend to know which specific drug reforms need to take place, but legalization of all drugs is not the answer. Robin Huang is a contributing columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

in that region. It is not surprising to see Obama accommodating his opposition given the way he approached his first term. However, to those who wanted to see the president step up as a leader in his second term, this may come as a disappointment. As an important side note, what was left out of Obama’s speech last night was something that the president has historically avoided discussing in public — drone warfare. Although the rhetoric of Obama’s speech suggests that war can be ended, drones are simply replacing humans on the battlefield, and war may actually become a perpetual threat.

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 150 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


8

NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

DINING

EDITED BY ANGEL CHANG DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

Cook up creative Valentine’s delights By CAITLIN SCHNACK

Valentine’s Day is undoubtedly the best occasion to indulge in heart-shaped desserts, but it is also an opportunity to get creative. Roll up your sleeves and try creating these homemade delights. HEART-SHAPED PANCAKES For a festive breakfast, whip up a batch of your favorite pancakes. Instead of pouring the batter directly onto the griddle, pour it into greased heart-shaped cookie cutters and place on a preheated griddle or pan. When bubbles appear around the sides of the pancakes, remove the cookie cutter and flip the pancakes over to cook them through. Pop the pancakes into a 250-degree oven until you are ready to serve them and be sure to grease the cookie cutter before preparing more pancakes. Serve with strawberries, whipped cream and heart-shaped sprinkles. DECADENT HOT COCOA Cozy up with your Valentine and two mugs of spiced hot cocoa. In each mug, mix together two teaspoons of cocoa powder (for a more decadent treat, use dark cocoa powder), two teaspoons of sugar, a dash of cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and a pinch of salt. Pour two cups of milk into a microwave-safe container and microwave for 30-second intervals, stirring after each interval, until the milk reaches the desired temperature. Whisk a cup of milk into each mug and stir in a drop or two of vanilla extract.

ASPARAGUS WITH OLIVE OIL Asparagus is said to be a natural aphrodisiac for both men and women. It is also incredibly healthy and will surely stave off any possible chocolate-induced comas. To make an easy asparagus dish, arrange asparagus spears in a single layer in a baking dish. Drizzle olive oil over the asparagus, and season with salt and pepper. Toss the asparagus to evenly coat and roast for 25 to 30 minutes in a 400-degree oven. CHOCOLATE AND CREAM FONDUE Fondue is always a fun dessert for sharing. In a heavy saucepan, heat three-fourths cup of heavy cream, stirring frequently, until it comes to a boil. Remove the pot from heat and add 15 ounces of bittersweet chocolate. Let it rest for a few minutes to soften the chocolate. Whisk the chocolate and cream together until smooth, then dip in whatever your heart desires. Try adding chocolate, marshmallows, pretzels or fruit. Even topping with bacon may make for a surprisingly delicious treat. HALF-SHELL OYSTERS If you want to really wow that special someone, start a romantic candle-lit dinner with fresh oysters on the half shell. It might sound strange, but oysters are another aphrodisiac because they contain zinc, the “sexy mineral.” Serve them with hot sauce to really get things fired up. Caitlin Schnack is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

Breads Bakery brings Israeli favorites to Union Square By CAITLIN SCHNACK

Just steps away from Union Square, the newly opened and aptly named Breads Bakery invites customers to warm up with freshly baked breads and pastries. Uri Scheft, owner of the popular Lehamim Bakery in Tel Aviv, Israel, opened Breads Bakery, his first American outpost, on Jan. 30. He was born in Israel but grew up in Denmark, and he translates the fusion of his roots into baked offerings at his new establishment. Breads offers several traditional Jewish treats, such as chocolate babka and rugelach, as well as artisanal breads made with Scandinavian rye. Many of the items at Breads are reasonably priced and attractive for a student budget. Little chocolate rugelach are in abundance, priced at $1.50 each. Paired with Breads’ $3 cappuccino, they make for the perfect afternoon treat. For those who prefer savory pastries, Breads offers highly addictive cheese straws (five for $9), a perfect blend of Gouda cheese and flaky pastry that will literally melt in your mouth. Equally delectable is the mini Mediterranean quiche ($2.50), a tiny savory pie filled with feta cheese, fresh roasted tomatoes and sunflower seeds. Breads also offers a soup of the day and a variety of sandwiches, such as smoked salmon, goat cheese and beet, and tuna salad. One of Breads’ best products is babka ($9.95), a sweet yeast cake available with either chocolate

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tament to the freshness of the products offered at the bakery. CAS freshman Hannah Weinstock had mixed feelings about the environment. “I feel a bit like I’m in a warehouse,” she said. “But I enjoyed the cappuccino. It’s cheaper than Starbucks’.” The open environment may not be the best for studying, but it is definitely a perfect place for meeting friends and grabbing a snack. After all, as Kazes said, one of the many philosophies of Breads is to create an environment in which you feel like you are “visiting your friend in their living room.” Breads Bakery is located at 18 E. 16th St. It is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Caitlin Schnack is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

JOON LEE/WSN

Tasty pastries from Breads Bakery are made fresh everyday.

Colombian street food spot serves twists on classic dishes By MARGARET WEINBERG

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or raisins. Breads, in an effort to create a welcoming environment, offers samples of their products throughout the day. Most of the products offered at Breads are similar to those sold at Lehamim in Tel Aviv, but Sharon Kazes, a co-manager of Breads, explained that some of the recipes had to be altered for different tastes in the United States. “A good recipe in another country might not work here,” he said. Rugelach and babka are staples in the Tel Aviv bakery, and he hoped that they would be attractive to the large Jewish population of New York City. According to Kazes, the concept of the bakery is freshness. Behind the espresso bar, Breads boasts a large baking facility that is uniquely open to customer viewing. This open baking area, complete with racks of rising bread dough and giant mixers, is a tes-

A recently opened, late-night eatery on the Lower East Side, Los Perros Locos is redefining our expectations of hot dogs and hamburgers. Customers who venture to this two-week-old restaurant can sample a variety of Colombian street food-themed items, from the El Niño Loco hot dog ($4.50), topped with Kraft macaroni and cheese and crushed Fritos, to the El Perro Perdido ($8), which is served in a deepfried French Toast bun. Even though it was inspired by Colombian street cuisine, the food at Los Perros Locos is anything but traditional. The owner, Alex Mitow, designed each combination on the menu. Customers can try Salchipapas, a standard Latin American fast food dish (starting at $3.50). But while Salchipapas include little more than French fries, sausage and maybe some sauce or cheese, Mitow’s versions offer additions, such as a soft-boiled quail egg and his own ChipZana sauce, which is a

blend of chipotle and apples. The restaurant’s “hamburguesas” are juicy, short-rib blend burgers grilled to order. Particularly scrumptious is the ÑYC Burger ($7.50), which comes topped with melted mozzarella, crushed chips and a variety of salsas. The El Puerco ($8.50) is served with bacon, ham, cheese and ChipZana sauce. Don’t miss the cheap snack options, such as the Mazzzzzorca, or grilled corn ($4). Mitow’s unique food creations reflect his own clever personality. An ambitious entrepreneur in spirit, he has plenty of experience in the restaurant business, having operated a seafood restaurant in Florida before managing a barbecue joint on the Upper East Side. As he is of Bulgar. ian descent, it may seem odd that he focuses on Colombian street food. “It just made sense,” he said. “What people want is grab-and-go food under $10 but still want something that is interesting.” Mitow cited the recent explosion of food trends, such as dumplings and crepes, as his inspiration.

Mitow is proud of the work put into the Lower East Side location. Although the restaurant opened later than expected because the effects of Hurricane Sandy delayed permit approvals, it is an excellent upgrade from the run-down Asian bakery that previously occupied the space. The restaurant is bright, clean, cheerful and houses bar-styled seating and a mirrored wall. Los Perros Locos offers an interesting look at a specific culture’s most accessible foods. Latin Americaninspired music plays as customers eat and sip on soda colombiana and Mexican Coke. “People want to be transported to another culture quickly and cheaply,” Mitow said. “We want to sell the experience as much as the food.” Los Perros Locos is located at 201 Allen St. The restaurant is open until 2:30 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and 4:30 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Margaret Weinberg is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

WSN021313  

Washington Square News February 13, 2013

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