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ARCHITECTURAL JOURNAL

ATMOSPHERE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

©2019-20 ATMOSPHERE PUBLISHED BY THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE and DESIGN, NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, NEW YORK, NY, 10023

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ISSUE 2019-20


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ISSUE 2019-20

This annual publication displays archives of students’ work containing projects & imagery from the academic year of Fall 2018 - Spring 2019, selected by Atmosphere editorial staff with support of faculty members. ©2019-20 ATMOSPHERE Published by the School of Architecture & Design, New York Institute of Technology, New York, NY 10023 All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission

Cover credits: “Automation by Design” class led by Dustin White and Pavlina Vardoulaki, Spring 2019, with students: Carlos Matute, Salvador Delgado, Nataly Hrytsv, Bersibeth Pfel, Luke Hyowon Son, Matthew Garcia. Image post-produced by Marcella Del Signore. 2


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DEAN’S NOTE It is with great pleasure that I endorse Atmosphere O3, our annual student-lead publication, summing up the incredibly creative work we see coming from the School of Architecture and Design’s undergraduate and graduate programs, from the multiple nurturing activities, events, and initiatives we offer. Our talented students have an important role to play in reimagining technology, innovation, how we lead design strategies and the critical role of architecture and design in a variety of environments and scales, locally and globally. At SoAD, we are a vibrant community dedicated to academic excellence. Our transformative and continuously evolving learning experiences prepare students to engage with leading design practices in a worldwide context. We are committed to interdisciplinary research initiatives and professional degree plans promoting collaborations with Schools and Colleges on New York Tech campuses and sites, but also with national and international institutions, partners and organizations. The School of Architecture and Design at New York Tech is the perfect place where encounters of ideas infuse innovation and advance discovery. More licensed architects in New York State graduated from our School of Architecture and Design than from any other school. That’s an incredible legacy, and it speaks well to the quality of our student learning experiences, faculty preparedness and credentials, our state-of-the-art facilities, and, of course, our renowned alumni architects and designers who practice and build beyond the New York/Long Island regions. A special thank you goes to all of our students for the production and selection of works in this third issue of Atmosphere representing what we do and what is still in the process of becoming; to the exemplary guidance and care of our faculty and administrative staff, and the support of our Alumni and Friends. We have in our hands the education of future leaders, individuals with a hunger for challenges that will shape their own future.

Maria R. Perbellini, Dean School of Architecture & Design New York Institute of Technology

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ASSOCIATE DEANS’ NOTE Driven by New York Tech’s vision as an institution of makers and doers, Dean Perbellini leads our shared mission in the School of Architecture and Design, to chart robust trajectories through technological experimentation, social innovation and outreach, and global citizenship. Our school prides itself on discovering next generation modes of conceiving, communicating and producing architecture and design. We had entered the 2019-2020 academic year with great optimism, ambition and determination to make great advances in the teaching, student outcomes, and academic culture of the SoAD. Despite our all best intentions to move forward from strength to strength in 2019-2020, we have all faced immense personal, academic, professional and institutional challenges as a result of the Covid-19 crisis. In Spring 2020, students and faculty in the SoAD had risen to the unexpected transition to remote distant learning, while our on-campus activities had been temporarily paused, and we continue to accelerate irreversibly towards new and unforeseen future areas of disciplinary investigation in teaching, research and practice. Tom Verebes, PhD Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor

The third volume of Atmosphere documents the exemplary student projects and the significant milestones in our curriculum programs’ evolution. Integration drives the initiatives that distinguish our interdisciplinary curricula, that prepare students to learn and work across disciplines and build professional partnerships that last years beyond graduation. The innovations launched by Dean Perbellini, have raised the SoAD’s ranking to 32nd nationally. The integration of emergent design, digital and critical thinking practices in the first two years of the BSAT degree the new MARCH program, empower students with advanced skills and knowledge. This volume is also evidence of the robust development of the enhanced team-teaching learning model and coordination that have fostered more meaningful holistic practices. These initiatives have strengthened studio culture and community further fueled by the new Student Affairs Committee the expanded student leadership opportunities. The work presented here is a testament to our progressive and supportive learning environment. Anthony Caradonna Associate Dean for Academic Operations and Professor

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ATMOSPHERE FOREWORD ARCHITECTURAL JOURNAL

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NYIT embraces the evidence-based contention that we are in a transformative moment for Academia and specifically the School of Architecture and Design at NYIT. The contemporary field of architecture and design is fluid, fast-moving, and global. In this evolving context, NYIT remains committed to offering career ready professional education in architecture and design at the graduate and undergraduate levels, while confronting and engaging the evolving and critical role of technology in the 21st century. NYIT’s strategic position in the heart of the New York City Metropolitan Region provides a draw and connection to world-class faculty and active professionals leading global practices. Our students combine theory with experience by conducting field study in and around New York City. Each year NYIT fosters a platform for cross-sectoral exchange and discourse through its design workshops, specialized studios and travel programs. SoAD was particularly prolific during our academic year 2018-19 as we hosted public events, lectures and exhibitions, bringing to our campuses leading thinkers, designers, practicing professionals and makers. Under the leadership of our Dean Maria Perbellini, NYIT’s continued commitment to embracing the nexus of technology, construction, urban systems science, ecology and representation is illustrated by our productive year 2018-19: Developing state-of-the art fabrication labs for digital design, hiring prominent new faculty, growing NYIT’s successful professional Master of Architecture. NYIT’s commitment to experimentation and innovation places it at the forefront of design research, as evidenced by the MSAURD program in Urban + Regional Design winning externally funded sustainable cities research from the National Science Foundation and by the upcoming launch of two new Master of Science Programs - in Architecture and Computational Technologies, and in Architecture, Health and Design. The 2018-19 studio work in this publication highlights our student engagement with NYIT’s ambitious pedagogical agenda through thoughtful articulation of design goals responding to the complexity of context, spatial scales and systems. We are proud to present how our students demonstrate and communicate design thinking through drawings, models, and fabrication in Atmosphere 03.

Jeffrey Raven, Associate Professor and MSAURD Director NYIT School of Architecture & Design

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LECTURE

Ben Van Berkel: Arnhem Central – a station with a twist A lecture by Ben Van Berkel, AA Dipl. (Hons), (F)RIBA, Hon. FAIA, Founder/ Principal Architect of UNStudio and Founder of UNSense.

WORKSHOP

Metropolitan approach for Rio de Janeiro Students investigated sustainable design strategies in relation to natural environments, infrastructure, productive land, water and energy management, pollution and waste, circular economic models for the natural reserve of Tingua’ and the agricultural area of the town of Nova Iguacu,’ at the north of the city of Rio de Janeiro. 8


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CONTENTS TABLE OF

DEAN’S NOTE ASSOCIATE DEANS’ NOTE FOREWORD

00 01 02 03 04 05

INTRODUCTION

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10 - SoAD Introduction and Program Descriptions

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FUNDAMENTALS

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12 - Introduction 14 - Design Fundamentals I 34 - Design Fundamentals II

CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

72 - Introduction 74 - Design Studio I & II 108 - Design Studio III & IV 134 - Design Studio V & VI 168 - Design Studio VII & VIII

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INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIOS 238 - Introduction 240 - Interior Design I 244 - Interior Design II

M. ARCH

260 - Introduction

M.S.A.U.R.D. STUDIOS 272 - Introduction

TRAVEL PROGRAMS 280 - Introduction 282 - Japan 288 - Italy and Germany

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WORKSHOPS & EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

VISUALIZATION

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LECTURES, EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS

HISTORY and THEORY

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TECHNOLOGY

202 - Introduction 204 - Building Construction I & II 208 - Environmental Systems I & II 212 - Project Integration

214 - Introduction 216 - Visualization I 222 - Visualization II 226 - Visualization III 232 - Automation in Design

236 - Survey History of Architecture I, II

290 - Introduction 292 - Metropolitan Approach for Rio de Janeiro Workshop 298 - S-LAB: Housing Density 302 - Masonry Explorations Workshop

316 - Introduction 318 - Lecture Series 320 - Symposiums 322 - Exhibition Series

CONVERSATION

326- Alumni I + II + III

EDITORIAL NOTE & CREDITS

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00 ATMOSPHERE

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INTRODUCTION NYIT School of Architecture & Design

The New York Institute of Technology offers professional, pre-professional and post- professional degrees in Architecture, in Urban and Regional Design, in Architectural Technology, and in Interior Design. We embrace the growing role technology plays in every facet of our lives, and we seek to leverage its potential as we reinvent the ways that architecture is practiced. It mediates between ourselves and the world around us both in its physicality as shelter and social organizer, and in the ideas it evokes, as it reveals what is characteristic and unique about our priorities, our values and our humanity. Inevitably, our architectural heritage concretizes that which is essential about our culture, how we have invested and how we have taken care of environment. This heritage takes the form of the infrastructural elements of our region, communities and institutions, and that of individual dwellings and their components. The School of Architecture and Design’s forward-thinking, professional education prepares students for professional leadership and community engagement. Under the guidance of a faculty of experts, degree candidates learn to think critically about architecture, design, and the world around us and to approach their work with intelligence, confidence, and the rigor of practice. Students gain hands-on experience through workshops, internships and research assistantships, to create unique portfolios of original works, and to make contacts in the region’s unparalleled networks in industry, the profession and in academia. Located in Old Westbury, NY, and in midtown Manhattan, NYIT’s academic programs in Architecture + Design guide our graduates the transition from professional study to professional practice.

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All NYIT SoAD degrees have STEM designation, making our international graduates eligible for the extended OPT visa. The professional M.ARCH Degree has initial candidacy status from the NAAB. The professional B.ARCH Degree has enjoyed continuous accreditation status since 1978 and will be up for reaccreditation in 2025. The BFA.ID has enjoyed CIDA accreditation since 1984

B.ARCH.

5 Year Program 160 credits The B.Arch. program, accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), offers candidates a rigorous, studio–based program of study to develop each student’s talents and professional abilities, while opening paths to pursue individual topics in the fifth year. During the first four years of study, students are challenged by increasingly complex and technically demanding issues, from form, composition and visualization in the first year, to progressively comprehensive problems of design exploration, experimentation and integration in subsequent years. Upper year studios concentrate on building design, community and urban design, and comprehensive design, with an emphasis on sustainability, using advanced architectural technology and design and fabrication strategies. This program culminates in a student driven, research and design thesis in the final year. The first- professional B.Arch. prepares students for New York State licensure and reciprocal licensure in other jurisdictions. The B.Arch. program is offered at NYiT Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses.


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B.S.A.T.

B.F.A.I.D.

NYIT’s Bachelor of Science in Architectural Technology develops skillsets in architectural design, building technology and project management. Coursework in the first two years of study is shared with the B.Arch. The subsequent two years offers to students courses in project integration, advanced technology, digital modeling, spec. writing and onsite construction observation. Students may opt to concentrate their elective credits to develop a major concentration in Construction Management. New York State recognizes the value of a B.S.A.T. Degree by offering an accelerated path to in-state licensure – 4 years of education plus 5 years of professional working experience. Successful graduates of the B.S.A.T. are eligible to apply for the 60-credit, 2-year, NAAB accredited 1st professional Master’s Degree Program. The B.SA.T. Degree is offered at both our Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses.

The mission of the B.F.A.I.D. program is to create globally engaged environmentally sensitive professionals who posses artistic sensibility, intellectual ability, and handson technical proficiency; to prepare interior designers for a lifelong process of interdisciplinary exploration and an acute understanding of human relationships and the built environment. The program stimulates creativity and engenders personal self-confidence, which is the earmark of leadership. The B.F.A.I.D. focuses on the relationship between human performance and environment through an innovative mix of studio design projects, profession-specific coursework, community-oriented projects and professional internships. The program is crafted around contemporary issues, theory, and historic precedents, using both analog and the latest digital media platforms. This program also offers students the opportunity to jump-start a 1- year MBA with a concentration in design management. The B.F.A.I.D. is offered at the Old Westbury and Manhattan Campuses.

M.ARCH

M.S.A.U.R.D.

NYIT’s Professional Master of Architecture prepares its students with intensive studio courses, advanced technology for design and fabrication, and the history, theory and liberal arts courses necessary to promote innovation and leadership within the profession. M.ARCH candidates develop the critical conceptual and technical skills to contribute to, and the perspective to lead interdisciplinary teams in the realization of built projects. We believe that the future belongs to the innovators, collaborators, and leaders who are prepared to create sustainable architecture, successful communities and resilient cities. The M.ARCH program

NYIT’s post-professional Master of Science in Architecture, Urban and Regional Design is for those holding a first professional degree in architecture, landscape architecture, or planning, with an emphasis on design of the built environment. Our M.S.A.U.R.D. confronts the challenges of urban design in the context of 21st-century cities and regions. The program is located in midtown Manhattan, drawing from world-class faculty, public and private organizations, and active professionals leading global practices based in the New York City metropolitan area. The program works to prepare graduates to succeed in this interdisciplinary field by providing opportunities for case studies to test an apply new insights, theory and designs to contemporary and future challenges. It operates at the intersection of urban form, sustainability and climate change as these issues emerge at the forefront of advanced urban design research.

4 Year Program 132 credits

2-Year Track – 60 Credits 3 1/2 –Year Track – 99 Credits

4 Year Program 109 credits

1-1/2 Year Program_36 credits + 1st Professional Degree in Architecture or Landscape Architecture

David Diamond & Giovanni Santamaria Professor & Associate Professor, SoAD at NYIT

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01

FUNDAMENTALS Design Fundamentals is an introduction to architectural composition and design and the tools with which they are explored. Its syllabus is delivered through a series of exercises that emphasize the dual influences of intuition and investigation. As they build in complexity, the projects are meant to help students to achieve the visual literacy needed to produce works with conceptual clarity and rigor – to both find and impart meaning to our creative work. The process involves a back-and-forth between creative speculation and skeptical questioning. The first-year studio provides a foundation upon which to build a design education. Design Fundamentals I begins with first principles and basic physical elements. With these elements, we perform the operations and negotiations to compose in two and threedimensions. We also build the vocabulary to describe and to think critically about form, space and the world around us. Basic concepts like level, horizon and threshold trigger deeper, metaphorical links to other moments in the practice, literature and culture of architecture. Naming our operations builds human awareness of the physical world around us and of our own perceiving selves. We call attention to the horizon, the threshold between earth and air and water, the most basic elements of which life and our environment are formed. The horizon is a universal datum, a liminal threshold between the world of our experience and what is beyond, a marker of time (sunrise and sunset), and the reference against which “level” is measured. It is as absolute and universal as it is individual and personal; the horizon is also contingent on our precise position in space and time. It is the reference plane that extends outward from our eyes toward the distant meeting of earth and sky. It joins something internal to us with what is most distant.

The Tidal Park, the terminal project in Design Fundamentals 1 is also in introduction to the dynamic systems in which we live. Students are presented with the opportunity to design a new topography for a waterfront site that was inundated during Hurricane Sandy. The park is to serve local residents and school groups as its topography provides space for recreation and pools, that dynamically transform that landscape during the daily cycle of tides and storm surge high water events. Design Fundamentals II develops the themes of visual literacy, and the anatomy of two and three-dimensional composition. Two project sequences – The Cut-Outs and The Cliff Dwelling, are meant as journeys of exploration and experimentation. In each, a hidden underlying organization is given priority over preconceived ideas about image, resemblance and style. The Cut-Outs, which involves the formal unpacking of piece of visual artwork – predominantly painting and collage - becomes a laboratory for experimental interpretation of given two-dimensional clues to three-dimensional events. The Cliff Dwelling is the first introduction to architectural composition in the form of a habitable matrix of spaces with real material systems and qualities. Despite the apparent directness of the challenge, there are no easy answers. Working out the problems of adjacency, access, material and structural system, circulation and habitable space serves as a microcosm of the problems to be encountered in all subsequent studios and in practice.

David Diamond Professor, SoAD at NYIT

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Joseph Okyere Professor Bradley Engelsman B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 13


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FUNDAMENTALS I

DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS I PROJECT 01 Project one explores the close packing of space and mass, analogous to the composition of honeycombs, of multi-story structures, or of urban compositions thus creating a balance of solids and voids, and spatial intervals at a variety of dimensions. Precisely crafted cubes and rods are arranged to create a matrix of solids and voids within the constraints of a 3” cube placed on a 9” square field.

PROJECT 02 Project two explores the extension of the Solid-Void project across an extended field. A Collage of select papers or surfaces of contrasting tone, color, image or texture, with experimentation with differing patterns of meshing or interpenetration to create something new on a 6” x 9” field, edge to edge. The Solid- Void project is placed within and the edges are extended off all the elements until they reach the boundaries to create new configurations.

PROJECT 03 Project three explores the boundaries between earth, water and sky. We realize that we ourselves are part of our design environments, part of nature, and that our perceptions and interactions have impact. We begin with some basics of number, order, geometry, proportion, unity, dialog, solid, void, hierarchy and armatures. The project is to design a topography that anticipates a variety of low and high water events, to measure water levels, and to provide platforms and shelters from which to observe the changing flux between earth, water, and sky. The park is to function when it is completely dry at low tide, partly underwater between low and high tides, and mostly under water during extreme weather events.

FACULTY

David Diamond Michelle Cianfaglione Bradley Engelsman Sergio Elizondo Maria Di Natale Sangdok Baak

Nina Ilieva Charles Matz

Esteban Beita Clara Ha Greta Weil Hormuz Batliboi

Diane Neff

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Christian Berrio Professor David Diamond B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 15


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James Schmidt Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 19


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Ken PItts Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 20

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Jean Michele Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 21


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Joseph Okyere Professor Bradley Engelsman B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 22

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Steven Berke Professor Maria Di Natale B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 23


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Jean Michele Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 24

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James Schmidt Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 25


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Irma Bonilla Professor Michelle Cianfaglione B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 26

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Jean Michel, Ken Pitts Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 27


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Ken PItts Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 28

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James Schmidt Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 29


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Jean Michel Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 30

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Anthony Reid Professor Michelle Cianfaglione B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 31


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Ken PItts Professor Charles Matz B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 32

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FUNDAMENTALS II

DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS II and VISUALIZATION II

Design Fundamentals II looks at diverse ways to think about architectural space.

PROJECT 01

Project 01, the Cut-Outs, examines the organization of visual fields, working with paintings as primary material. Students are challenged to unpack how our visual and intellectual faculties perceive surface, volume and space. Each student selects one of Le Corbusier’s Purist paintings, on the surface of which we find patterns of two-dimensional marks. Some are organized on grids, some imply perspective, modeling, or light and shadow, yet these flat signs imply other dimensions. They evoke either deep or shallow spaces, surfaces and objects layered in front of or behind one another, and in front of or behind the picture plane. They may suggest movement or the passage of time. Students are asked to identify and diagram the painting’s ambiguities, its episodes of opacity and transparency, overlap and intersection, foreground and background reversal, plan and section rotations, in other words, they are asked to tease apart the composition’s embedded oppositions and contradictions. Students are encouraged to prioritize articulation of relationships rather than objects, and to employ a method that is analogic rather than mimetic. The final phase of the Cut-Outs is the crafting of a three-dimensional composition in models and drawings based upon the relationships found in, rather than resemblances to the initiating image.

PROJECT 02

Project 02, the Bath House, calls attention to the haptic experience of architecture. Students must configure spaces for intimate human contact with the micro environments to be found in a bath house, with increasingly sophisticated digital modeling and fabrication tools. The Bath House is designed for hikers on a cliff-side site along the Hudson River. As students’ digital communication skills advance, they are asked to explore carving (with Boolean subtractions and unions) as space making strategies, hollowing out chambers for the therapeutic spaces in a bath house – warm, hot and cold pools, steam, sauna and massage rooms, showers, lockers and changing areas - all connected along paths that offer a rich variety of spaces that vary from dry to wet, from warm to hot and cold, from dark and interior to illuminated. In this project, students have their first introduction to architectural programs, scaled habitable spaces, and a site with explicit climate and solar orientation.

FACULTY

David Diamond Michelle Cianfaglione Marcus Carter Greta Weil Esteban Beita Sergio Elizondo Yaoyi Fan 34

Diane Neff Maria Di Natale Clara Ha Johana Monroy Nina Ilieva Pavlina Vardouilaki


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Emma Mangels Professor Michelle Cianfaglione B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 44

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Jennifer Buckley Professor Michelle Ciafaglione B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 45


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Jan Michael Manez Professor Johana Monroy B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 46

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Joseph Okyere Professor Diane Neff B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 47


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Anthony Orozco Professor Joahna Monroy B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 48

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Jean Michel Professor Johana Monroy B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 59


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Elizabeth Fuerte Professor Johana Monroy B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 61


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David Shacalo Professor David Diamond B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 63


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Kerri Kelly Professor David Diamond B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 64

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Lizzard Kishinevsky Professor Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 65


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Lizzard Kishinevsky Professor Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 67


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Iman Hamilton Professor Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 68

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Kaleb Malker Professor Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 69


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Shmuel Gladstone Professor Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 71


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02

CORE ARCH. STUDIOS The Bachelor of Architecture studio sequence affirms our belief in learning through doing, and in the role of studio courses as the laboratories where other experiences, from coursework and from life, are integrated in experimental and innovative ways. Our rigorous studio sequence is modeled to reflect a range of architectural issues one confronts in professional practice. It progresses from extra-small to extralarge projects, and from ones that are abstract and conceptual to ones that are comprehensive in their integration of user, technical and site considerations. The second-year studio challenges students to think conceptually while solving problems featuring increasingly plausible issues of use, site, and construction. Design I and II studios build from analysis to synthesis, requiring students to understand an architecture problem to address design solutions from a historical understanding of canonical precedents in the discipline and how critically engage considerations regarding ideas, typology, topology, site specificity, technique, structure, social and programmatic issues. Small to medium sized public building types are proposed in relation to existing building and site conditions. Precedent analysis is introduced as an essential research vehicle. The third-year studio is a more thorough introduction to architecture in the public and private realms. Design III involves the design of a small public institutional building and Design IV, housing. Accompanied by precedent analysis projects of greater scope and detail, the 3rd year studio explores issues of occupancy, use and site with increasingly realistic constructional, environmental and regulatory issues, and with an emphasis on passive strategies for daylight and ventilation, all with respect to the larger social and physical contexts for which projects are proposed.

The fourth-year studios, Design 5 and 6, focus respectively on urban scale Community Design and Comprehensive Design. The Comprehensive Design Studio is our closest simulation of an architectural project in a professional setting. Students are challenged with all aspects of design, from the conceptual to the technical, from feasibility models and drawings to detailed representative wall sections, construction solutions, integrated building systems, and draft specifications. Each academic year, the Community Design Studio adopts a local community with pressing development needs – from ones of recovery from extreme weather events like hurricane Sandy, to those of deindustrialization, environmental remediation or inadequate transportation infrastructure. Proposals are developed in student teams, with consultation and feedback from members of the subject communities. The fifth-year studio requires students to select a study topic for Design VII and VIII studios. Design VII is organized around research and documentation of the concepts, the background, the site and the available data surrounding the topic. Travel to the subject site is encouraged. The topic’s opportunities and limitations are assessed, including those of its intended site (zoning, climate, physical context, topography, etc.). Preliminary proposals are executed. Topics range from ones at the scale of individual buildings or their components to those of urban regeneration within extended regional landscapes. Design VIII is devoted to design and execution of project proposals, often accompanied by publication in book form. This capstone course allows students to practice the concepts and skills they have been acquiring during their previous years of study, and to pursue a topical specialization uniquely interesting to them.

72

David Diamond Professor, SoAD at NYIT


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Design Studio I Models B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018

73


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VOLUME 03 I 2019-20 2018-19

DESIGN DESIGNSTUDIO STUDIOIII

DESIGN STUDIO STUDIO III INTRODUCTION The spring semester focused on the public Design I will build up on the ability to realm / public and the that critically read, spaces understand and role decode architecture and the builtwith environment play architecture, starting architecture in provoking the activities that take place analysis. Design I will work on clearly within them.an understanding of an develop We examined thein role of the user architecture idea relation to aend problem as computer an integral ingredient that ultimately of representation, coordinating establishes the relationships transform a digital sign such as athat vector with the architecture public realm. an sign The such performance as column. space should consider that Design I will depart froma adesign parametric accommodate the of a square single actor, deconstruction of act a nine grid, to that of multiple actors. and Generating an understanding the function topological adaptable public performance space that possibilities of the various architecture accommodate diversity. elements that multiplicity compose and a grid-based Instead ofDesign thinking a fixed system. I of willarchitecture critique theasvarious condition, theofstudio investigated components a system, critiquingbuilding a clear methods through that allow for topological the adaptability of typology clear degree spaces. Architecture provocateur, that displacements. Theseasdisplacements will allows relationships, be usedforto unconventional activate clear subject-object instigating change, freedom service/served of expression, relationships, circulation, growth and fluidity. organizations and informing/informed by the program of an un-house dwelling for a dynamic contemporary family.

FACULTY FACULTY Efrat Nizan

Efrat Nizan Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa SimonFink Eisinger Janet Matthew Andreas Krajewski Tjeldflaat Krajewski Batliboi John Cunningham John Cunningham William Palmore BhallaBrens Trudy Scott Ruff Andrew Thomas Trudy Brens Manuel Garza Frances Campani

74 4 30

StudentsI will did study research and documented City withelements a focus on Design construction systemsNew and York architecture in Central Park. The combination material and construction tandem, understanding ideas of of construction types and their methods possible research, historical references, precedents site analyses were used topological displacements. Design I will alsoand activate ideas of structure in to develop a narrative. Precedence studies were conducted throughout coordination with Statics and Materials course understanding structural the semester as to a constant to critiquing such clear typologies types in relation a griddedreference system and reinforcetopological all aspectsdisplacements. of the designDesign process. Students collected team through I will then build up a critical and class research tospecificity base individual investigations and proposals idea. for a understanding of site in tension with a clear architecture performative public building space. Both Design I and II studios of Second Year will build from analysis to synthesis: requiring students to understand an architecture problem and to address design solutions from a historical understanding of precedence in the discipline and that that critically engage considerations of ideas, typology, topology, site specificity, technique, social, and programmatic issues. The Fall Semester Studio will engage with a single design project developing a dwelling or an “un-house�, aiming to address a contemporary notion of domesticity at the scale of a dynamic family structure. This design will be based on problems of computer representation and will then engage with problems of program, site specificity and information materialization and digital fabrication.


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Design Maria Studio I Models Models StudioLazaridis B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Professor + I.D.Programs Program Bhalla B. Arch + B.S.A.T. B.Arch + B.S.A.T.Fall Fall Program 2018 2018 Spring 2019 31 75 5


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EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC 1/4”=1’0

76 6 32


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DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO I III

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SECTION 1

SECTION 1

SECTION 2

SECTION 2

SECTION 3

SECTION 3

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SECTION 5

SECTION 5

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SECTION 6

SECTION RENDER 1/4”=1’0

SECTION RENDER 1/4”=1’0

Luis LuisSantos Santos Professor ProfessorTrudy TrudyBrens Brens B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Fall Fall2018 2018 77 33 7


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Julian Perez Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa + I.D. Program B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Fall 2018 8 34 78

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Ebu Tale Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa B.ArchB.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program + B.S.A.T. Fall 2018 35 79 9


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Kellie Silva Julian Professor Orellana Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa Kellie Silva B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Efrat Nizan + I.D. Program Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa FallArch 2018 B. + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 Fall 2018 80 10 36

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37 81 11


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Julian Silva Orellana Kellie Efrat Nizan Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa B. Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 Fall 2018 82 12 38

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN DESIGNSTUDIO STUDIOIII


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Kellie Silva Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 13 39 83


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Tomas Duch Tomas DuchTrudy Brens Professor Professor Brens B. Arch +Trudy B.S.A.T. Program B. Fall Arch2018 + B.S.A.T. Program Fall 402018

84 14 40

02.CORE COREARCH. ARCH.STUDIOS STUDIOS 02.

DESIGNSTUDIO STUDIOIII I DESIGN DESIGN STUDIO


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Tomas Duch Yuchen Li Professor Trudy Brens B.ArchB.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program + B.S.A.T. Fall 2018 41 15 41 85


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Andrew Giambertone Professor Trudy Brens B. Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Fall 2018 86 16 42

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN DESIGNSTUDIO STUDIOIII


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Andrew Giambertone Professor Trudy Brens B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 17 43 87


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DESIGN STUDIO II

DESIGN STUDIO II INTRODUCTION The spring semester focused on the public realm / public spaces and the role that architecture and the built environment play in provoking the activities that take place within them. We examined the role of the end user as an integral ingredient that ultimately establishes the relationships that transform the public realm. The performance space should consider a design that accommodate the act of a single actor, to that of multiple actors. Generating an adaptable public performance space that accommodate multiplicity and diversity. Instead of thinking of architecture as a fixed condition, the studio investigated building methods that allow for the adaptability of spaces. Architecture as provocateur, that allows for unconventional relationships, instigating change, freedom of expression, growth and fluidity.

FACULTY

Efrat Nizan Simon Eisinger Andreas Tjeldflaat Hormuz Batliboi John Cunningham Shantanu Bhalla Scott Ruff Trudy Brens Frances Campani

88

Students did research and documented New York City with a focus on Central Park. The combination of material and construction methods research, historical references, precedents and site analyses were used to develop a narrative. Precedence studies were conducted throughout the semester as a constant reference to reinforce all aspects of the design process. Students collected team and class research to base individual investigations and proposals for a performative public building space.


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Maria Lazaridis Professor Shantanu Bhalla B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 89


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Maria Lazaridis Professor Shantanu Bhalla B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 91


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Longitudinal Section C 1/16” = 1’

0’

5’

15’

ROJECT

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92

5’

15’

Street plan 1/8” = 1’


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Julian Orellana Professor Efrat Nizan B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 93


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ROJECT

Exploded Axon

Frame System

Exploded Axon

Frame System

Sara Raghunath Professor Trudy Brens B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 94

Exploded Axon

Frame System


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Yuchen Li Professor Trudy Brens B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 95


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DESIGN STUDIO II

Cultural Center exploded axonometric


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Katelyn Trainor Professor Andreas Tjeldfaat B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 97


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Aimee Flanagan Professor Andreas Tjeldfaat B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 99


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Yancheng Liang Professor Andreas Tjeldfaat B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 100

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO II


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Ken Pitts Professor Andreas Tjeldfaat B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 101


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Exoloded Axonometric 1.1

6.35

3.53

2.87 6.35

3.53

2.87

102


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Ahmad Almahdi Professor John Cunningham B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 103


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Brian Panama Professor John Cunningham B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 104

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO II


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DESIGN STUDIO II

Erick Ruivo Professor John Cunningham B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 105


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106

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DESIGN STUDIO II


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Matthew Kennedy Professor John Cunningham B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 107


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VOLUME 03 I 2019-20

DESIGN STUDIO III

DESIGN STUDIO III INTRODUCTION

The Third Year Studios, Design III and IV are seen as interrelated in terms of a dialectic theme of public and private, with a public - cultural institution building in the Design III and the dwelling in Design IV. A second objective is to introduce the comprehensive nature of architectural design in the pedagogical sequence of studios.. Each semester focuses on the design of a single project with phases that progress from analysis to synthesis; schematic design to design development. The intention is to develop comprehensive design solutions that critically engage multiple considerations of socio-cultural meaning, form, program, construction and environmental ecology. The studios engage historically related precedent, social and environmental concerns and technological innovation through built form.

FACULTY

Michael Schwarting Matthias Altwicker Jonathan Friedman Naomi Frangos Adegboyega Adefope Jan Greben

108

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

This year in Design III, the public institution was a K-3 school on an urban site at 8th Avenue, between 21st and 22nd Street in New York City. The studio addressed the significance of the role that built form plays in the manifestation of social, cultural and political values in our institutions, as well as how the designed architectural environment relates to and structures a child’s learning and education. Another issue was to investigate creating an image of the institutions in the urban realm that is made of a hierarchy of significant images. The schools large spaces of cafeteria, gymnasium and library were to serve as a resource for community use after school hours, providing the neighborhood community with a place to meet. Designs were to be achieved through the creation of inventive, useful and meaningful space.


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Francis Rodriguez Professor Matthias Altwicker B. Arch Program Fall 2018 109


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110

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO III


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DESIGN STUDIO III

Peter Thompson Professor Adegboyega Adelepe B. Arch Program Fall 2018 111


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112

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO III


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Allison Beamer Professor Adegboyega Adefope B. Arch Program Fall 2018 113


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Michael Langjahr Professor Naomi Frangos B. Arch Program Fall 2018 114

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO III


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DESIGN STUDIO III

Bartholomew Ostrowski Professor Adegboyega Adefope B. Arch Program Fall 2018 115


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Taylor Mavros Professor Adegboyega Adefope B. Arch Program Fall 2018 116

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO III


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Thomas Manetta Professor Adegboyega Adefope B. Arch Program Fall 2018 117


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Andrew Pires Professor Adegboyega Adefope B. Arch Program Fall 2018 118

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO III


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Jaredd Mendez Professor Adegboyega Adefope B. Arch Program Fall 2018 119


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VOLUME 03 I 2019-20

DESIGN STUDIO IV

DESIGN STUDIO IV INTRODUCTION

Design IV provided the second part of the dialectic of public and private with the study of the dwelling or private realm of our society. Following the consideration of the role of public institutions in our society, the relationship of the residential component to urbanization was considered in a general and specific manor with the program of urban multi family housing. The private domain is critical to the definition of personal freedom and its organization provides the setting for, and shapes domestic rituals. Alternatively, collective housing can assist the integration of residents and participate in the creation of neighborhood.

FACULTY

Michael Schwarting Jan Greben Matthias Altwicker Naomi Frangos Jonathan Friedman William Palmore

120

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The program dealt with the changing definition of the family make-up and relations and the interrelation or social integration of groups of inhabitants. Social issues of affordability are also discussed. The multiple scales from the individual dwelling to the aggregation of units with the collective potential of shared circulation, communal spaces and programs was a critical area of examination. The role of housing in the creation of physical urban fabric, its relationship to the surrounding context, were important issues with each studio section studying different in-fill sites in the five boroughs of New York City. With the same program there was the potential for comparison of the effects of site on the designs.


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Ariel Lorenzi, Gjujana Mulosmanaj Professors Matthias Altwicker, Michael Schwarting B. Arch Program Spring 2019 121


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122

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DESIGN STUDIO IV


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$'&411/

$'&411/

$'&411/

567&+1

 

Anthony Rosas Professor Matthias Altiwcker B. Arch Program Spring 2019 123


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ROJECT

Recreational Spaces and Apartment Composition

124


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Apartment Composition Options

2 Studio

Studio

3 Bedroom Simplex 3 Bedroom Duplex 2 Bedroom Simplex

3 Bedroom

2 Bedroom Duplex 1 Bedroom

1-2 Bedroom

19 Ariel Lorenzi Professor Matthias Altwicker B. Arch Program Spring 2019 125


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126

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DESIGN STUDIO IV


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Marilyn Corea-Ramirez Professor Matthias Altwicker B. Arch Program Spring 2019 127


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128

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DESIGN STUDIO IV


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Ler Simoneau Professor Michael Schwarting B. Arch Program Spring 2019 129


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Ler Simoneau Professor Michael Schwarting B. Arch Program Spring 2019 130

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO IV


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15

ACES ISONOMETRIC

Stuart Jacome Professor Matthias Altwicker B. Arch Program Spring 2019 131


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132

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DESIGN STUDIO IV


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Stuart Jacome Professor Matthias Altwicker B. Arch Program Spring 2019 133


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DESIGN STUDIO V

DESIGN STUDIO V INTRODUCTION

The Community Design Studio is a unique vehicle to practice your influence in the future development at multiple scales: a region, a community, a block and lot. Inwood East of Broadway to the Harlem River Waterfront in Upper Manhattan will be your laboratory for experimenting with a process that re-thinks, re-shapes and regenerates the Urban Environment in the 21st century. While neighborhoods of Inwood West of Broadway have long been characterized with access to beautiful parks (Fort Tryon Park, Inwood Hill Park, Isham Park and a well-developed Hudson River Waterfront with recreational spaces, bike paths, and cultural institutions (The Cloisters, NY Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University’s Baker Athletic Campus), the Inwood East of Broadway remains underserved with a post-industrial and infrastructural landscape marked by lower income communities (77% of households earning less than $20,000). Broadway also acts as a racial divider with West Inwood predominantly White and East Inwood heavily Dominican. Inwood recently went through a rezoning that will inevitably impact these communities and future developments.

FACULTY

Farzana Gandhi Antonio Gabriele Andrew Thomas John DeFazio

134

Many commercial corridors (Dyckman Street and Broadway, for example) of East Inwood remain untapped and ripe with potential as a vibrant links between East and West. You will graphically map and illustrate the development and evolution of each district within our study area, tracing these areas from their current condition to their original historical, cultural, ecological, and hydrological state. This area offers a range of infrastructural, ecological, programmatic, socio-economic and cultural design opportunities due to the large variety of contexts one encounters as one progresses West to East. The scale of development, land use, density, open space, population changes, transportation shifts, watershed conditions, topography, landscape, and infrastructure are just a few of the many observed elements that provide different contexts in Inwood. Transformative agents and external forces over time including storm-water and flooding, sea level rise, wave action, currents, erosion, wind, and urban heat island effects create additional variety along the two Waterfronts (Hudson River and Harlem River) that can be forecasted, depicted, and animated over time. Where these various conditions overlap, edges and boundaries are perceived, and thresholds can be identified should be studied in detail as potential points of intervention.


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DESIGN STUDIO V

Stefan Eitnier, Robert Nafie, Jimi Adeseun Professor Farzana Ghandi and John DeFazio B. Arch Program Fall 2018 135


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Stefan Eitnier, Robert Nafie, Jimi Adeseun Professor Farzana Ghandi and John DeFazio B. Arch Program Fall 2018 137


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Stefan Eitnier, Robert Nafie, Jimi Adeseun Professor Farzana Ghandi and John DeFazio B. Arch Program Fall 2018 139


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DESIGN STUDIO V

P 01 ROJECT 01

Y

Triangular TYpologY

he d s. et a n.

providing storMWater collection and treatMent as Well as providing sitting and gathering area to the existing and neW coMMunities.

movie projeCtion

Y

resiDenTial TYpologY

pMst al ls s.

providing a place for residents to spend tiMe together and outdoors at playgrounds and dog parks.

paved and lit seating area

Y

play ground/ dog park

Triangular TYpologY

ce o d al n.

providing parking, storMWater collection and treatMent as Well as providing sitting and gathering area to the existing and neW coMMunities.

Community garden 21

140 8

storm water treatment/ parking


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Nataliya Hrytsiv, Devora Schwartz, Conor Mathers, and Rob Kotelsky Professor Farzana Ghandi and John DeFazio B. Arch Program Fall 2018 141


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO V


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Ben Sather, Andres Caracamo, and Brianna Lopez Professor Antonio Gabrielle and Andrew Thomas B. Arch Program Fall 2018 143


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144

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO V


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DESIGN STUDIO V

Jairo Aguilar, Matthew Garcia, Ashley Mandat, Paolo Mondoza Professor Farzana Ghandi and John DeFazio B. Arch Program Fall 2018 145


ATMOSPHERE

VOLUME 03 I 2019-20

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

DESIGN STUDIO VI INTRODUCTION

Design Studio VI is the second comprehensive design studio, which means the expectations are that it acts as a summation of all the technical AND studio coursework completed over the last four years. Given this definition, this semester will be about research and evaluation based on criteria that are quantifiable but eventually extremely non-objective. To design a building while experiencing this tension is highly unnerving; it is also a tension where brilliant architectural decisions are made, or at the very least, the tension will allow for spectacular mistakes to occur.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION (LONG ISLAND STUDIOS)

During the semester students will be asked to integrate many aspects of your architectural education coming from several disciplines of research in architecture to create a small public building complete with its materiality, structure and heating/cooling systems and site considerations. As it is in any significant work of architecture, the emphasis will be placed in the creativity of the process of integrating all building systems and environmental concerns in the design. This will be done in the most conventional way, ie. it mirrors the way good practicing architects think. First and foremost, the intention is to develop your project as one might in an architectural practice – in parallel, simultaneous, collaborative ways.

The site is located at the corner of Canal and Lafayette Streets. It is currently zoned within the Downtown M1-5B Manufacturing district. This Zoning ordinance will allow artist live-and-work space, residential use, commercial and light manufacturing, as well as community uses. As a corner site with added FAR (Allowable Floor Area) bonuses for community services allow the height of the building to exceed 5 stories. The surrounding community is in desperate need for affordable routine health care, dental and pediatric services, supplementary education in English language and an adult education and legal services. A column free multi-purpose space that could be used for group meetings, performances and celebrations is also a very desired component. The space placed on the street and second Floor levels of the building could give this building a character as well as visibility for the surrounding communities. The South-West orientation of the site poses a welcome challenge for façade strategies and the careful use of daylight.

FACULTY

Brad Engelsman Antonio Gabriele Sergio Elizondo Janet Fink John Defazio Farzana Ghandi

146

On September 2018 the New York Institute of technology engaged the services of Perkins + Will and Arup as design/engineering partners to create a new campus Commons space and evaluate the current Wisser Library at their Old Westbury campus. The central driver of this initiative was to improve the student experience through a sense of space and community. In their long-term planning, in addition to the new Campus Commons, several new buildings are proposed for a new academic building, student residences, and other service buildings. When all the buildings are completed the new Commons building will be part of a new academic Quadrant. The professional team will be assisting the groups working on this project by periodic meetings and by attending juries held on the Old Westbury campus.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION (MANHATTAN STUDIOS)


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

Phillip He, Wang Leng Professor Brad Engelsman B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 147


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P 01 ROJECT

148

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

Phillip He, Leng Cheng, Jiahan Wang Professor Brad Engelsman B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 149


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P 01 ROJECT

150

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

Devorah Schwartz Professor Farzana Ghandi B. Arch Program Spring 2019 151


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P 01 ROJECT

152

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

Brianna Lopez, Jonathan Kennelley Professor Sergio Elizondo B. Arch Program Spring 2019 153


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154

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

Delando Desouza and Isaiah Miller Professor Brad Engelsman B. Arch Program Spring 2019 155


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P 01 ROJECT

Michael Carrotta, Ari Begun Professor Sergio Elizondo B. Arch Program Spring 2019 156

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI

Rochelle Brown, Isaiah Brown, and Wlater Romero Fuentes Professor Brad Engelsman B. Arch Program Spring 2019 157


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158

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

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DESIGN STUDIO VI

N TIO EC S LL ER CO TOW E

AG

O

H2

OR ST

OF

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ECTION

OR COLL

EXTERI

AREA

E

UR

CT

RU

ST

E

AD

C FA

IN

MA

RS

OO

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R

IO

ER

INT

IN

DIST RI B

AREA OF

MA

RS

OO

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EF FE CT

OR UT OR

RI

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RS VE

REC EI

EA Jonathan Dils, Peter Leonardis, and Evan Scheer Professor Brad Engelsman B. Arch Program Spring 2019 159


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01 

ROJECT

STUDENT AFFINITY

LOUNGE AREA STUDENT AFFINITY ROOMS MULTIPURPOSE

DINING

DINING/ACTIVITY MEETING ROOMS

RETAIL BREAK AREA

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT OFFICES

160


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DESIGN STUDIO VI





Samantha Arena, Eliana Colina Professor Sergio Elizondo B. Arch Program Spring 2019 161


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

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DESIGN STUDIO VI

Silvio Tellez, Marko Despot Professor Sergio Elizondo B. Arch Program Spring 2019 163


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164

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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DESIGN STUDIO VI

Simon-Peter Omooba, Yemi Oyewole Professor Sergio Elizondo B. Arch Program Spring 2019 165


ATMOSPHERE

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P 01 ROJECT

Qiui Chen Professor Janet Fink B. Arch Program Spring 2019 166

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VI


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DESIGN STUDIO VI

Matthew Garcia, Jairo Aguilar Professor Janet Fink B. Arch Program Spring 2019 167


ATMOSPHERE

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THESIS STUDIOS The architectural thesis is the capstone course of the B.ARCH program at NYIT. It summarizes and demonstrates the competencies required for this first Professional Degree. A thesis is a project with a proposition that contains a theory, “a supposition or system of ideas intended to explain something” (Oxford English Dictionary). For architecture students the thesis year involves transforming theories into the design of buildings—speculating through Architecture. This goes beyond just solving the problem of program and site, to the historical, social, cultural and ideological meanings of the topic. The two semester Thesis studio requires independent work and responsibility on the part of the student. The professors for the studio are thesis advisors. Each section has a focus as described in the studio outlines. Requirements for work throughout the semester are set by the individual section advisors. Beyond fulfilling the requirements for each section, it is the responsibility of each student to demonstrate the validity, competency and completeness of their project to the thesis faculty as a whole in order to successfully complete the studio. The thesis faculty reviews the work of all students before the final reviews for Design 7 and Design 8. This process is known as the “walk-through”. Students will be given guidelines for a summary board of the semester’s work, to be submitted between the mid-term and final reviews on specific dates for each semester. If the faculty find a student’s work incomplete or inadequate he/she will either be asked to demonstrate the appropriate level of work before the final review or be removed from the final review schedule and required to repeat the semester.

FACULTY

Dongsei Kim Manuel Garza Maria Cumella Robert Cody 168

Beyhan Karahan Giovanni Santamaria John Di Domenico Michael Nolan

In Design 7 students are expected to develop their projects through invention and research. The research component of the thesis year is an important demonstration of skills required for the professional degree, as specified by NAAB criteria: Design Thinking, Investigative Skills, Architectural Design Skills, Use of Precedents, Pre-Design, and Research. Research should examine the history and theory of topics related to the thesis proposal: Humanistic Discourse, Space, Poetics, Program, Site, Structure and Sustainability. Research should also include the plastic study of speculative design proposals. Conclusions drawn from research should be presented at the final review. By the end of Design 7 a clear thesis statement and project proposal must be established and fully documented. In Design 8 students develop and complete the project to a resolution appropriate to the nature and scale of the thesis proposal. Each student must establish the goals of the thesis with his/her advisor. A successful project will achieve these goals. It will also demonstrate the student’s skills as a designer, and ideally, become the most sophisticated and substantial achievement of his/her student work. This collection of thesis work includes also some of the proposals part of the collaboration between our School of Architecture and Design at NYIT and the Italian energy company ENEL, within the project Futur-e. Students from the thesis sections of Prof. Beyhan Karahan and Giovanni Santamaria, took part to a study trip abroad, and focused on processes of adaptive reuse and environmental restoration of selected abandoned power plants and their critical contexts.

Giovanni Santamaria & Antonio Gabriele Thesis Coordinators, SoAD at NYIT


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Saw Hla Nwe, Zeynep Kurt Professor Giovanni Santamaria B. Arch Program Spring 2019 169


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PROJECT 01

170

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Saw Hla Nwe Professor Giovanni Santamaria B. Arch Program Spring 2019 171


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PROJECT 02

172

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Zeynep Kurt Professor Giovanni Santamaria B. Arch Program Spring 2019 173


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174

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Zeynep Kurt Professor Giovanni Santamaria B. Arch Program Spring 2019 175


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PROJECT 03

176

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Zandile Ncube Professor Giovanni Santamaria B. Arch Program Spring 2019 177


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PROJECT 04

178

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Jenna Hong Professor Michael Nolan B. Arch Program Spring 2019 179


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PROJECT 05

180

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Sarah Sawiris Professor Michael Nolan B. Arch Program Spring 2019 181


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PROJECT 06

182

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Rachel Spampinato Professor Manuel Garza B. Arch Program Spring 2019 183


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PROJECT 07

184

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Mingyang Yu Professor Dongsei Kim B. Arch Program Spring 2019 185


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PROJECT 08

186

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Fabian Cortez Professor Maria Cumella B. Arch Program Spring 2019 187


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PROJECT 09

188

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Zeynep Abacioglu Professor Beyhan Karahan B. Arch Program Spring 2019 189


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PROJECT 10

190

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Wes Wu Professor John Di Domenico B. Arch Program Spring 2019 191


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PROJECT 11

Roger Roblero Professor Beyhan Karahan B. Arch Program Spring 2019 192

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


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PROJECT 12

Steven Sculco Professor Robert Cody B. Arch Program Spring 2019 193


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PROJECT 13

194

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


ATMOSPHERE

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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Candy Salinas Professor Robert Cody B.Arch Program Spring 2019 195


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PROJECT 14

196

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


ATMOSPHERE

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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Gutemberg Jean Baptiste Professor Giovanni Santamaria B. Arch Program Spring 2019 197


ATMOSPHERE

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PROJECT 15

KZin Hla Professor Maria Cumella B.Arch Program Spring 2019 198

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


ATMOSPHERE

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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

PROJECT 16

Ana Maria Ramirez Professor Maria Cumella B.Arch Program Spring 2019 199


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PROJECT 17

200

02. CORE ARCH. STUDIOS

DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII


ATMOSPHERE

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DESIGN STUDIO VII-VIII

Mitchell Stogel Professor Beyhan Karahan B.Arch Program Spring 2019 201


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03

TECHNOLOGY The methodology for this section places an emphasis on how parameters of climate, construction, and material define the making of a piece of architecture, both in form and in detail. By making we are interested in how these parameters control and define both the broad decisions and the specific details behind implementation and expression of a construction system in a building. The development of the details of the building will always manifest themselves in constructive layers that are inherent in all constructive systems - Bearing, Insulation, Protection + Finish. Furthermore, each of these layers must always relate to a specific condition between the environment and the building - Foundation, Wall, Roof. The complexity of these interactions makes the resolution of even a simple building a challenging task of coordination and synchronization between the demands of Function, Constructability & Aesthetics. It will quickly become apparent that there are many more constructive possibilities than can be taught in a five-year curriculum, let alone a two-course sequence. What is more interesting and helpful for you is to learn a methodology for dealing with the variety of constructive situations students face. This method will present a way of designing and detailing simultaneously, which means the characteristics of the various construction types will reference a larger strategy of organization, an organization that operates at every scale of the building and the site.

202

Building Construction I + II introduces students to building construction and materials, and their interrelationship with the environment, with the goal of introducing you to a more holistic conception of architecture. While initial architectural concepts may involve understanding construction and material in spatial or formal terms, the making of architecture is defined by parameters from the climate, the wsite, and the efficiency and logic of the systems used. Construction and material can reciprocally inform a design concept and enrich its ultimate potential. These courses are to be understood as parallel and integrated with the studio experience. Just as it is expected that issues of sustainability and construction manifest themselves within your studio projects, it is also expected that issues of form and space manifest themselves in the building construction course. Structure and material are not to be applied, either conceptually or literally, to architecture: they are inherent in every line you draw, just as they should be inherent in every work of architecture you create. Environmental Systems I+II introduces students to the basic provisions of comfort, health, safety, and their role as the most basic objective in creating architecture. The course sequence will develop a basic understanding of how to achieve and maintain these provisions and how to integrate them into the architectural design process. Through a combination of theoretical seminars and practical design assignments the following main topics are addressed: Climate Responsive Design, Solar Orientation, Indoor Air Quality, Performance Assessment Tools, Carbon Neutral Design, Bioclimatic Design, Energy Efficiency, Performance of Envelope Systems, Moisture Transfer, Thermal Control, Active/Passive Heating and Cooling, Water and Waste, Plumbing and Acoustics.


ATMOSPHERE

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Adam Blood, Jiancarlo Caravajal + Laura Perez Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019

203


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03. TECHNOLOGY BUILDING CONST. I

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I Building Constructions I introduce students to architecture from a technological point of view. An architecture of technology will become active through building construction systems based on materials. Through the curation of the courses, issues of efficiency, environmental footprint and a wide range of interrelationships with the environment will become a common means to approach architecture, with the goal of introducing students to a more holistic conception of architecture and sustainability. Building Constructions I will study material-based building construction systems based on wood and masonry. The technology sequence at NYIT, different from other schools is to be understood parallel and integral to the architecture design studio, informing the design project and not just working as its actualization. Just as it is expected that issues of sustainability and construction will be studied within studio projects, it is also expected that issues of form and space manifest themselves in the building construction course through the tectonics and logic of a material-based system. The architecture project’s organization, its structure and materiality are not to be applied to an

FACULTY

Matthew Ford Beyhan Karahan Caroline Grieco Victoria Morelli Neil Rosen

204

abstract formal idea, but they are thought as inherent to the syntactical form of the development of the project. The logic of the various construction types will reference design strategies for architecture organizations and linguistic expressions. These studies are taken also in parallel to understand the material tectonics of large scale digitally fabricated physical models such as laser cut models and 3d printed models which as material based construction systems are understood as means to activate the logic of the design from the linguistic syntactical possibilities of the construction system. For the last masonry construction system students develop a computational exercise studying first how to design walls by drawing complete brick/CMU coursing and after understanding its modulation, develop a series of brick layout variations including mortar joints.


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03. TECHNOLOGY BUILDING CONST. I

Exploded Axon

Exploded Axon - South West 0

3

6

9

12

Yucheng Li + Fenglin Chen, Anderw Hertz + Belarminio Peralta, Wei Cui + WenSen Lu Professor Beyhan Karahan B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Fall 2018 205


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03. TECHNOLOGY BUILDING CONST. ll

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION II Building Constructions II will study material-based building construction systems based on steel, glass and concrete. Continuing with the construction sequence and its fundamental concepts and technical methodologies laid out in Building Constructions I, students are asked to think their design II projects through a material tectonic and through a building construction system, studying variations and design. By understanding first the logic of a specific material, its industry proportions and properties, its possibilities, characteristics and performance, students will start addressing the material based construction systems, its components, assembly, interrelationships and overall systemic logic and design possibilities. Examples of these explorations include Ÿ� scale digitally fabricated physical models, revealing and aiming to explore the possibilities of the construction system, but also exploring limits in the ranges, for instance applying conventional solutions first, but then systematizing its understanding more efficiently and in relation to the structure of the building, exploring alternative solutions to known conventions, exploring systematic variations of found architecture potential

FACULTY

Mathew Ford Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa Neil Rosen Evan Akslerad

206

within the construction system and, overall each student will be asked to develop theirs own syntaxis of the architecture of the project in relation to the material-based construction system. By exploring possible variations, at a certain point, each student starts addressing the beginning of a degree of creativity to develop their own building construction systems and detailing understanding conceptually technological problems such as thermal insulation layers, water proofing continuity, and the relationship between the building construction material based system and the structure of the building, addressing loading capacities and spans. For the last concrete construction system students develop a shell structure design to understand the potential capacity of reinforced concrete by optimizing its form through a structural computational simulation.


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03. TECHNOLOGY BUILDING CONST. ll

Jiancarlo Caravajal + Laura Perez, Kellie Silva + Jamie Lopez Lamar Professor Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 207


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ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS I Through a combination of theoretical seminars and practical design assignments, Environmental Systems 1 introduces students to both passive and active methods of designing sun, wind, and water systems within a building. Five sequential assignments, coordinated with the design studio, explore the inter-relationship between passive architectural design and active mechanical design. Students are asked to make climate responsive architectural developments to their studio project, coordinate and calculate their passive design responses, and subsequently size the active thermal controls and water/waste systems.

FACULTY

Matthias Altwicker Michael Huang

208

03. TECHNOLOGY

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS I


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03. TECHNOLOGY

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS I

Julian Orellana, Nicholas Spano Professor Matthias Altwicker B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Fall 2018 209


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ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS II This course focuses on natural and artificial lighting strategies as related to electrical systems within building design. Using similar methods to Environmental Systems 1, students first optimize natural lighting use through calculations and computer modeling prior to the artificial lighting design. In combination with efficient electrical design and optimized transportation systems and core layouts, these studies allow them to see their design studio project in a new way, augmenting the project symbiotically. They are then asked to see how much of the building energy can be offset with alternate energy sources, and how these can be integrated in to the design.​

FACULTY

Matthias Altwicker Victor Dadras Niel Rosen

210

03. TECHNOLOGY

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS II


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03. TECHNOLOGY

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS II

Rob Nafie, Juhisha Kamleshbairay, Anthony Rosas, Rajiv Persad Professor Matthias Altwicker B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 211


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PROJECT INTEGRATION

PROJECT INTEGRATION Students working in teams generate and develop the design of a small-scale building. In the process the students incorporate the guidelines as described in the phases of service of the Professional A.I.A. Agreement. The design of a harmonious relationship between the site and building is stressed. Emphasis is placed on creativity in the process of integrating all building systems (spatial, structural, mechanical and electrical) in the design.

FACULTY

Jason Van Nest Antonio Gabriele

L9

L6

L8

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C4 L7

L 10

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L 11

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C5 L1

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CALE : 3/16” = 1’-0”

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CANAL ST SECTION [c__]

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LAFAYETTE ST SECTION [L__]


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03. TECHNOLOGY PROJECT INTEGRATION

Greg Jacobsen Professor Jason Van Nest B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 213


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VISUALIZATION The Visualization sequence curriculum supports primarily the process of translating ideas into visual and representational formats that foster the transition from the mind-hand to the computer and vice-versa and to develop a critical approach to this generative process. It is designed to accompany and support the design studio sequence. It provides tools to enhance our awareness of the coordination of eye, mind, and hand, both to better understand how we see and to better document our ideas. The three visualization courses seek to position themselves within an academic and professional environment of constantly changing design tools, representational methods, and technologies. Through the careful introduction of appropriate tools and methodologies, these courses are meant to equip students with a digital and analog framework that supports fluidity in the process and reinforcement of the benefits and value of each through an exchange and overlap. Visualization I is the introductory drawing course for Interior Design and Architecture Majors. It is the first in a series of courses that impart the concepts and skills of visual communication necessary to explore and practice these two related fields. The course aims at exposing the students to the understanding of architecture as a discipline and practice through a variety of input to support the students’ critical process of understanding architecture and its expanded field. Students learn how we can transfer ‘what we see’ and ‘what we think’ into different visualization formats, and more importantly, how we can record our thoughts and inform design processes through iterative explorations. Visualization II introduces the use of CAD (ComputerAided Design) + CAM (Computer-Aided Manufacturing) technologies to support critical visual thinking. Much like skills introduced in Visualization I, the exercises offer not only new tools for visual communication and representation but also

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new methodologies for design and abstraction. The course provides new tools to enhance further the ability to explore and improve visual communication skills, as well as their generative approach to design and critical thinking. Visualization III provides skills for more advanced computational tools and digital fabrication techniques and tectonics. More advanced platforms of investigation of computational technologies in design are offered to students as a format to get them exposed to the interchangeability between platforms and modes of operation. Students are exposed to the feedback loop between design and making, generative protocols, and coding. A discussion of the way in which emerging technologies are affecting contemporary practice and process act as a theoretical underpinning to all exercises.


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VISUALIZATION I Visualization I is the introductory course of the Visualization sequence. It is the first in a series of courses that impart the concepts and skills of visual thinking and communication necessary to explore how methods and tools for seeing, representing, and visualizing can inform architectural thinking and design methods. The class explores how free-hand drawings, orthographic projections, composite and hybrid drawing techniques, and modes of two and three-dimensional translation applied to making and diagramming are used not only to represent but also as important components in the generative design process. The course aims at exposing the students to the understanding of architecture as a discipline and practice through a variety of input, including lectures, readings, and field trips to support the students’ critical process of understanding architecture and its expanded field. Students learn how to transfer ‘what we see’ and ‘what we think’ into different visualization formats, and more importantly, how to record our thoughts and inform design processes through iterative explorations. Students begin with free-hand sketching, observational, and projected drawings to then be introduced to concepts of transferability between analog and digital platforms. The use of digital applications in Visualization 1 is introduced to support primarily the process of translating ideas into visual formats that foster the transition from the mind-hand to the computer and viceversa and to develop a critical approach to this creative and generative process.

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Trudy Brens Michelle Cianfaglione Marcella Del Signore Sergio Elizondo Nina Ilieva Gabriel Munnich Efrat Nizan Alessandro Orsini Alejandra Rojas Jaramillo Ebru Sulker

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Santiago Hernandez, Kaguya Okawa-O’Connell B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 217


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Judah Cohen B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 219


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Adam Giannios, Liliana Saus, Saad Khan, Gabriella Rodriguez B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. + M.Arch Program Fall 2018 220

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Ru Jia, Judah Cohen, Saad Khan, Santiago Hernandez B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Fall 2018 221


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VISUALIZATION II

VISUALIZATION II Visualization II is designed to support the curriculum, methodologies, and projects developed in AAID 102Design Fundamentals 2. Students apply the course’s digital knowledge and tools in their design studio projects to foster cross-integration of processes, skills, and critical thinking between the two courses. This course has been designed to include CAD (Computer-Aided Design) + CAM (ComputerAided Manufacturing) technologies to support the design studio sequence. Students are introduced to computer software and digital fabrication techniques, which allow them to support their 2D and 3D development of the work. The course provides new tools to enhance further the ability to explore and improve visual communication skills, as well as generative approaches to design and critical thinking. As part of the new visualization curriculum sequence, the course builds upon the skills learned in the first part of the visualization course, while laying the ground for new tools and techniques. The course aims to develop generative modeling abilities and explore strategies to imagine spatial and tectonic conditions digitally reinforced by analog processes. The investigations are nurtured by issues and tasks related to the application and use of computational tools and information technologies to foster experimentation, iterative processes, and generative design thinking.

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John Bermudez Michelle Cianfaglione John Cunningham Marcella Del Signore Sergio Elizondo Bradley Engelsman Yaoyi Fan

Nina Ilieva Johana Monroy Gabriel Munnich Alessandro Orsini Alejandra Rojas Jaramillo Andreas Tjeldflaat Pavlina Vardoulaki

Shaquilla Morris, Santiago Hernandez B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 222


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Shaquilla Morris, Santiago Hernandez B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 223


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Ru Jia B.Arch + B.S.A.T. + I.D. Program Spring 2019 224

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VISUALIZATION III Visualization III is designed to develop the ability to model spatial, tectonic, and performative conditions digitally. The first part of the course is dedicated to support and expand students’ proficiency and skills with previous software used in Visualization 1 & 2. The course continues with the exploration of tools that aid in 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional representation and the means to translate from digital models to physical models. Visualization III supports the core curriculum and addresses topics and issues that are concerned with the latest digital design and fabrication processes. The course offers instruction in digital modeling, rendering, presentation drawings, parametric design, and 2D and 3D fabrication platforms (3D printing, laser cutting, and CNC milling).

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Marcella Del Signore Bradley Engelsman Georgina Lalli Pavlina Vardoulaki

Adriana Canizares Andrade, Jiahui Li. B.Arch + B.S.A.T Program Fall 2018 226

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Eliana Colina B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Fall 2018 227


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Laeticia Hervy B.Arch + B.S.A.T Program Spring 2019 228

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Crystal Tan, Abrahamsen Heidi, Adriana Canizares Andrade, Michael Carotta, Timmy Cassese, Eliana Colina, Sophia Garcia, Isabel Tabet, Yurika Takadachi, Obi Ventura, Jiahao Wang B.Arch + B.S.A.T Program Fall 2017, Spring 2018 230

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AUTOMATION IN DESIGN Design is an ever-changing process, each time moving further into design automation and process optimization. With each evolution in automated design thinking the designer becomes freer to be concerned with big picture items, leaving repetitive and technical aspects of the design to the automation process in the form of systems and algorithms. The current age of design can be considered as the age of the processor in contrast to the first computer age in design which was the age of memory. The initial impact of computers in design was solely to store design data and information. The new era of design sees the designer as someone who defines goals and parameters for computers to work within, outputting many potential options within the defined rules. “Automation in Design” has quickly become the new normal for design practices in both the cutting of time on low level mundane tasks and mathematically optimized marvels that the human mind alone could not achieve. America’s first Virtual Reality Cinema and Playlab - “Jump into the Light” located at the Lower East side of Manhattan is providing us with the opportunity to build a permanent installation. The double height space of the VR company is allowing us to create an automated ceiling installation that will attract visitors. In the course students explored the idea of the contemporary chandelier and adapting it to the Palylab’s space. The investigations are looking back at historical and important chandeliers, and dissecting their parts and elements and reconfiguring and reprocessing what a new idea would be for a contemporary digital chandelier that reacts to place, person, and space. The design techniques for the design and production of the installation are explored and students are being introduced to a number of software, like Grasshopper and Maya, in order to create their own version and contribute to the design and construction of the installation.

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Dustin White Pavlina Vardoulaki

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Carlos Matute, Natalia Hrytsv Professor Dustin White, Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 233


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Bersibeth Pfel, Luke Hyowon Son Professor Dustin White, Pavlina Vardoulaki B.Arch + B.S.A.T. Program Spring 2019 235


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HISTORY and THEORY SURVEY HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE I , II Survey History of Architecture I addresses historical development of architecture from its earliest forms through the Baroque period. The course focuses on major buildings primarily from the Western tradition. Basic issues of planning, design, program, structure, and materials are examined in relation to one another and to the cultural and climatic context in which the building was erected.

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Nader Vossoughian Angela Amoia William Palmore Sean Khorsandi

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Survey History of Architecture II addresses the development of the modern movement in architecture from the built and theoretical work of Boullee and Ledoux in the 18th century to buildings by 20th century masters such as Frank Lloyd Wright, LeCorbusier, Walter Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Alvar Aalto, and Louis Kahn. Changes in the form and the development of modern building types are discussed in relation to the new technological, social, political, and economic circumstances to which they respond.


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INTERIOR DESIGN The Interior Design Program at the New York Institute of Technology is unique within the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. It is CIDA-accredited, alongside a NAAB-accredited architecture program. Both within the same school of architecture and design. The exposure and synergy from the convergence of these two disciplines under one roof—ranging from the expert, diverse faculty, to innovative, cross-disciplinary studios and digital integration of contemporary design—defines the identity of the program. The curriculum was created to provide a superb educational track towards the goal of excelling in professional practice, research, theory and academics, as well as civic and institutional spheres. The program emphasizes the application of current issues, historical precedent, wide-ranging building typologies, and project types, backed by mastery of the most advanced technology platforms. Founded by the renowned, Dutch interior designer and architect Han Schroder, in 1967 (Rietveld/Schroder House, Utrecht), the program continues to be guided by her core commitment to the “... the interrelatedness of material, tool, form, and strength...” with a mandate to stay on the cuttingedge of practice. Students and faculty originate from around the world and participate through the program in prestigious design conferences and venues such as The International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) and the Salone del Mobile, Milano. We remain dedicated to the aspirations of our graduates who are engaged in lifelong learning by supporting their growth and the qualities that will distinguish them as leaders in the industry for the 21st century and beyond.

Charles A. Matz Professor and Director, the Interior Design Program Faculty, SoAD at NYIT

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INTERIOR DESIGN I The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the structure and process of design as it relates to the articulation of the spatial envelopes of buildings. They are exposed to the fundamental elements of design practice such as mass, shape, texture, materials, line, and the design principles of scale, spatial-visual continuity, balance, procession, passage, threshold, and space planning concepts. Emphasis is on the acquisition of the understanding of color principles, theories, and systems as well as the basic theories of design composition, human behavior in the interior environment, and understanding the historical precedents that underpin strategies and approaches. Students learn to express design alternatives in graphic, verbal and written forms. Students learn to research, analyze and program relevant materials, extract core ideas, define the underpinnings of basic concepts and develop schemes that build on a foundation of exploration. Emphasis is placed on the process of shaping the dominant idea into a strong scheme that embodies the salient characteristics of design.

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Gertrudis Brens

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INTERIOR DESIGN II Recognition of simple design problems and analysis including human needs and behavioral patterns as the basis for planning interior environments and interactions of interconnected spaces, including experiments in the organization and furnishing of residential interiors. The focus is on the impact of the cultural factors of users and clients on design solutions. The student solves interior design problems of limited scope. The impact of sociological and spatial factors on design is highlighted in the application of principles of design and in the creation of aesthetically pleasing interior spaces. The goal is the identification of factors which determine the form, design, and use of inhabited, residential and working spaces; as well as to assess and analyze the client’s needs in accordance with the function of a space, and to design appropriate solutions for specific user needs within the built environment. Toward that goal, the designer provides fundamental analysis techniques and identifies appropriate reference materials to obtain information relevant to a particular project. The designer also expresses design in graphic, verbal and written form and develops skills in drawing, three-dimensional visualization, and composition, which embody the salient characteristics of the design, through minimal means, down to the scale of details.

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Gertrudis Brens Adefope Adegboyega John Bermudez

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M. ARCH

In an environment where related disciplines work together with common purpose, M. ARCH candidates develop fluency with evolving technologies for effective problem solving, experimentation, and communication. As the building professions increasingly focus on specialized processes, the role of architects in society will be to provide the critical skills to contribute to, and the perspective to lead interdisciplinary teams in realizing built projects. We believe that the future belongs to the innovators, collaborators, and leaders who are prepared to create innovative and sustainable architecture, successful communities and resilient cities. The M.ARCH is organizwed into two tracks. Beginning at the 600 level, Track 1 is for students who do not have a pre-professional degree in architecture and are new to architectural studies. Beginning at the 700 level, Track 2 is for students with a 4-year, pre-professional degree in Architecture. Both tracks share coursework at the 700 and 800 levels. 600 level coursework is an accelerated introduction to the anatomy of architectuer and focuses on the conceptual and technical akills upon which to build an architectural education. ARCH 602 begins with a deep analysis of canonical buildings. We use architectural structure as a model to develop a critical understanding of its role

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in architecture: physical, organizational, and the structures of logic that underpin architectural language. Structures are tested for their coherence as systems, and at model scale for their load resisting properties. Systems of structure are further tested against topological and topographic conditions, where the design process plays out as a series of negotiations between competing agendas. Studio ARCH 603 is offered as an international study abroad program – to Japan in 2019, working with professors from the prestigious Universities of Kyoto and Tokyo. 700 level coursework develops themes relating to architectural anatomy, with particular focus on building skins or systems of enclosure, with attention to architectural performance, and integration of technology, with an expanded range of material and tectonic systems. Studio ARCH 705 concentrates on integrative design, developing projects of increasing complex anatomy. 800 level coursework is research based and is devoted to experimental, topical areas of focus: Environmental Urbanism, Digital Design + Fabrication and Advanced Architectural Technology. Ad-hoc research and design workshops, some international, allow us to engage contemporary issues with internationally renowned experts.

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LIBRARY FINAL FLOOR PLANS AND SECTIONS: GROUND FLOOR PLAN ENTRY LEVEL +0’ ELEVATION

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Cradel/Glue-Laminated Through Bolts. Turnbuckle connection at cradle. 0.25 IN. tick steel plate glue-laminated beam cradle/tripod axis. Swivling tripod leg cradle conneciton. Swiveling tripod leg cap. Tripod Leg Columns

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INSTRUCTOR : DUSTIN WHITE VISUALISATION 2 ALEKSANDRA ZATORSKA ASSEMBLIES KIMBELL ART MUSEUM BY RENZO PIANO

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Laminated safety glass, curved, of 2x 10 mm heat strengthened, low-iron glass, ceramic frit Cantilevering beam of welded steel slats Ă˜ 114 mm steel rod mm steel channel Steel grating Gutter: 1 mm aluminium sheet, PVC-coated 70 mm EPS thermal isulation to fails 2 mm aluminium sheet, lacquered 96 mm wide0flange steel I-beam (HEA 100) Primary beam: 1321 203 mm glue laminated Douglas fir, white lazure Connection element: aluminium, welded, with thermal zoning 1.0 mm aluminium-sheet panel; 60 mm thermal insulation; 1.0 aluminium sheet Thermal glazing: 6 mm toughened glass+ 16 mm cavity+ laminated safety glass of 2x5 mm toughened glass, ceramic frit Pivoting aluminium solar control louver, with integrated photovoltaic module Thermal gl., curved: 8 mm toughened gl.+ 16 mm cav.+ la. safety gl. of 2x6 mm heat-strenghth, gl. all low-iron gl. ceramic frit, light permeab.: 62.5% Sprinkle pipe Bracing/ beam suspended ceiling(compression member): 60 mm steel CHS Bracing (tension member):Ă˜ 14 mm steel rod Suspended ceiling: polyester fabric in alum. frame 250 mm reinforced concrete; 127 mm EPS thermal ins. vapour retarder; 80 mm precast concrete unit steel studs; 250 mm reinforced concrete Aluminium connector between beam with thermal break blocking Painted steel cross bracing Laminated timber beam Curtain wall system with reinforced steel and tempered glass panels Movement joint Laminated beam painted steel connector (type-2 typical beam coupler) Double layered glass skylight system (curved fritted glass to diffuse sunlight) Skylight system support beam Skylight system glass panel frame Upper steel beam support roof maintenance walk thread and operable louver system (painted steel) Operable louver system with photovoltaic inserts (control interior sunlight) Skylight system support post (painted steel) Cast in place concrete column Gutter downspout Light 180 70

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VISUAL COMMUNICATION YEAR: SPRING 2018 FACULTY: D. WHITE

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Kaung Khant, Aleksandra Zatorska + Japheth Aleyapko Professor Dustin White M. ARCH Program Spring 2019

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Japheth Aleyapko Professor Christopber Kilbridge M. ARCH Program Spring 2019

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M.S.A.U.R.D. STUDIOS Our contemporary cities exist in perpetual urgency: metropolitan territories demonstrate tremendous diversity and complexity in growth and decline. By 2050, 70 percent or so of the world will live in cities. What does it mean for us to live together? The goal of ths studio is to explore integrated, urban design and planning strategies for creating sustainable and resilient communities that can adapt and thrive in the changing global conditions, meet carbon-reduction goals, and sustain urban populations in more compact settings by providing amenities that people need and want. Students explore how these compact communities can mitigate climate change by reducing Greenhouse Gas emissions through spatial efficiencies, pedestrian access to public transportation and preservation of open space and habitat. The focus this semester is cooling hot cities while leveraging cascading benefits. This design studio engages NYC districts as a research platform and introduces the ideas, representations, and techniques of contemporary urban design and discourse through the lens of a resilient built environment. These districts are home to a diverse population of residents and workers. Students will test the hypothesis that reconfiguring urban form according to climateresilient principles will strengthen community adaptability to climate change, reduce

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energy consumption in the built environment and enhance the quality of the public realm. Students will develop user-friendly regional qualitative design guidelines backed by cost-benefit performance indicators at the urban design scale. Building massing, urban ventilation, solar impacts, green infrastructure and anthropogenic factors will shape the outcomes. Outcomes in Energy, Transportation, Waste, Water, Green Infrastructure/ Natural Systems, and other urban infrastructure systems will be evaluated by students for their technical, social and ecological consequences, including flood mitigation. As is now widely recognized, cities can be the main implementers of climate resiliency, adaptation, and mitigation. The Urban Climate Lab explores win-win solutions for configuring climate-resilient compact urban form. The major finding we can expect for Climate observation and projections: • Urbanization tends to be associated with elevated surface and air temperature, a condition referred to as the urban heat island. Urban centers and cities are often several degrees warmer than surrounding areas due to presence of heat absorbing materials, reduced evaporative cooling caused by lack of vegetation, and production of waste heat. • Some climate extremes are exacerbated under changing climate conditions. Extreme events in many cities include heat waves, droughts, heavy downpours, and coastal flooding are projected to increase in frequency and intensity.

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TRAVEL PROGRAMS The purpose of the traveling programs at the School of Architecture and Design at NYIT is to develop design studio work combined with a critical understanding of architectural history, case study and comparative analysis through a direct and full immersive examination of the overall complexity of the places visited and their built forms. It is a way to learn principals of urbanism and architecture by visiting and studying significant urban environments and their canonical examples of architecture from early history to the present. By examining and comparing the cities and their work, the intention is to develop a means to evaluate both those works and to become more critical of one’s own design. The design studio teaches to begin with concepts and ideas and move to the development of more concrete proposals, constantly verifying and discussing these with classmates and faculty, within the specificity of their contexts which are directly experienced and understood. Combining these affords emerges a very important possibility of knowing what ideas ultimately produce, and how these are often deeply rooted in their surroundings. Architects have always traveled to look at built form. In particular, we know that in the Italian Renaissance, architects from Brunelleschi to Bramante and Palladio, to name just a few, traveled to Rome to look, measure and draw ancient architecture, in order to establish the Early and High Renaissance style. This was not to return to what the Romans did, but to understand the principles upon which that work was based, in order to create a ‘re-birth’; a new style beyond the Medieval. Probably before, but from that time, Architects have taken the “Grand Tour” to go beyond the conditions of their time and place in order to create the new. 280

The english architect, Inigo Jones visited and studied the work of Palladio. Le Corbusier went on his “Voyage d’ Orient” to help him make the change from a watch case designer to an architect. We can therefore synthetize the foci of the SoAD summer programs in three main goals. The first is to provide a deep awareness of the evolution of the cities visited, including economic, social and political factors and their respective transformations that lead to the vital cities they have become; as well as the contributions made by successive generations of architects and urban planners, so that one may understand how they retain their unique and vibrant qualities through the ever evolving processes of renewal, demolitions and insertions of new structures. The second goal consists in developing a critical view of the historic and contemporary works visited to better understand their contributions to the canon of modern and contemporary architecture, opening to further experimentations. The third goal is to channel new knowledge and experiences in a studio project focused on specific topics and sensitive locations, critically selected among the ones visited. Throughout the program, students and faculty meet with practicing architects, students and professors of architecture, and urban planners of several academic and professional environments across the countries and cities visited. Students are then expected to document these sites through sketches, analytical drawings and notes that are often shared and evaluated through group activities during the program. Our traveling program is therefore a kind of mobile studio. Students continue their studio endeavors, their education to becoming an architect, as they move from city to city. The student’s work space will pack and unpack itself, it will adapt to best provide the places we engage and draw. In conjunction with local experts from several fields, and accordingly to the real project site selected and its related issues, the studio crosses dimensional scales and engages issues that go from the most ephemeral of local behaviors and socio-cultural phenomena that students understand and decode, to the more physical ones concerning space and form making and their effects. Differently from the other studio experiences at home, during our summer abroad students are exposed to different cultures, way of operating but also thinking, relating toplaces and people far from their usual environments. They are much more sensitive to fully interact with classmates and locals, to push their own limits and re-think about their beliefs and habits, opening their mind to new discoveries also about themselves, then to fortify their personalities and expand their profession and cultural dimension. Angela Amoia & Giovanni Santamaria Faculty, SoAD at NYIT I


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JAPAN SUMMER ABROAD

JAPAN NYIT’s summer program to Japan builds upon our relationships with faculty members at the Universities of Kyoto and Tokyo, and at the Shibaura Institute of Technology. With the assistance of alumni, academic, and professional colleagues as lecturers and guides, the program visited ancient, modern and contemporary sites in Kyoto, Naoshima, Gifu, Sendai, Yokohama and Tokyo. Our daily schedule included walking tours of canonical and vernacular projects and neighborhoods that we recorded in notes and sketches, and partaking in the life of the cities we visited. This Program explored contemporary themes in architecture, urbanism and design, in the context of Japan’s unique emphasis both on the essentiality of nature -natural landscapes, natural materials, and traditional craft practices- and highly advanced technologies –industrialization and infrastructures. The program had several goals. The first was to provide a deep awareness of the architectural heritage and culture of Japan through its architecture, art, cultural artifacts and urbanism. The second consisted into the examination of issues regarding contemporary architecture and urbanism specifically related to Tokyo’s role as an ‘event city’ and location for the most advanced experimentation in the several areas of design. The third goal consisted in channeling our experiences through a workshop and studio project for a site in Tokyo. Our immersion in the artisanal, material, technology (and gastronomic) cultures of Japan was instrumental in how we approached our studio project: a new community center for the island of Tsukishima. Since the 17th century, Tsukishima was a small fishing village, then expanded with reclaimed land in the 19th century when it was designated for industrial use. Situated in Tokyo Bay not far from Olympic venues, Tsukishima is now subject to massive development in anticipation of the summer 2020 Olympic Games, now postponed until 2021. Our studio toured the island with Professor Hidaeki Shimamuri of the Shibaura Institute of Technology, where he directs a

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studio devoted to the needs of the community and to preserving its heritage. Each student selected a vacant site, which was to relate to its surroundings and to the other project sites, as integrated and coordinated insertions to the existing fabric. Students proposed a variety of community / culture and social service focused projects, with respect for the area’s unique history and needs, and to its continuing viability with respect to global warming and sustainability

FACULTY David Diamond Giovanni Santamaria STUDENTS Chenfei Cao Qiuyi Chen Hunter Engrassia Adam Giannios Andrew Hertz Younghoon Jeong Maria Lazaridis Alexix Sakatis Alyssa Stahl Aleksandra Zatorska .


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Maria Lazaridis B.Arch Program Professor David Diamond and Giovanni Santamaria Summer 2018 287


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ITALY and GERMANY FACULTY Robert Cody Matthias Altwicker STUDENTS Allison K. Beamer CJ Buchanan Ayman Helo Michael J. Langjahr Carlos Matute Marcela Ona Sandoval Hyowon Son Jason Eric Bottiglieri Michael Anthony Carrotta Johnathan Dils

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Hywon Son and Carlos Matute B.Arch Program Professor Rober Cody Summer 2019 289


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EXCHANGE PROGRAMS & WORKSHOPS Workshops and International Exchanges are part of the ‘learning by making’ and of the believing in ‘cross fertilization’ processes among communities and academic environments at the School of Architecture and Design at NYIT. These experiences allow students to grow and learn, to understand needs and approaches of several diverse contexts, and to collaborate with local governments, communities, experts, civil servants, and schools on specific projects. These projects often have a proactive social and environmental value, intervene in sensitive areas of the world, and prove to be challenging for our students. They are then called to open their minds, expand their horizons, and share and improve their skills, establishing immersive interactions through which they can have a direct understanding of the identity of the several users involved and their backgrounds; of the different ways of operating, different methodologies, tools, design and construction processes. This makes possible, a better use of local techniques and materials so that students themselves can give a more effective and responsible contribution to the process of transformation of real contexts. Students also have the chance to participate in experimental and research oriented projects lead by passionate and well prepared faculty, focused on sustainable topics concerning our environments at several scales. They become aware of new possible fields of exploration that can be perused within their academic path, or that can drive their professional work afterword. 290

In any event, these are ways to practice what they have learned, to apply and verify their knowledge in the field, and at the same time improve it and be confronted with new circumstances and challenging problems to enrich communities. This facilitates the process of bridging the gap between the “reality” within the school and the one outside, both integrating the pedagogy of the courses already offered, while providing new ones focused on special projects that are taught in a more experimental way. These are often inclusive of a brief traveling component, or can be considered as applied research. The collaboration on shared projects with students and professors from other universities at the international level, helps our students be more sensitive and learn through direct experience about the richness and depth that a thorough understanding of a cultural background can give to a project. Through the eyes of our invited guests at the workshops organized at our school, students learn to see their own contexts differently and discover new ones when they work collaboratively in places abroad. The design component of the proposals developed during the workshops is coordinated also to symposia and lectures that help strengthen contents and issues explored through the design. These events frame the theoretical cores of design experiences by creating opportunities for proactive interactions with local and international academic and professional contexts, and improve the quality of the work and its dissemination. This facilitates the dialogue on relevant topics among schools and experts, making studies and research otherwise difficult to share, more accessible. New possibilities for future cooperation, new expertise, a renewed enthusiasm for their studies and more mature ways of communicating and representing ideas, are fascinating results of these experiences. These enrich students from both a human and professional point of view, and at the School of Architecture and Design at NYIT, we consider this as a fundamental base for a better education... a more balanced society to come.

Giovanni Santamaria Associate Professor, SoAD at NYIT I


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METROPOLITAN APPROACH FOR RIO DE JANERIO

From the 21st to the 29th of November a group of thesis students from the B.Arch. program at the School of Architecture and Design at NYIT participated to the International Workshop M.A.Rio- Metropolitan Approach for Rio de Janeiro. This project was part of a collaborative effort between the MS-Lab at the School of Architecture of Politecnico di Milano- IT, the Master in Urban Design at PUC University in Rio-BR, and the SoAD at the NYIT-USA. Guided by Associate Professor Giovanni Santamaria, NYIT students collaborated with Brazilian and Italian students and their professors Maria Fernanda Lemos and Antonella Contin to the success of this initiatives. It included seminars and lectures by experts in the field of metropolitan planning and resilient urbanism, academicians and representatives of the local administration. Visits to the design sites, and to relevant urban locations, meeting with local stakeholders and NGO organizations were part of the activities of the first part of the workshop, while the second part of it focused on defining sustainable design strategies for the natural reserve of Tingua’ and the agricultural area of the town of Nova Iguacu’, at north of the city of Rio de Janeiro and included in its metropolitan region. SoAD students Salvador Delgado, Yeshara Pryor, Christian Wade and Teresa Ferreira worked in mixed teams across the universities involved, sharing specificity of backgrounds and approaches in investigating existing conditions, vulnerabilities and potentials of the sites understood at several dimensional scales and in regard to natural environments, infrastructure, productive land, water and energy management, problems of pollution and waste, possible circular economic models etc. Students presented and discussed their ideas and proposals during a final review Nov 29 before a jury of prestigious professors from different local and International universities, professionals and experts.

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Giovanni Santamaria

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Christian Wade Teresa Ferreira Salvador Delgado Yeshara Pyror

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S-LAB: HOUSING DENSITY

S-LAB: HOUSING DENSITY INTRODUCTION

Housing Density: From Tenements to Towers is an exhibition co-curated by Prof. Matthias Altwicker, AIA LEED AP (SoAD), and Prof. Nicholas Dagen Bloom, Ph.D. (CAS) with Carol Willis, founder and curator of The Skyscraper Museum. The exhibition and research was coordinated as a Student-Led Architecture Build (sLAB) project, which brings together students and faculty on a research project that is to be designed and built collaboratively. Institute of Technology What is density? Does the word describe a condition of people or place? Is it people crowded together? Buildings too tightly spaced, or too tall? Or is it a lack of open space on ground level? Arguments about density have shaped and reshaped New York. Critics of tenement life and housing reformers viewed open space and sunlight as the antidote for overcrowding and created a new vision of master-planned, high-rise, residential communities. Density today remains a hyper-charged concept – a negative to many who equate it with crowding – or a positive for those who claim it creates more vibrant and affordable urban life. Whatever one believes about its relative merits, a better understanding of density is a first step to meaningful dialogue about the future of the city.

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Matthias Altwicker Nicholas Dagen Bloom

THE SKYSCRAPER MUSEUM: Carol Willis Josh Vogel Leonardo Tamargo

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

In the fall semester, 12 second- and thirdyear architecture students teamed up to propose designs for how the exhibition would be organized. The following spring, they were tasked with creating original models that would help museum visitors better understand housing density. The models were of selected neighborhoods, buildings, and apartment units throughout New York. The district models intend to show the relationship between buildings and open space, the building models show how the abstract massing seen in the district model is developed with windows, balconies, and the unit models bring the components of the buildings down to a human scale. Through this experience, they learned firsthand what it means to create a museum installation, taking into account not only the design and production of the objects on display but the overall impression and narrative flow that could be understood by all museum visitors.


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MASONRY EXPLORATIONS WORKSHOP

MASONRY EXPLORATIONS This week long travel workshop in Mexico City and Oaxaca included project visits to such prominent sites such as Barragan’s Casa Gilardi, Barragan’s Chapel and Convent of the Capuchinas Sacramentarias, Romero’s Museo Soumaya, Chipperfield’s Jumex Foundation, Kalach’s Biblioteca Vasconcelos, and Escobedo’s La Tallera. The group also toured historical and cultural sites including the Zocalo, Palacio de Bellas Arts, Museo Franz Mayer, and Museo Nacional de Antropología. Through travel sketches and photography, students catalogued and documented brick and masonry construction systems and considered performative qualities focusing on daylight, ventilation, program, structure, and tectonic expression. While touring, students were also asked to identify topics of interest including part to whole relationships, pattern and repetition, interlocking and overlapping joints, material thickness, volume, and transparency, and threshold/portal conditions. The workshop also included several hands-on opportunities to engage in craft and making. In Oaxaca, students engaged with local artisans to learn pottery making and textile weaving processes. In Long Island City in NY, students worked with the International Masonry Institute to learn how to lay brick. The workshop culminated with students developing designs for individual masonry unit types, their aggregations, and wall sections to consider how their innovative systems performed for local environmental conditions.

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Farzana Gandhi Manuel Garza

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Jimi Adeseun Kevin Chen Steven Fish Diana Marquez Samuel Molina Gamyl Morin

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Robert Nafie Salmah Nashurdeen Karla Perez Anthony Rosas Benjamin Shaffer Rachel Spampinato


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PARAMETRIC STUDIO WORKSHOP

PARAMETRIC STUDIO ARCH 294 – Parametric Studio Workshop was a companion course to ARCH 402 – Comprehensive Design Studio. The workshop was tailored to support the general design workflows in 402, by helping students adopt contemporary parametric design workflows into their design investigations. The workshop first introduced established data types and common data flows that are common to all architectural computational platforms. Then, the course introduced general parametric tools used in contemporary design settings for students to consider. This brief survey was completed around the same weeks that 402 studios were pivoting from research into massing and primary design moves. As a result, workshop students began experimenting with basic 2D parametric definitions approximately the same weeks that they were making their first elevation studies in studio. These first exercises that students completed served two purposes – to create sophisticated design iterations for preliminary studio review, and to create focused discussions in the workshop that explored the relation of an architect and their tools. After midterm, students’ studio investigations grew more complex, and in response the workshop transitioned from lectures, exercises, and discussion into one-on-one deskside crits. Students first selected an area of focus (a building mass, a façade system, or a structural layout) with which to concentrate deeper parametric explorations. Then, studentinstructor interactions

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were moved to the computer, and first saw students define the data types that would best parameterize architectural elements. With that definition, the students were encouraged to be specific in ways they considered computational tools that would apply to their design exploration. After students could describe a clear model of data flow, the instructor worked with the young designers to tailor parametric scripts to produce iterations of design options on each project. The workshop’s data-focused analysis of computational tools helped ease many common digital bugaboos that students face. The course’s approach clarified purposes for each of the (myriad!) software platforms used in an architectural studio environment. The workshop topics gave young designers several new ways to evaluate existing contemporary architectural buildings in media. The experience of creating parametric definitions help students question the role of the designers in 21st Century production. And the workshop’s culture of free-use with attribution illustrated the importance of opensource media in contemporary design culture.

FACULTY

Jason Van Nest

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Rakan Yousef Alshanifi Runmei Cui Paul Michael DuBois Jr Christopher John Henry Yeeun Hong Nataliya Hrytsiv Hajer Mohammed Imam Kelsey Miller Himesh Bharatkumar Patel Adelina Sinanaj


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International Exchange Agreement between SoAD at NYIT and Scuola di Architettura e Societa’ at Politecnico di Milano. International Workshop “Metabolims of a City. NYCER-Lab” Spring 2019 Professor Giovanni Santamaria, Guest Professor Antonella Contin and Sandy Ming, with students from Politecnico di Milano Spring 2019 309


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METABOLISM OF A CITY

POLITECNICO DI MILANO AT NYIT SOAD Part of the International Exchange Agreement between the SoAD at NYiT and the Scuola di Architettura, Urbanistica ed Ingegneria delle Costruzioni of Politecnico di Milano, the design workshop “Metabolism of a City_NYCER(Lab) VI – 2018” focused on Roosevelt Island in New York City, and the role of the East/Hudson River corridor. Guest students participated in topical lectures organized within the workshop and in site visits to better understand issues and potentials regarding the site, which was approached at several dimensional scales. They worked in teams to elaborate design proposals able to integrate with metropolitan, urban, neighborhood and building strategies, catalyzing through the projects issues regarding natural ecosystems and urban ecologies, processes of transition and urban growth, layered infrastructures and post-industrial environments, new urban morphologies and building typologies, new possibilities for public spaces, retrofitting strategies and advanced technologies and materials. The first draft of the project and the mapping/survey exercises elaborated upon during the workshop and discussed at the final reviews with guests with diverse expertise, will be further developed during a spring semester studio in Milan, generating new possible solutions for a sustainable and environmentally balanced growth of Roosevelt Island and its surroundings. Therefore design strategies explored issues such as rising water levels, climate change, and rethinking the vulnerability and accessibility of the entire waterfront. Solutions will include reduction or managing of pollution, adaptive reuse of existing building and infrastructures, improvement of connectivity and circulation systems, and envisioning new typologies of spaces for public and shared activities in integrated and adaptable ways. Proposals are asked to creatively consider the integration of social and spatial factors at the scale of the metropolitan region, but at the same time to understand their effects at the local level. The workshop becomes then the opportunity to rethink tools and methodologies to holistically approach urban design for a more resilient and sustainable future, where the designer has a collaborative and multidisciplinary role, and is prepared to proactively operate within and throughout the specificities of multiple contexts and at the same time remain aware of the larger and rhizomatous systems which these belong to.

FACULTY

Giovanni Santamaria

GUEST PROFESSOR Antonella Contin Sandy Ming

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LECTURES, EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS Approaches to the use of media and methods in design throughout history have been central in guiding how Wmatter is conceived, communicated and configured. Today’s heterogeneous landscape of practice, research and teaching is increasingly connected to experimentation with the impact and consequences of quickly evolving technologies. In 2018-2019, the School of Architecture and Design’s public program of lectures and events focused on the critical issues and debates related to mediation and making, across a range of disciplinary areas and scales of design products. We hosted several public lectures, a roundtable panel discussion, an international symposium and a series of exhibitions featuring the work of SoAD faculty and students. In Fall 2018, our lecture series, titled, FAST-FORWARD >> MAKING PRAXIS, hosted a selection of established voices in a lecture series which surveyed a variety of professional and academic stances on design, communication, production and construction. In Hernan Diaz Alonso’s lecture, Déja vu, he reflected upon some of today’s most radical ventures in architectural education and practice. Jens Holm presented the work of his office, 3XN, rooted in a human-centric approach to formal, material and ecological innovations. Ben van Berkel’s lecture prompted a discussion with Dean Maria Perbellini about the impact of the qualities of designed environments upon people’s physical and emotional health and wellbeing. In the final lecture of Fall 2018, Monica Ponce de Leon articulated the leading edge of fabrication and robotics in the design disciplines as cultural constructions. Continuing in Spring 2019 as FAST-FORWARD >> MAKING MEDIUM(S), our series of lectures opened with Jenny Sabin’s lecture, Matter Design Computation: Biosynthesis and New Paradigms of Making, outlining her thesis on architecture’s relationships to scientific method and natural models as generative media. Our screening of the film, The Making of an Avant-Garde: The Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies 1967-1984, written produced and directed by Diana Agrest, was followed by an in-depth discussion on the Institute’s culture, community, personalities, products and 316

legacies. In the final lecture of our spring series, Gundula Proksch presented the potential synergies of integrating living ecological systems guided by economic principles in buildings and cities. In February 2019, the SoAD held a Roundtable Discussion, (UN) programming COMPUTATIONAL PROCESSES, organized and moderated by Marcella Del Signore, introduced by Anthony Caradonna, and comprising of a series of presentations by Naomi Frangos, Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa, Christian Pongratz, Tom Verebes and Dustin White. The presentations and proceeding round table panel discussion explored the impact of computational processes through design manifested both as algorithmic construct and analog forms of computational thinking and making. Addressing the possible overdetermination of predictability, precision, optimization, and repetition, in contrast with an evident cultural shift towards embracing uncertainty, in which processes, materials, tools, and production methodologies potentially allow for more emergent modes of conception, generation and production. In 2018-2019, our series of exhibitions in Fall 2018 in the Education Hall Gallery in Old Westbury started with Projecting the DMZ, an exhibition on Assistant Professor Dong-Sei Kim’s research on the Demilitarized Zone between North Korea and South Korea. It followed with an exhibition of SoAD students’ work during Summer Abroad in Spain, led by Profs. Giovanni Santamaria and David Diamond; Paintings and Drawings, by Professor Frances Campani; Variable Typologies – An Infrastructural Organism Urbanizing Los Angeles, curated by Associate Professor Naomi Frangos; and, Visualizing | Representing | Generating, led by Profs. Marcella Del Signore, Dustin White and John Bermudez. In a series of events, organized by Dustin White & Pavlina Vardoulaki under the umbrella of Automation in Design – Design by Automation, the SoAD hosted an international symposium, an exhibition at New York Tech’s Manhattan campus, and a permanent installation at America’s first Virtual Reality Cinema and Playlab in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, as the outcome of SoAD course ARCH 490. In April, presenters at the Design by Automation symposium included a keynote lecture by Theodore Spyropoulos, and presentations by Volkan Alkanoglu, Robert Stuart-Smith, Li Chen, and SoAD faculty, including Maria Alejandra Rojas, Marcella Del Signore, Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa, Pavlina Vardoulaki, and Dustin White. As a crucial part of the SoAD’s culture, the integration of these public events into the educational experience of our students continues to be motivated by creating a critical dialogue in which the future of architecture can be speculated upon, debated, and disseminated. Tom Verebes Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor Lectures and Events Committee Chair


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3. 1. Lecture : Déjà Vu, Hernan Diaz Alonso with Dean Maria Perbellini, Auditorium on Broadway. 2. Lecture : You are here—Projects by 3XN, Jens Holm, Manhattan Campus. 3. Lecture : Constructing Culture, Monica Ponce De Leon, Auditorium on Broadway.

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6. 4. Lecture : Arnhem Central – A Station with a Twist, Ben Van Berkel with Associate Professor Nader Vossoughian, Auditorium on Broadway. 5. Lecture : Arnhem Central – A Station with a Twist, Ben Van Berkel and Dean Maria Perbellini, Auditorium on Broadway. 6. Lecture : The Making of an Avant-Garde, Diana Agrest with Associate Professor Naomi Frangos, Auditorium on Broadway.

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1. Lecture : Matter Design Computation: Biosynthesis and New Paradigms of Making, Jenny Sabin, Auditorium on Broadway. 2. Lecture : Between Materiality, Landscape, and Light: Geometry, Borja Ferrater, Auditorium on Broadway. 3. Lecture : Creating Urban Agricultural Systems, Gundula Proksch with Associate Professor Matthias Altwicker, Auditorium on Broadway.

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5. 5. Symposium: (Un)Programming Computational Processes, Del Signore, Frangos, Lorenzo-Eiroa, Pongratz, Verebes, Vardoulaki, Manhattan Campus. 6. Symposium: Automation in Design | Design by Automation, White, Vardoulaki, Spyropoulos, Caradonna, Del Signore, Chen, Rojas, Eleazer, Manhattan Campus.

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1,2. Exhibition : Projecting the DMZ led by Assistant Professor Dong-sei Kim, Education Hall, Center Gallery. 3. Exhibition : Summer Abroad in Spain led by Associate Professor Giovanni Santamaria and Professor David Diamond, Education Hall, Center Gallery. 4. Exhibition : Paintings and Drawings by Frances Campani, Education Hall, Center Gallery.

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5,6,7. Exhibition: Automation in Design | Design by Automation led by Dustin White and Pavlina Vardoulaki, Manhattan Campus.

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1,2. Exhibition : Variable Typologies – An Infrastructural Organism Urbanizing Los Angeles led by Associate Professor Naomi Frangos, Education Hall, Center Gallery.

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3,4. Exhibition: Visualizing | Representing | Generating led by Marcella Del Signore, Dustin White and John Bermudez, Education Hall, Center Gallery.

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CONVERSATION NYIT SoAD ALUMNI

Christian Wade

Degree Earned: Bachelor of Architecture, NYIT SoAD Year Graduated: 2019 Current Position: Junior Designer Q: Why did you choose to study architecture? A: Growing up I enjoyed being creative, always playing with Legos and drawing. Along with that, most of my family members are engineers, so naturally I gravitated towards archi;tecture and decided that this field would be my ultimate goal at an early age. After middle school I decided to go to a technical school for the Engineering/Robotics and Architecture program to explore my interests further. It is there that I learned some of the technical and creative drivers in architecture, which made me eager to explore more ultimately at NYIT. Q: What ways studying architecture at NYIT has aided your development as a student? A: The professors at NYIT were crucial in my development as a designer, allowing me to explore my creativity as well as my design sensibilities and understanding space. My professors always reminded me of the role the architect assumes in our society and how we affect the built and unbuilt spaces simultaneously. Beyond professionalism, confidence, and technical skills, the biggest takeaway for me was: everything we do as architects has a direct or indirect consequence whether it is positive or negative, despite our intentions. This notion shifted my views as a student, from working toward a letter grade to working toward an idea and using my skills to explore these ideas effectively.

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Q: What advice would you like to pass down to prospective/new students entering the SOAD? A: Some advice I have to give to a prospective student is to make use of what this institution has to offer during your time there. NYIT’s faculty and students come from all around the world, and they all have a unique perspective to share with you. This is important because our field is so vast and complex it can feel overwhelming to someone who is “new”. Taking the time out to soak in all of the knowledge available to you, and then learning how to decipher it all with the help of your peers will allow you to develop your own thoughts and opinions as a student, which will eventually mold you into the graduate you want to be. Q: How did your education within the SOAD inform your professional/educational path after graduating? A: My previous professors have a lot of experience in the professional architecture world, so they gave me great insight in what varying architectural offices look for in potential hires as well as what I should be looking for based on my personal goals. I was also able to spend five years developing skills as a designer, but also in BIM programming which is in high demand for several offices. It was also stressed to me the importance of self-worth as I became a professional and learning how to balance eagerness in learning new things with confidence in my knowledge gathered prior as a student.


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Teresa Ferreira

Degree Earned: Bachelor of Architecture, NYIT SoAD Year Graduated: 2019 Current Position: Junior Architect Q: Why did you choose to study architecture? A: I chose Architecture as I became aware that the African continent lacks infrastructure, affordable housing, institutional and public spaces, it lacks the essential elements that are crucial for a healthy and livable environment for everyone regardless of their social status. I’m from Angola but I grew up in Portugal, whenever I would go back home, I would be confronted by the reality the people in my country were living in. I wished I could do something that would have a positive impact on society, and I believed that pursuing a degree in Architecture would be the way to go and so I did it! Q: What ways studying architecture at NYIT has aided your development as a student? A: The way the school has designed the Architecture program it’s so dynamic and complete that allows us to experience the field in so many ways, weather you are into landscape or transportation, into technology or hand drawing it trains you in a way that you can be ready for the professional world and at the same time allows you to explore your area of interest. The strong studio culture also to contributed a lot on my growth as a student as it exposed to constantly interact with my classmates as we learned a lot from each other.

Q: After graduating NYIT, how connected are you with NYIT faculty and students? Has this had an impact on your professional/academic path? A: I would advise them to take advantage of the resources the department makes available for us such as lectures and workshops. While we are at school we tend to get so caught up with assignments and projects that we never prioritize such events but now that I look back, I wish I managed my time better and attended more. Many of these events are hosted by great professionals that share with us their expertise on the field with their best work/achievements which is such an honor because not every Architecture school gives you such opportunity. Q: What advice would you like to pass down to prospective/new students entering the SOAD? A: My education within the SOAD has been of such positive impact that it goes beyond my educational and professional path, it opened my horizons in so many aspects that it allowed me to develop skills I never thought I would. The intense workload has taught me how to manage my time and work efficiently which is something of extreme relevance in the professional setting. Being exposed to so many challenging projects also allowed me to become more versatile while designing, always be a critical thinker and learn how work in teams.

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Zeynep Kurt

Degree Earned: Bachelor of Architecture, NYIT SoAD Year Graduated: 2019 Current Position: Architectural Designer at the Turett Collaborative Q: Why did you choose to study architecture?

Q: What advice would you like to pass down to prospective/new students entering the SOAD?

A: Initially I didn’t want to be an architect, and I started as an “undecided major” at NYIT. I took a drawing class and met many architecture students. I enjoyed it so much and decided to take a design studio class which turned out to be a completely different world than what I expected. It allowed me to be more creative, connected my mind to my hands, and made me spatially more self-aware. It was, and still is a constant self-exploration and learning about the possibilities of pushing personal limits. The journey was tough during school but It was worth it.

A: My advice for the prospective/new students would be that they should truly explore ideas, themselves, possibilities, different fields during school and always push the limits. Because it is harder to experiment with personal projects in professional life. Also, they should take advantage of the location we are in. NYC is a dynamic city and full of opportunities. It is hard to keep up with the architectural events during school but it helps with networking, and keeping yourself updated with the current situations.

Q: What ways studying architecture at NYIT has aided your development as a student?

Q: How did your education within the SOAD inform your professional/educational path after graduating?

A: The program provided a range of architecture professions both within and outside of the studio classes. In the design courses, I learned a set of skills that helps identify and solve the problem in a peculiar, creative and also in a practical way. The given projects were always related to current environmental, social, and economical issues, so we tackled the real life problems from local to global scale during school. There were also really intense elective courses such as parametric design, and visualization classes. Personally, I tried to learn the fundamentals of all taught software, and different model making tools, etc. which put me a step ahead in my job search and made me a well-rounded student.

A: The level of depth of the school projects, and using different mediums to execute the ideas definitely helped me find my passion and my personal architectural approach during those years. Especially in my thesis year, professor Santamaria’s Urban Design Studio made me realize that I really enjoy researching and designing at a bigger scale and want to pursue urban design. However, currently my main goal is to have my architecture license and fully understand the technical parts then go back to school or find a way to get involved with the urban design field in the future.

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EDITORIAL NOTE ‘ATMOSPHERE,’ Issue 03 showcases the pedagogy, activities, and initiatives of our school through the eyes of our students, in the form of design studios, technology, visualization, history, research, and collaborative projects from the Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. The body of work presented in this issue represents our undergraduate and graduate degree programs: B.S.A.T., B.ARCH., B.F.A.I.D., M.ARCH., M.S.A.U.R.D. Our school is dedicated to excellence and a culture of innovation in architecture and design through its curricula and specialized course formats, such as service-learning, travel abroad, sLAB, international workshops, exhibitions, events, and lecture series. The SoAD educates skilled professionals, talented designers, makers, innovators, and critical thinkers that project positive and transformative change in today’s world, operating within local and global contexts. While Atmosphere is retrospective, in the sense that it features work already accomplished, it also embodies an ongoing process of transformation, experimentation, and innovation, as SoAD renews its emphasis on technology to improve human environments. The student projects illustrated here provide a window into the rich, diverse, and creative Atmosphere at the NYIT School of Architecture Design and its community.

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The Editorial Team


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CONTRIBUTIONS NYIT ATMOSPHERE EDITORIAL STAFF EDITORS: Marcella Del Signore Sergio Elizondo Bradley Englesman Saw Hla New Sohee Noh Zeynep Kurt Christopher Pope Giovanni Santamaria Marc Schaut Grace Zajdel ART DIRECTORS: Marcella Del Signore Sergio Elizondo FACULTY COORDINATORS: Marcella Del Signore Giovanni Santamaria ADVISOR: Anthony Caradonna SPECIAL THANKS TO: Maria R. Perbellini Anthony Caradonna Tom Verebes Jeffrey Raven David Diamond Charles Matz

We thank all faculty & students who contributed to make this issue possible.

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ATMOSPHERE 03 _New York Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Design  

ATMOSPHERE 03 showcases the pedagogy, activities, and initiatives of New York Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Design thr...

ATMOSPHERE 03 _New York Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Design  

ATMOSPHERE 03 showcases the pedagogy, activities, and initiatives of New York Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Design thr...

Profile for nyitsoad

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