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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 4

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013

nyunews.com

Labor campaign begins at NYU

FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS

By TATIANA BAEZ

NYU kicks off MLK week NYU alumnus Dr. Roscoe Brown spoke at yesterday’s opening ceremony for Martin Luther King Jr. week. By highlighting the importance of a commitment to social change and justice, Brown inspired students to embrace diversity of culture and race.

STORY ON PAGE 3

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: CONCACAF: U.S. and Mexican soccer teams should challenge higher level opponents.

COURTESY OF ED YORBA

CONCACAF on PG. 8 JEBLINSKI ON PG. 7 Generation Citizen, a youth empowerment club, deserves a chapter at NYU.

JEBLINSKI on PG. 7

BRIA WEBB/WSN

Last night, former sweatshop workers spoke to the NYU community at the Kimmel Center for University Life, the first stop on a nationwide tour to raise awareness about poor international working conditions at international clothing corporations like Adidas and Nike. Spearheaded by United Students Against Sweatshops, the event featured Telemarque Pierre and Yannick Etienne from Haiti and Raquel Lauarro from Honduras. The speakers shared their stories of working in sweatshops. Several organizations sponsored the event, including NYU College Democrats and the NYU DREAM Team, and was hosted by the Student Labor Action Movement (SLAM). The campaign comes after several colleges and universities severed their ties with Adidas, which manufactures collegiate apparel for NYU. Alexandra Cardinale, Steinhardt

SLAM continued on PG. 3

‘Tomorrow’ escapes conventional filming methods By JORDAN AXELROD

With the 2013 Sundance Film Festival coming to a close and movies like “Fruitvale” and “Blood Brother” enjoying the royal awards treatment, it is perhaps Randy Moore’s “Escape from Tomorrow” that left the festival with the title of “most controversial.” Filmed almost entirely on location in Disneyland and Disney World, in Anaheim, Calif. and Orlando, Fla. respectively, but without permission from Disney, “Escape from Tomorrow” follows a man’s mental breakdown during his family vacation at the Happiest Place on Earth. Cinematographer Lucas Lee Graham spoke with WSN about the process of creating such a daring film and exposing it to the audience of Sundance. “Before the first screening, [director] Randy [Moore] and I were shaking, we were so nervous,” Graham explained. “Up until that point, nobody had seen it.” Moore and Graham knew that “Tomorrow” was never going to receive consent from Disney officials to film on the theme parks’ premises due to its dark and adult themes, making guerilla-style filmmaking — a method embodied by shooting in real locations and without permission — a necessity. Moore hired Graham after approaching him in a Starbucks coffeeshop, and the idea of filming in the Disney parks immediately

intrigued Graham. Production placed Moore, his cast and his crew at the constant risk of being caught, but an extensive pre-production period helped alleviate the danger. “We scouted heavily both parks,” Graham said. “We brought the DSLR [cameras] that we planed on shooting the movie with with us, just to get a feel of how it would play out.” What Graham discovered, however, is that many of the parkgoers used the same cameras that the crew did, allowing them to blend in more easily as they shot their movie. “That took a lot of the stress off, right off the bat,” Graham said. “We thought, ‘Oh my god, we can get away with anything.’” Since their Sundance screening, Disney has yet to reach out to the filmmakers, but it seems as if the film’s journey has just begun. While no specific distribution companies have publicly announced acquisition of the film, “Tomorrow’s” positive reviews have generated quite a bit of buzz. As for Graham’s advice to filmmakers who dream of tackling an endeavor like “Escape from Tomorrow,” he gives a simple response. “Don’t do it,” he said. Graham also stressed that they did not film at the Disney parks to be “rule breakers,” but rather because the locations were essential to telling the film’s story.

COURTESY OF MANKURT MEDIA

A disgruntled father struggles to deal with his family during a Disney vacation. Finally, he concluded, “If you have a story that is worth telling, and there is no other way to do it ... go for it.” Moore’s “Escape from Tomorrow” may not only inspire more use of guerilla-style filmmaking but also open the door for more movies to test the boundaries of filmmaking as an art form. Jordan Axelrod is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE STAFF PLAYLIST

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COMPILED BY THE

WSN STAFF

IN AND OF

THE CITY

By ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE Finding new bands and songs to listen to is one of the undeniable perks of music fandom. We at WSN are always looking for the next big thing, but we’re happy to fall back on the classics as well. This week, we present a list of some of our favorite songs.

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“Keep Me in Your Pocket” –Those Dancing Days

It’s a big city and a widespread university. Catch up with our daily updates on university and city/state news headlines other publications are covering.

–The Village Voice

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“Drinking Problem” –Surfer Blood

“Under Control” –The Strokes

Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH Managing Editor

AMY ZHANG Web Managing Editor

HANQING CHEN Deputy Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ Assistant Managing Editor

NICOLA PRING Creative Director

KALEEL MUNROE SENIOR STAFF

university TATIANA BAEZ city/state VERONICA CARCHEDI investigative NICOLE BROWN arts JOSH JOHNSON features KRISTINA BOGOS sports MARY JANE DUMANKAYA multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN copy MICHAEL DOMANICO,

CONEY ISLAND’S NATHAN’S BEGINS DEMOLITION Nathan’s Famous on Coney Island has weathered many a storm after standing for almost a century. After closing because of Superstorm Sandy this fall, Nathan’s began demolition Monday in efforts to begin a new remodel.

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

WICY WANG foreign correspondent JULIE DEVITO senior editors GENTRY BROWN, DAN

HINTON, CHARLES MAHONEY, CLIO MCCONNELL, STEFAN MELNYK, LAVYA YALAMANCHI

DEPUTY STAFF VIA FLICKR.COM

SWEET SANDY RECOVERY PROJECT Instead of donating money to help rebuild their neighborhood, Brooklyn-based sugar factory Domino Sugar donated two tons of sugar to Smack Mellon, a fine art gallery in DUMBO that was submerged in six feet of water. The sugar was used to create a large-scale Persian carpet for the art gallery floor.

–DNAinfo

university KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR city/state EMILY BELL, ANDREW

KARPAN books/theater OLIVIA GEORGE film JEREMY GROSSMAN entertainment ALEX GREENBERGER music ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE the highlighter blog SAM RULLO features HELEN HOLMES beauty & style MICHELLE LIM dining ANGEL CHANG sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia REBECCA CLEMENTI,

JOON LEE

“Audience of One” –Cold War Kids “White Room” –Solander “Babies” –Radiation City “Wetsuit” –The Vaccines “Everlong” –Foo Fighters “Departure” –Crystal Stilts “Stuck In The Middle With You” –Stealers Wheel “Let’s Dance to Joy Division” –The Wombats “Fir Coat” –Widowspeak “Street Joy” –White Denim “Kissing Families” –Silversun Pickups

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

SAMEER JAYWANT deputy opinion editors

VIA FLICKR.COM

1: COURTESY OF WICHITA RECORDINGS 2: COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. RECORDS 3: COURTESY OF RCA RECORDS

THREE MEN STABBED IN QUEENS SUBWAY STATION The Jamaica Center-Parsons Archer station was the scene of a three-man stabbing late Monday afternoon. The stabbings were the result of a dispute between two groups of men. The wounds sustained by the victims were not lifethreatening.

ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER

REBECCA RIBEIRO CIRCULATION MANAGER

CHLOE COFFMAN

UNIVERSITY SALES COORDINATOR

KAITLYN O’BRIEN SALES REPRESENTATIVE

ELLEN MCQUEEN

–NY1

SNAPSHOT

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, RAQUEL WOODRUFF

SALES ASSOCIATES

LATE ED KOCH NOT TO BE HONORED WITH SUBWAY RENAMING MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz has stated that there are no plans to rename the 77th Street/Lexington Avenue subway station after recently departed former New York City mayor Ed Koch. Ortiz explained that the tradition of naming stations after streets helped passengers to avoid navigational confusion.

–The New York Times

ARIANA DIVALENTINO, CHRIS ELWOOD, ALISON LIZZIO, SAM WANDER CIRCULATION ASSISTANT

OMID GOLMOHAMMADI GRAPHIC DESIGNER

KALEEL MUNROE

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

NANCI HEALY

A couple stands on the oldest bridge on the river Seine, the Pont Neuf, in Paris, France.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN TAN

NEW YORK FRACKING POLL REVEALS EVEN SPLIT A new poll released by the Siena Research Institute indicates that statewide, opponents and supporters of hydraulic fracturing — or “fracking” — each account for about 40 percent of those polled. The remaining 20 percent surveyed had no opinion.

EDITORIAL ADVISER

KEITH LEIGHTY EDITORS-AT-LARGE

MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN, JAEWON KANG, FRANCIS POON, MERYLL PREPOSI, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG

FILE PHOTO BY RACHEL KAPLAN/WSN

–CBS News

GOT AN EVENT? EMAIL US AT AGENDA@NYUNEWS.COM OR TWEET US @NYUNEWS. GOT SOMETHING TO SHARE? EMAIL US AT TIPS@NYUNEWS.COM.

About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Amy Zhang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

NYUNEWS.COM


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SLAM continued from PG. 1

International labor unions demand equitable treatment

freshman and member of College Democrats, said that she hoped the event would raise awareness for global issues. “These issues of international development do not have nearly enough support and familiarity within the NYU community, so I am extremely excited [for] the influence and impact the SLAM event garner[s],” she said. Caitlin MacLaren, Gallatin junior and SLAM organizer, hopes the protest will lead to NYU abandoning the company. “I hope this inspires people to get involved in the fight for better working conditions everywhere,” she said. “The first step is getting NYU to cut its contract with Adidas.” Pierre, a member of the Haitian garment union “Sendika Ouvriye Takstil ak Abiman,” which in English is the Textile and Apparel Worker’s Union, said workers could earn as little as 14 cents for producing six dozen shirts. Etienne expressed the urgency of altering labor conditions. However, difficulty communicating between workers due to language barriers and distance makes solidarity harder to achieve. “This is a weak point in the struggle because we want to fight. We want to win. We have to com-

municate. We have to be together, but different languages sometimes separates us,” she said. A member of a labor union in Honduras and a former textile factory worker, Navarro emphasized the short career span of laborers. “Many of us started working in the textile factory when we were only 14 years old with a lot of dreams and hopes for a better life. However, whenever we turn 30, many of us are considered old already and it’s hard to get jobs,” she said. Prachi Vidwans, CAS senior and College Democrats president, attended the event to learn more about the situation abroad. “Sometimes we can feel so disconnected because we don’t see these [working] conditions right in front of us,” she said. “But it’s important that we understand that we fall and rise together.” Mathias Rabinovitch, a CAS senior who also attended the event, hopes that the United States will come to play a larger role in the movement. “We need to push for the U.S. to become even more friendly with labor unions and stop viewing them as groups that bring down the economy,” he said. Tatiana Baez is university editor. Email her at tbaez@nyunews.com.

Alternate sources for textbooks lower bookstore sales By SU SIE PARK

With the increase of startup textbook exchange companies and a movement towards online textbook purchases, the NYU Bookstore has seen a decrease in sales in the past four years. College students often try to save money when purchasing textbooks by using sellers other than the school bookstore. The common conception is that buying textbooks in the bookstore is more expensive than purchasing them online. “I use Amazon. If I can’t find it there, I’ll try eBay or basically any other website before ultimately resorting to the NYU bookstore,” said LSP freshman Gabriella Diez. “Why pay full price for a new book when you can pay a lot less for a used one that is still good quality?” Diez added. Factors such as students selling books to each other or buying them at other bookstores in the city also contribute to less textbook sales at the bookstore. “Textbook sales peaked in about 2008 and have been decreasing about three to five percent each year,” a NYU bookstore representative said. “Reasons are the proliferation of peer-to-peer purchases, lower prices on digi-

No 7-Eleven group spreads awareness about small stores

By EMILY BELL and VERONICA CARCHEDI

On Feb. 2, a group of 60 East Village residents toured local stores and restaurants as a part of the Bodega Walk in an ongoing protest against the expansion plans of 7-Eleven franchises in the neighborhood. The No 7-Eleven group, which organized the event, is rallying against an announcement of plans by 7-Eleven to open 100 new stores by 2017. They wanted to spread awareness both to East Village inhabitants and to local bodegas who are unaware of the plans. “The purpose of the bodega walk is to connect with the people and businesses in our community and make them aware 7-Eleven is planning a strategic, corporate takeover of our neighborhood,” said Liberation Iannillo, the social media strategist of No 7-Eleven. Iannillo explained that 7-Eleven openings choke out local convenient stores, bodegas and delis, and have a negative impact on the character of the East Village. “People travel to the East Village because it’s a unique, culturally rich, diverse neighborhood,” he said. “They don’t travel here for Big Gulps and Slurpees.” However, Margaret Chabris, a

native of Greenwich Village and director of corporate communications for 7-Eleven, said 7-Eleven convenient stores can provide a valid service to the neighborhood. “Our goal is to meet the convenience needs of people in that immediate trade area,” she said. “We believe that area is under -served. So we would hope to bring something clean, modern, efficient, yet something that the community can benefit from. We also have a special downtown, urban format for our stores that lends itself to Manhattan.” Chabris also cited the fact that each 7-Eleven, although part of the franchise, is individually owned, and therefore the company does provide support for small business owners. However, Robert Galinsky, a bodega walk organizer, said although each store may be independent, they are still under the guise of a larger corporation, which causes a disconnect with the store and local community. “During Hurricane Sandy, the bodegas were open and giving away coffee and giving away food,” he said. “The 7-Elevens were closed. It’s part of that corporate mentality, ‘We better check with corporate headquarters to find out.’ When you have an individual bodega, you check with yourself, you check with your heart, you check

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with your community. That’s what this is about.” Eileen Myles, another organizer of the No 7-Eleven group and NYU English professor, further explained how franchise stores undermine a community. “They don’t stand with the neighborhood on summer nights or in disaster,” she said. “They don’t hold your keys for friends, give you credit, know you and your pet for years ... Bodegas and their employees are our neighbors and our friends.” Loretta Owens, a freshman in the Silver School of Social Work, said that although she favors smaller stores, she sometimes finds their locations inconvenient. Still, she supports the No 7-Eleven movement. “I feel as though communities have the right to feel upset and rally against the construction of 7-Elevens because that promotes the mass integration of commercial stores which tend to drive out smaller businesses,” Owens said. No 7-Eleven is planning on hosting bodega walks every two weeks to continue spreading awareness. The next one will be on Feb. 16 at noon. Emily Bell is deputy city/state editor. Veronica Carchedi is city/state editor. Email them at cstate@nyunews.com.

tal and custom materials and the explosion of textbook rentals.” The bookstore provides an online price comparison option where students can easily check their textbook prices at the bookstore, the warehouse and online — minus the cost of shipping. Most books appear to be cheaper online; however, when the price of shipping is added, some books can be bought or rented for less at the bookstore. Still, CAS sophomore Amber Poon said sometimes students can avoid shipping fees. “As a student, you can get one year of Amazon Prime for free two-day shipping and renting textbooks,” she said. An advantage of buying books at the bookstore is that there is no wait. “I would usually wait for my syllabus first ... and if the bookstore textbooks aren’t too expensive then I would just buy it from the bookstore,” said LSP freshman Miranda Tan. Other universities have seen the same trend in textbook sales. “I got [my textbooks] from Abe Books, and it was a lot cheaper than in the bookstore,” said University of Miami freshman Sabrina Carro. “There is also a Facebook group for Miami stu-

dents to sell books. That is generally the popular choice.” LSP professor Mary Roma recognizes the benefits of trading and renting textbooks, but she also has a sentimental feeling toward owning college textbooks. “I still own the books I had to buy for my college courses, and they are the only ones I would never sell or get rid of,” Roma said. “They serve as a record of my experience in my classes as a student.” Su Sie Park is a contributing writer. Email her at investigative@nyunews.com.

BRYAN NELSON/WSN

Students are purchasing books from cheaper sources.

Congressional medalist opens MLK Week By NEELA QADIR Last night ushered in NYU’s weeklong Martin Luther King Jr. celebration. This week’s theme, 50 Years Forward: The Cost of a Dream Deferred, is meant to facilitate a dialogue about the consequences of not accomplishing social justice, according to Monroe France, director of the NYU Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Student Center. The opening ceremony was meant to engage students and build a community within NYU. “When we do such events it is to build community and to give out a message,” said event coordinator Manavi Khurana. “The message would be of MLK’s and what he left behind with us. [With] this event, we hope to bring like-minded people, maybe socialists or students that have similar interests.” Dr. Roscoe C. Brown, a former NYU graduate and Tuskegee Airman, was the night’s keynote speaker. Dr. Brown was previously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal and was also one of the first African-American professors at NYU. Studying at NYU during King’s assassination, Brown encouraged students to follow their dreams despite obstacles.

“Focus on the future,” he said. “The past is interesting, but the future is where you will be living.” Cenithia Bilal, LSP freshman, said the event helped create a place where she could celebrate Black History Month. “At my school I never got a chance to actually celebrate it other than the fact they would throw it out over the loud speaker,” Bilal said. To Steinhardt first-year graduate student Loris JonesRandolph, hearing Dr. Brown speak made her feel connected with black history. “Someone that can actually tell you that this is what happened ... when I walked in with MLK and this is what happened ... when I was a kid. That always makes me feel connected and alive,” Jones-Randolph said. “I know that dream is not going to die and is going to keep going forward from generation to generation.” Martin Luther King Jr. week will feature a weeklong schedule of events. Tonight students can attend a film screening and panel discussion at Kimmel. Neela Qadir is deputy university editor. Email her at nqadir@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

BEAUTY AND STYLE

EDITED BY MICHELLE LIM BSTYLE@NYUNEWS.COM

Student blends punk style with loud color

Five frame shapes to flatter your face

By MARINA ZHENG

As geek chic rises in popularity, finding a pair of glasses completes a smart look. However, different face shapes call for frames that will enhance strong features. Follow this handy guide to find the perfect pair to suit your unique face. SQUARE Square-shaped faces tend to have prominent jawlines, broad foreheads and wide cheeks. To soften the sharply defined edges, opt for oval and round frames. Also aim for styles that sit high on the bridge of the nose to lengthen the face and detract attention from the jawline. To prevent a square face from appearing bulky, avoid materials like thick plastic. OVAL For a face with high cheekbones and a chin slightly narrower than the forehead, choose glasses that won’t elongate the face. Square, rectangular and geometric frames are great options to balance the soft curves of an oval face. To draw focus to the center of the face, choose frames with a detailed bridge and stay away from oversized frames. Remember this rule of thumb for oval-shaped face: nothing wider than the widest part of the face. ROUND Shaped like a circle, round faces have full cheeks and few sharp angles. Choose geometric styles that sharpen features while simultaneously downplaying the curves of the jaw. To elongate and slim the face, scout out horizontal styles and thin metal frames with defined bridges, which draw attention to the center and away from the cheeks. Avoid the two S’s, small and short, because they only enlarge a round face. HEART A heart-shaped face is defined by a broad forehead, wide cheeks and a small chin. The key is to find a frame that balances out these features. Bottomheavy styles add width to the lower portion of the face and oval-shaped frames selections broaden a narrow jaw. Thin frames made from light metal

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By ARIANA DIVALENTINO

or clear plastic also serve to draw attention to the eyes and away from a pointy chin. Don’t forget to avoid frames with a thicker top because they only focus on the widest part of the face. DIAMOND Diamond-shaped faces may feature strong cheekbones, narrow eye and jaw lines and a small forehead or chin. To balance these prominent characteristics while highlighting the dramatic bone structure of the cheeks, opt for cat eyes and rimless styles and for oval frames to even out the overall appearance. Skip the narrow frames that emphasize a slim eye line or any wide frames that overpower the cheekbones. Marina Zheng is a staff writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

1: VIA SHOPBOP.COM 2: VIA MEZZMER.COM 3: VIA ANTHROPOLOGIE.COM 4: VIA MADEWELL.COM 5: VIA URBANOUTFITTERS.COM

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Tips for best hair in harsh climates

You have probably seen her around campus: the girl with the pleather spiky backpack, clothing in bright colors or busy patterns and any one of her bright and brash accompanying wigs. “Loud” seems to be the defining word for Leor Freedman’s wardrobe and personality. A freshman in Gallatin studying performing arts and computer science, Leor is known for being boldly outspoken and whip-smart. When asked about her favorite article of clothing, Leor had trouble deciding: “I don’t wear anything unless it’s my favorite.” Ranking high on her list are the googly-eye shirt she made herself, the blackand-white star-covered cardigan she calls a “stardigan” and the black skirt full of slits she acquired at a clothing swap. Ask her how she would describe her style ­— she already has a name for it: “TackyFemme ClownPunk.” Fittingly, Leor has recently discovered NYU’s circus club, Violet Circus Arts, the latest of her memberships. Last semester she was a member of the Tisch All-University Drama Cantorum, and is on the hunt for her next chance on stage. “I really want to do some musical theater,” she said. “I’m itching for it now. I did the school musical all four years of high school, so after a semester of not doing one, I’m ready to be in another show.” Leor is a also a member of the Gallatin Coloring Club, as one may expect from someone who enjoys juxtaposing black, white and neons. Art is a major component of Leor’s style — she can be seen with hand-drawn graphic makeup design around her eyes. She has sev-

eral personalized clothing pieces, like the “art pants” her friends have taken turns drawing on. Despite her crazy fashion sense, Leor is very serious about certain things, namely feminism and LGBTQ issues. “People think that you’re just trying to prove yourself as an educated, politically correct citizen,” she said. “But it’s honestly just about not being a jerk and creating a world that is livable and comfortable for as many people as possible. It’s about acknowledging that a lot of the nice things you have in your life come from the oppression of others.” Leor will be the first person to point out when something is based on a harmful social construct and will always encourage her friends to never be ashamed of who they are. Leor’s wardrobe is not so much a component of her personality as a manifestation of it. The rainbow pants, polka-dot Doc Martens and black lacy fascinator serve to complement her intelligence, creativity, big heart and talent for puns. Ariana DiValentino is a staff writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

COURTESY OF TANNER NELSON

Freshman Leor Freedman infuses her wardrobe with color.

Although it is February, the temperature is not getting any warmer and the winds are still harsh. As the bitter winter drains the life out of your luscious locks, protect your frizzy, dry and static hair by following these simple tips.

By CLARA YANG

LEAVE-IN CONDITIONERS Leave-in conditioner,which has become a more widespread option, is an easy hair product that keeps hair from becoming frizzy. After a shower and towel-dry, apply a dime-size amount to wet hair until your next shower. For those with fine, thin hair who find regular conditioners too heavy, leave-in conditioners are feasible alternatives. This product is recommended for those who use an extensive amount of heat to style hair. Try these wallet-friendly conditioners to moisturize dry winter hair: Herbal Essences None of Your Frizzness Smoothing Leave-in Crème ($3.99), Giovanni Direct Leave-in Conditioner ($7.99).

AVOID BRUSHING When your hair is fully dry, don’t brush it. This is every hair expert’s ultimate rule. Brushing dry hair will damage its cuticles, resulting in breakage. If you need to brush your hair, do so right after you shower, and towel dry. Then apply hair styling products. Say goodbye to styling your hair with a brush.

NO HEAT Although they’re hard to let go, give some break time to your straighteners, curlers and other electronic styling tools. These products make your hair damaged and stiff, leaving room for easy breakage. Even though the cold can freeze wet hair, relax on blow-drying this winter and opt for a thorough towel dry.

WET FINGERS If your hair becomes frizzy and tangled throughout the day, don’t take out your minibrush but wet your fingers. Frizzy hair just needs water to calm the dryness, so simply comb your hair with wet fingers. It’s a simple and easy trick, and your “tools” are always with you. It will quickly bring back the hair that you started with in the morning.

ALCOHOL-FREE Alcohol takes the moisture from your hair, leading to even more frizz. Look for alcohol-free products to avoid dry and brittle hair. Outside of the salon, these may be difficult to find. Alcoholfree products may be more expensive, but they are worthwhile in the long run. Pamper your hair with quality products.

Clara Yang is a staff writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

VIA AMAZON.COM

Combing with wet fingers can be a great solution for frizzy, tangled hair.


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

ARTS

EDITED BY JOSH JOHNSON ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Orchestra disappoints with second album

‘Bread’ finds humor in disability By EMMA DOLHAI

By KEMET DUGUE

Unknown Mortal Orchestra first set themselves apart from other indie bands two years ago with a soft, psychedelic-pop foundation layered with elements of alternative, garage rock and lo-fi. Frontman Ruban Nielson provided a sample from his psychedelic lo-fi project titled “Ffunny Ffrends,” which was an immediate success, causing listeners to scour the Internet in search for another UMO gem. Despite his sudden popularity, Nielson hid from the spotlight, working on material before releasing the band’s self-titled debut album with bassist Jacob Portrait and drummer Riley Geare. However, it’s difficult to follow up such an impressive entrance into the music world. “II,” UMO’s sophomore effort, fails to meet the standard that Nielson had so proudly set. For a band that enjoys incorporating various sounds into their routine, UMO doesn’t showcase anything unique on “II.” In fact, little is dynamic or interesting on “II.” Many songs on “II” are accompanied by unnoticeable hooks and relentlessly apathetic bass lines, which make Nielson’s vocals unbearable. While Nielson’s androgynous vocals capture the band’s genre-eluding sound, it is a major problem for the album as a whole. His voice works well when paired with the band’s trademark style, but it falls apart on the majority of “II’s” tracks due to the disparity between the two albums’ aesthetics. This issue is unfair to both Nielson, who is quite talented, and the listener, who has to sit through 40 minutes of vocals incongruous to the rest of the album. With a well-received debut in their pocket, bands will often use their second album to explore different genres — listen to MGMT’s “Congratulations,” for instance. However, in UMO’s situation, it doesn’t make sense to sail away into new, unfamiliar territory after having just begun to develop a new genre. Hopefully Neilson and his bandmates will consider reverting back to their preciously eccentric sound. Kemet Dugue is a staff writer. Email him at music@nyunews.com.

Food is a central facet of daily life. It brings people together and allows them to bond over everyday ups and downs. It was in this spirit that members of Israel’s Nalaga’at Theater created the ensemble piece “Not by Bread Alone,” which played at NYU’s Skirball Center through Feb. 3. In the play, the actors bake loaves of bread in real time, sharing their trials and triumphs with the audience. Black-clad interpreters share the stage with the cast because the actors cannot hear or see. Brought together in 2002 by director Adina Tal, the troupe has performed worldwide. From start to finish, much of the play focuses on showing the condition of those performing, including their tales of living in a pitchblack, soundless void as well as adding sign language interpreters in the lobby. Beating drums give the cast their cues throughout the show. The show’s most powerful moments, however, are those in which the audience is reminded of the traits they share with the actors in spite of the performers’ obvious disabilities. Despite an unfortunate disconnect between the stories portrayed, which creates a frustrating lack of closure for the audience, Tal succeeds in incorporating a wealth of comedic moments in contrast to the sob story that the piece could have so easily become. At one point, while one actor shares his dream of becoming a bird-watcher on stage, another enters clad in feathers, begrudgingly playing his part to the amusement of the au-

After bursting onto the music scene in 2011 with their critically acclaimed debut and enjoying continued success with 2012’s album “Come of Age,” U.K. punks The Vaccines continue their hot streak with a U.S. headlining tour. Their show at Terminal 5 on Thursday, Jan. 31 demonstrated both the band’s growing American presence as they near the end of the U.S. leg of their 2013 tour and its potential to follow in the footsteps of rockers like the Arctic Monkeys. The night’s opening acts included Australian indie-pop band San Cisco and New York rockers DIIV — pronounced dive — with the former providing perfectly catchy tunes to energize the crowd. The chemistry between lead singer and guitarist Jordi Davieson and drummer

and vocalist Scarlett Stevens of San Cisco bolstered their bright, garage pop. The second band played more of a Nirvanameets-world-music set, which failed to hold the audience’s attention for long. Finally, after over an hour of watching roadies set up the instruments, The Vaccines finally took the stage and dived straight into their flashy set with “No Hope.” The heavy drums and rapid guitars at once became familiar, and the fans concurred that the band was well worth the wait. Powering through the set, The Vaccines played new tracks such as “Tiger Blood” and the bass-heavy “Ghost Town,” as well as old favorites like “Blow It Up,” “Post Break-Up Sex” and “Wetsuit.” In addition to multiple female crowd surfers, one young woman successfully jumped onstage, but was

Netflix taps into new TV market with original online shows By MONICA SKOKO

COURTESY OF SKIRBALL CENTER

Blind and deaf actors bake bread onstage during “Alone.” dience. In a scene where the cast re-enacts a visit to Italy, a mock pope appears on the balcony, waving to an imaginary crowd. In yet another scene during which a character longs for his wife, a cluster of men dressed in veils fawns over him until he touches their hands and is disgusted when he realizes their gender. For any group on the cutting edge of the theater scene, there will always be challenges and drawbacks to face in creating new work. Even though “Not By Bread Alone” fails to have a cohesive storyline beyond the commonality of its actors’ disabilities, its magic lies in moments in which the audience forgets about those disabilities and the story becomes focused on a shared human experience — the act of breaking bread. Emma Dolhai is a contributing writer. Email her at theater@nyunews.com.

Vaccines take Terminal 5 by storm By YASMINE PANAH

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chased off after a few seconds of fame. Frontman Justin Young moved around the stage comfortably, playing in a style surprisingly similar to that of Dave Grohl — head banging included. Without a doubt, “If You Wanna” and “Wreckin’ Bar” were the most highenergy songs, causing the crowds on every floor of Terminal 5 to bounce around and scream the lyrics. Despite a solid performance with a three-song encore, the band barely spoke to the audience between songs. Disregarding this lack of connection, which was actually due to a time constraint, The Vaccines clearly demonstrated they have the potential to be America’s next big rock band. Yasmine Panah is a staff writer. Email her at music@nyunews.com.

Not long ago, a television premiere presented something much different than what it is today. If you missed an episode when it first aired, you might never see it again. But gone are the days of the urgency when it came to catching “Dallas,” a popular soap opera that debuted in the 1970s. Some may say television viewing was once a more communal experience, as people would tune in without being distracted by their Twitter feeds. Those detractors likely include television network executives who do not approve of television’s rapid digitalization. Instant-viewing platforms are evolving faster than their creators know how to respond. Netflix began as a company that strictly rented existing and already-released films and television shows to subscribers. Now the company has signed on to produce major original projects, such as David Fincher’s “House of Cards,” starring Kevin Spacey, and the highly anticipated return of “Arrested Development” through Netflix Instant, the online component of Netflix’s popular rental service. One might expect shows premiering online to garner low ratings and to only slowly increase in popularity, largely due to the difficulty of introducing viewers to a new network. However, previously unknown low-rated networks that produce quality content have already broken this boundary. Such networks include AMC — as evidenced by the success of “The Walking Dead” — and PBS, with “Downton Abbey.” Buzz about Netflix shows has continued to mount, and, contrary to expectations, these show may record high ratings immediately. Regardless of its viewership, Netflix’s new approach will leave a positive mark on the history of television due to its ability to allow for more creative content than previously possible. Netflix is not bound by any of the constraints networks face, which gives them more freedom from FCC censorship. “House of Cards” and “Arrested Development” are critical for Netflix, as the company must use these original projects to brand itself as a content provider that can offer something different from the content produced by networks like HBO and AMC. Even if the content weren’t promising enough, Netflix is already off to a good start with the way it will release its shows. Instead of maintaining the old one-episodeper-week series model, Netflix has chosen to post all episodes at once to target the 18-34 digital demographic, an age group that has no qualms about engaging in “television binging” — watching an entire television series in a short period of time. There is a definite chance this instant gratification will burn out show buzz, but Netflix and the showrunners behind their content are aware of this problem, and are willing to take the risk. It is likely a risk that will ultimately pay off brilliantly, and one that will put them far ahead of any normal network on air today. Monica Skoko is a contributing writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com.

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY SAMEER JAYWANT OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

SOCIAL JUSTICE

Generation Citizen deserves NYU chapter

By D. WILLIAM JEBLINSKI

Generation Citizen is not for the faint of heart. Like many NYU clubs, GC dedicates itself to addressing and ameliorating socio-political issues that plague our society. However, this particular group differs greatly from other NYU social justice clubs in two crucial ways: its members work directly in New York City’s public schools, and it’s not yet an NYU club. GC seeks to empower the city’s youth — especially low-income and minority students, who are among the least politically active and most disenfranchised in our country — to be civically active by directly working with them in the classroom. Akin to the Peer Health Exchange approach, GC sends proactive NYU students into classrooms to lead high school students through the process of identifying a salient problem in their community, formulating an attainable solution, identifying the decision-makers who can affect change on their issue, creating an action plan and finally presenting their arguments to those decision-making officials so they can create change. Past projects have included providing convenient, educative opportunities to pregnant teenagers, hosting a job fair with local employers to reduce teen unemployment and many others. Still, although some GC-led

classes have induced significant policy changes, this is not the sole goal; the primary purpose of the program is to teach students how to pursue and effect change in their communities beyond their GC involvement. And it works. Despite GC’s relative infancy, it’s been shown that GC alumni are 22 percent more likely to vote and 20 percent more likely to volunteer in their communities — high numbers, considering most are not yet 18 years old. NYU students who work with GC work hard. GC’s version of club participation is not discussing societal plight in a Kimmel room overlooking Washington Square Park, it’s taking the C train into Bedford-Stuyvesant at 8 a.m. twice a week to teach 30 teenagers how much civic apathy can devastate a community. Sounds tough, right? Well, the NYU students — formally called Democracy Coaches — are not alone. Each is paired with a teacher at their host school, whom they work with closely to develop effective teaching skills and lesson plans. In all, Democracy Coaches dedicate roughly seven hours a week to GC: two to three hours teaching, which includes lessons and travel time, one to two hours to plan each lesson and a one-hour weekly meeting — a manageable workload for an organized undergrad.

As it is still relatively young and unknown to the NYU masses, GC is constantly attempting to court the brightest and most civically minded students on campus despite the impediments of lacking formal club status. The Student Activities Board has twice denied the chapter’s application, citing lack of funding. Nevertheless, through diligent recruiting GC has increased its membership every semester since its inception on campus, placing as many NYU students in New York City’s public schools to teach civic engagement as possible. The need for a program such as GC is obvious. Young people, minorities and those in poverty all vote and participate civically at a substantially lower rate, leaving their collective futures to be decided by those with different and often conflicting interests. Instead of allowing this group to be ignored — or even worse, exploited — NYU and its students will ultimately empower the youth of the city to affect their community positively by supporting and participating in GC. And that is something, at least in theory, NYU students believe in. D. William Jeblinski is a contributing writer. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

GENDER ISSUES

Women in military produce equality By NINA GOLSHAN

Two weeks ago, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta lifted the ban on women in direct combat, opening doors for hundreds of thousands of women and allowing them to serve their country on the ground alongside fellow male soldiers. The announcement from the Pentagon met with mixed reactions: some see it as another step forward for equality in the United States, but others as a potentially troublesome choice. The question that remains is whether our military leaders have made the right choice. The pursuit of equality and opportunity defines our nation; not allowing women to partake in direct combat overseas will jeopardize the security of these historical pillars. Opponents of lifting the ban cite the overall weakness and vulnerability of women in combat. Military commanders have stipulated that physical requirements will not be relaxed in an effort to include women. If women can meet these

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requirements, then they should be permitted to serve; if not, then they should be turned away just like other service members. However, modern technology and weaponry have surpassed hand-tohand combat and leveled the playing field for women in the armed forces. Physical strength is fundamental, but not as central to direct combat as in previous wars. Let us also not forget that despite the restrictions placed on women in direct combat, they have been fighting on the ground under the radar for decades. During Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2.49 percent of the 20,062 female service members deployed as of February 2012 were wounded or killed in action, and similar numbers have been calculated for other operations in Iraq. Male members of the military have voiced concerns regarding potential changes in relationships and cohesion within a unit. For them, the feeling of obligation to protect a female comrade or the possibility of developing romantic relationships

between soldiers could negatively affect the efficacy of a unit. Decades ago, these same arguments were made about assimilation of women in the work force. Of course, they are two drastically different situations, but they share the same principle: with change comes a degree of uneasiness, but it is a necessary hurdle. No change is easy. Benjamin Franklin, one of our founding fathers and signatory of the Constitution, once said that “those who would sacrifice freedom for security deserve neither.” In these times of uncertainty it is hard to say that American lawmakers and the public have not betrayed Franklin’s sentiment and cost us some of our natural rights. This new announcement from the Pentagon, however, does not imply a sacrifice of either security or freedom; it denotes an affirmation of those pillars of equality, and is helping to lead us in the right direction. Nina Golshan is a staff columnist. Email her at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Social media produces envy factor

A recent study by researchers at the Department of Information Systems of the Darmstadt University of Technology and the Institute of Information Systems at the Humboldt University of Berlin found a significant statistical association between Facebook use and feelings of envy and general dissatisfaction. Over one-third of the respondents in the study described being frustrated, depressed or less confident as they scrolled through their friends’ pictures, statuses and posts. Furthermore, the study found that about one-fifth of the recent events that provoked envy in the respondents’ lives took place on Facebook. To a certain degree, these results are to be expected. Facebook is not an accurate representation of our lives, but rather a filtered representation. We only show others what we want them to see and vice versa, thus inducing jealousy or envy when considering our own imperfect, ordinary lives. That said, an important implication of the study is the necessity of moderation with regards to social networking and our general online presence. Furthermore, it is important to recall that Facebook interaction is not a reasonable substitute for personal interaction and should not be treated as such. Social media is inherently vulnerable to significant embellishment, whether of our looks, credentials or experiences. More importantly, it tends to minimize our quotidian imperfections, which ultimately define us. If we continue to compare our real selves to enhanced versions of our friends, we will undoubtedly find ourselves on a path of self-deprecation. The effects of Facebook usage shown in this study echo the concerns of earlier days regarding the effects of violence in video games, cellphone radiation and food preservatives. Many of these incredible technologies catch on quickly, becoming household names within the blink of an eye, but can have profound health effects that are only discovered years later. Fortunately, the solution here is simple — use social media in moderation. Log out and call a friend.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Sameer Jaywant (Chair), Raquel Woodruff (Co-chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Nickhil Sethi

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 150 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY MARY JANE DUMANKAYA SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

U.S., Mexico must leave Concacaf to restore competition By FRANCISCO NAVAS

Although both Concacaf powerhouses — the Mexico and the U.S. men’s soccer teams — tied in their latest friendly matches, expectations are still high for both sides before the final round of Concacaf World Cup qualify-

ing. Anything but qualification in either first or second place would, of course, be considered a failure for both. History commands these expectations even though soccer is but a budding sport in the United States. Despite that, Honduras should not be a problem for the U.S. team,

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Javier Hernández Balcázar leads in number of goals for Mexico.

a team with high-caliber players. But it is. This problem is deeply rooted in competition, specifically the weakness of Concacaf. Since the 1998 World Cup in France, 32 world-class teams from five confederations have come together to test themselves against each respective confederation’s best. Through 83 years of organized international play, only two confederations have split the 19 world cups between them: UEFA, the Union of European Football Associations, has won 10, while Conmebol, the South American Football Confederation, won nine. Respectfully considered one of the toughest confederations, Conmebol, based in South America, is comprised of past champions Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and rising powerhouses like Chile and Colombia. Of course, each confederation has weak countries, but even Bolivia has taken a squad to three world cups. Four out of 10 Conmebol teams directly qualify to the World Cup, and one has a playoff against the OFC conference. To the north of Conmebol is Concacaf, a 40-team confederation dominated by the rivals

Mexico and the United States. Since its inception, only 10 of its teams have even qualified for the World Cup, including the two rivals, Costa Rica and even Cuba. By reason of soccer virtue, Mexico and the United States have almost always placed in the top three, which leads to direct qualification. Both countries have placed either first and second in qualifications for the past five World Cups. Qualifying has become expected for the classic Concacaf rivals. Playing against Jamaica, Canada and Honduras is not going to get either country anywhere. In other terms, if the Milwaukee Bucks, a middle of the pack team, were in a conference with the Charlotte Bobcats and the New Orleans Hornets, which are both last place in their divisions, how can they be expected to improve? Answer: they will not. They would continue to score easy wins in a failure of a conference. The same thing is happening with the United States and Mexico. For the sake of world soccer competition and their own competitive toughness, the United States and Mexico have to find

a way to remove themselves from Concacaf. If they were willing to incur higher travel costs, the gains to their squads would be much more substantial. Of course, the first few qualifiers would be difficult and maybe neither country would qualify, as they would not be accustomed to the level of competition in Conmebol. With time comes experience, however, and with experience comes improvement. Mexico has not gotten past the round of 16 in the last six World Cups despite having squads with players that play for European teams. Simply put, when they are matched against UEFA or Conmebol teams they are outplayed. The same goes for the United States, which was knocked out by Ghana in round 16 of the 2010 World Cup. If Mexico and the United States did move, it would also benefit the rest of the Concacaf as well as the Conmebol, with increased competition and thus better quality matches and teams for the World Cup. Francisco Navas is deputy sports editor. Email him at fnavas@nyunews.com.

Ray Lewis was talented, controversial player By SEBASTIEN VAN HEYNINGEN

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It all ended on a goal line. The San Francisco 49ers were surging after a power outage gave them all the momentum in the closing half of Super Bowl XLVII. The 49ers had the Baltimore Ravens on the ropes — less than 10 yards from the end zone — with four opportunities to score and complete the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history. Ray Lewis wouldn’t have had it any other way. Times like these are what the 37-yearold, 17-year NFL veteran lives for. It is a time like this when the tougher opponent wins, and Ray Lewis is tough as nails. The 240-pound, 6’1” linebacker has been cracking skulls since high school, and it was time to crack some skulls. The result? Baltimore stuffed San Francisco, who looked scared, disorganized and, worst of all, soft against Lewis’ band of defensive enforcers. The Ravens’ defense assumed the Lewis’ intense, passionate persona. And he ended his professional career with the same characteristics as the moment he entered the league. So how will we remember Lewis? As a murderer? The charges against him were dropped in 2000 when he testified against two companions who were on the scene with him. A media firestorm and many loose ends to the story were not sufficient to send him to prison for the murder of two men. However, Lewis’ large settlement with the affected family has raised many questions about his involvement in the incident. Still, the truth behind that night may never be revealed. The following year, Lewis won his first Super Bowl and his only Super Bowl MVP. He

flew around the field with a ferocity that no other could match. Many have called him the greatest linebacker to ever play, and few have argued against that statement. Will we remember the Lewis who found God? The tireless Samaritan has brought so much to Baltimore that he could easily become the city’s mayor. Watch out, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake. Lewis is a born leader, as shown by his team’s heightened level of play during his last hurrah. The Ravens were clearly the best postseason team this year. Will we remember an old man who miraculously recovered in 10 weeks from an injury that typically takes six months to heal? Some have accused him of taking performance-enhancing drugs. But again,

he is involved with a questionable case and maintaining his innocence against some murky proof could go either way. As a football fan there is only one way I can remember Lewis. I will remember the fear I felt when my favorite team matched up with his defense. I will remember cringing when he caused another player to end up with a concussion. I will remember a phenomenal football player whose team I would watch with the sole purpose of seeing him play. A field general, a super bowl champion, a great man. Have a great retirement, Ray Lewis. Sebastien Van Heyningen is a staff writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

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Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis retired after winning the Super Bowl.

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