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Save Smarter • Live Better • Rockford Region/Freeport 95¢ • October 16, 2013

IN !

Right In Our Region

It’s A ‘Grand’ Debut for RSO

By Rebecca Nunes t’s not everyday that a pianist has the opportunity to play at the debut performance of an entirely rebuilt grand piano. On Nov. 9, Jesse Parker will be doing just that on the historic stage of the Coronado Performing Arts Center. The Steinway was purchased by Rockford Symphony Orchestra in 1988 with the help of famous pianist Andre Watts. Although the piano has always been in good condition, it had lost the power to play alongside a full orchestra. Continued on p. 20

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In This Issue Right in Our Region: A ‘Grand’ Debut for RSO..........Cover & p. 20 Your Home Updating Your Fireplace..............................11 Inspiration & Worship ..............................12 Your Kitchen: Tailgating & Diabetes..........15 Your Style Adding to Your Fall Wardrobe.....................17 Your Health Super Foods................................................25 Your Fun.................................................... 27 On the Town.............................................. 29 Tips Veterans and Assisted Living Funds .........31 Your Money Outlasting Your Money................................33

Smart L iving Weekly P u b lish er/ E dit or- in- C h ief Bill H ughes

E x ec u t iv e E dit or J anine Pumilia M anag ing E dit or/ W eb E dit or Chris L inden A ssoc iat e E dit or/ Sp ec ial P rojec t s E dit or K arla N agy Senior St af f W rit er/ P rom ot ions C oordinat or Paul Anthony Arco Grap h ic s D irec t or Blake N unes Grap h ic A rt ist Christin Dunmire Grap h ic s/ E dit orial A ssist ant Rebecca N unes General Sales M anag er Brent H ughes Sales M anag er Brad H ughes A c c ou nt E x ec u t iv es Steve Blachford, L isa Chatfield, Brian H ughes & L iz Thomas A dm inist rat ion & C irc u lat ion M anag er L isa H ughes W eb sit e www.N WQ SmartL iving.com Published by H u g h es M edia C orp . 72 8 N . Prospect St., Rockford, IL , 6 110 7 (8 15 ) 3 16 -2 3 0 0 , F ax: (8 15 ) 3 16 -2 3 0 1 lhughes@ northwestquarterly.com Smart Living Weekly. Copyright 2013 by Hughes Media Corp., 728 N. Prospect St., Rockford, IL, 61107. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited.

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Simple Pleasures

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round our house, we know summer has truly ended when Dairyhä us in Rockton closes up for the season. H ow we love those summer evening treks through the countryside up to Rockton! Baxter, our golden retriever, anticipates the home-made waf e cones and ice cream as much as we do. N ow he’ll have to set his sights on other simple pleasures, just as we will. (Are there any other kind for dogs?) eafing through fall recipes for soups, stews and chili, is one of my simple pleasures. Burning sticks in the backyard firepit is another sometimes marshmallows are involved.) This time of year is the be s t for taking long walks through forest preserves and parks. It’s also the time of year we start feathering our nests, making indoor spaces a little more comfy for the long winter days ahead. So go ahead. Buy yourself one of those scented candles that smell like simmering apple cider, or one of those fuzzy throws that feel sooo soft. Stock the birdfeeder. Clean out the fireplace and plant yourself in front of it with a good book, or the fall issue of N ort hw es t Q uar t erl y M agazine. hether you find yourself buying apples, winterizing your home, making H alloween costumes or getting a jump on holiday shopping, we hope you’ll keep your local retailers in mind. To the CEOs of big box stores, we’re nothing but numbers on a ledger sheet. But to the owners of local mom-and-pop shops, we’re the only thing standing between the “ open” and “ closed” sign hanging on the door. The more we shop locally, the more our money continues to circulate close to home, rather than in the states of big box headquarters. That’s good for all of us. Soon it will be time to “ fall back” for daylight savings time (on N ov. 3, 2 a.m.). L et’s make this the year we spring forward on behalf of local businesses, even during autumn. Enjoy! Jan ine P u m ilia, E ex c u t ive E dit or

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New Stoves, Fireplaces Burn Cleaner, Better By Jim Killam

I

t s no secret that an older fireplace isn t the most efficient home heating method. Worse, it can serve as an unwanted air conditioner during winter. An open fireplace can actually have a negative efficiency because of the amount of air it sucks out of the home,” says rad ander eyden owner of Advanced himney ystems onergan r. ockford. ome fireplaces consume to cubic feet of air per minute out of the house. hat s one thing when it s or degrees outside but it s another thing when it s zero or below zero. ou ust suck so much air out that your furnace is working overtime. ome of the old noncertified wood stoves do better up to a - or -percent efficiency range ander eyden says. ut new technology in wood-burning appliances brings a huge improvement. ewer cleaner-burning stoves are up to percent efficient.

f you have an old inefficient non-certified stove you ll easily save a third of your wood by replacing it with a new one he says. ve had some people come in and say they re getting the same heat and burning half the wood.” hat s largely because some new stoves or fireplace inserts cause secondary combustion basically they burn up the smoke before it ever enters the chimney. hat not only e uates to better heat transfer it also reduces dangerous creosote buildup. ireplace inserts either woodor gas-fueled can transform an older warmth-stealing fireplace into an efficient heating option ander eyden says. ne big difference today is ceramic glass doors instead of tempered

glass. he doors prevent warm air from being sucked out of the room but in the past tempered glass also blocked fireplace heat from entering the room. oday homeowners get the ambience of a fireplace and it even heats the room. ❚ Get SLW Home & Garden articles every week. Visit NWQSmartLiving. com and start your E-Edition today.

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I  W

It’s Simple I

ronically one of the things we find most confusing about Christianity is its simplicity. e don t have to fill out an application, take a test, network with “ the right” people, enroll through a website or pay money to be part of od s family. hat s because acceptance is based on H i s goodness not ours. hat s called grace. There is one re uirement however e must choose to believe. you declare wit your mout esus is Lord and elieve in your eart t at od raised im rom t e dead you will e saved. or it is wit your eart t at you elieve and are usti ed and it is wit your mout t at you ro ess your ait and are saved. omans 10, N IV ) M any times throughout the G ospels, J esus tells his followers to approach the kingdom of od as little children do. ruly say to you w oever does not receive t e kingdom o od like a c ild s all not enter it. (Luke 18:17, ESV) oes this mean we re to be blind followers who never uestion our faith ot likely. any of the people od interacts most closely with in the ible do plenty of questioning. hildren are naturally good at loving and allowing others to love them. hey re unafraid to depend on others for their most basic needs. And they haven t yet built up the walls of pride and ego that so easily separate us from od. hen asked about od s highest priority, J esus answers, Love t e Lord your od wit all your eart and wit all your soul and wit all your mind. (M atthew . od s great desire is for us to love im without reservation. ho s better at returning unconditional love than a child ure od e pects us to mature and grow up in the ways of hrist ph. . ut ust as human parents never stop loving their adult kids or craving their love in return od never stops loving us. t s that simple. ❚ Get SLW Inspiration & Worship articles every week. Visit NWQSmartLiving.com and start your E-Edition today. 12

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T H E A RT OF WOM EN ’S HEALTH

Take time for yourself Join us for The Art of Women’s Health There’s nothing more beautiful than good health! During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, celebrate that beauty at the beautiful Freeport Art Museum. Galleries will showcase women’s health, as follows: 1. Visit with the Nurse Navigator from the Women’s Diagnostic Center about breast cancer awareness, self-examinations, and general breast health 2. You know you need to exercise – but when? Squeeze fitness into even the busiest day 3. Is a new baby on the horizon for you or someone you know? Chat with our obstetrics team about prenatal classes, how and why to carry to full-term, breastfeeding, and “all things baby!” 4. Sneeze with ease: incontinence doesn’t have to be a fact of life! Hear about the latest therapies as we keep our sense of humor about learning to laugh without worry 5. Your mind/body connection: relax your mind with basic yoga (nothing done on the floor) 6. Enjoy informal conversation with members of FHN’s ob/gyn team 7. Snap up creative recipe and meal tips from FHN’s dietitian experts

SP EA KE R S E R IE S

The Art of Women’s Health Tuesday, October 29 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Freeport Art Museum 121 N Harlem Ave Freeport Refreshments Goodie bags Door prizes

The museum’s gallery themes will also be reflected in a healthy taste treat for each gallery, and all attendees will receive goodie bags. Call us toll-free at 1-877-6000-FHN (1-877-600-0346) ext. 901 or visit www.fhn.org/women to register for this free event. Be beautifully healthy!

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Diabetic? You Can Still Tailgate Responsibly F

ootball season is here, which means parties and tailgating. These are often synonymous with calorie-packed, high-fat foods that can make it challenging for people with type 2 diabetes to stay on track. N ovo N ordisk is helping adults tackle common challenges associated with type 2 diabetes by offering diabetes-friendly recipes and resources. H ere are a few favoirtes, and many more may be found at DiabetesinaN ewL ight.com.

ot Spinic

rtic oke Dip

akes: ser in s 1 package frozen chopped spinach 1/4 cup Pepper Jack cheese, shredded 1 cup imported Parmesan cheese 2 cans artichoke hearts packed in water 1/2 cup light mayonnaise 1/2 cup fat-free ricotta cheese 2 teaspoons fresh lemon uice 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper egetable dippers such as strips of bell pepper, carrot sticks, celery sticks, endive spears, or whole-wheat bagel or pita chips Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray a 1-quart baking dish with nonstick spray. Microwave the spinach according to package directions. rain, let cool, then s ueeze dry. Transfer spinach to a large bowl. Meanwhile, to make the topping, combine Pepper ack cheese and 2 tablespoons of Parmesan cheese in a small bowl until blended. Pulse artichoke hearts in a food processor until smooth, then transfer to the bowl with the spinach. Stir in remaining Parmesan, mayonnaise, ricotta, lemon uice, and ground red pepper until well mixed. Scrape into the prepared dish. Sprinkle evenly with the topping. Bake, uncovered, about 30 minutes. Serve with the vegetable dippers. Per serving (1/4 cup without dippers): 140 calories, 10 g fat (2 g saturated, 0 g trans), 10 mg cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 7 g- carbohydrate, 2 g ber, g protein.

1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 pound ground chicken breast 1 small red bell pepper, minced 3 tablespoons reduced-sodium bottled hot pepper sauce 2 tablespoons plain dry whole wheat bread crumbs 1 shallot, minced 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 teaspoon salt Celery carrot sticks for dipping

Preheat the oven to 425 F . Spray a large baking pan with cooking spray. Combine mayo, sour cream, blue cheese, lemon juice and pepper in small bowl. over and refrigerate so avors

blend, about 15 m inutes. Combine ground chicken, bell pepper, 2 Tb. hot pepper sauce, bread crumbs, shallot, garlic, and salt in a large bowl. With lightly moistened hands, form into 30 (11/ 4 -inch) balls. Bake until lightly browned, 12 t o 15 m inutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Add the remaining 1 Tb. hot pepper sauce and gently toss until coated. Serve with the dressing, celery and carrot sticks. Per three meatball serving: 180 calories. U se light mayonnaise, reduced-fat sour cream and reduced-fat blue cheese to keep it delicious without extra fat and calories. *T hese recipes have been reviewed by Diabetes Care and Education, a dietetic practice group of the Academy of N utrition and Dietetics. ❚ (Source: BPT)

Swapping out fatty mayonnaise with creamy (but fat-free) ricotta cheese and using Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese amps up cheese power in a smaller amount.

Bu a o St e

icken Bites

akes: ser in s 1/2 cup light mayonnaise 1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream 1/4 cup reduced-fat blue cheese crumbles 1 tablespoon lemon uice Smart Living Weekly

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Fall Trends: Add to Your Existing Wardrobe A

s the weather outside changes, so must your wardrobe. But are last year’s clothes still trendy? L uckily, incorporating some of this season’s top trends into your look is an easy way to add style to last year’s fall collection. F all 2013 is full of trends that are both comfortable and affordable. H ere are some trends for this autumn that will keep you looking great without breaking the bank.

Colorful Hats

Beanies, fedoras, baseball caps, oh my! When it comes to fashion meeting function for fall, there’s no better option than a great hat. H aving a few in your collection means you can mix and match depending on your mood. Remember, accessories are a good way to experiment with color, so a hat in rusty orange or vibrant teal might be the perfect way to integrate unique hues into your wardrobe.

Slimming Features

F rom tanks that tuck and jeans that smooth, designs that slim are hot for fall. Pants are a great way to incorporate this trend into your look. The innovative slimming features of dEN iZ EN from L evi’s brand jeans create a fashion-forward look that complements any body shape. G et a few in some of the season’s most popular styles, like the Essential Stretch M odern Skinny and Essential Stretch M odern Boot-cut.

Lovely Layers

L ayering is a fashionable way to stay warm when temperatures dip. Stay on trend by mixing textures and prints for a one-of-a-kind look. The trick to layering is to start with light fabrics and then build thickness with each layer. F or example, start with a cotton tank or T-shirt, layer with a light cardigan or sweater, and finish with a thicker ean acket or military-style blazer. ❚ (Source: BPT)

Get SLW Style articles every week. Visit NWQSmartLiving.com and start your E-Edition today.

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R  O R

RSO’s ‘Grand’ Debut C ont i nue d f rom cov er

“ It’s not that there was anything wrong with the piano,” explains RSO M usic Director Steven L arsen. “ But a grand piano is designed to cut above the orchestra and ours had lost the ability to do that.” Although the piano was still performing well for solo performances, it was virtually useless when playing alongside the powerful orchestra. In fact, RSO had been renting pianos for the symphony performances because the Steinway just couldn’t perform with enough gusto anymore. So how does one take on a project that requires such specific knowledge? Being in a dedicated music community, something Rockford can brag about, certainly helps. M erle L angs, master piano teacher and RSO volunteer, recognized the need for this project and got the ball rolling by reaching out to Robert H ohf, a piano restorer from Whitewater, Wis. H ohf has been tuning and taking care of L angs’ three pianos for more than seven years, since

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she moved to Rockford from N ew Y ork City; H ohf also happens to be one of her concert-level adult students. It turns out there aren’t many local piano restorers with the expertise or workshop capacity to deal with a piano of this size. But H ohf has always had a soft spot for concert grands, so when he designed his workshop, he specialized it for his preferred 9 -foot instruments. “ I’m so proud that we have someone in our area who can rebuild this piano,” says L angs. “ It’s no easy task.” With more than 12 ,0 0 0 parts and 4 0 ,0 0 0 lbs. of string tension to maintain, it certainly isn’t a simple “ fix.” H ohf started the project 5 months ago and plans to finish this month. “ Dealing with the mechanics of the piano is a huge part of rebuilding it,” says H ohf. “ It’s not simply an instrument. It’s also a large piece of machinery.” It all comes down to the redistribution of force, which will help the sound of the piano resonate. F or example, H ohf replaced all of the strings in the piano, measuring them to find the optimum height for the action.

“ There may only be a quarter of an inch difference from what they were originally, but it will make a big difference,” explains H ohf. H e custom ordered new strings from a manufacturer in G ermany, one that he feels is the best in the world. “ Pianos are built in factories, so they may not be built in the most optimal way for each particular instrument,” says H ohf. “ This often creates problems of alignment and fit that can be greatly improved upon.” And it’s not just the technical aspects that are important; it takes a musician to truly interpret the tone of the new instru-

Emily Bear performs on the piano with RSO.


ment. H ohf has been playing piano his whole life and says this ability is the N o. 1 diagnostic tool he relies on for specializing mechanical techniques. “ I relate playing the piano to the cause and effects of how it works,” says H ohf. “ Ear training as a tuner is different than ear training as a musician.” So why take on the immense challenge of customizing a 2 5 -year-old piano? It turns out a brand new concert grand would have cost the RSO more than $ 115 ,0 0 0 , making the mere $ 2 1,5 0 0 cost of restoration look like a steal. Even better, many dedicated area musicians and music lovers were able to chip in to cover the cost. “ I reached out to the community and I had the money raised within a week,” says L angs. “ I myself contributed $ 2 ,0 0 0 and then I called members of our music community and asked, ‘ H ow much can you give to rebuild this piano?’” H ohf explains that purchasing a new piano would have been like starting over. “ Older instruments often have a better tone,” explains H ohf. “ The wood changes and the sounds resonate better because the

instrument has adjusted to the shape it’s been formed to.” In fact, there’s a certain amount of adjusting that will need to happen in the weeks before the debut performance. H ohf will be visiting several times during those weeks to make minor adjustments as the piano “ settles in.” H e says it takes nearly 5 years to break in a piano that gets played everyday. RSO is selling half hour increments for individuals to play the piano on the Coronado stage during the two weeks before the debut. J esse Parker, the Rockford professional musician who’ll play the restored grand

Jesse Parker

during RSO’s “ L ove of N ature” concert N ov. 9 , will practice on it for two weeks. Emily Bear and Russian pianist Olga K ern also have performed on this piano. Parker completed his graduate musical education at Stanford U niversity, where he received his M .A. in Composition and Ph.D. in M usicology. H e’s performed as a pianist in solo and chamber recitals and with orchestras throughout the nation. H e and wife L ibby moved here three years ago from Seattle, where he taught at the Cornish College of the Arts. Parker is resident accompanist for the Academy Y outh Chorale, which L ibby directs. “ This restoration will have a significant effect on the music community and that’s one of the reasons I do this kind of work,” says H ohf. “ Rockford has a very dedicated music community. It’s a good bunch of people to work for.” So head over to the Coronado on N ov. 9 to see and hear the debut of the Steinway concert grand, which will finally compete on equal footing with the incredible RSO. “ We already have a world-class orchestra,” says L angs. “ We needed a piano to match.” ❚

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Halloween Snacks

S

pine-chilling treats are a great way to kick-off this H alloween season. M ake these simple but yummy treats designed to look like spiders to add a little spook to your H alloween party. Serve them when guests arrive to kick-off the scary festivities.

Peanut Butter Pumpkin Spiders

(6 Servings) Ingredients: 6 Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins 1/4 cup Hershey's Milk Chocolate Chips Large pretzel twists (2 -1/2 to 3 inches) 12 yellow Reese's Pieces Candies

Directions: Line tray or cookie sheet with wax paper. Remove wrappers from peanut butter pumpkins and place alongside each other on tray leaving 1 inch of space between each peanut butter pumpkin. For each spider, cut 8 matching curved sections from pretzels which will form the legs. Set aside remaining pretzels pieces. Place milk chocolate chips in small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave at medium 30 seconds; stir. If necessary, microwave at medium an additional 10 seconds at a time, stirring after each heating, until chips are melted and smooth when stirred. Transfer to small heavy duty plastic food storage bag. Cut o one corner of bag about 1/4 inch from the tip. Attach pretzel legs and yellow candy "eyes" to spider with melted chocolate; place dot of melted chocolate on each eye. Allow chocolate to set before moving spiders.

L ooking to add a little more spook to your party? Download a haunted playlist. N othing is quite as spooky as the sound of doors creaking or ghosts shrieking. Put together a haunted playlist that you can listen to while guests arrive. F or more wickedly delicious recipes, visit CelebratewithH ersheys.com. â?š 22

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Y H

Super Foods with Powerful Health Impacts T

he term appears on headlines and is splashed on food labels everywhere: “ super foods” get people talking. But how do you cut through confusion to find the foods that truly have a powerful impact on your health and wellness? “ Super foods are foods that have a very high nutrient profile says ophie liano ew ork imes best-selling author and healthy living advocate. Some of the most powerful super foods may surprise you. liano s list of super foods that pack a big serving of healthy goodness include:

2. Sardines ardines contain vitamins phosphorus potassium and iron. hey re particularly rich in hearthealthy omega- fatty acids which also are important for their anti-in ammatory effects. “ Canned sardines are just as healthy and rich in nutrients as fresh sardines liano says. f you dislike the taste and te ture mash them up with spicy mayo and eat as you would tuna salad. f you re still not sold consider a high uality fish oil supplement from ordic aturals which will give you a boost of the omega- s.

1. Goji Berries hese little berries are a very rich source of antio idants avonoids polyphenols and carotenoids and contain vitamins and A. hey have a whopping amount of vitamin -- over times more than an orange. n addition these tasty berries contain amino acids including eight essential amino acids. hey re also anti-inammatory anti-bacterial and anti-fungal.

3. Kale n addition to vitamin which is important for blood-clotting and healthy bones kale is packed with vitamins A and calcium and fiber. he veggie also contains loads of carotenoids which are great for eye health. ifferent kinds of kale include urly ale ino ale remier ale and edbar ale e plains liano. love to steam kale and drizzle

with olive or toasted sesame oil and a little tamari sauce. eat it warm or as a cold side in the summer. t s also great to eat raw but make sure that you wash well and remove all of the tough stems before chopping it up.” Add these top three super foods to your diet and improve your health today! ❚ (Source: BPT) Get SLW Health articles every week. Visit NWQSmartLiving.com and start your E-Edition today.

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Haunted Rockford Bus Tours Through Oct. 26, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Every Saturday in October, climb aboard a coach bus to visit haunted locations throughout the city. $20.Kathi Kresol provides haunting histories. Call (815) 871-4239, sponsored by Rockford Public Library. Music on Main Oct. 17, 5:30 p.m., the Vince Chiarelli band performs as part of the Jazz at Emerson series. Each third Thursday, relax to jazz from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at historic Emerson House, 406 N. Main St. Wine and light refreshments available. $15 for adults, $10 for students. “Seek the Unknown: Alien Invasion” Oct. 19, 2-5:30 p.m. Ages 13 to 19 celebrate Teen Read Week’s theme “Seek the Unknown,” by discussing UFO reports, dissecting an alleged alien species, and watching the film Dark Skies. Info: rockfordpubliclibrary.org. Event: Sullivan Center, Rockford. Family Fossil Field Trip Oct 19, 1-4 p.m. Join the folks at Burpee Museum of National History for a Family Fossil Field Trip to a local Rockford quarry to collect fossils and minerals. Call (815) 9653433 for more details or to register. Nature Gets Ready for Winter Oct. 20, 1-2:30 p.m. Naturalist Rick Barton from Natural Land Institute leads this hike through Kieselburg Forest Preserve to explore nature at the turn of the season. Walk the easy trail around the sedge meadow and prairie restoration to find signs of what happens to plants and insects in the winter. Meet at Redcedar Ridge Shelter, 5801 Swanson Road, Roscoe. Tender Loving Crafts Sale Oct. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is the 23rd annual crafts sale presented by Christ United Methodist Church. Selected artisans and crafters. Barbeque lunch available. Guaranteed “church lady” baked goods! Located at Alpine and Highcrest. (815) 399-5910.

Join Midway Village for All Hallows Eve festivities on Oct. 19, from 2 to 8 p.m.

decorated and waiting for young trick-or-treaters. $5/members free. Midway Village, Rockford, midwayvillage.com. Carving Masters Oct. 23, 6 to 9 p.m. 12 and over. BYO hollowedout pumpkin and learn from carving masters to use tools in new ways to create the pumpkin you’ve always wanted. Children under 12 must be with an adult. Info: rockfordpubliclibrary. org. Event: Sullivan Center, Rockford. Ridges and Rivers Oct. 27 1-2:30 p.m. Environmental educator Katie Townsend leads this exploration of ridges, gorges, forests and prairies at Kishwaukee Gorge Forest Preserve. This is a familycentered activity with something for all ages. Moderate hiking, some climbing of steps and inclines. 4643 Blackhawk Road, Cherry Valley. Halloween on the Prairie Oct. 27, noon-4 p.m. Haunted hay rides, face painting, spooky games, straw maze, kids’ crafts, snake wrangler, more. Jarrett Center, Byron Forest Preserve, byronforestpreserve.com.

BJS: Heavenly Strings Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m. Robert Tomaro, conductor; Scott Cook, cello. Boccherini: Concerto for Cello; Barber: Adagio for Strings; Dvorak: Serenade for Strings. Eaton Chapel, Beloit College, College and Chapin streets, Beloit, Wis. Tickets: (608) 313-1200, beloitjanesvillesymphony.org.

LOLTOS Spirited Ghost Tours Oct. 30 & Oct. 31, 7-9 p.m. Experience firsthand accounts of the unexplained noises, scents and sightings within the historic Coronado Theatre, during this tour of the downtown building given by LOLTOS (Land of Lincoln Theatre Organ Society). For more information call the Coronado Box Office at (815) 968.0595. Reservations required. ❚

All Hallows Eve Oct. 19, 2-8 p.m. Trick or treating and children’s activities and crafts, with village buildings

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2nd Cousins Bar & Grill, 6246 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves Park, (815) 637-2660: 10/16, 10/23 & 10/30 DJ Aaron Hodge; 10/17, 10/22 & 10/24 DJ Sandy Monster; 10/18 & 10/25 Destination Unknown, all 9 p.m. Big Al’s, 610 N. Bell School Road, Rkfd., (815) 398-6411: 10/18 The Sensations; 10/19 Clutch Cargo; 10/25 Boo Bash!!!, all 9 p.m. Butterfly Club, 5246 E. County Road X, Beloit, (608) 362-8577: Fri. & Sat. First 2 Weekends of Month: Mike Williamson, 7 p.m. Cannova’s, 1101 W. Empire, Freeport, (815) 233-0032: Live Pianist Fri. & Sat. 6-9 p.m. Coronado Performing Arts Center, 314 N. Main St., Rkfd.: 10/26 Ghost Brothers of Darkland County, 8 p.m. Call (815) 968-0595, coronadopac.org. District Bar & Grill, 205 W. State, Rkfd., (815) 977-4524: 10/18 Wedding Banned, 10 p.m.; 10/26 Dueling Pianos, 8 p.m. Franchesco’s, 7128 Spring Creek, Rkfd., (815) 229-0800: 10/19 Dueling Pianos; 10/25 Comedy Night, all 9 p.m. The Grove, 100 E. Grove, Poplar Grove, (815) 765-1002: Thu. Open Mic, 6 p.m.; Fri. Karaoke, 9 p.m.; 10/19 TBA; 10/26 Western Sky. Hope and Anchor, 5040 N. 2nd, Loves Park, (815) 977-8585: 10/18 Firelight Dimmers, 7 p.m.; 10/19 The Blue Olives, 8 p.m. JustGoods Listening Room, 201 7th St., Rockford, (815) 965-8903: 10/18 Emery’s Blues Boys, 7 p.m.; 10/19 Council Choraleers Children’s Chorus, 3 p.m. / Emily Hurd, 7 p.m.; 10/20 Richard Paul Thomas, 7 p.m. Jax Pub, 4160 North Perryville Rd. Loves Park, (815) 877-0600: Wed., Fri., Sat., Music w/Special Guest. Kryptonite, 308 W. State, Rkfd., (815) 9650931: Thu. Karaoke & BARGO 8:30 p.m.; 10/16 Dave Tamkin, 9 p.m.; 10/26 Calico Flamingos / Mulligan Stu / The Smoothies, 8 p.m.

Oscars Pub & Grill, 5980 East State St., Rkfd., 815-399-6100: Wed., Fri., Sat., Music w/Special Guest. Murphy’s Pub & Grill, 501 S. Perryville, Rkfd., (815) 986-0950: 10/16 & 10/23 DJ Sandy Monster; 10/17 & 10/24 DJ Aaron Hodge, all 9 p.m. Poison Ivy, 5765 Elevator Road, Roscoe, (815) 623-1480: Live DJ Fri. & Sat. 9 p.m. Rascal’s Bar & Grill, 5223 Torque Road, Loves Park, (815) 636-9207: 10/17 3GM; 10/19 Mr. Big Stuff; 10/26 Shifty Shafer, all 9 p.m. Rockton Inn, 102 E. Main St., Rockton, (815) 624-8877: Thu. Harlan Jefferson, 7 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. DJ Ron Schoepfer, 8 p.m.; First Fri. of month Dirtee Sheetz, 8:30 p.m.; 2nd Fri. of month Ken Curtis 7 p.m. Shooters (inside Don Carter Lanes), 4007 E. State St., Rkfd., (815) 399-0314: Live Band Sat., 9 p.m. Shooters East (inside Cherry Bowl), 7171 Cherryvale Blvd., (815) 3325229: 10/18 Shovelhead; 10/19 Stage Fright, all 9 p.m. Shooters North (inside Forest Hills Lanes), 7742 Forest Hills Road, Loves Park, (815) 654-3900: Live Band Sat. Splitters, 5318 N. 2nd St., Loves Park, (815) 877-6051: 10/19 The Sensations; 10/26 Pablo & The Rythmix, all 9 p.m. ❚

Mary’s Place, 602 N. Madison, Rkfd., (815) 962-7944: Tue. & Thu. Open Stage; Wed. Karaoke; 10/18 The Stragglers; 10/19 Kelly Steward & The Restless Kind, all 9:30 p.m.

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Assisted Living

Veterans May Qualify for Help By Jim Killam eterans and their spouses who need assisted living can benefit from a littleknown federal program but many don t realize it says ike arr sales counselor at rimson ointe enior iving an assisted living facility at rimson idge r. ockford. he eterans Administration s Aid and Attendance program provides e tra money for in-home care or to reside in an assisted living facility or nursing home. A veteran and or surviving spouse is eligible if he veteran was not dishonorably discharged from the service. e or she served at least one day during a wartime period even if they did not serve in combat and had days of continuous military service. e or she is eligible for a eterans Administration pension. penses for the needed living arrangements e ceed income. Assets don t e ceed e cluding home and vehicles. f younger than age the veteran must be disabled. f a veteran lives independently but his her spouse cannot they still may be eligible. According to veteranaid.org ma imum aid can range from to a month depending on the situation. et not many veterans and their families know about the program says arr. f talk to potential families who are looking to move in residents in the ne t three months will guarantee you that of them have never heard of this benefit arr says. t s the best-kept secret in America. ecause the application process is complicated time-consuming and paperwork-intensive arr recommends that veterans get help. e connects residents and potential residents with an e pert who can help navigate the sea of red tape. he lengthy process can prove well worth the hassle. A significant number of our residents are financially able to live at rimson ointe as a result of this program he says. hat s how important it is. ❚

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Concerned About Outliving Your Money? W

hat concerns Americans the most as they look ahead toward retirement years? One of their biggest worries is outliving their money, according to a recent survey by Prudential Retirement. A substantial 71 percent of respondents fear they may not have enough retirement income to last a lifetime. Putting money aside for retirement while you’re still working is important, but only part of the solution. Equally important is having a plan on how to manage your retirement nest egg so it will continue to generate income throughout your life. Develop a plan on how to use savings. Sri Reddy, head of Institutional Income for Prudential Retirement, advises people nearing retirement to begin shifting their focus from accumulating savings to considering how best to distribute those savings during retirement. One avenue to explore is to check with your employer to see if there is a guaranteed income option available in your com-

pany’s retirement plan. Two out of three participants in the Prudential Retirement survey said investing in this type of option made them more confident about their retirement security. Continuing to work part-time may be a necessity in order to generate needed income for your retirement budget. According to the Prudential survey, nearly three in four middle-class Americans believe they will have to find some work in retirement. Check out possibilities now for parttime employment. Don’t wait until after retirement. Once you have a plan in place to generate lifetime income, look at how to cut expenses after you retire. One of the best ways to stretch your retirement savings may be to reduce housing costs, which are a major expense for most Americans. If your kids are out of the house and your mortgage is paid off, think about downsizing before you retire. Add profits from the sale to your retirement savings and move to a less costly situation.

In addition, do an assessment of all the ways you spend money and economize wherever you can. Careful planning now, while you are still working, will help you to achieve your goal of a secure and fulfilling retirement that lasts a lifetime. ❚ (Source: BPT ) Get SLW Money articles every week. Visit NWQSmartLiving.com and start your E-Edition today.

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Smart Living Weekly - October 16, 2013