Page 1

L I V E • PLAY • DO

magazine

SURROGACY IN PORTLAND | OPEN ADOPTEE Q & A WINTER BREAK CAMPS | FOUND AROUND TOWN: SHOPS

nwkidsmagazine.com

Nov

2015


2 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 3


EDITORS’

Corner

Hello November, we’ve missed you. We’re ready to snuggle up with family and friends this month. It’s National Adoption Month, too, which in our (Kelley’s) family reminds us each year of how we came to be. In years past, I’ve written about how much adoption has changed my life. It really has. In obvious and profound ways. Our daughter is now 7-years-old and is a most amazing kid. I would never have known motherhood, had we not taken a risk, and I feel gratitude each and every day for those who helped us along the way. In this issue we celebrate families; how they are born via surrogacy and adoption, and provide some resources for those who might be considering these options. We revisit our sweet cover family from two years ago—look how those kids have grown! Are you interested in working with a surrogate? Head over to p.8 to read up on where to start. Have you ever wondered about what it means to be openly adopted? Check out our Q & A with two open adoptees on p.12. And heading into this delicious holiday season, be sure to try out the pumpkin biscuit recipe on p.18 or eat some pumpkin pie. Get cozy and stay tuned to KATU on November 15th at 8:50am for one of our regular segments on fun things to do around Portland with the kids! Gobble gobble, Kelley & Beth

4 | NW Kids Magazine


Contents NOVEMBER 2015

8 Making a Miracle: Surrogacy 101 12 The Voices of Open Adoption: AQ&A 14 Resource Guide: Adoption & Surrogacy 16 The Thanksgiving Experiment

18 Thanksgiving Recipe: Pumpkin Biscuits 20 Winter Break Camps 24 Best of Portland and Beyond: Our Top Picks for Getting Out This Month 30 Found Around Town: Shops

Cover and Contents photography by EMMA EASLEY DARDEN reversedlensphotography.com

NW Kids Magazine | 5


Listings All Families Surrogacy....................................... 9 Amazing Fairytale Parties................................11 Art of STEM......................................................19 Barre3................................................................. 7 Bella Stella.......................................................31 Bennett Suzuki................................................... 9 Black Wagon....................................................21 Coffee Kids.......................................................31 Columbia Gorge Railroad Club........................29 Dr. Pike Dentistry for Children..........................11 Engineering for Kids........................................18 Fit4Mom..........................................................17 German International School..........................27 Glendoveer Tennis............................................19 Goodtime Chinese School...............................13 Holt International............................................... 2 Imago Theatre..................................................27 Kenton Business Association...........................29 Lake Oswego Parks & Rec................................19 Law Office of Maurice Cassidy LLC.................... 9 Legacy Health.................................................... 3 Leisure Sports Inc Club Sport...........................17 Little Fruit Farm................................................17 Nelson Pediatric Dentistry................................. 7 Northwest Academy........................................13 NW Surrogacy Center........................................ 9 OHSU FM Adoption Health Services................. 9 Oregon Ballet Theatre......................................25 Oregon Rail Heritage Center............................13 Portland Life Consulting..................................19 Portland Spirit..................................................25 Portland Trampolines.......................................23 Saturday Academy...........................................17 Seahorses.........................................................31 Sit Still..............................................................29 Soccer Shots.....................................................32 Spielwerk Toys..................................................31 Summa Academy............................................21 Sunshine Montessori.......................................27 The Kids’ Backyard Store..................................23 Urban Farm Store.............................................27 Very Important Babies ....................................13 WeVillage.........................................................21 World of Smiles................................................21 6 | NW Kids Magazine

magazine

Publisher / Advertising Director Michelle Snell michelle@nwkidsmagazine.com Editorial Beth Friesenhahn beth@nwkidsmagazine.com Kelley Schaefer-Levi kelley@nwkidsmagazine.com Advertising Director Laurel Carrasco laurel@nwkidsmagazine.com

Client Services Coordinator/ Client Ad Design Karel Chan karel@nwkidsmagazine.com Graphic Designer Robyn Barbon robyn@folkloremedia.com Advertising Inquiries: 503-282-2711, ext. 1 sales@nwkidsmagazine.com Accounting & Business Services Heather Rex heather@nwkidsmagazine.com Administrative Assistant Brandi Green brandi@nwkidsmagazine.com Connect With Us: • Phone: 503.282.2711 • email: contact@nwkidsmagazine.com • Facebook: facebook.com/nwkids • Twitter: @nwkids • Pinterest: pinterest.com/nwkids NW Kids is published monthly by Miche Media, LLC. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy; sometimes we make errors. Please let us know when we do and accept our apologies. Printed locally; Please recycle.

WHAT WE’RE READING

twobeardsandababy.com


NW Kids Magazine | 7


Phocographs courtesy of ALL FAMILIES SURROGACY

Making a Miracle: SURROGACY 101 by KELLEY GARDINER

Ever been curious about surrogacy options available for families in Portland? Naturally, anyone considering using a surrogate to add to their family will have questions. LOTS of questions. We took a look at the basics and the need-to-knows about this unique way of adding a new member to a family. WHAT IS SURROGACY? When a person or a couple wants a biological child of their own, but isn’t able or wishing to carry a pregnancy to term, surrogacy is one of the options to create the family they’re looking for. A surrogate mother carries and delivers the baby. The intended parents, who are often present at the birth, then get to meet and take their baby home. HOW DOES IT WORK? Using an experienced agency for surrogacy means leaving much of the legal and emotional work to professionals: They screen potential surrogate mothers, match parental needs with the needs of the surrogate, help prepare contracts, coordinate medical care, and in general, support all parties and keep this complex process as smooth as possible.

WHY SURROGACY? Northwest Surrogacy Center says their clients choose surrogacy “because it is fast, has an extremely high success rate, and gives intended parents a high degree of choice and control.” Depending on the intended parents, the baby can be biologically related, and parents can get to know the surrogate to the degree that’s comfortable for both sides. “I gave birth to a beautiful baby boy on a gorgeous October afternoon via C-section,” says Carey Flamer-Powell, Director and Founder of All Families Surrogacy. “One of his mothers held my hand in the operating room as he was born...Besides the birth of my own daughter, being part of his birth was the most incredible moment of my life.” FlamerPowell was moved to create All Families Surrogacy to provide that experience for other families. WHAT DOES IT COST? It’s not inexpensive but most couples wanting to build a family via surrogacy find a way to make it happen! Charges will depend on the agency you choose, if donor eggs or sperm are needed, any additional rounds of in vitro fertilization, other medical procedures, continued on p. 10

8 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 9


testing, and other variables. Intended parents may need to travel several times to meet the agency, meet the surrogate, and, of course, to meet their sweet new baby. Many agencies list basic structures on their websites, so you can get a general idea of what’s in store. CAN I USE AN AGENCY IF I’M GAY OR SINGLE? Straight, gay, single, you’ll be able to find an agency that will support you. All Families Surrogacy, based in Beaverton, works primarily with gay and lesbian intended parents, but welcomes families and single people of all orientations. CAN I USE A SURROGATE IF I’M ABLE TO CARRY A PREGNANCY MYSELF, BUT I DON’T WANT TO? Some agencies only accept clients who are medically unable to carry a pregnancy to term, or whose parents wish to avoid passing down certain genetic traits. WHAT IF THE SURROGATE DECIDES TO KEEP THE BABY? It makes a compelling television plot, but it’s rare. In more than 20 years, Northwest Surrogacy Center has been providing these services, they “have never had a surrogate want to keep an intended parent’s baby.” Northwest Surrogacy Center only provides gestational surrogacy services, so the surrogate is not biologically related to the baby. Rest assured that surrogates are screened carefully, and contracts are in place before a pregnancy occurs. DOES THE SURROGATE KEEP A RELATIONSHIP WITH THE BABY? That’s up to the intended parent and the surrogate. Some families keep a close relationship, especially if the surrogate mother lives closeby. Other families might send pictures and updates. Others might prefer to keep their lives a little more private. Ask any potential agencies about their recommendations and policies just to make sure you’re on the same page before making the plunge. 10 | NW Kids Magazine

GLOSSARY Intended Parent(s): The person or couple hoping for a new baby. Surrogate: The woman who carries the pregnancy. Traditional surrogacy: The surrogate’s eggs are fertilized with donor sperm or sperm of intended parent. The surrogate is biologically related to the baby. This method is illegal in some states, and is not supported by all surrogacy agencies. Gestational surrogacy: A fertility clinic creates embryos using eggs and sperm from intended parents and/or donors, which are then implanted in the surrogate via in vitro fertilization. HOW CAN I BECOME A SURROGATE? Interested in carrying a child for someone else? It’s a huge commitment, and one that would come with medical risk, not to mention a heavy emotional load. Most surrogates do it not only for the compensation (a base fee plus compensation for additional procedures, childcare, time off work, etc.), but also because they enjoyed being pregnant or want to give back by carrying a baby for someone else. There are a number of criteria for interested women, so check with an agency if interested, but if you’re healthy and you’ve enjoyed being pregnant, you may qualify for further followup and more intensive screening. Note that compensating a surrogate is illegal in Washington. WHAT’S THE NEXT STEP IF I’M INTERESTED? Read up on information from groups like Men Having Babies,and start thinking about the kinds of questions you’ll ask any prospective agencies. Good luck! Kelley Gardiner is a Portland native, a freelance writer and blogger, and the mother of one sweet toddler. To see what she’s up to, visit kelleygardiner.com


NW Kids Magazine | 11


THE VOICES OF

OPEN ADOPTION: AQ&A by KELLEY SCHAEFER-LEVI

Open adoption is no longer brand-new. In fact, Oregon Adoption & Family Services has been helping bring birth and adoptive families together for a few decades now, but the experience, on the whole is still pretty mysterious to those who aren’t adopted, nonetheless openly adopted. I had the opportunity to talk to two dynamic young women, Taylor and Claire, both open adoptees. They’re now young adults whose lives seem pretty ordinary by their own measure. They’ve always known they’re adopted, and know their birth mothers. One a recently graduated college student and one currently getting her undergrad degree, both with extremely bright futures ahead of them, shed a little light on what it means to be openly adopted. Have you always known about your adoption? CLAIRE: I have! I can’t recall a time that I didn’t know Heather was my birth mother. We started visiting her from day one. Was there ever a time where open adoption felt confusing to you? TAYLOR: My mom says I began to question my adoption at the ages of 5-7. I personally do not remember much about that time. It has always been a little confusing that people were confused about my situation (If that makes any sense). I knew and had accepted the knowledge that I, in essence, I belonged in more than one place. I knew who I was; I was simply confused about how others could fail to see what I saw. What question do you most commonly get asked about open adoption? CLAIRE: People who are unfamiliar with open adoption often are confused by it. They’ll ask if I like it, assuming that I don’t at first. I explain why it is so important to me and why I fully support it. Then the question of, “Aren’t you mad that your birth 12 | NW Kids Magazine

mom gave you up?” I hate that question! I always have to explain that she didn’t “give me up.” She was strong enough to give me a life that she knew she was incapable of providing herself. How could I ever resent her for that? I’m beyond grateful. If you could tell your 7-year-old self something about open adoption that you’ve learned since then, what would you tell her? TAYLOR: I would tell her that it makes her unique and special and that her birth mother wanted her to have a better life. I would also tell her that she was loved enough to be placed with a family who could devote themselves to her and to her wellbeing. Who were stable economically, who would treasure her and support her. How would you describe your relationship with your birthparent(s)? CLAIRE: My relationship with my birth mother, Heather, is warm. We were closer when I was younger because we would see her and my half brother more often than we do now. But it is still very loving and fulfilling. continued on p. 14


NW Kids Magazine | 13


Do you know both of your birthparents? If not, are you curious about the one you don’t know? TAYLOR: I have pictures of my birthfather and I know his name, but beyond that I have no personal connection to his family. I know that he was not a great person and that I maybe should not meet him. I am curious though because he is a piece of my past. What do you appreciate about your adoptive family? CLAIRE: I appreciate everything about my adoptive family. They are my parents. They raised me in a loving household and helped me become the woman I am today. I appreciate how open they are to talking about and having a relationship with my birth family, especially my birth father’s side that I recently came to know. How have your parents helped foster your relationship with your birthparent(s)? TAYLOR: They have encouraged us to have a real relationship, and to spend time with her and to tell her about what I’ve been up to and what’s going on in my life. They used to have her over for weekends and they encourage me to go visit with her. How does your open adoption change your view of the world? CLAIRE: Adoption has shown me that family does not just mean blood. The meaning of family is different for everyone. I think that my open adoption has made me appreciate and cherish my close relationships above all else. TAYLOR: It makes me really open to other cultures and family structures and the ways other people live. I’m open about it because I know that mine is different. I have four sides to my family, not two. It’s a different way of thinking about the world.

14 | NW Kids Magazine

Claire Engelhard is 23-years-old. She lives in West Seattle and is a full-time nanny for a baby boy. She’s currently taking prerequisite classes so that she can apply for the master’s in teaching (elementary) at the University of Washington. She graduated from Eckerd College in 2014 with a BA in Anthropology and Spanish. When she’s not busy working and prepping for grad school, she enjoys playing the cello with her family and in the Seattle Rock Orchestra Social Club, getting exercise, spending quality time with friends and family, traveling, and enjoying the PNW.

Taylor Roghair is 20-years-old and a Junior at University of Puget Sound. She’s studying Medieval European History & Spanish Language & Culture. She’s currently abroad having spent one semester at University of Edinburgh, Scotland and one in Granada, Spain. When she’s not busy with school she likes to write, run, make wire jewelry, play soccer, and the Tuba!


Resource Guide:

ADOPTION & SURROGACY SUPPORT AND RESOURCES

ADOPTION COUNSELING SERVICES adoptioncounselingservices.com ADOPTION MOSAIC adoptionmosaic.org ADOPTIVE FAMILIES MAGAZINE adoptivefamilies.com ALL FAMILIES SURROGACY allfamiliessurrogacy.com BETHANY CHRISTIAN SERVICES bethany.org/portland BOYS & GIRLS AID boysandgirlsaid.org CATHOLIC CHARITIES catholiccharitiesoregon.org CHOSEN INTERNATIONAL choseninternational.org DOVE ADOPTION INTERNATIONAL adoptions.net FAMILIES WITH RUSSIAN AND UKRAINIAN ADOPTIONS (FRUA) frua-oregon.org FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN FROM CHINA (FCC) fcc-nw.memberlodge.com FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN FROM VIETNAM fcvn.org

KINSHIP HOUSE kinshiphouse.org KOREAN FOCUS NW nkcs.org MOTHERS WHO ADOPT AS SINGLE PARENTS Contact Cindy at 503-929-8450 or redthreadredhead@yahoo.com NORTHWEST ADOPTION SUPPORT northwestadoptionsupport.com NORTHWEST SURROGACY CENTER nwsurrogacycenter.com OHSU ADOPTION HEALTH SERVICES ohsu.edu/adoption OPEN ADOPTION AND FAMILY SERVICES openadopt.org OREGON ADOPTION oregonadoption.com OREGON FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN FROM GUATEMALA Email: sharonscheurer@yahoo.com for more information. OREGON POST ADOPTION RESOURCE CENTER (ORPARC) orparc.org NORTHWEST ADOPTIVE FAMILIES nafaonline.org

FUTURE FAMILIES NW futurefamiliesnw.com

NORTHWEST ICHILD (INDIA CHILD) nwichild.org

HOLT INTERNATIONAL holtinternational.org

SW WASHINGTON ADOPTION SUPPORT Contact Darlene Wilson 360-256-8795

JOURNEYS OF THE HEART journeysoftheheart.net

TREE OF LIFE ADOPTION CENTER toladopt.org NW Kids Magazine | 15


The Thanksgiving Experiment by LAURA JOST

I feel like I am constantly pumping my children full of the ideals I’d like them to share with me: your body is beautiful and perfect just the way it is; knowledge is power; every soul on this earth deserves compassion; don’t litter, recycle, and take care of this earth; if you are respectful you will garner respect; have faith; etc. I do my best to model confidence and empathy, humbleness and forgiveness, passion and perseverance. But when they can’t manage to put on socks after I’ve asked them four times, I often wonder if they can really hear me at all, especially on the important topics. What is actually happening in those heads when I speak; am I teaching them anything or am I merely white noise? The other day, I decided to make a space to find out. It was after school and the car was calm and quiet. I asked them what they were thankful for in this life. They said they were thankful for their family and friends (and listed them individually), the dog, my husband’s job, my thrifting skills (to be fair, I do find them amazing things), the pending arrival of their unborn cousin, the city we live in, each other, and that God chose to make them ours. I’m sure my mouth was agape; here I was thinking that this would be a teaching moment. And it was…it just wasn’t me doing the teaching. After discussing all of these wonderful points, I really wanted something visual to remind us of our thanks. I collected a few dry branches from the tulip tree outside and cut out some paper leaves. We sat around the table and we wrote down the individual words that represented all of the things that we were 16 | NW Kids Magazine

thankful for; one for each leaf. We hung the leaves on the branches and soon we had a tree of gratitude. We put it in the dining room where it will stay. As time passes, we can add new leaves to the tree. And as a real tree grows, so can our tree. And it can remind us how we’ve grown: from the developing handwriting and the adorable misspellings to revisiting the leaves of the cutest things kids might give thanks for. Our children may be young, but they are present. They are wiser than they get credit for most of the time (my son is picking his nose right now; I get that it’s often difficult to read their depth). They are more than beasts of bickering or makers of trails of dirty socks and wet things. From the moment we know they are headed our way, they are the source of some of our most intense gratitude in this life. And as they grow, they can be wonderful reminders of all of the things that we SHOULD be grateful for and often forget in the hustle and bustle of being an adult. Like heat, flowers, neighbors, allergen-friendly cheese, and sharks. Laura Jost is mom to two stand-up comedians in training. They know when to laugh and they know when to give a hug. When in doubt, always give a hug.


NW Kids Magazine | 17


Pumpkin Biscuits by JENNIFER BRYMAN

Don’t reserve pumpkin just for dessert. These flakey biscuits are the perfect accompaniment to your holiday spread. Serve warm out of the oven with a drizzle of honey. 12 Servings (1 biscuit per serving)

YOU WILL NEED:

1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup whole wheat flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon 1 teaspoon sea salt 4 tablespoons cold butter, cut into small cubes ½ cup pumpkin puree ½ cup milk ¼ cup pure maple syrup or honey

MAKE IT:

1 2

Preheat oven to 425˚F. Line or grease a large baking sheet.

In a large mixing bowl, combine flours, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. Using your fingers or a fork, work the butter into the flour mixture until crumbly.

3

In a separate bowl, whisk to combine pumpkin, milk, and syrup. Pour into the flour mixture, and knead until it’s a cohesive dough.

4 5

Place dough on a lightly floured work surface, sprinkle with additional flour, and flatten into an even rectangle, about ¾” thick. Using a 2 ½” biscuit cutter or plain cookie cutter, cut out rounds and transfer to prepared baking sheet. Lightly brush some additional milk on top of each biscuit. Bake until golden brown, about 10-12 minutes. 18 | NW Kids Magazine

KIDS IN THE KITCHEN:

This is a great recipe to get the kids involved. Have them combine the dry ingredients and whisk together the wet ingredients. You can also have them cut out the biscuits and place them on the baking sheet. Jennifer Bryman is Co-Founder of The Heart’s Kitchen, a boutique consulting organization based in Portland, Oregon. The Heart’s Kitchen works with natural food producers and health organizations nationwide to develop recipes and nutrition education materials. theheartskitchen.com


NW Kids Magazine | 19


K A E R B R E T N I W CAMPS WE VILLAGE - PLAY CAMP

CHILDREN’S GYM SPORTS & DANCE CAMP Shake off the winter doldrums with an engaging Sports Camp, which includes a gymnastics lesson or Irish Dance Camp. Both camps include rock climbing time at The Circuit Bouldering Gym, play time in the gymnastics center, arts and crafts, group games, and field games. Details: Dec 21-23 and 28-31; 9-3:30; before and aftercare available; $65-210; ask about the sibling discount! 1625 NE Sandy Blvd childrensgym.com

CREATIVE ROOTS THEATER & PUPPETRY CAMP Let your imagination run wild with two weeks of creative fun featuring themed camps on theater and advanced puppetry. Details: Dec 21-24 & 28-31 8:30am–4:30pm, ages 5-12 (flexible); $75 per day. Older kids, ages 12+ are encouraged to apply to be camp assistants. 2661 NW Thurman St creativerootspdx.com

ENGINEERING FOR KIDS STEM CAMP Calling all Minecraft and Lego robotic aficionados! Students will learn virtual engineering with Minecraft EDU and Lego Robotics. Amazing and fun! 20 | NW Kids Magazine

Details: Dec 21-24 – Camp 1: 9-11am, $115; ages 4-14, and Camp 2: 12-6pm every day, 12/24 ends at 4pm, $250; ages 7-14. Dec 28-Jan 1 – Camp 1: 9-11am, $150; ages 4-14, and Camp 2: 12-6pm every day, 12/31 ends at 4pm, $325; ages 7-14. 11507 SW Pacific Hwy engineeringforkids.com

MJCC WINTER BREAK CAMP PLAY & SPORTS CAMP Need something for your kids to do this Thanksgiving and Winter breaks? Keep them busy and having fun at the MJCC with sports, swimming, gymnastics, arts and crafts, games, and more! Details: November 11, 23, 24, 25 December 21-24 & 28-31 Half and full day options: $20-47 per day; before and after care available For ages 3-11 (kids must be potty-trained) 6651 SW Capital Highway oregonjcc.org/vacationcamps

MODERN DOMESTIC SEWING CAMP MAKE A QUILT

MODERN DOMESTIC SEWING CAMP Learn how to make a quilt in this fun and creative kids sewing camp for ages 8 and up. Details: Dec 28-31; 10am-1pm; $275 1408 NE Alberta shop.moderndomesticpdx.com/classesclasses-for-kids continued on p. 22


NW Kids Magazine | 21


TRACKERS - HERE WE GO A WAFFLING WINTER CAMP

NE COMMUNITY CENTER PLAY CAMP Sign up for one day or 6! Campers will make new friends while spending time making crafts, playing games and sports and splashing around in the pool! Details: Dec 21-23 & 28-30; 9am-4pm; $40-50 per day; for ages 6-11. 1630 NE 38th necommunitycenter.org

NORTHWEST CHILDREN’S THEATER ACTING CAMP The time has come for fairytale creatures of all shapes and sizes to gather in Shrek’s magical swamp for a rowdy fairytale mashup! Whether you’re a princess with a secret past or an ogre with a heart of gold this camp promises to be a hilarious way to spend the holidays. Students will write an original Shrek-inspired showcase to present on the last day of camp. Price includes admission to “Shrek the Musical.” Details: Dec 28 - 31; $250 For grades K-2 & 3-5 1819 NW Everett nwcts.org

PENINSULA CHILDREN’S CENTER PLAY CAMP Have fun playing over winter break with camp at Sabin and Boise Elliott Details: Dec 21, 22 29-31; 6:30am-6pm; $50 per day or $188 for all days; for ages 5-12 penchild.org

PIZAZZ SWEETS BAKERY BAKING CAMP Do you love to bake? Spend the break making delicious holiday inspired treats to share with friends and family. Details: Dec 28-30; 9am-noon; $160 For grades K-5 18305 Timbergrove Court, Lake Oswego pizazzsweets.com/calendar

22 | NW Kids Magazine

PORTLAND ROCK GYM CLIMBING CAMP Whether it’s your first time or your 50th, kiddos will love this fun and engaging climbing camp. Details: Dec 21-23 & 28-30; 9am-3pm; $75 for the first day and $60 for each additional day. 21 NE 12th portlandrockgym.com

TRACKERS EARTH OUTDOOR CAMP It’s been voted our reader’s favorite for a reason! Spend winter break with Trackers and learn fun wilderness and folk crafts for the season. Take part in a role-playing story, developing new skills along the journey. Maybe even go snowshoeing or train archery. There’s no limit to the adventures you can have! Details: Dec 21-23 & Dec 28-31; 8:30-4pm; before and aftercare available; $67 per day; ages 4-12. 4617 SE Milwaukie Ave trackerspdx.com

WE VILLAGE PLAY CAMP Playtime is always the main event, but the camps are chalk full of activities, games, and a wintery theme. Each day will include a winter craft that kids can take home, snacks, and of course all of the playtime they need to ensure they go home with big smiles on their faces. Details: Thanksgiving and Christmas break Monday-Friday 8am-5pm; before and after care available; for ages 3 to 12 years old; call or visit website for pricing. . 4 Locations: Pearl, NE Broadway, Orenco Station and Happy Valley wevillage.com


NW Kids Magazine | 23


Best of Portland and beyond OUR TOP PICKS FOR GETTING OUT THIS MONTH

NOVEMBER

1

All Nov CRAFT FACTORY NOVEMBER SPECIAL OPEN STUDIO

This month, head over to one of our favorite drop-in craft studios and make any animal craft for just $10, with unlimited embellishments and for as long as you’d like. Turkey, anyone? $10 for first craft, craftfactorypdx.com

2 Nov 6-15 USAGI YOJIMBO The premiere stage adaptation of Stan Sakai’s beloved comic book about a young rabbit’s journey to become a samurai in feudal Japan. Ages 7 and up, $8-10, pcc.edu/about/theatre

4

3

Nov 7 WORDSTOCK

Hooray for books! A literature festival featuring readings, author discussions, a huge book fair, food trucks and a beer tent, and activities and workshops for all ages. $10-20, 17 and under free, portlandartmuseum.org/wordstock

Nov 14 STAR WARS DAY

Child’s Play Toys welcomes your favorite Star Wars characters for a day of intergalactic fun! Dress up like Luke or Leia, enjoy some tasty movie-themed treats, and get a start on your holiday shopping. 20% of all sales to benefit Chapman School. Free, childsplayportland.com

Please confirm calendar events and performances as scheduling changes may occur. 24 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 25


5

Nov 14 NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CELEBRATION Learn about the cultures native to the Pacific Northwest, as well as the rest of the States, in this family-friendly celebration with hands-on activities and crafts for all ages. Free, cityofvancouver.us/watercenter

6

Nov 15 BLAST OFF! OREGON SYMPHONY KIDS CONCERT

The theme is planets and outer space! A symphony experience for kids and adults alike, with selections from Star Wars, Planets, and more. $10-40, orsymphony.org

7

Nov 15 CHANUKAH GIFT AND BOOK FAIR

Shop goods and wares by local artists and browse books for the perfect holiday gifts. Enjoy a latke lunch at the cafe and listen to live music! Storytime for kids 3-8 at 2pm. Free, oregonjcc.org/jewish_culture

8

Nov 21 HOLLADAY PARK TURKEY TROT

Kick off Thanksgiving season with the first Fun Run for the kiddos. Races separated by age (5 and under, 6-7), with crafts and activities afterward. Rain or shine. Free, holladaypark.com

Remember to check the NW Kids online calendar for dozens more outings and activities each day. Share with friends, subscribe to the RSS, add directly to your calendar, and more features. There’s something going on you don’t want to miss!! nwkidsmagazine.com/events/month 26 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 27


9

Nov 22 THANKSGIVING WALK

Walk along the Sandy River at Oxbow Regional Park with a naturalist expert and observe the wildlife and coming of winter. Bring a sack lunch to eat around the campfire to the hear the Iroquis “Thanksgiving Address.” Hot drinks provided. $5-7 per vehicle, oregonmetro.gov

10

Opens Nov 27 CHRISTMAS IN THE GARDEN

A beloved and award-winning holiday favorite! Shop at the Traditional German Market and marvel at the light display in the Rediscovery Forest. New this year: an outdoor ice skating rink! Enjoy classic holiday treats and beverages, say hello to Santa, meet live reindeer, and more. $4-6, oregongarden.org

11

Starts Nov 28 CINNAMON BEAR CRUISE

A family-friendly cruise with the Cinnamon Bear, made famous by the 1937 radio program. Take a picture with the Bear himself atop his magical throne, eat yummy treats, and experience storytelling and holiday magic. $22-30, kids 1 and under free, group rates available, cinnamonbearcruise.com

12

DEC 5 THE VON TRAPPS HOLIDAY CONCERT

We’re glad the von Trapps adopted Portland as their hometown. Don’t miss this opportunity to see the great grandchildren of the Captain and Maria von Trapp in this special family holiday concert at Lake Oswego High School. Tickets must be purchased prior to event. $14 for children (2-11years); $20 for adults; 6-8pm. loparks.org

28 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 29


6

Found around Town SHOPS

Photograph courtesy of AMY CLOSE PHOTOGRAPHY

1

7

2

1

AMERICAN GIRL PORTLAND PIONEER PLACE Open Through: March, 2016 americangirl.com

2

ROSEWAY PLAY CAFÉ 71st and NE Fremont rosewayplaycafe.com

3 3

WEVILLAGE- NE BROADWAY

1901 NE Broadway wevillage.com 4

CRISP

3901 N Williams crispsaladsnw.com 4

5

5

ZOOM+KIDS DISCOVERY CENTER 4427 NE Fremont zoomcare.com/clinic/zoomkids

6

AMAZING FAIRYTALE PARTIES 2137 East Burnside amazingfairytaleparties

7

BEANSTALK - MONTAVILLA

New location opens November 10th 8021 SE Stark beanstalkchildrensresale.com 30 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 31


32 | NW Kids Magazine