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APRIL 2016 • Vol. 22 No. 4

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

www.nyscc.org

Planning Your Career & Education Pathway by Understanding Jobs and Skills in Demand in the Personal Care Science Industry …by Jennifer (Lenahan) Cleary

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any Chemists are interested in building their careers within the Cosmetics and Personal Care Science industry (referred to here as the Personal Care Science Industry). Some do this by entering as entry-level Chemists and exploring their career options through professional networks. New tools are available, however, that can give you a clearer picture of the jobs and skills in high demand among employers in the industry. This information, in turn, can help you choose degree programs and courses that will position you best to meet these demands. This article presents an analysis of U.S. job openings posted on-line between February 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 by Personal Care Science Industry employers. To do this, we used a tool called Labor Insight from Burning Glass, which lets researchers mine all of the detailed information stored in job postings, from job titles to skills, education, and experience requested.1 See the Methods section below for more information on how we conducted the analysis. Overall, we focused the analysis on science and science-related business jobs in the industry and excluded occupations that would require less than a Bachelor’s degree. We also focused the analysis on jobs that require five years or less of experience, as these are generally the jobs most available to new graduates and other young professionals looking to advance their careers in the business. Finally, at least one large employer—Johnson & Johnson—was excluded because most of the jobs they advertise are on the medical side of their business and there was no way to isolate the jobs specific to Personal Care Science. With these restrictions, we identified 3,267 jobs posted in the Personal Care Science Industry across the U.S. between February 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016. Keep in mind that this is likely an undercount of all jobs available, as this is a new tool and it may not capture all employers and jobs advertising online. The information can alert you to possible emerging trends in job and skills in demand, however. This data can be most helpful when combined with other sources of information on industry trends. (Continued on page 3)

SUPPLIERS’

DAY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS • PAGES Raritan Center • Edison, NJ

12-27


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2016 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS CHAIR Rey Ordiales (732) 878-7798 reyordiales@outlook.com

CHAIR-ELECT Marie Thadal (609) 712-3716 chairelect@nyscc.org

TREASURER Cathy Piterski (201) 675-3799 cpiterski@essentialingredients.com

SECRETARY Giorgino Macalino (862) 324-2749 Secretary@nyscc.org

ADVISOR Kim Burch (609) 443-2385 Kim.Burch@elementis.com

HOUSE Mohamed Abdulla (973) 487-6572 mohamed.abdulla@airliquide.com

MEMBERSHIP John Carola JohnC@protameen.com

PROGRAM John Goffredo (267) 318-6168 john.goffredo@univarusa.com

COMMUNICATIONS Stephen Weinberg (973) 307-4854 webmaster@nyscc.org

SPECIAL EVENTS Gillian Ratto (723) 788-7320 Gillian.Ratto@elementis.com

COSMETISCOPE EDITOR Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

COSMETISCOPE ASSISTANT EDITOR Joe Albanese (908) 456-2968 joealbanese2@gmail.com

COSMETISCOPE ADVERTISING Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

COSMETISCOPE EMPLOYMENT Joel Diaz diaz.joel.a@gmail.com

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More Suppliers’ Day information on pages 12-27 A P R I L

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(Continued from page 1)

Chemists and Outside Sales are the most frequently advertised job titles, but overall there is a wide diversity of job titles used in the industry. There is no single job title that dominates the job postings we found in the Personal Care Science Industry. Of the 3,267 unique job titles advertised online in the U.S. between February 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 in the Personal Care Science Industry, there was no one job title that made up more than a small fraction of all the job titles advertised. Outside Sales Representative and Chemists, for example, were the most frequently advertised job titles, but each one accounted for just about 5% of all job titles posted. Figure 1 provides a look at the most in demand job titles posted in the industry by total postings and percentage of the total. !"#

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Figure 1. Top 10 Most Frequently Advertised Job Titles in the Personal Care Science Industry, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016, by Percentage of Total Job Postings (N=3,267).

While Chemists are one of the most commonly found job titles in the industry, Science, as a category, accounts for fewer than 1 in 10 of the jobs advertised online. If we look at jobs in the Personal Care Science Industry by broad job category, it is clear that there are many more jobs being advertised in management and other business-related occupations than in frontline science jobs. As you can see in Figure 2, Management jobs account for the highest percentage of all advertised jobs (20%). Jobs in the Computer and Mathematical, Sales and Related, Engineering, and Business Operations categories account for between 14% and 18% of posted jobs. By contrast, Life, Physical, and Other Science related jobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the category that Chemists fit intoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;make up just 7% of the total jobs posted online. So, while Chemists are one of the most in demand job titles, jobs in that category make up just a small part of the total jobs in demand in the industry. !"# -./.01-1/2##

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Figure 2. Major Job Categories for On-Line Job Postings in the Personal Care Science Industry, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016, by Percentage of Total Postings (N=3,267). (Continued on page 4)

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On the other hand, chemistry skills, especially when combined with business and other skills, are in demand across a wide range of job types. Chemistry is the most frequently requested skill across all of the job postings in the Personal Care Science Industry we examined. As noted in Figure 3, Chemistry was listed as a required skill for 20% of all jobs posted. So, while Chemists make up only 5% of all the jobs we examined, it is clear that chemistry is an important skill to have in a wide range of jobs. Expertise in the business operations and customer relationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; software, SAP, was the second most commonly requested skill in job postings (18%). Technical Support and Chemical Engineering skills were each requested in about 12% of all the job postings we examined. Packaging, Collaboration, Sales, Biology, Optimization, Scheduling, and Product Development each appeared in between 7-9% of the postings. !"#

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Figure 3. Top 10 Most Frequently Requested Skills in Personal Care Science Industry Job Postings, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016, by Percentage of Total Postings (N=3,267).

When looking at broad skill categories, the importance of having business and communications skills for most jobs becomes clear. When we examine the skills requested in online job ads in the Personal Care Science Industry by broad skill category, you can see that communication and other common business skills are in high demand across a wide swath of jobs. Around two-thirds of all jobs advertised in the industry require skills related to Communication and Coordination (69%), Business Environment (65%), or Problem Solving (63%). Another 40% of job postings require applicants to demonstrate Project and Process Flow skills. More than one-fifth of job postings also request IT/Business Intelligence skills (23%), Business Process and Planning skills (22%), general Supply Chain and Logistics knowledge (21%), and Chemistry (21%) skills. !"#

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Figure 4. Top 10 Most Frequently Requested Skill Clusters in Personal Care Science Industry Job Postings, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016, by Percentage of Total Job Postings (N=3,267). 4

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Nearly 1 in 3 jobs posted on-line in the Personal Care Science Industry is located in the New York/New Jersey area. The good news for members of the NYSCC looking for jobs close to home, as you can see in Figures 5, jobs postings last year were highly concentrated in New York City and the Northern and Central New Jersey Metropolitan Statistical areas.

Figure 5. Map of Top 15 Metropolitan Statistical Areas Posting Personal Care Science Industry Jobs, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016 (N=3,267).

Taking a closer look at the types of jobs and skills that are concentrated in the Trenton-Ewing, New York/Northern New Jersey/ Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington metropolitan statistical areas, you can get a better sense of the opportunities open locally. As Figure 6 shows, 939 Personal Care Science Industry jobs were posted in these three areas over the one-year period examined. This is about 29% of all the Personal Care Science jobs posted nationwide; or nearly one in every three jobs posted! The Trenton-Ewing metropolitan statistical area, in particular, has much higher demand for Personal Care Science Industry jobs than average. There were four jobs posted for every 10,000 employed people over the February 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January 2016 period. The New York/Northern New Jersey/Long Island metropolitan statistical area had the highest number of total job postings (803), making it an area of high demand even though there were fewer job postings relative to the working population. On the other hand, the Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington metropolitan statistical area has much lower than average demand for jobs in personal care science. Outside of this area, a few metropolitan areas in the mid-West and the South also have higher than average levels of demand for personal care jobs. Job postings per 10,000 people employed

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Figure 6. Summary of On-Line Job Demand in the Top 15 Metropolitan Statistical Areas Posting Personal Care Science Industry Jobs, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016 (N=3,267).

Several Large Cosmetics Companies make up the list of top employers advertising Personal Care Science Industry jobs online. Large employers in the Personal Care Science Industry that advertised jobs online between February 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 include: 1. Ecolab Incorporated (Continued on page 6)

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2. BASF 3. L’Oréal USA Incorporated 4. Clorox Company 5. Procter & Gamble 6. Reckitt Benckiser 7. Agilex 8. Colgate-Palmolive Company 9. Church & Dwight 10. Estée Lauder Company Many of these employers are cosmetics companies or suppliers of cosmetic ingredients. Many also have large operations in the New York/New Jersey area.

Chemists and Marketing Managers are the most in-demand job titles in the New York/New Jersey Area. As Figure 7 shows, Chemists were the most frequently requested job title in online job postings between February 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 in the local area, which we defined to include the Trenton-Ewing, New York/Northern New Jersey/ Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington metropolitan statistical areas. Online ads for Chemists comprised 6% of the 939 total job postings found in the area (compared to 5% of the national total). While Outside Sales was one of the highest demand job titles nationally (5% of all U.S. postings in the industry), that title did not even make the top 10 in the local job market. Rather, Marketing Manager was the second most in demand job title locally, making up 4% of postings. Titles including Buyer, Logistics Analyst, Production Supervisor, Sales Manager, Production Manager, Sales Specialist, Supply Chain Manager, and Purchasing Manager each comprised about 1% of job postings in the local area. !"# -./0123##

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Figure 7. Top 10 Most Frequently Advertised Job Titles in the Personal Care Science Industry, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016, in the Trenton-Ewing, New York/Northern New Jersey/ Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Areas, by

There is more concentrated demand for jobs in Science, Management, and Business and Financial Operations categories as well as others in the New York/New Jersey area compared to the nation. To understand what job categories are particularly valued by employers in the local job market, we examined which categories had at least 90 job postings and a high location quotient. A location quotient (LQ) above 1.0 indicates a high concentration of demand in the local area compared to the rest of the country. As you can see in Figure 8, in the Trenton-Ewing, New York/Northern New Jersey/Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington metropolitan statistical areas, there is relatively strong demand for Life 6

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Science and other Science jobs (LQ of 5.4), Management (LQ of 4.6), and Business and Financial Operations (LQ of 4.3). Computer and Mathematical and Engineering jobs also have a high location quotient in the New York/New Jersey area. !"

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Figure 8. Major Job Categories of Job Postings in the Personal Care Science Industry, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016 in the Trenton-Ewing, New York/Northern New Jersey/ Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Areas, by Location Quotient (N=939).

Product Development skills and knowledge of key performance indicators are particularly highly valued by Personal Care Science Industry Employers in the New York/New Jersey areas. We examined skills that appeared in at least 75 job ads and had a high location quotient for TrentonEwing, New York/Northern New Jersey/ Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington metropolitan statistical areas. Based on this analysis, some skills are more likely to be asked for in the local area than nationally, indicating that these skills are highly valued by employers in the local job market. These include: Product Development skills (LQ of 5.5), Key Performance Indicators (LQ of 4.9), Logistics (LQ of 4.7), SAP software (LQ of 4.6), Scheduling (LQ of 4.2) Collaboration skills (LQ of 4.1). Other high demand skills in the area include Packaging (LQ of 3.8), Chemistry (LQ of 3.6), and Chemical Engineering (LQ of 2.3). !"

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Figure 9. Top Skills Requested in Personal Care Science Industry Job Postings, February 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016 Trenton-Ewing, New York/Northern New Jersey/ Long Island, and Philadelphia/Camden/Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Areas, by Location Quotient (N=939). (Continued on page 8)

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Planning Your Career & Education Pathway Premium Ingredients. Custom Solutions.

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Overall, it is clear that a mix of Chemistry and other Business Skills is a highly valuable set of skills for jobs within and outside of the local New York/New Jersey Personal Care Science Industry Job Market. Many students looking to enter the Personal Care Science Industry express initial interest in pursuing careers as Chemists in cosmetics formulation, but this analysis shows that there are many other career opportunities in the Personal Care Science industry where students and growing professionals can apply Chemistry skills. The trick, it turns out, is to also develop a complementary set of skills in business and other areas discussed in this article. Chemists and other Science-focused jobs, while making up a larger part of the industry here than elsewhere, still account for only about 1 in 10 jobs in the Personal Care Science Industry in the New York /New Jersey area. However, we can see that there is strong demand for Chemistry, plus a range of business skills, for jobs that span many other job categories. Two out of three jobs posted in the industry require communication and coordination, business, and problem solving skills, for example.

As a result, those considering higher education programs to start or advance in the Personal Care Science Industry may want to consider a Professional Science Master’s (PSM) program. The Professional Science Master’s (PSM) program is a new national model for educating scientists who plan to work in industry. Started by a series of grants from the Sloan Foundation in 1997, Professional Science Master’s programs now exist at research universities around the nation. According to the PSM website, the degree is “designed for students who are seeking a graduate degree in science or mathematics and understand the need for developing workplace skills valued by top employers.”2 PSM programs offer students a full Master’s of Science in a particular discipline, but also require students to complete a professional component that includes business, communications, regulatory affairs, completing an internship or other work experience, and attending professional education and networking events. Overall, the degree is a great fit for scientists who want to be able to have a seamless transition into industry-relevant work, or to add more flexibility to their career by deepening their science knowledge and acquiring the business skills needed to effectively apply science in an industry context.

The Rutgers University Master’s of Business and Science (MBS) Program, which offers a concentration in Personal Care Science, is a local option for those interested in pursuing a PSM. The goal of the MBS Personal Care Science concentration is to educate students in the essential skills and tools relevant to the Personal Care (Cosmetic), Consumer Health Products, Pharmaceutical and Specialty Chemical industries. Students will be taught the fundamentals and applications of personal care chemistry, food science, process engineering and science, and will receive training in finance and accounting, marketing, communication and leadership, management of science and technology, ethics, and entrepreneurship. The objectives of the MBS Personal Care Science concentration are to, learn the fundamentals of cosmetic chemistry including: raw materials, bioactives, emulsions, hair biology and function, and skin biology and function; and to gain an appreciation of national and international regulatory guidelines, testing of raw and finished goods, and marketing aspects of personal care products, as well as business fundamentals. For more information on the Rutgers University MBS program in Personal Care Science, go to mbs.rutgers.edu or call: (848) 932-5117. See the events schedule on the website for information on an Open House to be held on April 4, as well as monthly information webinars for interested students.

Methods To do this analysis, we used a tool called Labor Insight from Burning Glass. It allows you to mine data from online job postings so you can see trends in the job market, such as job titles and skills in high demand and where jobs are concentrated, among other things. Because many jobs are posted several times in different places online, the system uses several methods to eliminate as many duplicate postings as possible.1 To get to the interesting information, Labor Insight breaks up all the pieces of the job description into fields that can be analyzed. This analysis included on-line job postings in the personal care industry from February 1, 2015 – January 31, 2016. To help students and other entry-level jobseekers, we limited the analysis to jobs requiring at least a Bachelor’s degree and five years or less experience. 8

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While this analysis has the potential to show jobseekers and employers important recent trends in the job market, there are limitations to this work. Not all jobs are advertised online, and not all of those online are captured by Burning Glass. The unstructured nature of job ads can make it difficult for the system to correctly identify individual pieces of information effectively in some cases. So, there may be some irrelevant jobs caught in the net and some relevant jobs may get left out. Overall, however, this analysis of “real-time” jobs data gives you a basic understanding of what is in demand in the current job market.

References 1. http://burning-glass.com/labor-insight/ 2. http://www.sciencemasters.com/about/history-psm

About the Author: Jennifer (Lenahan) Cleary is the Associate Director of the Professional Science Masters program at Rutgers University. She has fifteen years of experience as a senior researcher at the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, also at Rutgers, where she sought to understand how the skill needs of employers in various industries are changing. Ms. Cleary also managed large evaluation research projects for higher education programs that prepare people for work. She has authored a wide range of evaluation and industry reports, including reports on green jobs, life sciences, IT, transportation, and many others. Prior to her work in research and evaluation, Ms. Cleary managed a shelter for homeless families and spent several years working with people with disabilities. In her spare time, Ms. Cleary enjoys hiking, photography, and attending live music events.

Call for Papers

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he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

Upcoming 2016 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated NYSCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For National SCC information: www.scconline.org May 9 NYSCC Symposium on Product and Process Development, Sheraton Edison Hotel, Edison, NJ May 10-11 Suppliers’ Day, NJ Convention and Exposition Center, Edison, NJ June 8 NYSCC Cruise – Aqua Azul: Preservation Seminar, Weehawken, NJ July 21 Golf Event, Crystal Springs, Hamburg, NJ September 6 Cosmetic Claim Substantiation, Sheraton Licoln Harbor Hotel, Weehawken, NJ September TBD Culinary Event, Location TBD October TBD Personal Professional Development, Location TBD Oct. 30-Nov. 2 IFSCC Congress, Orlando, FL November 15 Rheology Symposium, Cook Campus Student Center, Rutgers University

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2016 Naturally Kiawah Symposium April 21, 2016 Kiawah Island Golf Resort • Kiawah Island, South Carolina Carolina Society of Cosmetic Chemists

Nextgen To Bridge The Gap Across Professional Levels

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ast year the Society of Cosmetic Chemists introduced a critical initiative, SCC NextGen, that offers the necessary skills and training needed for career advancement. NextGen helps young professionals (with less than five years of industry experience) and students further their education, so that they may attain successful and rewarding careers. NextGen provides registrants with the confidence to enter the workforce knowing that their education and training are aligned with workforce needs and that they have the support of fellow colleagues. The Society of Cosmetic Chemists plans to accomplish this mission by: 1. Presenting critical education tracks at meetings and events (e.g., Critical Thinking and Innovation, Basic Cosmetic Science, Introduction to Polymer Science and its Applications). 2. Networking at national meetings and events. 3. Coordinating small group projects where mentees and mentors engage in a technical area of shared interest. The goal for the mentee is to present a paper or organize a workshop in his/her second year of the program. 4. Collaborating with universities to supplement the education of their students. All colleges/universities participating in the NextGen program are eligible to provide students with their first year of membership for free. Please contact the SCC National office at scc@scconline.org, or call (212) 668-1500 for more information on how you or your university can get involved. All are welcome and encouraged to join! ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The official launch of the NextGen program will take place on April 20-22, 2016 at the Carolina Chapter, “Naturally Kiawah Symposium.” Course: SCC NextGen 101 Instructor: Mark Chandler – ACT Solutions Corp. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

SCC NextGen is a new series of courses designed for individuals who are new to the cosmetic industry as well as those who are more seasoned, but who would like to expand his or her knowledge of the basic concepts underlying the technology of the personal care industry. The NextGen 101 CEP course is a one-day basic overview of the fundamentals of hair care, sun care, skin care, and much more. 10

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NYSCC Cruise • June 8, 2016 Aqua Azul: Preservation Seminar

Weehawken, NJ Topic: The Challenges of Global Preservation of Cosmetics Speaker: David Steinberg

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he relentless attack on all preservatives goes on. These include new bans and restrictions on previously approved preservatives in the EU, additions to Canada’s Hot List, State prohibitions and their pseudo retractions, the NGO’s scare tactics, and the worst attacks, by the marketers of cosmetics. What is the end result of these attacks? A mad scramble to find anything to preserve our products that is acceptable to our marketing department. Suppliers come out with new, unheard of “natural” preservatives, blends of whatever marketing will accept to try and find a combination that works, and recalls of contaminated products. Guess who woke up to this problem? The regulators! What will they do? The EU is proposing a ban on “free” claims, but the one to watch out for is the latest FDA’s Cosmetic Guidelines issued early this year.

Biography David C. Steinberg graduated with a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Drexel University and an MBA in Management from Pace University. In 1995, he founded Steinberg & Associates, Inc., a consulting firm for the Cosmetic industry specializing in the chemistry of cosmetic ingredients, preservatives and preservation, international and U.S. regulations, domestic and international labeling of cosmetics and cosmetic drugs, and marketing of ingredients. He has been an expert witness in patent, business issues, and injury cases dealing in the personal care area. In 2008, David founded Report Reaction, LLC to assist clients in complying with new FDA OTC labeling requirements. Mr. Steinberg was one of the original founders of the Master’s Degree Program in Cosmetic Science at Fairleigh Dickinson University where he taught as an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemistry from 1982 to 2000. He is a member of numerous organizations and received a number of awards including the Society of Cosmetic Chemists’ Merit Award and was also awarded the status of Fellow in the Society of Cosmetic Chemists.

Make note of it… Send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to Roger McMullen, Editor • E-mail: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

2016 NYSCC Ski Trip

Brian Ecclefield sincere thank you goes out to all of our NYSCC and LISCC members who made the trip to Killington for the first combined NYSCC-LISCC Ski Trip to Vermont! I had an amazing time helping to coordinate the event and it would not have been possible without all of your support. A special debt of gratitude goes to AMA Laboratories in New York for their “Double Black Diamond” sponsorship, which provided everyone with a delicious breakfast at the Killington Grand and some giveaway goodies. In total, we had fifty-one registrants for the trip, which blows the previous records out of the water! This was my first organizational event on behalf of the NYSCC, which was both exciting and rewarding as I got to meet a lot of new people and work on something that will hopefully continue to grow in the years to come. Details for the 2017 NYSCC Ski Trip will be available later this year. Thanks again for your support and I look forward to seeing you on the slopes again next year!

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Suppliers’ Day Education Session 1 • May 9

NYSCC Symposium on Product and Process Development Related Considerations Sheraton Edison Hotel Raritan Center • Edison, NJ SEPARATE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT

Attending the NYSCC Suppliers’ Day this year?

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ell then, you should know that we have added an entire extra day to that eagerly anticipated annual global event. This seminar will cover diverse aspects of the technologies that make up the product and process development steps needed to bring new personal care products to market, from ingredients and formulating, to delivery systems, to testing bench-top prototypes, to scale-up to commercial production—many of the things to consider if you would like your new product launch to succeed in the marketplace.

Don’t miss this great event! Please join us at the Sheraton Edison Hotel on May 9th. It is conveniently located close to the Expo Center where the Suppliers’ Day event is being held on May 10th-11th. Shuttle buses will be available to the Expo Center.

Symposium Chairs: Daphne Benderly (daphne.benderly@gmail.com) • Joseph Albanese (joealbanese2@gmail.com)

Program: 8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Breakfast & Registration • Menlo Park Ballroom

Each time slot has two presentations: Session A (Lab 1) and Session B (Lab 4) 9:00 - 9:10 a.m. Opening Remarks A: Joseph Albanese B: Daphne Benderly 9:10 - 9:45 a.m. A: Marc Cornell – Skin Bio 101 and Cosmetic Actives Delivery B: Joseph Dallal – Shampooing and Conditioning: Not just for Cleaning, but for Delivering…Where Do You Start? 9:45 - 10:20 a.m. A: Douglas Cole – Personal Care Wet Wipes, A Unique Delivery system B: Steve Herman – Modern Solutions for Preservation 10:20 - 10:55 a.m. A: Dave Strueli – Aerosol Technology—Fundamentals in Product Development B: Eric Arbutyn – Thinking Fundamental and Integrity Aspects of Formulation Stability 10:55 - 11:30 a.m. A: Dr. Claudio Ortiz – Testing Fragrance Encapsulation: In Vitro and In Vivo B: Samuel Shefer – Utilization of Sensory Markers in Dermatocosmetics 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch • Location: Center Labs 2 & 3 12:30 - 1:05 p.m. A: David Yacko – Scale-up Pitfalls in the Cosmetic Industry B: Mark Chandler – Adaptive Active Delivery 1:05 - 1:40 p.m. A: Dr. Robert Lochhead – The Prospects of Personal Care Products Minus Polymers B: George Deckner – Formulating Lamellar Gel Network Based Oil in Water Emulsions 1:40 - 1:50 p.m. Closing Remarks A: Joseph Albanese B: Daphne Benderly

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Sponsorship Opportunities: Sponsorships are available to suppliers/vendors. Sponsorship will help defray costs and provide additional exposure at the Suppliers’ Day event, and acknowledge your company as a strong supporter of the New York Chapter of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, helping it fulfill its mission of advancing the science of personal care. For more information contact Joseph Albanese (joealbanese2@gmail.com).

Symposium Location: Sheraton Edison Hotel Raritan Center 125 Raritan Center Parkway, Edison, NJ Tel: (732) 225-8300 www.sheratonedison.com

For registration, please go to the NYSCC website: www.nyscc.org.

Session A (Lab 1) • 9:10 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Skin Bio 101 and Cosmetic Actives Delivery Marc Cornell

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osmetic active delivery requires a thorough understanding of many physical and chemical factors within the vehicle that is selected for topical application. The complexity of this challenge is magnified by the unique biochemical structure of the target organ, the skin. This presentation will start with a review of skin biology. The primary focus of this talk will be directed towards selected anti-age claims, with a detailed discussion of dermal and epidermal structures and why these skin targets are the focus of cosmetic science.

Biography Marc Cornell is currently a Senior Scientist with Englewood Lab in Englewood, New Jersey. During his thirty-year career he has worked in an R&D role for large (Merck, L’Oréal, Bristol Meyers Squibb, and Union Carbide) and medium sized companies (Neostrata, ChemAid Labs, and KV Pharmaceutical). For the last twenty years he has worked primarily on the research and formulation development of “Cosmeceuticals” for various brands (Skinceuticals, Neostrata, Biomedic, Strivectin, and La Roche Posay). In this role he collaborated with researchers in skin biology and clinical testing to design, formulate, and test novel cosmetic active delivery vehicles. Marc’s work has been patented and published in peer review journals and trade publications. Most recently, Marc partnered with several scientists and editor Dr. Zoe Draelos to publish a technical reference book entitled Cosmetic Dermatology. His current research and product development areas of interest are in cosmetic active delivery to the hair and skin. (Continued on page 14)

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Suppliers’ Day: Product and Process Development

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(Continued from page 13)

Session A (Lab 1) • 9:45 – 10:20 a.m.

Personal Care Wet Wipes, A Unique Delivery System Douglas Cole

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ome and listen to why personal care wet wipes continue to grow worldwide due to the convenience, performance, and targeted delivery systems for skin cleaning. Personal care wipes encompass baby wipes, flushable wipes, beauty care wipes, and personal cleansing wipes along with other wet wipe applications. The combination of nonwoven materials and personal care formulations must be developed in tandem to provide consumers with the desired performance and removal of unwanted soils while delivering beneficial ingredients to the skin. Each wet wipe formulation is distinct and performs differently depending on the nonwoven fibers and material matrix. Regulatory changes, media hype around flushable wipes, and product preservation are among the highlighted challenges facing personal care wet wipes today. In this session, we will delve into some of the technical approaches to solve the challenges facing personal care wipes today and in the future.

Biography Doug is Vice-president of Global Product Development at Rockline Industries and has been with the company for over twelve years. Doug has had several R&D leadership assignments with Rockline located in both U.S. and UK. Prior to joining Rockline, Doug was with Kimberly-Clark Corporation in Neenah, WI for thirteen years, leading many R&D teams and large development projects in personal wet wipes. In 1985, Doug started his career at the Dial Corporation in Scottsdale, AZ, where he worked for 6 years and held positions of Senior Formulation Scientist and Assistant Brand Manager in both personal care and I&I products. Doug earned a B.S. degree and an MBA in Marketing from Arizona State University. Doug has been a member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists since 1990 and has numerous patents covering personal care formulations, absorbent products, dispersible nonwovens, and packaging.

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Session A (Lab 1) • 10:20 – 10:55 a.m.

Aerosol Technology—Fundamentals in Product Development David Streuli

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he Personal Care aerosol category consists of multiple product forms, each representing unique actuation specific to the delivery and overall end-use performance expectations. Whether it is a hairspray, sunscreen, mousse, or post-foaming shave gel, there are many parameters to consider in development. Providing for a soft fine mist, direct streaming spray, or foam application requires a balance of the functional polymers, system rheology, propellant choices, and appropriate componentry selection. The delivery aesthetics of such systems are not only equally important as to the performance desired, it is essential for the target application. The influencing factors of product development and performance optimization will be explored.

Biography David Streuli has over nineteen years of experience in the formulation, development, and optimization of personal care products. He has contributed to enhancements in product performance evaluation and measurement, new innovations allowing for enhanced attribute expression and analysis, and the exploration of properties and benefits of new and existing polymer chemistries and additives. He has several international publications and patents filed in the field of aerosol technology, polymer science, hair styling, and hair protection. He holds a B.S. degree in Chemistry from William Paterson University and has completed graduate studies at Seton Hall University. David holds a position with Ashland, Inc. as Principal Scientist in Applications.

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Session A (Lab 1) • 10:55 – 11:30 a.m.

Testing Fragrance Encapsulation In Vitro and In Vivo Claudio Ortiz

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wo methods have been developed to evaluate the performance and stability of fragrance encapsulates. An in vitro method was developed to quantify the leakage of fragrance from capsules using GC Headspace. Also, an in vivo method was developed to evaluate the performance of products with different fragrance encapsulates. These methods are currently being used to evaluate different fragrance capsules in personal care products.

Biography Dr. Claudio Ortiz is a Senior Technical Associate in the Fragrance Technology group of Colgate-Palmolive where his team evaluates new technologies for the delivery of fragrance in personal care products. He has published twenty-two papers and seven patents. He received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Texas A&M University followed by a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Schering Plough Pharmaceutical.

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Session A (Lab 1) • 12:30 – 1:05 p.m.

Scale-Up Pitfalls in the Cosmetic Industry David Yacko

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n the cosmetic industry it is imperative that new products get from the bench to manufacturing as quickly as possible. This is the job of the Process Development Engineer and the process is called scale-up. This presentation will discuss the pitfalls we fall into when going through a scale-up process and how to possibly avoid them.

Biography David Yacko is Vice-president of Research and Development at Estée Lauder Companies, Inc., which is one of the world’s leading cosmetic developers and manufacturers. He has been with Estée Lauder over twenty-four years. His department is responsible for worldwide scale-up for Estée Lauder Companies, Inc. David earned his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Tri State University in Angola, Indiana. He has worked in the cosmetic industry for over forty years. He spent seventeen years with Cheesebrough-Ponds in both Research and Development and Manufacturing.

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Session A (Lab 1) • 1:05 – 1:40 p.m.

The Prospect of Personal Care Products Minus Polymers Robert Y. Lochhead and Misty Shows

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n December 2015, the U.S. Ban on plastic microbeads was signed into law. Pressure is now mounting to enact a ban on many polymers that are included as ingredients in personal care products. The reasoning behind such a ban derives from the concern that polymeric ingredients go ‘down the drain’ and enter the environment. A recent United Nations Environmental Program fact sheet entitled, “Plastic in Cosmetics,” seeks to expand the definition of microplastic to many polymers used in formulation, such as polyethylene waxes, polyurethanes, polyacrylate thickeners, acrylates copolymers, and silicone resins. The Netherlands’ National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) acknowledges that microplastics have been identified as a global environmental problem and have been shown to affect aquatic life. In a letter report, RIVM attempted to define microplastics by specifying their physicochemical properties and addressing the three questions: • Is the material a microplastic? • Is it a microplastic that persists in the environment? • Is it likely that aquatic organisms are exposed? (Continued on page 16)

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It appears that the Netherlands is taking a carefully considered approach, but this might not be the case for other countries. Therefore, in light of the recent history of plastic microbeads, it is possible that laws banning such polymeric ingredients could be enacted. We have posed the question, “Are such ingredients really hazardous to the environment, ecology, or human health? The prospect of a ban on polymers in products that eventually go ‘down the drain’ has prompted us to investigate the environmental fate of such polymeric ingredients. We have attempted to answer the question by carefully reviewing the written evidence from the scientific peer-reviewed literature, the press, the media, and web sites of governmental and non-governmental organizations in order to critically judge the evidence. We have also considered and tried to deduce the form in which these ingredients could enter the environment after formulation, use by consumers, and eventual removal by means that would destine then to ‘go down the drain.” The results of our investigations and deductions to date (April 2016), will be revealed in this presentation.

Biography Robert Lochhead, Ph.D. currently serves as a professor at the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials at the University of Southern Mississippi. He was Director of that School for about the last twenty years. Prior to joining academia, the first twenty-five years of his career were spent in industrial research that ranged from polymer and silicone synthesis to colloid and surface science and to the management of a large hydrophilic polymers research group. Dr. Lochhead is the author of more than a hundred scientific papers and reviews, and a named inventor on 24 patents. The polymers that he has invented have enabled new and better technologies with beneficial societal and environmental impact.

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Session B (Lab 4) • 9:10 – 9:45 a.m.

Shampooing and Conditioning: Not just for Cleaning, but for Delivering… Where Do You Start? Joseph Dallal

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n today’s modern world of hygiene practices, the shampoo cycle isn’t just for stripping the hair and scalp. The shampoo cycle is a preparatory cycle for the entire styling regimen. A couple of key targets or results are the wetting of the cortex and ‘re-conditioning’ of the cuticle surface. In the process, there are many factors that formulators can influence: texture in the bottle, application and distribution textures, flash foam (low to high), and texture of individual bubbles as well as the overall mass of bubbles/lather through the rinse cycle, towel drying, and finishing. Within that development of clear to opaque emulsions, we can create varying degrees of effects from stripping through deposition via coacervation, harsh through mild. Whether you are the formulator or the project leader, marketing director, purchasing agent, supply chain representative, microbiologist, or advertising designer, the conundrum is still the same: Where do I start? How do I start? What do I start? How do I know I finished? Just like a good story, you have beginnings, middles, and ends. But, as any good book or movie goes, there are those twists of fate, multiple characters, plots that thicken, and all those red herrings that lead you astray. Working as a team could augment closing the gap from point ‘a’ to ‘b’ and get the product out the door to those consumers who need your product. It is a concert of action that creates and moves a product from concept to performance at the consumer level, whether you are a one-person company or an R&D and marketing team composed of many individuals.

Biography Joseph Dallal got his start in his Mother’s Beauty Salon, teething on perm rods and clippies. He started cooking for the family at twelve years old and made perms and shampoos at seventeen years old in the salon dispensary. After passing the state board exams and receiving his cosmetology license, he worked his way 16

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through college with a double major in Human Anatomy & Physiology and Chemistry, followed by a Master’s in Chemistry with a thesis on the topic of: Enzymatic Inhibition of Protein Synthesis by an Extract from Phytolacca americana. Joe’s first industry job was at Redken, followed by Zotos, and then GAF/ISP (now Ashland Specialty Ingredients). He has been an SCC member since 1978, Chair for the Connecticut Chapter, Area I Director, and National President in 2012. He was also part of COCA and taught in the CEP. Joe is the author and co-Author of two textbook chapters, was awarded two patents, and taught hands-on labs at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

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Session B (Lab 4) • 9:45 – 10:20 a.m.

Modern Solutions for Preservation Steve Herman

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preservative system must be safe, stable, effective, and economically viable. Combinations of ingredients are often needed to create the necessary efficacy. Synergistic effects with preservatives and solvents can produce excellent results. The most common glycols used as preservatives are pentylene glycol, 1,2-hexanediol glycol, and caprylyl glycol. They can exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and reduce the irritation of conventional preservatives. Ethyl lauroyl arginate HCl, ethylhexylglycerin, and hydroxyacetophenone are interesting modern preservative options. Essential oils have inherent strong odors, which may limit their broad application, but used judiciously (in addition to other methods) they may enhance preservation efficacy. A natural product of fermentation, ε-polylysine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent with good antibacterial activity against bacteria, yeasts, and fungi. Knowledge of available water and the application of Hurdle Technology can make preservation more effective by rendering the overall product less susceptible to microbial contamination. Product type, pH, packaging, glycols, and chelation are some key variables for the Hurdle approach.

Biography Steve Herman is President of Diffusion LLC, a consulting firm specializing in regulatory issues, intellectual property, and technology development. He has been an Adjunct Professor in the FDU Cosmetic Science Program since 1993, teaching the Cosmetic Formulation Lab and Perfumery. Steve was a columnist for GCI Magazine for seventeen years and has written a book, Fragrance Applications: A Survival Guide. His SCC activities include service as Chairman of the New York Chapter in 1992 and 2013, election to Fellow status in 2002, and instructor in the Continuing Education Program.

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Session B (Lab 4) • 10:20 – 10:55 a.m.

Thinking Fundamental and Integrity Aspects of Formulation Stability Eric Abrutyn

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hat is stability for cosmetics and OTC cosmetic drugs? Stability testing is simply an experiment in which you create a batch of your formula and place samples at different environmental conditions for a set period of time. These conditions vary in temperature, humidity, and light levels and are meant to simulate, or predict, what will happen to the product during its life cycle. In general, personal care and cosmetic product stability testing ensures that novel or modified products meet physical, chemical, and microbiological quality standards. Other than over-the-counter cosmetic drugs (e.g., antiperspirants, sunscreens, etc.), there are no regulated protocols for stability testing globally. There are a number of prescribed guidelines on what constitutes proper stability testing. But in the end, the key responsibility is to have written protocols on how to run the testing, who is responsible for the protocol and results interpretation, how equipment is standardized periodically, and how it is interpreted and recorded. During this short presentation we will explore what stability is, how to implement it properly in an organization, the best conditions to understand integrity as a measure of stability over time, safety, and (Continued on page 18)

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efficacy maintenance. Examples of coordinating stability conditions with what is needed to understand robust integrity of the formula, instrumentation/equipment, and interpreting results will be discussed.

Biography Eric Abrutyn is a graduate of New York University-New Paltz with a Master’s degree in Chemistry and a graduate of C.W. Post College/Long Island University with a B.S. degree in Chemistry. He has over forty-five years of experience in the personal care industry. Eric is a member of the Technical Advisory Board and pastcontributing editor for Cosmetics & Toiletries Magazine, contributing author and e-course instructor for SpecialChem4Cosmetics, and is a emeritus member (and past chair) of the International Nomenclature Committee (INCI) of the Personal Care Products Council (formerly CTFA). Eric has been actively involved in the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, serving as Chair of the Midwest and Ohio Valley chapters, Area II Director, Editor of the NYSCC’s Cosmetiscope, and various positions at the local and national level. In 2008, Eric formed TPC2 Advisor’s Ltd., Inc., a personal care cosmetic consultancy, that specializes in: (1) antiperspirant technology, application, and performance testing; (2) siloxane technology/applications and replacement products; (3) skin and hair care formulation and product performance and stability testing; (4) technology/marketing assessment; (5) personal care cosmetic labeling with specific emphasis on INCI nomenclature and registration; and (6) technology strategic planning and innovative ideation. Besides working as Senior Principle Scientist for Kao Brands, Eric worked for Dow Corning as a Senior Technical Service Scientist in the field of silicone chemistry, and Wickhen Products as Director of R&D in the field of antiperspirants, esterification, spray drying, free-radical polymerization, and controlled release. He has contributed broadly in the fields of hair care research, skin care product development, and developments in underarm treatment technology. Mr. Abrutyn holds over fifteen patents and is a contributing editor/author of four books. He has authored numerous articles and given presentations in the field of antiperspirants, polymerization, controlled release, and silicone applications. Eric also teaches courses on a variety of personal care topics.

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Session B (Lab 4) • 10:55 – 11:30 a.m.

Utilization of Sensory Markers in Dermatocosmetics Samuel Shefer

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n this presentation, we will discuss novel concepts that drive consumer perceptions of efficacy, such as combining the long-term benefits from collagen boosting peptides with the instant perception of a dermal filling polymer and a cooling agent. This combination is crucial to ensure that the consumer remains compliant in using the material long enough for the collagen-boosting peptide to have an effect. In practice, the sensory experiences of firming and cooling validate the consumer perception, ultimately increasing compliance. We will cover the most effective and appropriate ways to incorporate captivating consumer experiences, such as cooling/warming, fragrance bloom, and instant color-changes, into your product line to enhance consumer compliance.

Biography Dr. Sam Shefer is the CEO of Salvona Technologies, Inc. Sam’s expertise is in biochemical systems, interaction of polymers with human skin, development and engineering of pharmaceutical nano-technology, and microspheres for health and beauty. Sam earned a Ph.D. in Biochemical and Chemical Engineering and an M.Sc. and B.Sc. in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetic Engineering from Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel. Dr. Shefer established a career at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as a postdoctoral fellow and research assistant. Later, Sam joined the biotechnology industry in 1994 gaining industrial experience at W.R. Grace and International Fragrance and Flavors (IFF) prior to establishing Salvona Technologies in 1999. Salvona Technologies pioneered smart nano- and microspheres to trigger and target the release of actives 18

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from skin care and dermatological products. Sam has been issued over 100 patents and is the author of over fifty scientific papers on the subject of controlled drug delivery. Salvona, led by Dr. Shefer, won the Nano 50 prize from “NASA Tech Brief” for the top 50 technologies that have significant impact on business. Sam also earned the distinguished award of the Entrepreneur of the Year in 2014 from the center for Bio-Materials in Rutgers University.

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sensiva® – multifunctional additives designed for your innovation euxyl® – optimum preservation according to your needs

Session B (Lab 4) • 12:30 – 1:05 p.m.

Adaptive Active Delivery Mark Chandler

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here were many basic principles brought forth by Dr. Johann Wiechers with regard to Formulating for Efficacy™. In the estimation of many, none more important than the reality that solids diffuse more slowly than liquids into the skin, on the order of 10,000 times. So, the search for suitable solvents for actives should ensue. This can be an arduous task, but can be made easier by computer modeling. In turn, once solubility of an active is attained, then engineering a ‘driving force’ to the system can be undertaken. Once formulation parameters are defined, then permutations can be tested. The aid of computer diffusion simulation can save much time. From there, actual diffusion studies can be undertaken, then on to clinical trials. Gone should be the days when an active is placed in a standard base, then straight on to clinical studies (or to the market.) Careful consideration of formulation, tailored to the specific active, should become the rule rather than the exception.

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Biography Mark Chandler is President of ACT Solutions Corp. (Adaptive Cosmetic Technology Solutions), a formulation design consultancy founded in 2012, serving the cosmetic and topical pharmaceutical industries, focusing on Adaptive Aesthetic Design™, Advanced Emulsion Solutions™, and Formulating for Efficacy™, with formulation laboratories in Delaware and Ohio. Mark has been in the industry for over thirty years, most recently serving as skin care applications manager for Croda Inc. He held roles in Sales, Marketing, Strategic Planning and Acquisitions, and Research & Development. Mark has taught courses for the Society of Cosmetic Chemists (SCC) on Cosmetic Formulation, Cosmetic Raw Materials, Liquid Foundation Emulsions, and Low Energy Emulsification for over fifteen years. Mark also is a Prestige Clinical Instructor in the Cosmetic Science and Formulation Design program at the University of Toledo – College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. He was awarded Fellow status by the SCC in 2014. Mark has presented technology throughout the United States and in over a dozen other countries on five continents, published numerous articles and book chapters, and has been granted three patents.

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Session B (Lab 4) • 1:05 – 1:40 p.m.

Formulating Lamellar Gel Network Based Oil-In-Water Emulsions George Deckner

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amellar gel network based oil-in-water emulsions are the most common skin care and hair conditioner formulations sold globally, and one of the most important technologies used by most formulators. They consist of combinations of low and high HLB crystalline surfactants that can thicken water, emulsify oil, and suspend solids. The emulsion is stabilized by lamellar bilayers of surfactants and water surrounding the oil droplets. These systems have viscoelastic rheological properties and shear thin when applied to skin.

Biography George retired in June 2013 after working at Procter & Gamble for twenty-six years in personal care and product development. While at Procter & Gamble, he worked in skin care product development, global fragrance development, and most recently, oral care technology development. At P&G, George was considered one of the top formulation, material science, and active delivery experts in the company. (Continued on page 20)

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™ Nature’s Science. Our Technology. Your Beauty.

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George was appointed a Victor Miles Research Fellow in 1991. Formed in 1990, The Victor Miles Society recognizes those outstanding technologists whose innovations have led to significant business contributions throughout their careers at Procter & Gamble. It is the highest scientific and technical honor that can be bestowed upon a company technologist and society members are recognized by their peers as leaders in their fields and provide an unequivocal standard of achievement in technology. There are currently eighteen active members out of a total R&D staff of 9,000. While at Proctor & Gamble, George was one of the top inventors, with 354 granted and filed global patents (201 U.S. patents). He helped develop many of the core platform technologies used in skin care today with numerous products commercialized under the Olay, Bain de Soleil, Clearasil, Noxzema, and SK2 brands. He also contributed to the development of numerous products sold under the Pantene, Crest, Pampers, Vicks, and Tide brand names. Before working at P&G, George was a Director of Exploratory Formulation for Charles of the Ritz Group division of Squibb. During this time, George received the President’s Cup Award for outstanding business contribution and developed numerous skin care products marketed under the Bain de Soleil, Jean Nate, Yves Saint Laurent, and Charles of the Ritz Brands. George is a current member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and writes a column on formulation technology for the UL prospector web site. He is a frequent guest lecturer for numerous key global suppliers, as well as local and national SCC meetings.

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Suppliers’ Day Education Session 2 • May 10 & 11

Cosmetics and Personal Care – A Roadmap for Navigating Your Career New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center 97 Sunfield Avenue, Edison, NJ

Tuesday, May 10 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. Kevin Gallagher (Kevin Gallagher Consulting LLC) 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Snehal Shah (Estée Lauder Companies) 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Brian Czetty (P&G)

Wednesday, May 11 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. Tony O’Lenick (Siltech LLC)/ Mark Chandler (ACT Solutions Corp) 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. Mike J. Fevola (J&J) This event will be held at the Suppliers’ Day event in the tent adjacent to the luncheon.

Suppliers’ Day Education Sessions 2 & 3 will be held at the Suppliers’ Day trade show venue: New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center, 97 Sunfield Avenue, Edison, NJ. Please see the map on page 21 where the circle indicates the location of Suppliers’ Day Education Sessions 2 & 3 at the trade show. 20

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Tuesday, May 10, 2016 10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Kevin Gallagher Founder, Kevin Gallagher Consulting LLC

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fter a thirty-seven-year career with Croda, Kevin Gallagher retired from Croda as President – Personal Care and Actives North America at the end of 2015. Kevin started at Croda as an Applications Chemist in 1978, and held positions in R&D, Quality Assurance, Sales, and Marketing before moving into General Management in 1989, running the automotive sealants business that was known as Croda Technologies Inc. Kevin is particularly proud of his contributions to innovation, starting with being the co-inventor of seven patents held by Croda that all resulted in successful commercial products, as well as leading the “patented product initiative” in North America starting in 2001. This initiative became an important precursor to Croda’s current new and patented product strategy. Kevin also actively participated in a number of important merger and acquisition activities on behalf of Croda, including the acquisition of Sederma in 1997 and the “transformational” acquisition of Uniqema in 2006. Kevin joined the board of directors of P2 Science as a non-executive director in 2014. P2 Science is a start-up company (coming out of Yale University), specializing in making value-added fragrance components and surfactants from natural raw materials using novel ozonolysis technology. Kevin has also recently joined (Continued on page 22)

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(Continued from page 21)

the Inolex Board of Directors as a non-executive board director. And in January 2016, Kevin founded Kevin Gallagher Consulting LLC, consulting in the specialty chemical and related industries. He is the author of numerous articles on personal care ingredients, and is a fellow of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists. Kevin’s educational background includes a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology, a certificate in Financial Controls from New York University, and a certificate from the Senior Executive Program of the London Business School.

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12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Snehal Shah Vice-president, Research and Development, The Estée Lauder Corporation

nehal Shah is the Vice-president of Research and Development for The Este ́e Lauder Companies, and has been a inspirational leader and disruptive innovator in consumer product development for more than thirty years. Before joining Lauder in 2015, he held positions of increasing responsibility at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products (Skillman, NJ). Snehal began his career at the company with Neutrogena (Los Angeles, CA) before relocating to Skillman to lead global teams focused on innovative products for the Neutrogena, Aveeno, and Clean and Clear’s brands. He was responsible for the cleansing, acne, sun protection, and facial treatment categories. His experience also includes OTC and non-OTC global products. Prior to Johnson & Johnson, Snehal worked at Redken (L’Ore ́al) and for contract manufacturers. His diverse professional background and passion for developing and inspiring talent is the foundation from which he helps formulation chemists navigate their careers in the cosmetic industry.

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2:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Brian Czetty Procter & Gamble

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rian Czetty received his Bachelor’s of Science degree in Biochemistry from Hartwick College in 2004, focusing on organic synthesis. After graduating, he entered the cosmetics world via Victoria’s Secret Beauty before joining Doctor’s Dermatalogic Formula (DDF), which was acquired by Procter & Gamble in 2008. As a senior researcher, he worked on global Olay Professional Pro-X, Regenerist, and Total Effects.

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Wednesday, May 11, 2016 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

Tony O’Lenick Siltech LLC

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ony O’Lenick is President of Siltech LLC. (Lawrenceville, GA), a silicone specialty company. Prior to that, he held technical and executive positions at various surfactant and specialty chemicals companies, including Alkaril Chemicals Inc., Henkel Corporation, and Mona Industries. He has been involved in the personal care industry for more than thirty-five years, and is a Fellow in the Society of Cosmetic Chemists (SCC). Tony is the author of Surfactants Chemistry and Properties, Silicones for Personal Care, Organic Chemistry for Cosmetic Chemists, Oils of Nature, and Patent Peace of Mind. He has also edited several books, including Naturals and Organics in Cosmetics: Trends and Technology, Microorganisms and Cosmetics, and Formulating Strategies in Cosmetic Science. Tony has also published over forty technical articles in trade journals, contributed chapters to five books, and is the inventor of over 350 patents.

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 Tony teaches courses about Silicone Chemistry and Patents for the SCC. He has received a number of awards, including the 1996 Samuel Rosen Award by the American Oil Chemists’ Society, the 1997 Innovative Use of Fatty Acids Award by the Soap and Detergents Association, and the Partnership to the Personal Care Award by the Advanced Technology Group. Tony was a member of the Committee on Scientific Affairs of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and also served as National Treasurer and President of the SCC.

Mark Chandler ACT Solutions Corp.

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ark Chandler is President of ACT Solutions Corp. (Adaptive Cosmetic Technology Solutions), a formulation design consultancy founded in 2012, serving the cosmetic and topical pharmaceutical industries, focusing on Adaptive Aesthetic Design™, Advanced Emulsion Solutions™, and Formulating for Efficacy™, with formulation laboratories in Delaware and Ohio. Mark has been in the industry for over thirty years, most recently serving as skin care applications manager for Croda Inc. He held roles in Sales, Marketing, Strategic Planning and Acquisitions, and Research & Development. Mark has taught courses for the Society of Cosmetic Chemists (SCC) on Cosmetic Formulation, Cosmetic Raw Materials, Liquid Foundation Emulsions, and Low Energy Emulsification for over fifteen years. Mark also is a Prestige Clinical Instructor in the Cosmetic Science and Formulation Design program at the University of Toledo – College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. He was awarded Fellow status by the SCC in 2014. Mark has presented technology throughout the United States and in over a dozen other countries on five continents, published numerous articles and book chapters, and has been granted three patents.

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10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Michael J. Fevola, Ph.D. Research Director & Fellow, Global Beauty R&D Platforms

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ichael J. Fevola is currently Research Director and Fellow, Global Beauty R&D platforms at Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc. in Skillman, NJ, where he leads the Polymer and Surface Chemistry and Skin Measurement and Applied Research Techniques (SMART) groups. He joined the company in 2003, and has held positions of increasing responsibility within R&D at Johnson & Johnson, successfully leading programs to develop and commercialize new technologies for personal cleansing products. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Delaware, and earned a Ph.D. in Polymer Science and Engineering from the University of Southern Mississippi for his studies of stimuli-responsive water-soluble polymers. Prior to joining Johnson & Johnson, he worked with Hoechst Celanese Corp. and National Starch & Chemical Co. To date, Dr. Fevola is the inventor of twenty issued U.S. Patents and the co-author of twelve peerreviewed articles and book chapters. He is a two-time winner of the Philip B. Hofmann Research Scientist Award of Johnson & Johnson, and received the Johnson Medal for Research and Development in 2011. He serves as a member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists Committee on Scientific Affairs, editor of the Journal of Cosmetic Science, and is a member of the Personal Care Products Council’s International Nomenclature committee. (Continued on page 24)

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The NYSCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. All five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. Once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

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Suppliers’ Day Education Session 3 • May 11

Skin Toxicology for Cosmetics – Risk Assessment of Skin Exposure New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center 97 Sunfield Avenue, Edison, NJ Presentations from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. This event will be held at the Suppliers’ Day event in the tent adjacent to the luncheon.

Symposium Chair: Nava Dayan

Program description:

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he cosmetic and personal care industry underwent key changes in the past decade to advance regulations and guidelines for safety assessment of consumer products. While regulations are slowly implemented in practice, the methodical technical process of risk assessment is limited and the completion of a “check list” often replaces it. The regulatory framework creates the perception that “safe” products can be launched if certain studies are conducted. However such an approach generates only partial acknowledgement of the limitations of the studies, science involved, and selection of a tier approach that is logical, based on the intended use, and is scientifically savvy. The animal testing ban dictates that risk assessment should be followed by in silico evaluation and a tier of in vitro or ex vivo testing. While refraining from animal testing adds challenges, it opens up opportunities for better understanding of mode of action and allows us, in many cases, to conduct the studies on more relevant human derived cells and models. Many regulatory guidelines express the need to employ experts in risk assessment of raw materials and finished formulations. Such practice can be faster, cheaper, and business rewarding. This workshop is established to discuss general aspects in risk assessment of skin care products combined with examples of specific studies and initiatives of key national organizations and companies. National leaders in Toxicology are joined to share recent knowledge and address questions and concerns of industry members.

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11:30 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.

Skin as Immune Organ— Implications to Risk Assessment of Dermal Exposure Nava Dayan President, Dr. Nava Dayan LLC

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he skin is the largest immune organ of the human body. As such it combines innate and adaptive immunity to fulfill its role. This introductory talk will discuss healthy skin barrier properties, immunity aspects, and key considerations in safety assessment of exposure.

Biography

Nava Dayan, Ph.D. has twenty-six years of experience in the skin care segment, and has yielded more than 150 publication credits in numerous industry respected journals and books. She was awarded the In-Cosmetics Gold Award for innovation and was given commensurate recognition from the NYSCC and the CRS for excellence. Dr. Dayan is the owner of Dr. Nava Dayan LLC, a skin science and research consultancy serving the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and personal care industries (dermal and transdermal). Dr. Dayan advises on product feasibility in skin care as well as efficacy and toxicology. She also advises teams in planning, 24

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executing, and interpreting data of claims, formulations, delivery for improved efficacy, and attenuated toxicity. Sample areas of expertise include: drug-skin interaction, bio-markers (genomics and proteomics), skin/age related sensitivities, inflammatory skin disorders, innate immunity, and biota. She can be contacted at nava.dayan@verizon.net.

__________________________________________________ Making P Personal ersonal Car Caree Beautiful®

12:05 – 12:40 p.m.

Specialty Silicones & Actives

Alternative Methods for the 21st Century Helena Hogberg and Thomas Hartung Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Baltimore, MD, U.S.

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Skin Car Caree Caree Hair Car Color Cosmetics ®

www.biosiltech.com

oxicology in the 21st century is confronted by challenges such as mixture toxicology, susceptible subpopulations, new products, and hazards as well as transparency. Current traditional (animal) tests have several limitations to tackle these objectives including costs, throughput, human relevance, and animal use. The National Research Council report, Tox-21c, suggests moving away from these traditional test methods to modern technologies based on toxicity pathways. This report emphasizes the need for new high content and high throughput approaches, such as omics techniques, organotypical cell cultures, machine learning, and mathematic modeling. These concepts are already used in a number of programs by federal agencies, human-on-chip programs, the Human Toxome project, efforts for translating evidence-based medicine to toxicology, etc. The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT) at Johns Hopkins is one of the groups involved in these developments. This presentation will give a summary of the overall activities in the field combined with illustrations of proof-of-principle work at CAAT.

Biography Dr. Hogberg received her Ph.D. from Stockholm University, Sweden in 2009. Her experimental work was performed at the European Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), Joint Research Center, European Commission in Italy. Her thesis work consisted of developing alternative tests for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) by monitoring gene expression and electrical activity recording. Together with Dr. Hartung, she started the current laboratory at the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT) as a Postdoctoral Fellow. She was later promoted to a faculty position and later to Deputy Director of the Center. Her current research activity is still in the field of DNT with the use of emerging tools, such as 3-D organotypical cell models and omics approaches.

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12:40 – 1:15 p.m.

FDA Perspectives on the Regulation of Cosmetic Products Nakissa Sadrieh Director of the Cosmetics Division in the Office of Cosmetics and Colors (OCAC), Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

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his presentation will provide an overview of cosmetic regulations in the U.S. followed by a summary of several priority areas currently active in the Division of Cosmetics at the FDA. Areas such as adverse events analysis, compliance-related activities, labeling, claims, and active cosmetics research will be discussed.

Biography

Dr. Sadrieh obtained her Ph.D. in Toxicology in 1993 from Rutgers University in New Jersey. Following a postdoctoral fellowship in the Laboratory of Chemical Carcinogenesis at the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Sadrieh joined the Food and Drug Administration in 1996 as a pharmacology and toxicology reviewer. In 1998, Dr. Sadrieh became the supervisory pharmacologist in the Division of Medical Imaging and Radiopharmaceutical Drug Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). In 2002, Dr. Sadrieh joined CDER’s Office of Pharmaceutical (Continued on page 26)

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Science (OPS) as the Associate Director for Research Policy and Implementation. In OPS, Dr. Sadriehâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work focused on scientific research that directly impacted regulatory decisions. As a scientific advisor to the OPS, Dr. Sadrieh supported CDERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scientific mission by designing, conducting, and managing appropriate research projects aimed at resolving pending regulatory questions. Since 2004, Dr. Sadrieh has assessed the impact of new technologies, such as nanotechnology, on drug development and the regulatory review process, and as such, she is one of the Agency experts in all matters related to Nanotechnology. In October 2013, Dr. Sadrieh $XQLTXHFOLQLFDOWHVWLQJIDFLOLW\ Joined the Center for Food Safety and Nutrition (CFSAN) as the Director of the Cosmetics Division in the WKDWEULQJVWHVWLQJFODLPVVXEVWDQWLDWLRQ Office of Cosmetics and Colors (OCAC). PDUNHWLQJWRJHWKHU

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1:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:50 p.m.

CIR Safety Assessment of PEGs Cocamine and Application of a Framework for Read-Across Analysis Ivan Boyer Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR)

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his presentation will provide a brief introduction to the CIR safety assessment process, CIRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initiatives and goals for enhancing the process, and a framework for identifying and categorizing analogs for read-across assessments. The presentation will review the recent CIR safety assessment of polyethylene glycol cocamine (or PEGs cocamine) and related ingredients as a case study, including the CIR Panelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s critique of the framework and the computational methods used to implement the framework.

Biography Dr. Ivan Boyer received his Ph.D. in Toxicology from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in Rochester, New York. He then worked as a post-doctoral fellow in the Pharmacology Department at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine. His postdoctoral research was supported by a National Research Service Award from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Subsequently, he served as a Toxicologist/Reviewer at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Boyer then served for over 20 years as a Toxicologist and Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessor at The MITRE Corporation and Noblis, Inc., which are non-profit government consulting firms headquartered near Washington, D.C. Currently, Dr. Boyer is the Senior Toxicologist at the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) in Washington, D.C. Dr. Boyer is the principal author of more than 100 technical reports, and has authored or co-authored peer-reviewed publications in areas ranging from the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis to the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients.

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1:50 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:25 p.m.

Tox21 In Vitro Approaches: Quantitative High Throughput Screening and Cellular Secondary Screening David Gerhold Genomic Toxicology NCATS Division of Pre-Clinical Innovation NIH

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he Tox21 Consortium is a collaboration between: the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NIH-NCATS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Toxicology Program (NTP)/NIEHS, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA); with a mission to replace animal testing with in vitro methods. The Tox21 Consortium is currently screening 10,000 environmental compounds for potential human toxicities using a variety of in vitro cellular screens using Quantitative High Throughput Screening (qHTS). Assay AC50 values are quantitated for each chemical, and active chemicals are pursued through secondary cellular screens including gene expression and computational analyses.

Biography David Gerhold is a staff genomic toxicologist at NCATS. He is developing in vitro methods to identify toxic compounds by introducing differentiating stem cell models and the gene expression technologies, 26

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RNAseq and RASL-Seq. These new technologies support efforts to identify potentially toxic chemicals in the environment through the Toxicology in the 21st Century consortium, identify biomarkers of genetic susceptibility to tobacco, and facilitate drug development through the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases program. Previously, Gerhold pioneered gene expression microarray technology at Merck Research Labs, applying this expertise to identify kidney injury biomarkers. He subsequently co-led the Kidney Biomarker Working Group within the Predictive Safety Testing Consortium, collaborating across the pharmaceutical industry to qualify seven biomarkers with the FDA, publishing the findings in 2010. Gerhold also worked as a liaison with clinical nephrologists initiating translational studies to improve nephrology standard of care.

The Soul & Science of Beauty. www.evonik.com/personal-care

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2:25 - 3:00 p.m.

Advanced 3-D In Vitro Tissue Models Offer Valuable Insight into Product Safety Alex Armento MatTek Corporation

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dvancements in tissue engineering combined with a greater understanding of basic human skin biology have driven the development of highly predictive in vitro test methods. 3-D in vitro skin models can be used to evaluate standard toxicity endpoints (irritancy, corrosion, sensitization, etc.) in addition to ever more complex product safety questions, including elucidation of the molecular mechanisms driving skin toxicity. This presentation will provide a current overview of both the advantages and limitations that 3-D tissue models offer for the development of skin care products and outline product development strategies utilizing commercially available 3-D tissue models.

Biography Alex Armento is the Director of Business Development at MatTek Corporation, an in vitro assay development and tissue engineering firm. He joined MatTek in 2008 and has since supported the development and implementation of in vitro safety and efficacy test methods for chemical, cosmetic, personal care, and pharmaceutical organizations.

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3:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Question and Answer Panel Discussion

Employment Opportunities For complete ads please go to the NYSCC website: https://www.nyscc.org/employment-listings.html.

n Sr. Formulation Chemist Vi-Jon, St. Louis, MO

n Technical Marketing Leader Gattefossé, Paramus, NJ

n Chemist The Hain Celestial Group, Lake Success, NY

n Product Development Manager StriVectin Operating Company, Inc. New York, NY

n Formulation Chemist Vi-Jon, St. Louis, MO

n Chemist John Paul Mitchell Systems, Santa Clarita, CA

n Business Development Leader UL, LLC Northbrook, IL/Overland, KS/Greater New York City Area

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n Sr. Scientist Nice Pak Products, Montvale, NJ

n Personal Care Account Manager Superior Materials, Inc. Northeastern US (NY/NJ/CT)

n Ester Sales Manager ICOF America Inc (Musim Mas Group) Northeast USA 27


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Cosmetic Claim Substantiation Workshop Science, Marketing, and Regulations September 6, 2016 Sheraton Lincoln Harbor Hotel Weehawken, NJ

Symposium Chair: Nava Dayan, Ph.D.

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anufacturers of raw materials and finished cosmetic products conduct topical human exposure studies with the aim of drawing consumers through appealing claims. Market competition often drives aggressive campaigns that may be confusing and misleading, compounded by studies which may be poorly designed and executed, and scientific data which could be incorrectly interpreted. In recent years, cosmetics manufacturers have come under increased scrutiny from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for advertising claims. The advertising industry’s self-regulatory forum, the National Advertising Division (NAD), further examines truth and accuracy of national advertising claims. With the skin care industry striving to produce safer products, it should also focus its scientific resources towards better testing regimens demonstrating a product’s efficacy, which can support advertising claims. Establishing common criteria to support advertising claims is challenging given that claims are driven by the testing on an individual product. This workshop brings together experts from the industry and regulatory world to provide guidance on sound scientific practices and demonstrate how to ensure advertising claims match the underlying science.

Program Agenda 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

Introduction—Why Claim? Nava Dayan

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hy do cosmetic products carry claims? What is the difference between purpose of use and marketing claims? Can science be translated to fair claims for the average consumer to understand? Where are we heading with claims in the industry?

Biography

Nava Dayan, Ph.D. has twenty-six years of experience in the skin care segment, and has yielded more than 150 publication credits in numerous industry respected journals and books. She was awarded the In-Cosmetics Gold Award for innovation and was given commensurate recognition from the NYSCC and the CRS for excellence. Dr. Dayan is the owner of Dr. Nava Dayan LLC, a skin science and research consultancy serving the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and personal care industries (dermal and transdermal). Dr. Dayan advises on product feasibility in skin care as well as efficacy and toxicology. She also advises teams in planning, executing, and interpreting data of claims, formulations, delivery for improved efficacy, and attenuated toxicity. Sample areas of expertise include: drug-skin interaction, bio-markers (genomics and proteomics), skin/age related sensitivities, inflammatory skin disorders, innate immunity, and biota. She can be contacted at nava.dayan@verizon.net.

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10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Break

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10:45 – 11:45 a.m.

Advertising Self-Regulation and Cosmetics Claim Substantiation Annie Ugurlayan

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n this session, we will learn about the advertising self-regulatory forum and its approach to claim substantiation as it relates to cosmetics cases.

Biography

Annie Ugurlayan is a Senior Staff Attorney at the National Advertising Division of the Advertising Self-Regulatory Council. Since 2003, she has handled over 200 cases and has successfully argued appeals before the National Advertising Review Board. Annie is also a frequent lecturer at conferences nationwide and abroad, particularly those with a focus on cosmetics and personal care products. She is also a published author. Annie is actively involved in various bar associations, serves on the Board of Directors of the New York Women’s Bar Association Foundation and is a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. She is fluent in French and Armenian and proficient in Romanian. Annie is a graduate of Hamilton College (B.A., magna cum laude – French and World Politics) and Hofstra University School of Law.

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11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch

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1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Clarifying Rules for Cosmetics Claims—FTC Advertising Law Basics Serena Viswanathan

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n this presentation, we will provide an overview of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC’s) laws against deceptive advertising, guidance on how to substantiate your advertising claims, and examples of recent cases the FTC has brought against cosmetics sellers.

Biography

Serena Viswanathan is Assistant Director in the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Advertising Practices, where she supervises enforcement actions against deceptive and unfair advertising practices. Since joining the Commission in 2000, she has investigated and litigated deceptive advertising cases on a broad range of products, including dietary supplements, cosmetics, devices, and foods. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and received her law degree from Georgetown University Law Center.

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2:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Claim Substantiation: Best Practices for Avoiding Unwanted Attention from Government Regulators and Private Plaintiff Lawyers Ronie Schmelz

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uring this session you will learn what steps you can take to reduce the likelihood that your advertising practices will draw the attention of the National Advertising Division (NAD), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Federal Trade Commission (FTC). We will also discuss: best practices you can employ to strengthen your position should you find yourself the subject of a regulatory inquiry; how to avoid becoming the target of a consumer class action; and ways to successfully defend consumer class actions.

Biography Ronie Schmelz, Tucker Ellis LLP, represents clients in broad-based commercial litigation, with a particular emphasis on consumer class action defense. She also regularly counsels clients on: litigation-avoidance strategies and ensuring compliance with state and federal laws, including regulations enforced by the FDA, FTC, and other regulatory agencies; California Proposition 65; and advertising, labeling, and (Continued on page 30)

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claim substantiation. Ronie has profound industry knowledge in the representation of domestic and international companies in the cosmetics, personal care, and consumer product industries. Ronie is active in several trade and professional organizations serving the personal care product and insurance industries, and is regularly sought out to speak at industry conferences. She spent the first twentyfive years of her career practicing in the Los Angeles office of Sidley Austin LLP, where she represented clients in complex commercial litigation, consumer class actions, real estate, health care, reinsurance disputes, and governmental investigations.

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3:00 – 3:15 a.m.

Break

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3:15 – 4:15 p.m.

Ethics: What Connects Cosmetic Science and Product Claims Ken Richman

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egal compliance, market trends, and pressure to maximize sales are just some of the factors influencing the claims used in packaging and marketing of cosmetics and personal care products. What about ethics? Is ethics another factor in addition to these? Is compliance with laws and industry standards enough to satisfy our ethical obligations? This session will present concepts and vocabulary for identifying and addressing ethical issues across domains, with special emphasis on product claims. Drawing on philosophical concepts from Aristotle, Kant, and others, we will discuss ways to integrate ethical discussion into everyday business decisions.

Biography Kenneth A. Richman is Professor of Philosophy and Healthcare Ethics at MCPHS (formerly the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences) in Boston. He grew up in South Orange, New Jersey, and studied philosophy at Haverford College, the University of Oxford (UK), and Rutgers University. As a philosopher working in the field of bioethics, Ken regularly works with researchers and institutions to promote the responsible conduct of research in both academic and business contexts. His work as a consultant and speaker for the cosmetics and personal products industry has focused on identifying ethical liability in research practices, especially involving human research participants. More information about his work is available at www.richmanweb.com.

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4:15 – 5:00 p.m.

Panel Discussion Q&A Period

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Symposium Location: Sheraton Lincoln Harbor Hotel 500 Harbor Boulevard Weehawken, NJ Tel: (201) 617- 5600 www.sheratonlincolnharbor.com

Like, Connect & Tweet About Us!

FACEBOOK: NEW YORK LINKED IN: NEW YORK SCC TWITTER: @NYSCC INSTAGRAM: NYSCCMAIN SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS These connections were made possible by the NYSCC Social Media Committee

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International Conference on Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (ICTAC) August 14-19, 2016 Walt Disney World Swan & Dolphin Hotel • Orlando, Florida

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he focus of this global conference is traditional thermal analysis, calorimetry, and rheology applications. A Personal Care session is included in ICTAC 2016. If you use thermal analytical techniques in your Personal Care research, please consider submitting an abstract for this session. To submit an abstract, please go to the website for the North American Thermal Analysis Society (NATAS): www.natasinfo.org. Once there, go to the Conferences menu and select: ICTAC 2016. You will then select the link: Abstract & Manuscript Submission Portal. This will bring you to a page where you need to create a user profile for the primary author before submitting an abstract. The deadline for abstract submission is May 6, 2016. If you have any questions, please contact Denise Wade Rafferty: denise.rafferty@lubrizol.com.

CTSCC Golf Outing • April 25 The Great River Golf Club, Milford, CT The Connecticut Chapter of the SCC proudly announces its 8th Annual Golf Outing! We are seeking sponsors for holes, raffle prizes, lunch, the cocktail hour, dinner, etc. For registration, contact Dan O'Neill at doneill@charkit.com.

JOURNAL OF COSMETIC SCIENCE The Official Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

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he Society of Cosmetic Chemists is soliciting scientific manuscripts concerned with cosmetics or the sciences underlying cosmetics, as well as papers of interest to the cosmetic industry for publication in the Journal of Cosmetic Science, The Official Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists. The JOURNAL will consider manuscripts for publication in the following categories, provided they are prepared in proper scientific style and adequately referenced: • Original articles • Review articles • Technical notes • General articles • Preliminary communications • Letters to the Editor SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPTS Manuscripts submitted for publication should be accompanied by a cover letter and sent via e-mail to dscelso@scconline.org. Additional information is available from the SCC National Office: www.scconline.org.

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Cosmetiscope - April 2016  
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