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Smart L iving Weekly Save Smarter • Live Better • Rockford Region/Freeport 95¢ • November 13, 2013

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Right in Our Region

‘Messiah’ Celebrates the Christ in Christmas By Chris Linden, managing editor

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ore than 130 vocalists and instrumentalists will ring in the holiday season on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, with the Rockford Choral Union’s 68th annual presentation of Handel’s Messiah, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 200 N. First St., Rockford. The singers represent about 65 local churches, and many of the professional and semi-professional musicians also perform with Rockford Symphony Orchestra. Nearly 1,200 people are expected to attend the performance. “It’s more than directing a great piece of music – it’s a ministry,” says Nat Bauer, who’s now in his 12th year of directing the concert. “It gets a message out that I think is important to remember. Jesus Christ lived among us, he died for us and there’s hope that he will come again. It’s the story of Christianity in two hours.” Continued on p. 20

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In This Issue Right in Our Region: 68 Years of Messiah ............... Cover & p. 20 Your Home Best Kitchen Update ..................................11 Inspiration & Worship ..............................12 Your Kitchen Talking Turkey with Pete .............................15 . Your Outing Barbara Buck Santas, Freeport .................17 Your Health Three Key Teen Issues ...............................25 Your Fun ................................................... 27 . On the Town ........................................... 29 Your Money Avoiding Medical Identity Theft .................33 Tips Rethinking Assisted Living .........................31

Smart L iving Weekly ™

Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Bill Hughes Executive Editor Janine Pumilia

Managing Editor/Web Editor Chris Linden Associate Editor/Special Projects Editor Karla Nagy Senior Staff Writer/Promotions Coordinator Paul Anthony Arco Graphics Director Blake Nunes Graphic Artist Christin Dunmire General Sales Manager Brent Hughes Sales Manager Brad Hughes Account Executives Steve Blachford, Brian Hughes Administration & Circulation Manager Lisa Hughes Website www.NWQSmartLiving.com Published by Hughes Media Corp. 728 N. Prospect St., Rockford, IL, 61107 (815) 316-2300, Fax: (815) 316-2301 lhughes@northwestquarterly.com Smart Living Weekly. Copyright 2013 by Hughes Media Corp., 728 N. Prospect St., Rockford, IL, 61107. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited.

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‘Handel’ing Curiosity

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ur family adopted a stray black cat who was dumped from a car into our QHLJKERUKRRG D IHZ \HDUV DJR $W ÂżUVW she was afraid of us, but now she’s bold as brass. Two indicators told us how well she was recovering from her traumatic past: she began to play and she regained her natural curiosity. By now, she’s pawed and prowled through every drawer, closet, cabinet and cardboard box in our house. Her curiosity is admirable. It’s a healthy quality in people, too. When we’re open to experiencing new things, we’re growing and thinking about something other than our own fears and problems. It’s smart living. I learn something new from every article we publish in Smart Living Weekly and Northwest Quarterly Magazine. This week I learned that Rockford Choral Union came together at the end of 1945, as local people sought to recover from the misery and horror of World War II. What a spectacular vision our churches acted upon when they decided to present George Frideric Handel’s Messiah as a gift to our community. They sang the story of Jesus Christ, using the unforgettable music composed by George Frideric Handel two centuries earlier. Music has a way of penetrating our souls in ways that words alone don’t. If you’ve never sung or really listened to Handel’s Messiah, perhaps this is the year to experience it right here in Rockford. The Baroque-era music famously employs “text painting,â€? meaning the notes imitate the words being sung, such as “mountainâ€? being a high note, “valleyâ€? a low note, etc. It’s brilliant, inspiring music that burrows into your memory for good. Of all the things that have come and gone from our region over the past seven decades, how wonderful that Rockford Choral Union’s gift to us persists. If you know someone who’s feeling down, suffering loss or sickness, or who simply ZRXOG EHQHÂżW IURP D JRRG SRVLWLYH VDW uration of the soul, consider taking them to experience this concert. Curious? Learn more in our cover article and at rockfordchoralunion.org. Janine Pumilia, Executive Editor Smart Living Weekly

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Your Home & Garden

Stone Counters Give Kitchens a Facelift By Jim Killam

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hink of the words “Brady Bunch kitchen,â€? and your mind completes the picture: Dark cabinetry. Bright-orange countertops. What might look like a design nightmare today represented the height of kitchen fashion in the early 1970s. That’s because color was about the only way you could create big impact in a kitchen’s look back then, says Doug 7UXVVRQL &HUWLÂżHG .LWFKHQ 'HVLJQHU DW

Andco Kitchens & Baths, Inc., 540 S. Perryville Road, Rockford. “People don’t look for that any more,â€? he says. “They tend to let texture be their guide as far as creating activity.â€? And with cabinets, woodwork and appliances trending toward a more satin ÂżQLVKDOX[XULRXVJORVVIRUFRXQWHUWRSV adds big contrast without having to add a lot of color. The most popular choices to accomplish that: granite or quartz. “It’s glossy, so that texture of the gloss is very attractive. Not only does it dress it up, but it’s a functional piece that goes way beyond any kind of functional Formica.â€? Countertop replacements are the most common jobs Andco does today, Trussoni says. Sometimes that’s in response to social or economic pressures. “A client will say, ‘My realtor says I need to get granite in my kitchen if

we’re going to get anyone interested in the house,’â€? he says. “And it’s true.â€? Even throwing, say, a $5,000 countertops allowance into a house-sale contract may not be enough in a buyer’s market, he adds. Buyers commonly want a turnkey home with no projects facing them. With money tight, homeowners who want to upgrade their kitchens should start with the counters, Trussoni says. “Depending on the age of the kitchen, a lot of people feel that at 20 years or younger, they can accommodate a big change in their kitchen with just countertops and decorative (cabinet) hardware,â€? he says. “Of course a fresh coat of paint is a nice big plus in bringing it together, too.â€? ] Get SLW Home & Garden Ä‚ĆŒĆ&#x;Ä?ĹŻÄžĆ? ÄžÇ€ÄžĆŒÇ‡Ç ÄžÄžĹŹÍ˜sĹ?Ć?Ĺ?ĆšEtY^ĹľÄ‚ĆŒĆš>Ĺ?Ç€Ĺ?ĹśĹ?͘ Ä?ŽžĂŜĚĆ?ĆšÄ‚ĆŒĆšÇ‡Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒͲÄšĹ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆšĹ˝ÄšÄ‚Ç‡Í˜

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Inspiration & Worship

The Messiah Still Speaks

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hat does it really mean to “love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind”? It’s one of the most important questions Christians ask themselves, since the Messiah himself, Jesus Christ, cited it as the “greatest commandment in the law.” This is recorded in three of the four gospels, and Jesus doesn’t stop there. He immediately adds: “And love your neighbor as yourself.” (Matthew 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 10:25). To truly love God and people, then, should be the focus of our daily lives, not just our Sunday mornings. “Don’t merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves,” admonishes James. “Do what it says.” (James 1:22). To do the word means we have to know the word for ourselves -- the actual word -- not just what people say about it. In every culture since Christ came to Earth, and ours is no exception, peoSOH KDYH PHQWDOO\ UHVKDSHG *RG WR ¿W comfortably with what they already believe. We want to think God is concerned about things WE think are important, or that our political action committee or news station tell us are important. In truth, much of what we fret about is never even mentioned in scripture. God didn’t call us out to parrot our culture, but to do His will. To be doers of the word and not hearers only requires us to study scripture and listen to the spirit of God inside us. The good news is that the living God “opens the eyes of our understanding” (Eph. 1:18) as we seek Him. As we put aside our idols and give God time and space to work within us, we begin to experience the joy that goes hand in hand with obeying the message of the Messiah. ] Compiled by Janine Pumilia Get ^>t/ŶƐƉŝƌĂƟŽŶΘtŽƌƐŚŝƉĂƌƟĐůĞƐ ĞǀĞƌLJǁĞĞŬ͘sŝƐŝƚEtY^ŵĂƌƚ>ŝǀŝŶŐ͘ĐŽŵ ĂŶĚƐƚĂƌƚLJŽƵƌͲĚŝƟŽŶƚŽĚĂLJ͘ 12

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Your Kitchen

Talking Turkey with Pete at 640 Meats B y K a r l a N a g y, a s s o c i a t e e d i t o r

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orget the Butterball Hotline or Food Network’s “Thanksgiving Live.â€? Local meat master Pete Lentz, butcher and owner of 640 Meats, 6410 E. Riverside Blvd., Rockford, has the answers to your turkey preparation queries. Fresh vs. Frozen: “Fresh turkeys are juicer and more tender,â€? says Lentz. “Frozen turkeys are injected with a solution of water and sodium, for preservation. When they thaw, they lose all of that moisture.â€? Seasoning: “Some people brine a fresh turkey,â€? says Lentz. “That’s soaking it in a solution of salt and herbs for 24 hours before cooking. You can do it with a thawed bird, but it’s already salty because of that injected solution.â€? Lentz says he seasons his fresh turkey with just salt and pepper and then UXEVEXWWHUXQGHUWKHVNLQIRUH[WUDĂ€D vor and moisture.

Lentz says. “I tuck in the wing tips or cover them in foil, to keep them from burning. I put some water in the bottom of the pan and baste every 30 minutes.�

How to Thaw: A frozen turkey is best thawed slowly in the refrigerator, so planning ahead is vital. “A 25-lb. bird ZLOO WDNH IRXU RU ÂżYH GD\V WR WKDZ WKLV way,â€? he says. Lentz will receive fresh turkeys from a farm in southern Wisconsin, on the Sunday before Thanksgiving, in all different weights. “They come to me processed and in cryovac bags, so they’ll be good in your fridge for two weeks, if you don’t cook them on Thanksgiving.â€? ]

Stuffed vs. Unstuffed: “I prefer to FRRN WKH VWXIÂżQJ RXWVLGH RI WKH ELUG´ says Lentz. “The turkey cooks faster ZKHQLWLVQÂśWVWXIIHG´+HÂżOOVWKHFDYLW\ with fresh-cut apples and salt and pepper. “The apples add moisture, and give D OLWWOH DSSOH Ă€DYRU , WKURZ WKH DSSOHV away afterward. Some people stuff their birds with carrots and celery or other kinds of vegetables.â€? Cooking Method: “I bake my bird,â€? says Lentz. “It’s a personal preference. I have customers who deep-fry theirs, but I’ve never done that. Just make certain the bird is completely thawed if it was frozen, and that you’ve patted it completely dry, before it hits that hot oil.â€? Covered vs. Uncovered: “I cook my turkey uncovered, at a lower temperature – 325 F, rather than 350 or 375,â€? Smart Living Weekly

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Your Outings

Master Santa Artist Hosts Open House By Karla Nagy

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n the studio of her beautiful Victorian house in Freeport, artist Barbara Buck creates her nationally recognized masterpieces. Her work is owned by people worldwide, and for more than 20 years, she’s earned her living by following her passion: sculpting and building Santas. On Nov. 22-24, Buck will host the 25th annual Barbara Buck Studio Santa Fest, at 1240 S. Walnut St. From 10 a.m.7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and noon-5 p.m. on Sunday, visitors can view a gallery of themed her Santas that include QRUWKZRRGV WUDSSHUV ¿VKHUPHQ 3DFNHUV & Bears, winemakers and more. Her Santas are all one-of-a-kind, heirORRPTXDOLW\ ¿JXUHV PDGH ZLWK ¿UVWUDWH materials, Old World craftsmanship – and lots of love. Buck, who loves Christmas, has crafted thousands of Santas over the years. They come to life in her workshop, on an old kitchen table, in her very Victorian-like basement. She uses mostly hand tools and

elbow grease – no computers or programmable sewing machines. A seamstress and a woodworker supply much of the clothing and props, although Buck has made all of the pieces herself in the past. Buck uses vintage fabric, antiques and special-order, handPDGHSURSVWRDGRUQKHU¿JXUHV which range between 28 and 36 inches tall. She sculpts the hands DQG KHDGV KHUVHOI IURP 3ULPR polymer clay. Each head requires a fourstep process, with baking between each. She uses glass eyes, and gives each Santa face its lifelike character by hand-carving and painting it. Buck builds each wooden armature herself, inserting heavy-duty wires into dowels that will become arms and legs, so that they’re posable. For their portly physiques, she stuffs SRO\¿OOLQWRSODLQFRWWRQERGLHVDQGDURXQG the armatures. After attaching the head and

KDQGV VKH WKHQ RXWÂżWV WKHP KDQGVHZQ clothes; real fur trim; beards made of TiEHWDQ 3HUVLDQ RU FXUO\ 0RKDLU ZRRO DQ tique and hand-picked props. They are placed in special poses with other props, to create the specialty themed Santas for which her customers clamor. ] Get ^>tKĆľĆ&#x;ĹśĹ?Ć?Ä‚ĆŒĆ&#x;Ä?ĹŻÄžĆ?ÄžÇ€ÄžĆŒÇ‡Ç ÄžÄžĹŹÍ˜ sĹ?Ć?Ĺ?ĆšEtY^ĹľÄ‚ĆŒĆš>Ĺ?Ç€Ĺ?ĹśĹ?͘Ä?ŽžĂŜĚĆ?ĆšÄ‚ĆŒĆš Ç‡Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒͲÄšĹ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆšĹ˝ÄšÄ‚Ç‡Í˜

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Right in Our Region

Messiah Continued from cover For musicians and audience alike, it’s an inspiration, a reminder of their faith in God. “I got a letter from a woman who had been diagnosed with cancer last spring DQG VDQJ ZLWK XV IRU WKH ¿UVW WLPH ODVW year,” says Bauer, who serves as worship pastor and music director at Riverside Community Church. “She wrote to us that one of the choruses helped to give her and her family strength to get through this. The sad part is that she passed away in May, but the card she sent reminds me how meaningful it is to so many people.” The Choral Union was launched by a coalition of Lutheran churches, in 1945, as a way to build community, following World War II. Today the group involves more than 65 local churches across the faith, from Methodists and Presbyterians to Catholics and nondenominational churches. Some performers have been involved for decades. “We had one woman who had been

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doing it every year from the start, up unperformed in Dublin in 1742. Originally til last year,” says Bauer. “She’s quite elintended as an Easter celebration, the orderly now and in a nursing home, but it atorio includes more than 16 songs highsounds like she might attend, though she lighting Biblical references on the life, won’t be singing.” death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Like an opera sans actors, Messiah is The performance evolves each year, comprised of three major scenes: The as musicians come and go. This year, about 20 new faces have joined the choir, and many are young singers, from local high schools and colleges. Bauer is excited about this year’s newest orchestral addition, a harpsichord that was recently SXUFKDVHG VSHFL¿FDOO\ IRU this performance. “It was made specially in 1983 or 1984 for international musician Otis Skillings,” says Bauer. “He was loved in the church music genre. The harpsichord originally cost $30,000, so you can imagine what a ¿QHLQVWUXPHQWLWLV´ George Frederic Handel’s MessiahZDV¿UVW Director Nat Bauer leads a rehearsal of Handel’s The Messiah.


prediction and birth of Jesus, the death of Jesus and the return of Jesus. “I believe strongly in what it has to say,” says Bauer. “The person who wrote the words for Handel did a phenomenal job, because it brings in so many Old Testament references and the story of the birth of Christ. Much of the music is what I call descriptive, where it just tells the story on its own.” Its most famous piece, the Hallelujah Chorus, is often played during Christmastime. “We invite the audience to stand and sing along with us,” Bauer says of the chorus. “It’s really pretty simple. You have, ‘Hallelujah, the Lord God omnipotent reigneth,’ and that’s about it.” During rehearsals, which happen every Sunday for six weeks preceding the concert, Bauer highlights the story of Handel’s famous work, as he helps the musicians and choir to appreciate the intricacies of the music. He also uses rehearsals as a learning opportunity, for the many young and amateur voices in the choir. “Messiah music isn’t easy,” says

Bauer. “It’s mid18th century Baroque, and has VRPHUDWKHUÀRULG passages. One of the things we do in rehearsals is to encourage younger or less-skilled vocalists to listen to the other, more experienced members around them. It’s kind of a mentorship for them.” The Choral Union works on a small budget of about $15,000 – enough to pay the orchestra, soloists and director. There’s no admission cost to the concert, just a freewill donation, but dozens of local supporters offer their sponsorship each year. “As little as $10 will get your name in our program, if you choose,” says Bauer. “I have a full page of 80 to 100 sponsorships. We have some who give

$500 or more every year.” Performances are Nov. 30 at 7 p.m. and Dec. 1 at 3 p.m. For more information, visit rockfordchoralunion.org. ] Get SLW Right in our Region ĂƌƟĐůĞƐ ĞǀĞƌLJǁĞĞŬ͘sŝƐŝƚEtY^ŵĂƌƚ>ŝǀŝŶŐ͘ ĐŽŵĂŶĚƐƚĂƌƚLJŽƵƌͲĚŝƟŽŶƚŽĚĂLJ͘

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Your Health

Navigating Three Key Teen Health Issues W

hile teens face many health-related issues, experts recommend that parents focus on three key areas. 1. Stress Extreme stress isn’t good for anyone, and today’s teens have more on their plates than ever before. In addition to short-term physical symptoms like increased heart rate and breathing, headache, neck stiffness and pain, and stomach upset, stress can create long-term problems. One simple solution is more exercise. Getting off the couch or away from the computer screen and engaging in physical activity is a great stress buster. 2. Oral Health Parents and teens know that brushing and flossing are essential , but they may be unaware that crooked teeth, if left untreated, can lead to periodontal disease and premature wearing of the teeth. It’s easier than ever to straighten teeth, with choices like Invisalign Teen

(invisalign.com) that eliminate many of the negatives associated with traditional braces. The plastic, removable appliances are nearly invisible, and easy removal of the aligners allows wearers access to teeth for brushing and flossing. 3. Diet and weight More than a third of American children and teens are obese or overweight, but strict diets are not the answer. Good nutrition is just as important for teens as it is for young children, since teenagers’ brains and bodies are still developing. The single most important way parents can teach teens about health, diet and lifestyle habits is to model those habits themselves, experts agree. Involve teens in meal-planning and preparation, focusing on good nutrition and healthful choices. Encourage physical activity by engaging the entire family in fun, healthful exercise such as cycling, hiking or playing sports together.

Just talking about weight is not only inadequate, but also detrimental to teen health, reports the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. When parents focus on weight, size and appearance when talking to teens, they may actually increase a teen’s risk of engaging in unhealthy weight-control measures - such as fad diets or binge eating. (Source: BPT) Get SLW Health Ä‚ĆŒĆ&#x;Ä?ĹŻÄžĆ?ÄžÇ€ÄžĆŒÇ‡Ç ÄžÄžĹŹÍ˜ sĹ?Ć?Ĺ?ĆšEtY^ĹľÄ‚ĆŒĆš>Ĺ?Ç€Ĺ?ĹśĹ?͘Ä?ŽžĂŜĚĆ?ĆšÄ‚ĆŒĆš Ç‡Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒͲÄšĹ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆšĹ˝ÄšÄ‚Ç‡Í˜

F H N F E S T I VA L O F T R E E S G A L A

Join us at FHN’s Casino Loyale...and place a bet on the power of pet therapy! FHN’s 2013 Festival of Trees Gala, Casino Loyale, will raise funds for FHN’s first therapy dog program and depression treatment efforts overall, and 10% of the proceeds will be donated to the Friends Forever Humane Society! The benefits of pet therapy are well-documented and have become integrated in mainstream medicine. In treating depression, for example, pets lend a strong therapeutic effect both in provider offices as well as at patients’ homes. With depression directly affecting 10% of us every year (indirectly impacting up to 25% of a community), the human health value of a furry friend shouldn’t be underestimated! As man’s – and woman’s – best friend joins clinical practices from cancer treatment to psychological therapy, we invite you to our annual Holiday Gala to benefit the first therapy dog program at FHN. Enjoy a huge hors d’oeuvres buffet, complimentary beverages and cash bar, music, and a holiday silent auction while trying your hand at Vegas-quality casino games from roulette to blackjack. Holiday party attire – if you would like, feel free to glam it with your best casino garb! 6DWXUGD\1RYHPEHU‡SP Freeport Masonic Temple Ballroom, 305 West Stephenson Street, Freeport $50/person Reserve your spot on the Velvet Rope list online at KWWSIKQRUJ )HVWLYDORI7UHHVFDVLQRBOR\DOHBSXUFKDVHBWLFNHWVDVS or through Jill McKenna at 1-877-6000-FHN (1-877-600-0346) ext. 901. You may also purchase tickets at the door. We look forward to welcoming you to Casino Loyale!

Payment for purchases at the Gala may be made by cash, check, and Visa or Mastercard credit cards.

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Your Fun

Great Gardens of Japan: A Pictorial Tour Nov. 14, 7-8 p.m. Attendees will enjoy a pictorial journey of great gardens of Japan. Presented from a historical perspective, Anderson Japanese Gardens docent Janet Heuer will provide background on gardens in Japan and how they have evolved into the modern gardens we know today. AJG, 318 Spring Creek Road, Rockford. (815) 316-3307, andersongardens.org. Live Music with Ken Curtis Nov. 15. 7-10 p.m. Sit back and enjoy a glass of wine at Northleaf Winery in Milton, Wis., while listening to Ken Curtis’ folk and rock & blues performance. Northleafwinery.com. Brad Paisley at BMO Harris Bank Center Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m. Country music superstar Brad Paisley’s “Beat This Summer Tour 2013” with special guests Chris Young and Danielle Bradbery. This tour is in support of Paisley’s most recent album, “Wheelhouse.” Tickets can be purchased at the BMO Harris Bank Center or through Ticketmaster.com. Frost & Friends Nov. 15 & 16. A shopping/fashion show experience featuring the work of local artist Lisa Frost, plus many local retailers, at Clock Tower Resort, 7801 E. State St., Rockford. Proceeds support scholarships. $5 admission. More info at frostandfriends.com. Montana Skies Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte’s Web presents a musical duo that combines elements of classical, jazz, improv and the energy of rock n’ roll, from Vivaldi to Pink Floyd. Mendelssohn Performing Arts Center, Rockford, (815) 964-9713. mendelssohnpac.org. Sesame Street Live: “Make a New Friend” Nov. 22-24. Big Bird, Elmo and the gang bring an entertaining message to young children. BMO Harris Bank Center, 300 Elm St., Rockford, (815) 968-5222, thebmoharrisbankcenter.com. Santa Fest 2013 with Barbara Buck Nov. 22-24. Fri. and Sat. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sun. noon to 5 p.m. Celebrate the 25th anniversary of this holiday gallery walk featuring top-quality Santas by nationally recognized Santa artist, Barbara Buck. Cookies, cider and pumpkin fudge. 1240 S. Walnut, Freeport, (815) 541-8890. Little Women Nov. 29-Dec. 22. Old World Wisconsin, in Eagle, Wis., presents the classic story by Louisa May

Sesame Street Live: “Make a New Friend” comes to BMO Harris Bank Center Nov. 22-24.

Alcott, performed as part of a holiday dinner theater production. The stories of sisters Meg, Jo, Amy and Beth will be brought to life against the backdrop of the Civil War in the periodappropriate Caldwell Farmers’ Club Hall. More details at oldworldwisconsin.org. Stroll on State by Candlelight Nov. 30, 4-10 p.m. Kick-off event for “Merry & Bright: A Downtown Holiday,” a celebration lasting through Jan. 31. The stroll takes place from 5:30 to 6:15 p.m., on State Street between City Hall and PNC Bank; the road will be closed to traffic. Mayor’s tree lighting at 6:15 p.m.; Carolers and roaming musicians; s’mores making; food trucks; drink specials at bars. Rockford City Market vendors will set up inside Rockford City Hall. Santa and reindeer will be at Joe Marino Park, and the film “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” will be shown on the side of a building. Ice skating in the Register Star parking lot. Volunteers from Heartland Church will decorate vacant store windows, and downtown businesses will offer extended shopping hours; the former Water Street Cafe will sell baked goods. Autumn Joys of Gardening Nov. 16, 9 a.m.-noon. Offered by University of Illinois Extension, the opening session, “Bonsai Basics: How to Get Started in Bonsai” will be presented by Bill Horschke, followed by “Unique Terrariums for Indoor Spaces” by Extension Educator, Candice Miller, and “Creative Indoor Planters” by Extension Program Coordinator, Nikki Keltner. Freeport Public Library, 100 E. Douglas Street, Freeport. $20, Pre-register at (815) 235-4125. ]

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On the Town

2nd Cousins Bar & Grill, 6246 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves Park, (815) 637-2660: 11/13 11/14, 11/20 & 11/21 DJ Quick Mixin Nick; 11/16 &11/23 DJ JES-ONE; 11/15 County Line; 11/29 Southern Charm, all 9 p.m.

0XUSK\·V 3XE  *ULOO, 501 S. Perryville, Rkfd., (815) 986-0950: 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27 DJ Sandy Monster; 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28 DJ Aaron Hodge; 11/15, 11/22 & 11/29 DJ JESONE, all 9 p.m.

%LJ $O·V, 610 N. Bell School Road, Rkfd., (815) 398-6411: 11/15 The Sensations; 11/16 Clutch Cargo; 11/22 Classical Blast; 11/23 The Classix; 11/30 X51; all 9 p.m.

Poison Ivy, 5765 Elevator Road, Roscoe, (815) 623-1480: Live DJ Fri. & Sat. 9 p.m.

Butterfly Club, 5246 E. County Road X, Beloit, (608) 362-8577: Fri. & Sat. First 2 Weekends of Month: Mike Williamson; Third Fri.: Mike Williamson; Third Sat. & Fourth Fri. & Sat. Phil Ramsey, all 7 p.m. &DQQRYD·V, 1101 W. Empire, Freeport, (815) 233-0032: Live Pianist Fri. & Sat. 6-9 p.m. Coronado Performing Arts Center, 314 N. Main St., Rkfd.: 11/15 In the Mood 2 p.m. & 7 p.m.; 11/16 Cast of Impractical Jokers, 7:30 p.m.; 11/19 Buddy Valastro: TLC’s The Cake Boss Live! 7:30 p.m.; 11/22 Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus, 8 p.m.; 11/23 1964: The Tribute, 8 p.m., Call (815) 9680595, coronadopac.org. District Bar & Grill, 205 W. State, Rkfd., (815) 977-4524: 11/15 Jamie Campbell & The Redneck Romeos, 10 p.m.; 11/16 Sixteen Candles, 10 p.m. Hope and Anchor, 5040 N. 2nd, Loves Park, (815) 977-8585: 11/15 & 11/30 Gaelic Fury; 11/6 Sweet Lucy; 11/22 Trash 80s Unplugged; 12/6 After 5 Jazz Trio; 12/7 Desolation Row. JustGoods Listening Room, 201 7th St., Rockford, (815) 965-8903: 11/15 Merv Collins & Nic Juric all 7 p.m. Jax Pub, 4160 North Perryville Rd. Loves Park, (815) 877-0600: Wed., Fri., Sat., Music w/Special Guest.

5DVFDO·V %DU  *ULOO, 5223 Torque Road, Loves Park, (815) 636-9207: 11/16 Vintage Vinyl; 11/21 3 Good Men; 11/23 Men of Our Times; 11/30 No Dice, all 9 p.m. Rockton Inn, 102 E. Main St., Rockton, (815) 624-8877: Thu. Harlan Jefferson, 7 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. DJ Ron Schoepfer, 8 p.m.; First Fri. of month Dirtee Sheetz, 8:30 p.m.; 2nd Fri. of month Ken Curtis 7 p.m. Shooters (inside Don Carter Lanes), 4007 E. State St., Rkfd., (815) 399-0314: Live Band Sat., 9 p.m. Shooters East (inside Cherry Bowl), 7171 Cherryvale Blvd., (815) 3325229: 11/15 Missing Links; 11/16 Bullet, all 9 p.m. Shooters North (inside Forest Hills Lanes), 7742 Forest Hills Road, Loves Park, (815) 654-3900: Live Band Sat. Splitters, 5318 N. 2nd St., Loves Park, (815) 877-6051: 11/15 Flight Risk; 11/16 Audio Drive; 11/22 Desolation Row; 11/23 Shotgun Jane; 11/27 Can’t Touch This, all 9 p.m. ]

Kryptonite, 308 W. State, Rkfd., (815) 9650931: 11/23 My God, the Heat, 9 p.m., $5; 11/27 Black Wednesday Massacre, 9 p.m. $5. 0DU\·V 3ODFH, 602 N. Madison, Rkfd., (815) 962-7944: 11/15 Mana Kintorso; 11/16 On My Six w/Clean Mary; 11/18 (7 p.m.) Bun E. Carlos; 11/22 New Savages, all 9:30 p.m. Oscars Pub & Grill, 5980 East State St., Rkfd., 815-399-6100: Wed., Fri., Sat., Music w/Special Guest.

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Tips & Information

Rethinking a Move into Senior Living By Jim Killam oving to a senior independent living facility doesn’t have to be seen DVZDYLQJDZKLWHÀDJ,QIDFWWKHFKDQJH PD\RSHQZKROHQHZZRUOGRIIUHHGRP VD\V 'RQQD *RRPDV &RPPXQLW\ 0DQ DJHU DW ,QGHSHQGHQFH 9LOODJH  1 $OSLQH5RDG5RFNIRUG *RRPDVHQFRXUDJHVVHQLRUVWRWKLQN RILWDVUHIRFXVLQJWKHLUOLYHV ³7KH\ZHUHHLWKHUDKXVEDQGDQGID WKHUDQGJUDQGIDWKHURUDZLIHDQGPRP DQG JUDQGPD DQG WKH\ DOZD\V KDG WKHLU PHDOV DW WKHLU KRPH DQG WKH\ DOZD\V were at the center of everything going RQ´VKHVD\V³1RZDVWKH\¶YHDJHGDQG WKHLUNLGVKDYHJRQHLQWRWKHLURZQOLYHV VHQLRUVKDYHWRUHWKLQNDQGUHIRFXVRQWKLV QH[W FKDSWHU LQ WKHLU OLYHV 1RZ WKHUH LV time to enjoy doing what they want to do DVRSSRVHGWRZKDWWKH\PXVW7KLVLV WKHLUWLPH7KHSD\RIIIRUDOOWKH\HDUVWKDW WKH\ZRUNHGVRKDUGDQGFDUHGVRPXFK IRURWKHUVLVWKDWQRZLW¶VWLPHWKDWWKLQJV are done for them´ $WDQLQGHSHQGHQWOLYLQJIDFLOLW\OLNH ,QGHSHQGHQFH 9LOODJH WKHUH¶V QR PRUH ZRUU\LQJDERXWWKHIXUQDFHJRLQJRXWRU JHWWLQJVQRZSORZHGIURPWKHGULYHZD\ or falling down the stairs to get to the EDVHPHQW ODXQGU\ URRP 7KRVH GD\V DUH RYHUDQGWKDW¶VFDXVHWRFHOHEUDWH*RR PDVVD\V Fear of losing their independence YDQLVKHVRQFHSHRSOHPRYHLQVKHDGGV 7KH\ PDNH QHZ IULHQGV HQMR\ QHZ H[ SHULHQFHV DQG GR ZKDW WKH\ ZDQW ZKHQ WKH\ZDQW$QGLIWKHLUQHHGVFKDQJHZLWK DJHDGGLWLRQDODVVLVWDQFHLVDYDLODEOH ³,W¶V QRW GHIHDW´ *RRPDV VD\V ³7KH\FDQ¶WORRNXSRQLWDVµ,QRZQHHG KHOS DQG ,¶YH JRW WR PRYH VRPHSODFH¶ ,W¶Vµ,QRZDPDWDSODFH,FDQHQMR\¶$QG WKDW¶VWKHZD\ZHORRNDWLWKHUH,W¶VDQ DSDUWPHQW<RXFRPHDQGJR:HMXVWWDNH FDUHRIWKHKHDY\OLIWLQJ´]

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Nov. 13

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Smart Living Weekly

Jan 30


Your Money

Don’t Fall Victim to Medical Identity Theft A s health care technologies advance and more records are stored digitally, they become a goldmine for hackers. From September 2009 to April 2013, there were 571 breaches of unsecured protected health information that affected 500 or more individuals, with more than 21.7 million individuals impacted to date, according to data published by WKH2I¿FHIRU&LYLO5LJKWV Unlike other types of identity theft, the offender does not necessarily need your Social Security number; your name, address, and date of birth may be enough to commit the crime. To help lower your chances of falling victim to medical identity theft, TrustedID, a leading identity protection solutions provider recently acquired by Equifax, offers the following tips: .HHS7UDFNRI<RXU%HQH¿WV5HJ ularly ask your health insurance provider IRUDUHFRUGRIWKHEHQH¿WVWKDWKDYHEHHQ paid in your name. If there is a problem, you will already have the documents to

prove who you are and report the fraud. Only Disclose Personal Information to Legitimate Sources. Use the advice you may have gotten as a kid, “Don’t talk to a policeman unless he shows you his badge.” Identity thieves can easily impersonate medical personnel so make sure you ask for all of their information before giving them yours. Be wary if someone offers you “free” health services. +DYHD8QLTXH 3HUVRQDO,GHQWL¿ cation Number5HTXHVWWKDW\RXUPHG ical and insurance providers assign you DXQLTXHSHUVRQDOLGHQWL¿FDWLRQQXPEHU do not use your Social Security number on your records. Make the First Contact. It may be simple advice, but don’t talk to strangers. Never give out private information to someone over the phone or email unless you have initiated the call and know who you are dealing with. Secure Documents. Lock up any copies of your records in secure loca-

tions and shred any outdated information. Most consumers do not pay attention to the plethora of personal mail we throw away. Invest in a shredder to make sure that all information is discarded before being thrown in the trash. ] (Source: TrustedID) Get SLW Money ĂƌƟĐůĞƐĞǀĞƌLJǁĞĞŬ͘ sŝƐŝƚEtY^ŵĂƌƚ>ŝǀŝŶŐ͘ĐŽŵĂŶĚƐƚĂƌƚ LJŽƵƌͲĚŝƟŽŶƚŽĚĂLJ͘

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Smart Living Weekly - November 13, 2013