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Save Smarter • Live Better • Rockford Region 95¢ • September 11, 2013

Right In Our Region

A rtists’ E nsemb l e K icks O f f 1 0 th Season

By Paul Anthony Arco, senior staff writer

I

f you enjoy good theater, make plans to check out Artists’ Ensemble Theater, a Rockford-based professional group beginning its 10th season – no easy feat in today’s world. “Starting a non-profit theater in any community is a daunting task,” says Richard Raether, artistic director. “To reach that first years as a small business, nonprofit arts organization, is a big deal.” rtists nsemble produces a fiveshow season of Equity theater at Rockford niversity s lark rts enter. his year s lineup includes a little of everything – mystery, music and humor. Continued on p. 20

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In This Issue Right in Our Region: Artists’ Ensemble....20 Your Home: Fall Table Decor......................11 Inspiration & Worship ..............................12 Your Kitchen: Ultimate Football Parties.....15 Your Style: Dress for College Success......17 Your Health: Helping Young Athletes........25 Your Fun.................................................... 27 On the Town ............................................. 29 Your Money: Insuring Young Drivers ........33 Cover photo: D a v i d A . Berg er G rey i n “ J eev es i n a t ri l ogy of W ode hous t he i r w orl d pr em i eres at A be en pr od uced i n C hi cago, M i l w auk ee, M i ne apol i s and

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L y d ia e f i rs t had e s i nc e l phi a, ac es .

Smart L iving Weekly Pub l isher/ E d itor- in- Chief B ill H ughes

E x ec utiv e E d itor J anine P umilia M anaging E d itor/ W eb E d itor C hris L inden A ssoc iate E d itor/ Spec ial Proj ec ts E d itor K arla N agy Senior Staf f W riter/ Promotions Coord inator P aul Anthony Arc o G raphic s D irec tor B lak e N unes G raphic A rtist C hristin D unmire G raphic s/ E d itorial A ssistant R ebec c a N unes G eneral Sal es M anager B rent H ughes Sal es M anager B rad H ughes A c c ount E x ec utiv es S teve B lac hford, L isa C hatfield, B rian H ughes & L iz T homas A d ministration & Circ ul ation M anager L isa H ughes W eb site www. N W Q S martL iving. c om P ublished by H ughes M ed ia Corp. 7 2 8 N . P rospec t S t. , R oc k ford, I L , 6 1 1 0 7 ( 8 1 5 ) 3 1 6 - 2 3 0 0 , F ax : ( 8 1 5 ) 3 1 6 - 2 3 0 1 lhughes@ northwestq uarterly. c om Smart Living Weekly. Copyright 2013 by Hughes Media Corp., 728 N. Prospect St., Rockford, IL, 61107. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited.

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‘The Play’s the Thing’

I

was one of those shy teens who c rawled out of my shell only after c rawling onto a high sc hool stage. T he performing arts were my nic he, at a time when I badly needed one. I was no athlete, that’ s for sure. T heater and music transformed my sc hool life from miserable to magic al, and I was serious about it: I was the only ki d in the H arlem C lass of ’ 79 to appear in all 13 produc tions those four years. N o disrespec t to athletic s, whic h c an be wonderful for ki ds, but they’ re not the only way we learn to proc ess wins and losses, or to perform under pressure, or to func tion as part of a team. I rec all the j ubilation of being voted “ M ost D ramatic ” by my senior c lass. I also rec all the heartbreak of failing to c apture the lead in “ M y F air L ady.” M y good friend K aren landed the role and not only performed it more brilliantly than I ever c ould have, but also worke d harder to master it than I ever would have. S till, it was a blow to my fragile self- c onfidenc e. D uring the weeks of rehearsal, I learned to ac c ept disappointment and to be sinc erely happy for my deserving friend – no small thing for an ambitious and self- c entered 17- year- old. P urely by c oinc idenc e, while we were preparing for this issue, I rec eived in the mail an old photo from our 197 produc tion of “ Y ou C an’ t T ake I t W ith Y ou,” me in a blonde wig, as Alic e. I t was from K aren, who wrote: “ P erhaps you might enj oy these memories. ” I ndeed, I do. And I ’ m grateful for the life lessons that c ame with them. D uring the ’ 70s and ’ 80s , our little band of aspiring T hespians attended N ew Americ an T heater shows, awed by the ultra- talented E qui ty ac tors there – people like S tephen V rtol I I I and L inda Abronski . T hankf ully, these loc al luminaries are still delighting us in produc tions staged by Artist E nsemble T heater, whic h is now in its 1 0 th year. S o it’ s with spec ial j oy that we offer this c over artic le by one of our own talented teammates, P aul Anthony Arc o, a sports guy who understands that the world needs artists, too. ❚ Jan ine Pumil ia, E ex c utive E d itor

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Y H  G

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Fall into Great Tabletop Decorating Ideas aying goodbye to summer doesn’ t have to be a sentimental ending, when you c onsider it’ s also a beginning - - the ki c kof f to autumn. I t’ s a great time to dress up your home for fall entertaining, whether you’ re inviting friends to gather around the television and root for your favorite team or you’ re throwing an elaborate dinner party. “ D ec orating trends for this fall are really fun and func tional,” says visual merchandiser John riffith. “ olors that evok e a sense of nostalgia and family are a really big part of the visual design message for autumn 2013. R eds, golds and oranges are trending this fall. T hese hues are not only warm and c omforting; they’re re ective of the season.” riffith and teammate Julie Robbins add their own unique spin on seasonal design vignettes for R eplac ements, L td., the world’ s largest retailer of old and new c hina, c rystal, silver and c ollec tibles.

R obbins says that mixi ng in great fall c olor c an be as simple as adding a c harger plate or c olorful serving piec es. “ U sing c olored glass is a fantastic way of infusing autumn c olors to c reate a seasonal feel,” says R obbins. “ Amber- c olored glass is really popular this fall bec ause the ric h, warm c olor goes with so many patterns and designs. I ’ m big on the pressed vintage patterns; depression glass, c oin glass and sandwic h glass are all very lovely and nostalgic . I t looks great to mix designs whic h share the same c olors or to c ombine an array of c olors within a plac e setting.” M etal serveware is another popular trend. “ W e’ re inc orporating metal serveware into many of our displays bec ause you c an do so muc h with it from a design standpoint,” says riffith. “These are great ac c ent piec es you c an dress up

or down, plus it’ s family- and footballseason friendly. M etal serveware is also very func tional. O nc e heated, the alloy retains warmth to ke ep food warmer longer or c ooler longer, if you c hill these piec es. W e’ re using a lot of fun shapes, like leaf piec es and turke y platters.” Apples, gourds, pumpki ns and green pears bring a brilliant splash of c olor to the table, too. F ind more dec orating ideas at R eplac ements’ Y ouT ube c hannel and F ac ebook pa ge. ❚ (Source: BPT)

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I  W

Ready Hearts T

welve years ago today, the U nited S tates suffered a terrorist attac k unlike any it had ever know n; nearly 3,0 people died. D uring the aftermath, both ext raordinary ac ts of lovingki ndness and bitter ac ts of blind revenge played out, reminding us that whatever is sown into our hearts will emerge in times of stress. I n this world, we often have no c ontrol over the heartbreak whic h befalls us, whether it’ s c aused by disease, natural disaster, wic ke d violenc e or some other tool of S atan. J esus says in J ohn 10: 10: “ T he thief c omes only to steal and ki ll and destroy.” B ut he doesn’ t stop there. He finishes with “I have come that they might have life, and have it to the full.” (N IV ) W hile we c an’ t c ontrol the world around us, we can c ontrol the world w i t hi n us. W e c an dec ide, for exa mple, to reac t to tragedy by sowing love and light, rather than more darkne ss. S c ripture has a lot to say about preparing our hearts well. T he word “ heart” is used hundreds of times in the B ible, most often translated, in the N ew T estament, from the G reek word ka rdia ( as in our related word, c ardiology) . I t’ s the very c ore of our being, the thing whic h defines us and can never be hidden from G od. ( M an looks on the outward appearanc e, but the L ord l ook s on t h e he ar t - - I S amuel 16: 7.) I n M atthew 12, a group of elite religious leaders, or P harisees, c onspire to destroy J esus, after he heals a deformed man on the S abbath. J esus take s the opportunity to teac h about the heart, in M atthew 12: 3- 35 ( N I V ) . “ M ake a tree good and its fruit will be good, or make a tree bad and its fruit will be bad, for a tree is rec ogniz ed by its fruit. Y ou brood of vipers, how c an you who are evil say anything good? For the mouth speak s w hat the heart is f ul l of . A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in him, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in him.” W e need to store up good things in our hearts. O nly then are we prepared to be the hands and feet of J esus C hrist, in the best - - and worst - - of times. ❚ 12

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How to Throw the Ultimate Football Party F

ootball season is here, and whether you' re a diehard fan or just a fan of all the Sunday parties, chances are you' re going to attend or host a get-together centered around the country' s favorite sport, sometime soon. Lifestyle expert K ris Schoels of oung arried hic has some simple suggestions for making the most of football parties.

Decorations The aesthetics of a party are half the fun, so give guests something fun to look at when they aren' t engrossed in the game. P ick up plates, cups, napkins and ags with a football theme from a party store. ake your own football-themed decorations by taking a football-shaped stamp, inking it with your favorite team' s colors and stamping white napkins and plates. " To really get in the game-day theme, trade out a tablecloth for green turf and paint your own goal lines for a table topper," Schoels says. " Fill football helmets with chips for a more creative touch and swap out serving trays for chalkboards to label foods and chalk out ' plays.' " Drinks Drinks are a great opportunity to use some color to express team pride, advises Schoels. " Use a glass drink dispenser to show off a bright red punch for the K ansas ity hiefs add some blueberry juice to seltzer with a squeeze of lime for avor to make a blue fizz for the ew ork iants, or add a few drops of green food coloring to lemonade to show love for the reen ay Packers, she suggests. If you' re planning on having a kid' s table/viewing area, provide mini bottles of sports drinks so the kids can get into the game as well. Stadium Foods at Home When it comes to game day food, there are some classic favorites, both at home and at the stadium, like nachos, chicken fingers, hot dogs and soft pretzels. or your next party, Schoels recommends

chos. It' s a perfect way to enjoy stadium foods at home," says Schoels. " Emmi even sells a football helmet-shaped fondue pot at Emmi.com that' s sure to get your guests in the z one on Sunday, while they enjoy some warm, melted cheese."

putting a new twist on them with an ingredient that everyone loves -- melted cheese. " Ready-to-eat fondue, like the ones from Emmi of Switz erland, are perfect for dipping soft pretz els, pigs in a blanket, french fries and chicken fingers. ou can even use them as the cheese for na-

Dessert Whether satisfying a gridiron sweet tooth or keeping it light, there are creative ways to serve football-inspired desserts. " Use a tube of white icing to create laces on football-shaped treats, like brownies cut into the pigskin shape, cupcakes with chocolate frosting or chocolate-covered strawberries," says Schoels. " If opting for a healthier dessert option, try cutting out a watermelon in the shape of a helmet and filling it with fresh-cut fruit. ❚ ( Sour ce: B P T )

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Dressing for Success on Campus this Autumn

ollege students are c ash- strapped and time- c runc hed. S o how c an they look fashionable while j uggling their studies, c ampus ac tivities and a part- time j ob? I ntegrating basic items into their wardrobes is a start - and adding pops of c olor with accessories can transform a standard outfit into a standout style.

B uil d ing of f Fashion Stapl es “ F or both guys and girls, j eans, j ac ke ts and T - shirts are, of c ourse, all staples for a c ollege student’ s wardrobe,” says P eggy B lum, fashion program c oordinator at T he Art I nstitute of Austin, a branc h of T he Art I nstitute of H ouston. T his fall, “ blue is heralded as the new blac k,” says B lum. W arm reds and oranges, pastels, taxi c ab yellow and loden green are also trendy hues. B lum also suggests that c ollege students invest in boldstriped T - shirts, with stripes that vary in width. S he adds that prepster- style shirts are a fresh look for both men and women this fall. D enim W hile ski nny j eans still rule the denim world, expe c t to see them in neon c olors, or with printed or bleac hed treatments. Blum recommends that students seeking a more comfortable fit c hoose a “ boyfriend” j ean, whic h features more relaxe d styling without sacrificing style.

Also in style are wide- leg j eans and an overall masc uline look, says E milia V alle, program c oordinator for fashion at T he Art I nstitute of H ouston- N orth, a branc h of T he Art I nstitute of H ouston. “The look for the returning college student is definitely a c oat or j ac ke t with a strong masc uline look. F rom pastels - yes pastels even in fall - to traditional men’ s fabric s and some punk air, this upcoming season is full of overcoats to complete a strong polished style,” V alle says. ❚ (Source: BPT)

Bringing the World of Music to Rockford It’s September, Let the Season Begin!

Thursday, September 12, 2013 at 5:30 pm “Music on Main. . . Classically Inspired”

Thursday, September 19, 2013 at 5:30 pm “Jazz at Emerson”

$15/Adults, $10/Students Emerson House, 420 North Main

$15/Adults, $10/Students Emerson House, 420 North Main

Friday, September 13, 2013 at 7:00 pm

Friday, September 20, 2013 at 7:30 pm “Mendelssohn Mainstage Series”

Domenic DiCello, classical piano

The Avalon String Quartet

Firelight Dimmers

Chicago Brass Band

$15/Adults, $10/Students Mendelssohn Hall, 406 North Main

$25/Adults, $10/Students Court Street United Methodist Church 215 North Court Street

Saturday, September 14, 2013 at 7:30 pm Charlotte’s Web Troubadour Series

Friday, September 27, 2013 at 7:30 pm “Charlotte’s Web Mainstage Series”

$15/Adults, $10/Students Emerson House, 420 North Main

$20/Adults, $10/Students Mendelssohn Hall, 406 North Main Street

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California Guitar Trio

Mendelssohn Performing Arts Center

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Sept. 11

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Artists’ Ensemble Continued from cover

“Each season we try to do things that our audience has never seen before,” says Raether. “We do a number of original plays and regional premieres. We’re constantly out there looking for new plays that we can bring to Rockford. “You’re not going to see big spectacles, lush costumes and big cast shows,” he adds. “That’s not what we do. We do smaller, more intimate performances, with a focus on wonderful acting that tells a great story.” Raether says 80 percent of the actors are local and well-known, including Stephen F. Vrtol III and Linda Abronski. The others are regional performers from Chicago and Milwaukee. “One advantage for us is having a mostly familiar cast,” Raether says. “Still, to get it off the ground, to find that infrastructure, to find that organizational base and the funding to do what we want to do, is crucial. We’ve developed a following that, hopefully, will carry us on

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to be a regular part of the arts community.” It all started in 2003, when a group of friends who shared a passion for theater got together. “We were talking about theater and the type of theater we like to see,” says Raether, who spent 10 years at New American Theater. “Someone said, ‘Why don’t we just do it?’” The group decided to give it a try. “The worst thing that could happen was that no one would come out,” Raether says. They planned one season that included three shows – the drama “Dinner with Friends,” the comedy “Inspecting Carol,” and the comedy/drama “Over the River and through the Woods” – just to gauge community response. “Much to our surprise, every performance of Dinner with Friends sold out,” Raether says. By its second year, Artists’ Ensemble made Rockford University its permanent home. The group not only holds rehearsals and performances on campus, but is able to use equipment and office space and work with staff and students.

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“It’s a great relationship,” Raether says. “Students begin their paths towards becoming union actors or stage managers. They get exposed to what it’s like to work in the business.” Artists’ Ensemble has developed a loyal and growing audience. That support has helped the organization to remain in the black since its inception. It employs three people and contracts with several others. “That’s been important to us,” Raether says. “We didn’t want to have to

Lance Retallick and Richard Raether in “It’s a Wonderful Life, A Live Radio Play,” part of Season 9.


worry about paying our bills. Being creative is difficult enough, without having financial issues hanging over your head.” Over time, Raether and staff have come up with innovative ways to engage audiences. For example, Raether and company hold informal chats with ticketholders prior to the first Saturday and Sunday matinee performance of each show. They talk to guests about subjects like scriptwriting, set design, or the business of the theater, then answer questions. “We’re trying to create an insight into what the audience is about to see,” Raether says. “Hopefully, it will increase their appreciation and enjoyment of the performance.” Raether also co-hosts a monthly public access show to promote not only the Artists’ Ensemble, but other community arts programs as well. A subscription to Artists’ Ensemble includes five shows for the price of four, guaranteed seating, a ‘bring a friend’ discount, and free ticket exchange. Single-performance ticket prices are $10 for students; $28 for seniors; $30 for

adults, and $19 on Thursdays. Students also can buy unsold tickets five minutes to curtain for just $5. People under 30 can purchase an M-Card for $45, which includes three tickets that can be used for one performance with two similar-aged friends, or individual tickets for three different performances. “We’re constantly working to keep the prices low,” Raether says. “The bottom line is we want to perform in front of a full audience. That’s why we do theater.” Artists’ Ensemble partners with local restaurants such as Alchemy, Olympic Tavern and Five Forks Market. “So many people go out to eat before or after the show,” Raether says. “We’re local and these restaurants are local. It’s much more affordable to go out to dinner and see a show here, than travel to Chicago.” Raether promises that the 10th year of Artists’ Ensemble will be a special one. “Live theater is like watching someone walk a live wire,” he says. “Anything can happen. It creates an excitement that’s pretty unique and powerful.”❚

AE 2013-14 Season The Mystery of Irma Vep Sept. 6-22 A howlingly funny comedy that’s just like Downton Abbey, only with werewolves The Gifts of the Magi Dec. 6-22 Two O. Henry tales intertwine in this enchanting musical The Shakespeare Conspiracy March 14-30 A tale of mystery, manhunts, and the greatest literary deception of all time God of Carnage May 9-25 Two sets of parents meet to have a civilized, rational discussion about a conflict between their two sons. The result: all-out war in this comedy. Crumbs from the Table of Joy June 13-29 A captivating tale about a 17-year-old girl who moves to Brooklyn in 1950. For more information, visit artistsensemble.org

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Keep Your Young Athletes Safe and Strong P

laying sports c an teac h ki ds the importanc e of teamwork, help them to stay physic ally ac tive and c reate positive habits that last a lifetime. An inj ury, however, c an sideline young athletes for the season - or longer. A rec ent study by S afe ids Worldwide identified measures that athletes, c oac hes and parents c an take to prevent serious inj uries so ki ds c an stay in the game. A sports inj ury sends a young athlete to the emergenc y room every 25 sec onds in the U .S ., ac c ording to the report “ G ame C hangers.” M ade possible with support from J ohnson & J ohnson, the report exa mines data from the U .S . C onsumer P roduc t S afety C ommission’ s N ational E lec tronic I nj ury S urveillanc e S ystem ( N E I S S ) , whic h expl ores the types of inj uries sidelining youths. T he most c ommon types of inj uries in 201 were strains or sprains; frac tures; c ontusions and abrasions; and c onc ussions.W hile it may not be surprising that

the sport with the highest c onc ussion rate is football, wrestling and ic e hoc ke y have the sec ond- and third- highest rates, respec tively. S afe K ids rec ommends urges c oac hes, parents and athletes to adopt four ke y strategies to help reduc e inj uries: et educated and then share your know ledge. T hose interested in staying at the top of their game c an attend a S afe K ids sports c linic or go to safeki ds.or g to learn more. Teach children how to prevent inj ury, by staying hydrated; warming up with exe rc ises and stretc hing; protec ting inj ury- prone areas like pitc hing arms and kne es; and getting plenty of rest between games. Make sure kids know not to suffer in silenc e. I nj ured athletes may not report how they’ re feeling bec ause don’ t want to let down their teams, c oac hes or parents by aski ng to sit out a game or prac tic e.

Support coaches when they make dec isions that protec t the wellbeing of the athlete. H alf of c oac hes who responded to a 201 S afe K ids survey admitted they’ d been pressured by a parent or athlete to ke ep an inj ured c hild in the game. “ M ost states have laws to protec t young athletes from inj uries or repeat inj uries,” C arr says, “ but parents and c oac hes are the front line of protec tion for our ki ds. W orki ng together, we c an ke ep our ki ds ac tive, healthy and safe so they c an enj oy the sports they love for a lifetime.” ❚ (Source: BPT)

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AE: The Mystery of Irma Vep Sept. 6-22, see website for times. A gothic comedy full of werewolves and mummies and vampires. Oh my! Artists’ Ensemble, Maddox Theatre, Rockford College, 5050 E. State St., Rockford. Info: AE, (815) 394-5004, artistsensemble.org. Animal Day For Families Sept. 14, 10-3 p.m. Help to milk the goats, feed the horses, gather eggs from the chickens and make goat’s milk ice cream. Bring a sack lunch. $20. Angelic Organics Learning Center, 1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia, Ill., (815) 389-8455, learngrowconnect.org. Emergency Preparedness Day Sept. 14, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Make an emergency plan for you and your family. Visit with the Rockford Fire Department, Rockford Health System, U of I College of Medicine, Restoration and Insurance Companies. Take home a starter emergency kit. Sullivan Center, 118 N. Main St., Rockford. Hotrods and Handlebars Sept. 14, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum presents this free event featuring a multitude of old-fashioned cars and spiffed up motorcycles displayed on the museum grounds. Cars can be entered for judging; Enjoy food sold by vendors and DJ entertainment. Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum, 411 Kent St., Rockford Ill. Greenwich Village Art Fair Sept. 14-15, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5. A Rockford tradition, this outdoor fine art fair has been around since 1948. The fair is held on the grounds of the Rockford Art Museum at Riverfront Museum Park, 711 N. Main St., Rockford. Beekeeping Workshop Sept. 15, 2-4 p.m. Get bees ready for overwintering. Outdoor workshop; bring your bee suits. $2. Byron Forest Preserve, Byron, (815) 234-8535. Settings III: Designer Tablescapes Sept. 16, 10 a.m. This Rockford Women’s Club fundraiser will will showcase new and creative table settings and arrangements, with vendors present. Luncheon at noon. To make your reservation, contact Neva KelleyPaesani at (815) 637-1220.

Actors David Gingerich and Stephen Vrtol III in Artists’ Ensemble’s “The Mystery of Irma Vep.”

6th Annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s Sept. 21, 8:30 a.m.-noon. Held in more than 600 communities nationwide, this is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Library Park, 918 W. Main St., Lake Geneva, Wis. Call (800) 272-3900 or (262) 249-2328, alz.org/sewi/. 1876 Banwarth House Historic Tours Through Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Enjoy an informative guided tour and experience what everyday life was like during America’s centennial year. Barnwarth House & Museum, 408 E. Sycamore St., Elizabeth, Ill. (815) 8582014, banwarthmuseum.com. Worldwide Day of Play Sept. 21, 11 a.m. –3 p.m. Sept. 21 is the official day to turn off all things electronic, get off the couch, and go play! Join the fun at the Discovery Center and make masks, learn to drum, move with a kids’ Zumba class, and behave like animals with Rockford Dance Company performers. Discovery Center Museum, 711 N. Main St., Rockford, Discoverycentermuseum.org. RSO’s Opening Night Gala Sept. 21, Cocktails 5 p.m.; Opening Night Classics Concert, 6:30 p.m., featuring soprano Kathy Pyeatt. Cocktail attire. Coronado Performing Arts Center, Rockford. RSVP and get more info. at Symphony.com. ❚

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2nd Cousins Bar & Grill, 6246 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves Park, (815) 637-2660: 9/11 & 9/18 DJ Aaron Hodge; 9/12 & 9/17 DJ Sandy Monster; 9/13 Stateline Country Band; 9/14 DJ Lori & Esko – Mexican Independence Day Party, all 9 p.m. Big Al’s, 610 N. Bell School Road, Rkfd., (815) 398-6411: 9/13 The Sensations; 9/14 Clutch Cargo, all 9 p.m. Butterfly Club, 5246 E. County Road X, Beloit, (608) 362-8577: Fri. & Sat. First 2 Weekends of Month: Mike Williamson; 7 p.m. Cannova’s, 1101 W. Empire, Freeport, (815) 233-0032: Live Pianist Fri. & Sat. 6-9 p.m. Coronado Performing Arts Center, 314 N. Main St., Rkfd.: 9/20 Buddy Guy & Jonny Lang, 8 p.m. Call (815) 968-0595, coronadopac.org. District Bar & Grill, 205 W. State, Rkfd., (815) 977-4524: 9/12 Nonpoint w/Redline Chemistry & Surrender the Fall, 7 p.m.; 9/20 Back Country Roads, 10 p.m. Franchesco’s, 7128 Spring Creek, Rkfd., (815) 229-0800: 9/14 Mr. Big Stuff; all 9 p.m. The Grove, 100 E. Grove, Poplar Grove, (815) 765-1002: Thu. Open Mic, 6 p.m.; Fri. Karaoke, 9 p.m.; 9/14 Shot Gun James; 9/21 Clutch Cargo, 8:30 p.m. Hope and Anchor, 5040 N. 2nd, Loves Park, (815) 977-8585: 9/13 Friday the 13th w/Mr. Burgundy. JustGoods Listening Room, 201 7th St., Rockford, (815) 965-8903: Live Musicians Every Fri. Night. Jax Pub, 4160 North Perryville Rd. Loves Park, (815) 877-0600: Wed., Fri., Sat., Wed., Fri., Sat., Music w/Special Guest.

Murphy’s Pub & Grill, 501 S. Perryville, Rkfd., (815) 986-0950: 9/11 & 9/18 DJ Sandy Monster; 9/12 DJ Aaron Hodge; 9/13 DJ Jes One; 9/14 DJ Lori & Esko: Halfway to St. Patty’s Party, all 9 p.m. Poison Ivy, 5765 Elevator Road, Roscoe, (815) 623-1480: Live DJ Fri. & Sat. 9 p.m. Rascal’s Bar & Grill, 5223 Torque Road, Loves Park, (815) 636-9207: 9/14 Prime Time, 9 p.m. Rockton Inn, 102 E. Main St., Rockton, (815) 624-8877: Thu. Harlan Jefferson, 7 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. DJ Ron Schoepfer, 8 p.m.; 2nd Fri. of month Ken Curtis 7 p.m. Shooters (inside Don Carter Lanes), 4007 E. State St., Rkfd., (815) 399-0314: Live Band Sat., 9 p.m. Shooters East (inside Cherry Bowl), 7171 Cherryvale Blvd., (815) 332-5229: 9/13 Penatonics; 9/14 Dirty Fishnet Stockings, 9 p.m. Shooters North (inside Forest Hills Lanes), 7742 Forest Hills Road, Loves Park, (815) 654-3900: Live Band Sat. Splitters, 5318 N. 2nd St., Loves Park, (815) 877-6051: 9/14 The Hitmen; 9/20 Raised on Radio, all 9 p.m.

Kryptonite, 308 W. State, Rkfd., (815) 9650931: Thu. Karaoke & BARGO 8:30 p.m.; 9/14 Mana Kintorso, 9 p.m., $5. Mary’s Place, 602 N. Madison, Rkfd., (815) 962-7944: 9/11 Bobby Messano; 9/12, 9/17 & 9/19 Open Stage; 9/13 Henhouse Prowlers; 9/14 Jimmy Z; 9/18 Karaoke, all 9:30 p.m. Oscars Pub & Grill, 5980 East State St., Rkfd., 815-399-6100: Wed., Fri., Sat., Music w/Special Guest.

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Capture Memorable Back-to-School Photos A

s children across the country gear up with their new backpacks, school supplies, clothes and haircuts, parents are reaching for their cameras, ready to capture another milestone the annual backto-school photo. ven if you forgot to pull out the camera on the first day, it’s not too late to capture a memorable image ust like a professional. Here are some tips. Preparation: hange the batteries in your camera or charge your phone the night before you plan to take pictures. Lights: Make sure you have proper lighting - using natural light like the sun may be best. ighting can make or break your photo, so be sure there is enough light to showcase your child, yet not distract from the photo. Avoid having your child look directly into the sunlight, which causes s uinty eyes. Also avoid shooting directly into the sunlight as it will darken the photo overall. If you are using a ash, make sure that your child is not too close to a background that may cast a shadow.

Share it: The first day of school is a special time for parents and children, so why not share it hoose your favorite photo and post it on the Thomas Built Buses Photo ontest page on Facebook. Parents who submit the top five winning photos will each receive a 2,000 donation for their child’s school program in science, technology and math. Find out more about Thomas Built Buses and its Back to School Photo ontest atthomasbus.com or facebook.com thomasbuiltbuses. ❚ (Source: BPT)

Setting: What says “back to school” better than a yellow school bus hoose a background that will visually tell the story of the special occasion. Framing: Try different angles - closeups, mid-range, long-range - to add visual appeal. Try some photos in landscape mode, some in portrait, and maybe some that are even off-center. ou can add some depth by framing a photo with an interesting foreground or background. Capture the moment: oing back to school touches on a variety of emotions excitement, nervousness or maybe even a little reluctance. onvey the day’s true feelings with natural expressions and poses through candid photos. atch your children as they’re getting ready for their first day, as they await the school bus, or as they’re waving good-bye. andid shots that show true emotions will capture the spirit of the day and tell a better story than posed shots.

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Daily News Sites & Stations

Information Resources

n today’s fast-paced world, you can get breaking local and national news within minutes of when it occurs, from many different organizations. The following are reliable sources bringing you news and weather updates 24/7.

t Hughes Meda Corp., we’ve developed several sources of information you can utilize to enhance every aspect of your life. We’re interested in your thoughts about how we can make them even more valuable to you.

Northwest Quarterly Magazine, featuring Arts & Entertainment, Recreation & Destination and Mind & Spirit calendars as well as the Northwest Regional Dining Guide. northwestquarterly.com

• 13 WREX, WREX.com • 23 WIFR, WIFR.com • 17 WTV0, mystateline.com • WNTA 100.5 FM Radio, nta.fm • WNIJ Public Radio, 89.5 FM, northernpublicradio.org • WROK Radio, 1440 AM, 1440wrok.com • Rockford Register Star, rrstar.com • Rock River Times, rockrivertimes.com

WeBuyLocal Guide to Locally Owned Businesses, including a comprehensive medical guide to local physicians, clinics and hospitals. webuylocal.com Smart Living Weekly magazine, featuring weekly calendars for Family Fun and On the Town (nightlife) events. ❚

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Young Drivers? Parents Can Still Save on Insurance By Jim Killam

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s their teens begin driving, some parents feel like their best financial response is to start buying lottery tickets. Here are some better strategies. First, push the books. Most insurance companies offer a “good student” discount for high-school and full-time college students, usually up to age 25. The savings can be substantial, especially if your insurer also offers a safety program for young drivers who remain ticket- and accident-free. Beyond that, minimizing insurance costs often comes down to the vehicle Junior is driving. “The parents who get most upset are usually the ones who have bought their son or daughter a fancy new car that needs full coverage,” says Julie Weaver, State Farm Insurance Agent, 3065 N. Perryville Road, Rockford. “If they can buy something that’s older, maybe not worth as much, they’ll save a lot,” Weaver adds, because it

might not need collision coverage. Another way parents can save is to keep their overall number of vehicles lower than the number of licensed drivers in the family. That can keep a teen classified as an occasional driver instead of a primary driver. “As soon as we have one car per person, it’s safe to assume that that young driver has access to one of the cars all the time, or most of the time,” Weaver says. When a child turns 18, parents can take another step to protect themselves financially. “At that point, many parents, if they’re truly concerned about a liability situation, might consider taking their

own names off the title of the car that their son or daughter drives the most,” Weaver says. “When the parents’ names aren’t on the title … you’re trying to limit your liability exposure. If it’s not your car, that’s one less way that somebody can try to tie you into a liability situation for something that your son or daughter did.” ❚

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