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JANUARY 2017 • Vol. 23 No. 1

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

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www.nyscc.org

Eco-Evolution

cology is the branch of biology that deals with the relationships between organisms and their environment, including between other organisms.1 Evolution is the change in the heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations.2 Not surprising, evolutionary processes yield biodiversity and chemical diversity of molecules.3 Eco-evolution combines these two scientific fields of study in order to develop greater understanding of the dynamic action, reaction, and impact on every scale of chemistry, biology, and planetary state of being. This is a constantly changing process, and can be good, bad, or neutral. It is generally accepted that life began as a bacterial type of unit that was only possible because of how chemicals came together and organized themselves. Without similar chemical constructs, living organisms would not be able to utilize them as nutrients to sustain life. It is essential that we recognize the interaction between biology and chemistry as well as the accompanying changes. By fostering such an understanding, we can then recognize the impact on living things and non-living matter. The merging of known chemicals in our environment will have effects that must be examined thoroughly, not just taking into consideration their effects on humans, but also other living beings, their environments, and, finally, the overall effect on the planet. In addition, we must broaden our studies to accommodate new parameters by expanding analytical techniques and definitions of the phenomena that we seek to measure and observe. Every cosmetic ingredient has an environmental impact that can be objectively defined based on its effects on the skin, systemic

by Bruce H. Victor

reaction, biochemistry, and interactions with other life forms. Delicate ecological balances in nature—whether in the air, sea, or Earth, and all other areas that fall under the mantle of “the planet”— are affected. In the future, concerned industries and individuals may find themselves dedicating large amounts of resources to attend to these increasingly serious influences. The observation and study of all chemicals and life on our planet has evolved from a simple straight forward “cause and effect” to planet-wide awareness that every interaction produces a change in the time dependent movement forward. As we move forward in life, we seek to improve the planet in all areas of existence. In cosmetics we seek to improve the quality of life. This can be identified as a process that is constantly viewing the interaction of chemistry in our environment. The key issue is to make intelligent observations to determine what is safe and what is not. We use water, oils from plant leaves and fruits, and animal-based fractions in formulas to treat skin and hair. If such a formulated product eases discomfort, or makes our appearance more pleasing, we will use it. It is up to us as scientists to design structured studies of what these chemicals cause to change, not just in people, but also all living things and their environments. Some mechanisms of development produce wonderful ingredients while others produce negative hazardous or toxic ingredients. We must strive to understand through sound scientific study how the multitudes of elements that make up our universe relate and affect one another. In the remaining paragraphs, we will show how one study revealed the inter-relationship between chemistry and biology. It is simply an example used to illustrate how ecology and evolution (Continued on page 2)

E C O - E V O L U T I O N January 25, 2017 • Chart House, Weehawken, NJ


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2017 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS Chair Marie Thadal chairelect@nyscc.org (609) 712-3716

Chair-ELECT Cathy Piterski cpiterski@essentialingredients.com (201) 675-3799

TrEasurEr Michael Smith Treasurer@nyscc.org 908-625-4331

sECrETary Giorgino Macalino (862) 324-2749 Secretary@nyscc.org

advisor Rey Ordiales Reyordiales@outlook.com 732-878-7798

housE Mohamed Abdulla (973) 487-6572 house@nyscc.org

MEMBErship John Carola JohnC@protameen.com

prograM Steve Herman program@nyscc.org (973) 479-5702

CoMMuniCaTions Stephen Weinberg (973) 307-4854 webmaster@nyscc.org

spECiaL EvEnTs Amy Marshall amy.marshall@altana.com (908) 806-4664

CosMETisCopE EdiTor Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

CosMETisCopE assisTanT EdiTor Joe Albanese (908) 456-2968 joealbanese2@gmail.com

CosMETisCopE advErTising Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

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(Continued from page 1)

can join to identify how just one molecule (domoic acid) was determined to have a huge and negative impact on living things. An ongoing study by the National Geographic Society examines the influence of toxic algae on brain damage and memory loss in sea lions.4 The algae in question contains domoic acid—a kainic acid analog neurotoxin that causes amnesic shellfish poisoning in mammals.1 It accumulates in shellfish, sardines, and anchovies. When sea lions, otters, cetaceans, and humans eat the contaminated animals, poisoning may result. Exposure to the biotoxin affects the brain, causing seizures, and possibly death.3 The concentration of domoic acid increase as it moves up the food chain to higher life forms. In 1963, Alfred Hitchcock released a very popular film, The Birds. In this film, birds in a small harbor town suddenly began attacking people, flying into automobiles, glass windows, walls, and trees. It appears that a real-life event—minus the targeted attack on people— was the inspiration for the film. That event was The Red Tide—that occurred off Monterey Bay in California in 1961—which contained large amounts of red algae bloom. The identified neurotoxin is now known as domoic acid, which is produced by the marine diatoms present in the algae red tide. The prolific growth of these organisms is stimulated by certain pollutants from soil run-off into the ocean in Northern California. Currently, we are experiencing the death and loss of California sea lions who eat small fish that have eaten the red tide. In addition, there are many incidences of the beaching of whales (mostly California) and dolphin pods (mostly seen in New Jersey). Some small fish have gullet sacks allowing their liver to remove domoic acid from their circulation—thereby reducing the rate of poisoning in the small fish. These fish are also eaten by sea mammals and birds, who eventually suffer the consequences of domoic acid exposure and frequently die. Ongoing studies are providing us with much needed information on this epidemic. We must fully understand the complexities of this problem and find a solution, using this as a possible template for solving a world toxin evolution and stopping it without making the cure a new toxin.

References 1. www.dictionary.com. 2. B.K. Hall and B. Hallgrimsson, Strickberger’s Evolution, 4th ed., Jones and Bartlett: Sudbury, MA (2008). 3. www.wikipedia.org. 4. N. Drake, Toxic algae causing brain damage, memory loss in sea lions, National Geographic, December 14, 2015.

About the Author…

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ruce Victor completed a B.S. degree in Biology and Chemistry at Fairleigh Dickinson University. For sixteen years he served as President of Brundy Corporation, specializing in textile and cosmetic chemistry. During his career, he also held positions as Senior Scientist at Lipo Chemicals and Technical Director at CDC Products. In addition, he has nine years of experience consulting in product design, development, manufacturing (including scale-up), patents in analytical equipment design, and cosmetic chemistry. He can be reached at bhvictor@icloud.com.

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Letter from the Chair

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…Marie Renee Thadal

appy New Year! I hope you had a wonderful holiday season and are well rested and ready to enjoy all that 2017 has in store for you. During the holidays, I could not stop thinking about my journey leading to this important position. Serving on various NYSCC committees and on the executive board has been quite a rewarding experience for me both personally and professionally. Each position I have held has offered a new opportunity to contribute to the chapter’s short- and long-term growth. In the meanwhile, I also developed new skills and a business network. Having chaired various committees, such as Membership, House, Public Relations, and Treasurer, helped me to be confident in accepting the challenges of being the 2016 NYSCC Chair-elect and 2017 Chair. According to the NYSCC chapter’s mission, Program is one of the board’s most important tasks. As such, an exciting line up of events has been planned. The 2017 Program will emphasize the business of cosmetics with a focus of key growth drivers that will ultimately help our members gain market share and maintain a competitive advantage. The theme of the year revolves around Sustainability, Natural, and Green. These are areas showing evidence of strong growth opportunity. I encourage you to visit our website as well as to pay attention to our mailings and social media posts for upcoming events. Whether it is an evening or a full-day event, do not miss the distinguished presenters who will educate us on the topics of: Eco-Evolution; The Future of Sustainability; Open Innovation; Globalization and Emerging Markets; Colloids and Surface Science; Fashion, Beauty, and Technology; Innovation in Textured Hair Care; and It’s all About The Naturals! Keep in mind, there are also special events scheduled throughout the year so our members can socialize and network. Let us also make sure that every single one of us rushes to register for Suppliers’ Day 2017, which is being held on May 2nd and 3rd at the Jacob Javits Convention Center, making the Suppliers’ Day show a true New York show and one you should not miss. Of course, none of this would be possible if it were not for all the dedicated NYSCC volunteers who tirelessly work to fulfill the chapter’s mission of education. With their support and collaboration, I look forward to sharing a very exciting 2017 with all our members.

Renew Your SCC Membership

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enew your SCC Membership today by simply logging in to the Member Portal at www.scconline.org with your username/password (if you have forgotten your credentials, please follow the simple steps to reset your username/password). Once signed in, simply click “Renew Now” and proceed through the quick renewal process. By renewing your membership, you will continue to have access to the Online Membership Directory, Journal of Cosmetic Science, Online Newsletter, and the Members-Only Library containing helpful articles and information. Please note that all renewals must be paid by December 31, 2016. Payment received after this date will incur a $25 processing fee. All members or affiliates who have not paid their dues by December 31, 2016 will be dropped from the membership. The Society’s Policy for reinstatement is as follows: “Members or affiliates who are dropped for non-payment of dues must pay a reinstatement fee of $50 and current year dues in order to be reinstated. Members or affiliates who resign must pay current dues to be reinstated.”

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™ Nature’s Science. Our Technology. Your Beauty.

www.ajiaminobeauty.com ww w ww w.aj ajji aji


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Eco-Evolution January 25, 2017 • 4:00 – 8:00 p.m. Chart house • Weehawken, nJ

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Event Chair: Bruce h. victor, bhvictor@icloud.com

he January meeting brings two researchers to the New York Chapter who are helping to save our planet in different ways. Jeffrey Brooks is working to create cosmetic ingredients using agricultural products with a low environmental footprint and minimal impact on global warming. Dr. Sylvia Earle is a living legend whose life-long mission is to save our oceans and accomplishments have received world-wide recognition. Inspired by their efforts, our industry is speaking out for its concern for the global environment, investigating new ways to make our products with an eye on the future of mankind.

American Marine Biologist, Explorer, Author, and Lecturer

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– Sylvia Earle, Ph.D.

ational Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Sylvia A. Earle— called “Her Deepness” by the New Yorker and New York Times, “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress, and first “Hero for the Planet” by Time magazine—is an oceanographer, explorer, author, and lecturer. She has experience as a field research scientist, government official, and director for corporate and nonprofit organizations, including the Kerr McGee Corporation, Dresser Industries, Oryx Energy, the Aspen Institute, the Conservation Fund, American Rivers, Mote Marine Laboratory, Duke University Marine Laboratory, Rutgers Institute for Marine Science, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, and Ocean Futures. Formerly chief scientist of NOAA, Earle is the founder of Deep Ocean Exploration and Research, Inc., founder of Mission Blue and SEAlliance, and chair of the Advisory Councils of the Harte Research Institute and the Ocean in Google Earth. She has a B.S. degree from Florida State University, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University, and 22 honorary degrees. She has authored more than 190 scientific, technical, and popular publications; lectured in more than 80 At a habitat’s hemispheric window, countries; and appeared in hundreds of Dr. Earle shows algae to an engineer. radio and television productions. Earle has led more than a hundred expeditions and logged more than 7,000 hours underwater, including: leading the first team of women aquanauts during the Tektite Project in 1970; participating in ten saturation dives, most recently in July 2012; and setting a record for solo diving in 1,000-meter depth. Her research concerns Photograph by Bates Littlehales. marine ecosystems with special reference to exploration, conservation, and the development and use of new technologies for access and effective operations in the deep sea and other remote environments. Her special focus is on developing a global network of areas on the land and in the ocean to safeguard the living systems that provide the underpinnings of global processes, from maintaining biodiversity and yielding basic life support services to providing stability and resiliency in response to accelerating climate change. Earle is the recipient of more than a hundred national and international honors and in 2014 was named a Glamour Woman of the Year. Other honors include the 2011 Royal Geographical Society Gold Medal, 2011 Medal of Honor from the Dominican Republic, 2009 TED Prize, Netherlands Order of the Golden Ark, Australia’s International Banksia Award, Italy’s Artiglio Award, the International Seakeepers Award, the International Women’s Forum, the National Women’s Hall of Fame, Academy of Achievement, Los Angeles Times Woman of the Year, and medals from the Explorers Club, the Philadelphia Academy of Sciences, Lindbergh Foundation, National Wildlife Federation, Sigma Xi, Barnard College, and the Society of Women Geographers.

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Moisturization Through the Ages – Geoffrey Brooks

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will discuss some of the highlights on the important dynamics of how water works within the skin and hair in relation to water in the environment, and what the cosmetic industry has done to enhance the skin’s appearance by topically applying products. I am very proud and honored to speak on the same platform as Dr. Sylvia Earle who has spent a life-time understanding the dynamics which help to keep our oceans (70% of the planet!) healthy. Up to 60% of the adult body is water, and the skin contains 64% water. As we are terrestrial beings, we live in a very thin atmosphere. Globally, it contains only 0.04% of the world’s fresh water. Not much!!! It is measured by humidity, and your hair and skin are moisturerized when it is saturated (100% RH). Under desert conditions (10% RH), your skin and hair are dried out! External environmental moisture is very important. My previous experience includes working for Beecham (UK) on Brylcreem (about 50 years ago), which was described as the best moisturizing hair cream! I also worked on several skin care products (e.g., Margaret Astor) and understood the importance of moisturizing the skin to relieve dryness and provide a fresher look. Unfortunately the improved appearance of skin and hair was only transitory. Much effort was put into making the effects provided by moisture in your product, and from the body, last longer for greater consumer satisfaction. Moisturization was one claim we were allowed to make for our products, and perhaps the only real claim we are allowed to make now. Temporary relief of dry skin with a moisturizer is not treatment with a drug! Over the years, science has provided a good understanding on how best to moisturize the skin, how the skin uses moisture, and how the skin regulates itself to provide optimal homeostasis. Utilizing a good understanding of the functioning of the skin’s own master regulators (cytokines), it is possible to design analogs which will help optimize this process by up-regulating aquaporins (the cell’s water channeling/optimization mechanism) and other extra-cellular matrix components. We will discuss how these and other approaches can be used to more effectively provide the consumer with greater satisfaction. n geoffrey Brooks Geoffrey Brooks graduated from the University of London with a B.Sc. in Chemistry in 1966. Initially, he went to work for Beecham in Product Development on haircare products (Brylcreem, Silvikrin), then on bath products (Vitabath, Badedas, Midas), and later he helped introduce the Lancaster cosmetic line into the U.S. In 1974 he joined Croda in Technical Sales and Marketing, introducing new proteins, emulsifiers, hair conditioners, and waxes. In 1984 Geoffrey co-founded Brooks Industries, and functioned as CTO – Brooks Industries, introducing many innovative cosmetic ingredients, including yeast extracts, plant proteins, liposomes, and other advanced effective skin delivery systems. Brooks Industries was later sold to Arch Chemicals and provided the basis for their cosmetic specialty chemical business. From 2001 to 2008 he functioned as a roving technical scientific ambassador within Arch in an effort to provide cross business opportunities. In 2008 he joined Solazyme, Inc. in San Francisco as VP & General Manager for Nutrition and Personal Care. Two years later Geoffrey “retired”! However, he still kept very active, helping the University of California market their patented cosmetic peptides. He has also assisted personal care ingredient and nutritionally inspired start-up companies. Most recently, he has served as scientific advisor to Botaneco (located in Calgary, Canada) on their novel seed extraction technologies, which gently release the constituent bio-components in an environmentally friendly manner. The focus has been on utilizing agricultural products which have a very low water footprint, something increasingly important in a warming and changing world. _____________________________________________

Making P Personal ersonal Car Caree Beautiful®

Specialty Silicones & Actives Skin Car Caree Hair Car Caree Color Cosmetics ®

www.biosiltech.com

registration information SCC members Non-SCC members Students/Unemployed Emeritus members

Pre-registration cost $45 $75 $10/$0 $0

At door cost $70 $110 $50/$0 $40

Location Chart House • Lincoln Harbor, Pier D-T, 1700 Harbor Boulevard, Weehawken, NJ • (201) 348-6628 V O L U M E

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The Future of Sustainability February 15, 2017

seasons Westwood • Washington Township, ny

sensiva® – multifunctional additives designed for your innovation euxyl® – optimum preservation according to your needs

schülke schülke iinc. nc. 1 1-888-267-4220 -888-267-4220

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ustainability is a wide reaching term that covers many aspects of the cosmetics and personal care industry. This event aims to explore several aspects of sustainability and how they pertain to our responsibilities both as scientists and businesses. Green chemistry can reduce pollutants and lower the energy needed to make products. The repurposing of products originally considered waste not only reduces our footprint but also helps our bottom lines. Finally, understanding the commitments we have to customers to create products that improve both their lives and the world around them allows us to discuss the aspects of sustainability that reach beyond the products we create. Event chair: Elizabeth Kaufman (eak393@nyu.edu) For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org.

Agenda 8:00 – 9:00 a.m. 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

Registration and Opening Remarks Alex Mcintosh – Going Beyond ’Sustainability’ In Personal Care: Lessons From the Front Lines

10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Giorgio Dell'Acqua – Sustainability of Re-used Material and By-products from Food and Agriculture Waste

11:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Coffee Break

11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Rob Predale – Johnson & Johnson’s 2020 Citizenship and Sustainability Goals 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

Lunch

1:30 – 2:15 p.m.

John Warner and Amy Cannon – Entropy Considerations in the Sustainable Design of Cosmetics

2:15 – 2:45 p.m.

Coffee Break

2:45 – 3:45 p.m.

Chris Sayner – Sustainability and Ingredient Integrity

4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Awards Ceremony and Cocktail Hour

speaker abstracts and Biographies…

Going Beyond ‘Sustainability’ In Personal Care: Lessons from the Front Lines

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– Alex McIntosh

he cosmetic and personal care sector, at $450 billion and growing, physically touches millions of people around the globe daily. And while the last few decades have seen a significant increase in attention and resources devoted by both the private and public sectors to healthier and more

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sustainable ingredients, operations, and products, respected thought leaders argue our collective response is insufficient to meet the human and ecological challenges. Regulators, consumers, and retailers are ratcheting up their scrutiny and expectations, and argue that corporations, suppliers, and product development teams need to aim higher. This session, led by an executive who has worked for more than eighteen years at the leading edge of consumer goods and sustainability, will share the remarkable concept and story of Thrive Natural Care, a fast-growing brand that has created and operates the first regenerative supply chain in the personal care industry. Topics covered during the presentation and subsequent Q&A period include: • What does a ‘beyond sustainability’ business model look like in the cosmetic industry? • Is there a business case for operating a ‘beyond sustainability’ model? • What lessons learned are useful for other brands, suppliers, and industry leaders?

n alex Mcintosh Alex founded and serves as Chief Executive Officer of Thrive Natural Care, one of the most unique and healthy shave and skincare brands on the planet. Thrive’s team of American and Costa Rican entrepreneurs—farmers and scientists—produce new-to-market botanicals for the company’s products by means of an innovative business model that aims far beyond sustainability to actually regenerate impoverished ecosystems and communities. Thrive’s vision has attracted retail partners such as Whole Foods and Amazon, national media such as Travel+Leisure and Esquire, and investors from Clorox, Nestlé, Unilever, venture capital, and even the NBA. Alex is a managing partner of Ecomundi Ventures, a San Francisco impact investment fund focusing on transformative business models in personal care and sustainability. Prior to Thrive and Ecomundi, Alex was the founding Director of Sustainability & Corporate Citizenship at Nestlé Waters North America, the $4 billion division of the world’s largest consumer water company. At Nestlé Waters, Alex developed the vision and strategic plan, and provided hands-on leadership to build the corporation’s first sustainability program from the ground up during a time of intense social scrutiny. He created a broad network of partnerships with corporate, policy, regulatory, and nonprofit water organizations to advance sustainability and innovation. His success in aligning financial, environmental, and social strategies within the 8,500-person corporation played a key role in expanding Nestlé Waters’ reputation for excellence in the consumer package goods industry. Prior to Nestlé, Alex was Director of Philanthropy at The Nature Conservancy, where he helped raise a record $75 million in private capital for two of the largest watershed conservation projects in the organization’s history. Alex developed the vision, strategic plan, and provided leadership for the nine-person fundraising team that increased annual giving revenue 1,250% over four years and completed the most successful corporate conservation campaign in state history. Alex’s other environmental contributions include co-development of an eco-tourism business/funding model for Gabon’s president and Wildlife Conservation Society, creation of a five-year business plan for Big Bend National Park, and publication of a field guide to birds. Alex has served as a Board Director for Clearwater Systems Inc., and as a judge or mentor for Cleantech Group’s Global 100, The Global Social Venture Competition, Global Cleantech Cluster Association, and Net Impact. Alex earned his B.A. with academic honors at Duke University, and a Master’s degree in Environmental Management from Yale University. _____________________________________________

Premium Ingredients. Custom Solutions.

Deborah Bagnuolo 844 458 7111 lvlomas.com

Sustainability of Re-used Material and By-products from Food and Agriculture Waste

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– Giorgio Dell’Acqua

n a cosmetic market increasingly seeking sustainable ingredients, reduction of an ingredient’s carbon footprint through improvement of waste management is not only becoming a new trend, but also a necessary step in the product development cycle. Ingredient suppliers are exploring the possibility to recycle by-products or waste from the food industry into safe and efficacious cosmetic ingredients. These fully natural by-products, once optimized for use in cosmetic products, can act as natural preservatives, anti-oxidants, and anti-inflammatory agents. With the objective of waste reduction, it is necessary to merge the food and cosmetic raw material supply chains into one supply chain serving both industries.

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(Continued on page 8)

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The Future of Sustainability

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Johnson & Johnson’s 2020 Citizenship and Sustainability Goals

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– Rob Predale

n 2016, Johnson & Johnson finalized its 2020 Citizenship and Sustainability Goals. These goals continue the legacy of Johnson & Johnson’s efforts to advance healthier societies and are designed to help more people live healthier lives through the ideas we generate, products we make, and good habits and practices we create. The goals have three key areas: people, places, and practices. This presentation reviews the three main goals with a focus on how we evaluate the environmental impacts from the use of personal care products. We review sustainable design tools and how we integrate these tools into our product development process.

n rob predale Rob Predale is the Director of Environmental Product Stewardship for the Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies. In this role he works with the R&D community to integrate environmental sustainability principles into the product development process. He and his colleagues have developed several tools to measure the impact of products throughout their lifecycles. Rob represents Johnson & Johnson on several external forums, including the American Chemical Society’s Green Chemistry Institute’s Formulators Roundtable and the Personal Care Products Council’s Environmental Committee. He also recently co-authored a publication on greener ingredient replacements in the personal care industry. Rob has more than 25 years of experience in the environmental, health, safety, and sustainability fields. Prior to Johnson & Johnson, he worked for Honeywell, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and an international consulting firm. Rob earned an M.S. in Environmental Science from Rutgers University. _____________________________________________

Entropy Considerations in the Sustainable Design of Cosmetics

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– John Warner and Amy Cannon

ature creates materials of such exquisite structural complexity and diversity that humans may never be able to mimic them. Nature’s elegance is even more astounding when one considers the fact that most chemistry in the biological world is carried out at ambient temperature and pressure using water, for the most part, as its reaction medium. For society to become truly sustainable, the way we manufacture, use, and repurpose materials must change dramatically. This presentation will describe John Warner’s entropic considerations of materials design and illustrate their application through recent R&D examples from the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry.

n John Warner John is the recipient of the 2014 Perkin Medal, widely acknowledged as the highest honor in American Industrial Chemistry. He received his B.S. in Chemistry from University of Massachussetts Boston, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Princeton University. After working at Polaroid Corporation for nearly a decade, he then served as tenured Full Professor at University of Massachussetts Boston and Lowell (Chemistry and Plastics Engineering). In 2007 he founded the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, LLC (a research organization devloping green chemistry technologies) where he serves as President and Chief Technology Officer, and Beyond Benign (a nonprofit dedicated to sustainability and green chemistry education). He is one of the founders of the field of Green Chemistry, co-authoring the defining text Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice with Paul Anastas. He has published over 250 patents, papers, and books. His recent work in the fields of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, solar energy, and construction and paving materials are examples of how green chemistry principles can be immediately incorporated into commercially relevant applications. Warner received the 2004 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Mentoring (considered one of the highest awards for U.S. science education), the American Institute of Chemistry’s Northeast Division’s Distinguished Chemist of the Year for 2002, and the Council of Science Society President’s 2008 Leadership Award. Warner was named by ICIS as one of the most influential people impacting the global chemical industries. In 2011, he was elected a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and named one of “25 Visionaries Changing the World” by Utne Reader. 8

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n amy Cannon Amy holds the world’s first Ph.D. in Green Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts Boston where her research involved the environmentally benign synthesis of photoactive materials. She is the co-founder and executive director of Beyond Benign, a non-profit organization dedicated to green chemistry education. She received her M.S. in Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts Boston and her undergraduate degree in Chemistry from Saint Anselm College in Manchester, NH. Amy worked as an Assistant Professor of Green Chemistry and Director of Outreach and Community Education at the Center for Green Chemistry at the University of Massachusetts Lowell until September of 2007 when she left to co-found Beyond Benign. Amy has industrial experience working as an analytical chemist for the Gillette Company and as a scientist for Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials. Amy was awarded the Kenneth G. Hancock Memorial Award in Green Chemistry in 2004 for her work on titanium dioxide semiconductors and their application in dye-sensitized solar cells. Amy was awarded the 2012 EPA New England Environmental Merit Award for her leadership and work on green chemistry education. Amy is passionate about transforming the general public’s relationship with chemistry. She focuses on chemistry education to better prepare students and scientists to enter the workforce trained with the skills to create sustainable materials and products. _____________________________________________

Sustainability and Ingredient Integrity

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– Chris Sayner

onfirmation of sustainability credentials for cosmetic ingredients is becoming a pre-requisite for doing business. Major consumer companies have publicly stated targets around traceability, environmental responsibility, and social accountability. The need for uniform values throughout the entire supply chain, combined with increasing demand for third party verification of compliance, is supporting the drive for innovation.

n Chris sayner Chris Sayner has thirty-five years experience in the Home and Personal Care industry, having worked for Croda in a number of sales and marketing roles. During the last fifteen years as Vice-president Global Accounts, Chris has seen the evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility in the consumer goods industries. He helped designed the architecture around Croda’s Sustainability Reporting, which began in 2007, and in recent years has received increasing external recognition. Croda was included twice in the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World (2013 and 2014), and on the Climate Disclosure Leadership Index (2013) for leading on climate change transparency. Chris writes and presents extensively on ingredient integrity covering wide ranging issues, such as carbon footprint, renewable raw materials, traceability, supporting Certified Sustainable Palm Oil (CSPO) in the chemical industry, and on developing physical CSPO supply chains in Home and Personal Care. In May 2016, Chris transitioned to the position of Vice-president, Customer Alliances and Corporate Sustainability, engaging in all aspects of sustainability with customers across all industry sectors, as well as other stakeholders, NGOs, and industry bodies. _____________________________________________

awards Ceremony Hollywood’s award season is just around the corner. At the New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists, we thought it would be a good time to recognize some of the companies that are changing our industry for the better. The theme of this year’s NYSCC awards program is Sustainability. We are honoring the top supplier and the top finished goods house in each of three different aspects of sustainability, a total of six awards recognizing the leaders in our field in sustainability. We solicit from all of you a description (no more than five pages) of sustainability projects undertaken by your company in the last three years, together with the results of the project. The categories are: • Most Sustainable Product • Best Use of Green Chemistry • Most Sustainable Company (Continued on page 10)

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The Future of Sustainability

The Soul & Science of Beauty. www.evonik.com/personal-care

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Entries must be received in MS Word format no later than January 19, 2017. Please send submissions to: Elizabeth Kaufman (eak393@nyu.edu). The NYSCC event planning committee will choose and notify three finalists in each category. The winner in each category will be chosen by a panel of graduate students in a blind evaluation and the winning companies and their projects will be revealed at our February 15, 2017 full-day symposium. _____________________________________________

registration information Pre-registration cost SCC members $45 Non-SCC members $85 Students/Unemployed Members $10 Emeritus members $0

At door cost $80 $120 $50 $40

Location Seasons Westwood • 644 Pascack Road, Washington Township, NJ • Tel: (201) 664-6141 www.seasonscatering.com

To register, visit www.nyscc.org and click on the Events section.

Like, Connect & Tweet About Us!

FACEBOOK: NEW YORK LINKED IN: NEW YORK SCC TWITTER: @NYSCC INSTAGRAM: NYSCCMAIN SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS These connections are possible by the NYSCC Social Media Committee

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JournaL oF CosMETiC sCiEnCE The Official Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists CaLL For ManusCripTs

he Society of Cosmetic Chemists is soliciting scientific manuscripts concerned with cosmetics or the sciences underlying cosmetics, as well as papers of interest to the cosmetic industry for publication in the Journal of Cosmetic Science, The Official Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists. The JOURNAL will consider manuscripts for publication in the following categories, provided they are prepared in proper scientific style and adequately referenced: • Original articles • Review articles • Preliminary communications • Technical notes • General articles • Letters to the Editor SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPTS Manuscripts submitted for publication should be accompanied by a cover letter and sent via e-mail to dscelso@scconline.org. Additional information is available from the SCC National Office: www.scconline.org.

Make note of it… Send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to roger McMullen, Editor • E-mail: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

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2017 NYSCC Ski Trip • February 24 hunter Mountain, new york

Join the nysCC for a day of skiing or boarding. We will spend the day speeding down the slopes and then gather for a warm lunch at the mountain lodge. Event Chair: Amy Marshall (amy.marshall@altana.com, (908) 391-6294) For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org.

speaker 12:00 – 12:20 p.m. (during lunch) Marc Cornell – vp product development, Englewood Laboratories Topic: skin Biochemistry and surviving Extreme Weather Car pooling is recommended. Individuals seeking ride sharing opportunities please contact: Gita Calton at gita.calton@aak.com or (732) 713-3416 This is a family event, so children and other invited guests are welcome.

recommended Lodging: Hampton Inn Kingston • www.kingston.hamptoninn.com • (845) 382-2600 Special rate for NYSCC Ski Trip: February 23rd and 24th; $119/night plus tax; Please book at latest by January 20th. Pricing (SCC members and non-members): Adult lift ticket (19 and up) – $42 • Youth lift ticket(7-18) – $40 Ski rental – $29 • Snow Board Rental – $29 • Beginners lesson Pack – $49 All American buffet lunch – $30 Questions/info, refer to: Joe Albanese at joe@sytheonltd.com or (908) 456-2968 Pasquale Aramo at p.aramo@3VSigmaUSA.com or (862) 621-5022

Eighth Biennial Holistic Cosmetic Symposium & Suppliers’ Showcase soCiETy oF CosMETiC ChEMisTs – Twin Cities Chapter

Holistic Symposium • March 21 Earle Brown heritage Center • Brooklyn Center, Minnesota Topics of particular interest include: • Organic Ingredients • Green Packaging • Natural Preservatives • Green Manufacturing • Formulating Green • Sustainable or Fair Trade Ingredients • Biodiversity and Ethical Sourcing • Marketing and Consumer Trends • Regulatory Updates

Come be a part of the SCC’s original Green Symposium! For suppliers’ interested in participating in the afternoon showcase, a separate packet will be sent out in November. V O L U M E

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Open Innovation – The Business of Cosmetics March 23 • 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. pleasantdale Château • West orange, nJ

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enry Chesbrough popularized the phrase “open innovation” in his 2003 book Open Innovation: The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology. He described the concept as, “the use of purposive inflows and outflows of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation and expand markets for external use of innovation, respectively.” Open innovation assumes that firms should use external ideas as well as internal ideas to advance their technology. As boundaries have become more permeable, innovations can easily transfer inward and outward. Companies cannot afford to rely entirely on their own research, but should buy or license processes or inventions from other companies or research universities. In addition, internal inventions not being used should be taken outside the company through licensing, joint ventures, and spin-offs. Join us in March as a group of diverse experts illuminate the ways open innovation can stimulate your company’s future. Learn the benefits, challenges, and potential pitfalls when you explore opportunities with other companies through partnerships and licensing and with universities through their technology transfer systems. Anyone with a concern for the central role innovation plays in commercial success in the 21st century cannot afford to miss this exciting event.

Event Committee: Chair Mohamed Omer – Mohamed_omer@hotmail.com Sahar Fakhry-Smith – SaharF@snfhc.com • Mitisha Mehta – mitisham@student.fdu.edu For more information, visit www.nyscc.org.

Agenda 8:00 – 9:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Registration and Open Remarks (NYSCC Chair) Gene Slowinski – Implementing Open Innovation: Lessons from the Leaders John Bell – Topic TBD Jennifer Gottwald – Open Innovation and Licensing

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch (Sponsor Highlights)

12:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Doug Berger – The Future of Open Innovation Marisol Simard – Open Innovation in Packaging Open Innovation Panel

Reinventing Supplier Innovation Relationships Uncover the Power of Collaboration

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…A Note from Event Chair, Mohamed Omer

o compete effectively in today’s business environment, firms are replacing the “not invented here” syndrome with the “invented anywhere approach”. Leading organizations are rapidly moving from buy/sell relationships to close collaborations that allow both customers and suppliers to achieve a level of innovation that brings marketplace advantage. To better understand the dynamics of these relationships, the Industrial Research Institute sponsored a two-year study titled, Reinventing Supplier Innovation Relationships. The purpose of the research is to uncover the power and critical components that energize these collaborations. The goal is to uncover a set of guideline principals that lead to more innovative relationships. Is it time to unlock the innovation power of

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your supplier relationships? Join us at the Future of Open Innovation event and you will: • Learn how the “Want, Find, Get, Manage” model helps executives determine high value projects, allocate intellectual property rights, define agreement boundaries, and develop a financial model that shares both risks and rewards. • See how firms use Voice of the Supply Chain to identify higher value projects. • Understand how firms use collaborative relationships to grow outside the core. _____________________________________________

registration information Pre-registration cost SCC members $45 Non-SCC members $60 Students/Unemployed Members $10 Emeritus members $0

At door cost $70 $90 $50 $40

Location Pleasantdale Château, 757 Eagle Rock Avenue, West Orange, NJ • Tel: (973) 731-5600

NYSCC Historian

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he NYSCC Executive Board would like to welcome our new Historian, Sophia Chen. If there are any historical documents, photographs, etc. that you would like to share with other members of the NYSCC, please contact Sophia. She can be reached at historian@nyscc.org.

Employment Opportunities For complete ads please go to the NYSCC website: https://www.nyscc.org/employment-listings.html.

n R&D Manager Cosmetech Laboratories, Inc. • Fairfield, NJ

n Chemistry Associate II Vizuri Health Sciences • Baltimore, MD

n R&D Chemist Hayward Laboratories • East Stroudsburg, PA

n Application Laboratory Chemist Gattefossé • Paramus, NJ

n Senior Scientist – Sun Care Edgewell Personal Care Products • Allendale, NJ

n Technical Sales Person LANXESS Corporation • Mid Atlantic region (Philadelphia, New Jersey, New York)

n Junior Chemist – Cosmetics Repechage • Secaucus, NJ n R&D Manager Tropichem Research Labs, LLC • Jupiter, FL n Senior Chemist II Zotos (a subsidiary of Shiseido) • Darien, CT n Product Compliance Manager Inolex, Inc. • Philadelphia, PA

n Account Manager SEPPIC Inc. • Fairfield, NJ and/or home office n Customer Service Representative Inolex, Inc. Philadelphia, PA n R&D Group Leader/Makeup and Skincare Kolmar Labs/K.D.C. • Port Jervis, NY

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The nysCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. all five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

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Globalization of the Emerging Markets Bric ‘N Brexit April 19, 2017 The Bethwood • Totowa, nJ

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An Evening Update on Markets, Business Climates, and Culture in these Dynamic Regions

razil, Russia, India, and China are collectively referred to as the BRIC countries, and are among the fastest growing developing markets in the world. Collectively, and Brazil individually, are culturally diverse, and major consumers of personal care products and fragrances. Brexit has been an earthquake that has set the entire European continent rolling in terms of currency fluctuations, intercountry relationships, and many other facets, too numerous to mention. It will affect how markets interact and develop enormously over the years. As more companies are embracing globalization to reach new customers in new markets, a greater understanding of culture, consumer preferences, important product types, and regulatory issues in these vast and growing markets is essential. Event chairs: Michael Smith (MSmith@rd.us.loreal.com) and Mavis Dennis (mavis_dennis@colpal.com). For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org.

Upcoming 2017 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated nysCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For national sCC information: www.scconline.org January 25 Eco-Evolution, Chart house, Weehawken, nJ February 15 The Future of sustainability, seasons Westwood, Washington Township, nJ February 24 nysCC ski Trip, hunter Mountain, ny March 23 open innovation, pleasantdale Château, West orange, nJ april 19 globalization of the Emerging Markets - Bric ‘n Brexit, The Bethwood, Totowa, nJ May 2-3 nysCC suppliers’ day, Jacob Javits Convention Center, new york, ny July 9-12 91st aCs Colloid and surface science symposium, The City College of new york, new york, ny september TBd Culinary Event, location TBd september TBd Fashion, Beauty and Technology, new york, ny october 12 innovations in Textured hair Care, grand summit hotel, summit, nJ november 8 nysCC Board Transition Meeting, The venetian, garfield, nJ 14

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91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium July 9-12

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The City College of new york • new york, ny

teve Herman, Program Chair of the NYSCC, and Kaushal Rege of Arizona State University are chairing a session on Colloids and Surface Science in Medicine & Personal Care Products at the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium being held at The City College of New York next summer. In addition, the NYSCC is sponsoring the keynote speaker. This is a major annual event for the ACS that moves to a different university every year. The NYSCC is actively engaging other scientific societies for joint meetings and partnerships to increase the educational opportunities for our members, so this is a particularly exciting addition to our calendar. Elizabeth Kaufman, currently a doctoral candidate completing her Ph.D. work in chemistry at NYU, will moderate the session. For more information about the event visit: www.colloids2017.org. If you have any further questions about the NYSCC’s sponsorship or involvement in this event, please contact Steve Herman at steveh50@optonline.net.

Call for Papers

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he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

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Cosmetiscope - January 2017  
Cosmetiscope - January 2017