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nwkidsmagazine.com | August 2012

Back to School the Right Brain Initiative | Lunch Box Breakdown | green your way to school


2 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 3


Publisher / Advertising Director Michelle Snell michelle@nwkidsmagazine.com Editorial Beth Friesenhahn beth@nwkidsmagazine.com Kelley Schaefer-Levi kelley@nwkidsmagazine.com Account Managers Laurel Ackerman laurel@nwkidsmagazine.com Nancy Coronado nancy@nwkidsmagazine.com Client Services Coordinator / Client Ad Design Karel Chan karel@nwkidsmagazine.com Advertising Inquiries: 503-282-2711, ext. 1 sales@nwkidsmagazine.com Design Robyn Barbon robyn@nwkidsmagazine.com Accounting & Business Services Heather Rex heather@nwkidsmagazine.com

ON THE COVER and above: Photos courtesy of Emma Easley Darden. Emma is the co-principal of RLP Studios, which specializes in translating the emotion and connection of life’s moments into heirloomquality art-- with a modern twist. She also contributes monthly to NW Kids as the staff photographer. For more of RLP Studios work check out rlportraits.com/blog.

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Staff Photographer Emma Easley Darden emma@nwkidsmagazine.com Connect With Us: • Phone: 503.282.2711 • email: contact@nwkidsmagazine.com • Facebook: facebook.com/nwkids • Twitter: @nwkids NW Kids is published monthly by Miche Media, LLC. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy; sometimes we make errors. Please let us know when we do and accept our apologies. Printed locally; Please recycle.


contents

INSIDE: 8 Green Your Way To School

back to school

0 Fostering Creative Opportunity: 1 The Right Brain Initiative 14 Lunch Box Breakdown 16 Smart Eating For A Successful School Year 20 Allergy Free Lunches Made Easy

goods

10

18 Found Around Town: Back to School Lunch Gear 28 Best Back To School Reads

profile

30 Awesome NW Kid: Estee Rosenberg nwkidsmagazine.com Edible Art What to Plant Now

online this month

Meet The New School: The Portland School of Experiential Education Three Days At Pendarvis Farm: A Pickathon Wrap Up Resale Resource Guide Lights, Cameras, Bugs: How to get your family into nature using mobile technology Product Review: Neat-os Reusable Snack and Sandwich Bags

16

20


listings Aim High Martial Arts..................................11 Amanda Artp................................................29 Applegate Organics......................................32 Barre3............................................................31 Beanstalk.........................................................9 Bella Stella....................................................21 Bennett Suzuki Violin Studio........................13 Black Wagon.................................................11 Coffee Kids......................................................9 Daisies and Dinos............................................7 Do Jump!.........................................................9 Fine Art Starts...............................................11 Hi 5 Dental......................................................9 Hilltop Preschool & Kindergarten.................29 i9 Sports........................................................29 Justus Orthodontics........................................7 K-12.................................................................3 Kids’ Backyard Store........................................2 Lice Knowing You..........................................29 Little Fuirt Farm Montessori.........................23 Maria’s Place.................................................13 Mississippi Pizza.............................................9 My Masterpiece Art Studio.............................9 Neat-Os.........................................................13 Oregon Episcopal School..............................27 Oregon Volunteer Firefighters.........................7 Organic Valley...............................................19 Pediatric Dental...............................................3 Pfeifer Musicwerks........................................23 Piccolina........................................................11 Playground Gym...........................................13 Portland Language Arts.................................7 Portland Trampolines......................................2 Reversed Lens Photography.........................31 Scuola Italiana..............................................29 Sit Still...........................................................23 Snack Taxi......................................................21 Spanky’s Legendary Consignment...............13 Spielwerk Toys...............................................21 Sweet Peas Kidzone......................................11 Treehouse Boutique......................................23 Velocity Athletix............................................21 World Forestry Center...................................23 World of Smiles...............................................7

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editor’s

corner

 It seems summer has barely begun when we start thinking about sending our kids back to school each year. It makes us realize that we are a culture of rapidly moving families always preparing for the next milestone in our kids’ lives. Some of your children may be returning to the comfort of a school they’ve been attending for a while. Others may be starting at a new school or heading into a classroom for the first time. Regardless, back to school is upon us and we’re doing what we can to prepare you. In this issue, we are focusing on food and how much it affects the way that our kids perform in school. We break down a lunch box with a few tips on how to get kids to try new foods (page 14), include an article on creating a successful school year around healthy nutrition (page16), and be sure to check out some ideas on how to create yummy lunches for kids with food sensitivities and allergies (page 20). Back to school also marks the beginning of a new year packed full of great opportunities for adventure and learning, making new friends, and for some this list includes, helping others and making a difference. This month, we are pleased to introduce you to Estee Rosenberg, fashion show organizer and volunteer for Project Lemonade, and Awesome NW Kid (page 30). Estee is on a mission to help foster kids connect with new back to school clothing and accessories and we think she’s totally awesome! She is also the first in a new series on amazing kids we will be featuring throughout the next year. If you know an Awesome NW Kid under the age of 13 who’s extraordinary and doing something neat in our community we want to hear from you. Please email, awesomekid@nwkidsmagazine.com — Kelley and Beth


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back to school

Photo courtesy of Emma Easley Darden

Green your Way to School by brenna burke Our grandparents, and many of our parents, never would have thought about how to “green our way to school.” They likely would never have thought much about how to make any of the back to school experience more eco-friendly. As we enter the back to school season once more, it is clear we need to consider our impact and start greening our childrens’ way to school.

Get Out There and Walk Walking to school used to be the norm, but over time the number of students who walk to school has been reduced significantly. National Walk to School Day began in 1997 as a one-day event aimed at building awareness for the need for walkable communities and to promote the benefits of walking to school. This year we can celebrate National Walk to School Day on October 3, 2012. Why do we need a National Walk to School Day? • Currently only 13% of children K-8 walk or bike to school. • Only 35% of children who live within one mile of school walk or bike just once a week. • About 25% of morning traffic is parents taking their children to school.

The Magic School Bus Using the school bus on a regular basis is another good option for those days when walking and biking isn’t feasible. We are lucky 8 | NW Kids Magazine

to live in an area that strives to make school buses as eco-friendly as possible. Why Ride the School Bus? • Less than 50% of children ride the school bus. • Current statistics report that a child is 13 times safer in a school bus than in a car. • The total U. S. savings in fuel cost per year by students riding school buses is $6,097,028,413. Every family that sends their child to school on the bus reduces one fewer car on the road. If you have ever been near a school at the start or end time, that can be a huge difference in traffic and emissions, not to mention a reduction in exposure to traffic pollution. Walking to school promotes physical activity, a cleaner environment, community benefits, and perhaps counterintuitively to some, greater safety. The National Walk to School website has lots of resources for how to plan a great event and how to keep it going throughout the school year. Visit walkbiketoschool.org for more information. Brenna Burke is a mama of three trying to live a green life, pursue greater health and well-being for her family and the planet, and teach her children well, all while always seeking the best tips, insight, and fun for those wanting to go a little greener. Brenna blogs at almostallthetruth.com


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back to school

Fostering Creative Opportunity:

by Kelley Schaefer-Levi

“Brains come with two sides for a reason. They need each other. They fill in each other’s blanks. One is messy by plan. The other regimented. One is linear. The other bounces off walls. One reasons. The other feels. But what happens when they work together is magical. Magical enough to make kids connect, achieve, aspire, succeed. In a future that will require the full measure of our thinking, it’s no time to leave kids half-interested, half-motivated, half-engaged, half-ready.” -The Right Brain Initiative After decades of extreme budget cuts and more occurring annually, creative opportunities for learning have nearly disappeared from Portland area schools. The Right Brain Initiative is changing that. They entered classrooms in 2008 and since then have partnered with 31 Portland area K-8 schools, local government, talented artists and educators to make arts education accessible in schools where it no longer exists. “Right Brain is a bright spot at a time

Photo courtesy of Zac Goodwin 10 | NW Kids Magazine

when public schools are in real crisis. We’re bringing all parts of the community together to make a long-lasting difference on the way our kids learn,” said Outreach Specialist Rebecca Burrell. Through 50/50 public and private funding and 30% foundation support, the initiative was created not only to bring arts back to schools, but to enhance learning in other subjects for students regardless of income, neighborhoods and language learning. For example, school teachers work with a teaching artist to integrate what is being learned in the classroom with a project using the right brain, forging new pathways to understanding a multitude of subjects. Kids may learn to apply mathematical concepts by using cameras or demonstrate knowledge about history or a specific culture through movement and performance. continued on p. 12


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back to school

Photo courtesy of Allie Maya

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Each experience is designed to meet the learning goals and needs of individual schools and the RBI works in tandem with them to carry out the program. If a schools has a specific target they are trying to meet, the RBI works with them to reach it. Teachers are selected throughout the year to work with initiative coaches to implement the process in their classrooms with different techniques and meet other teachers who are doing the same. MEASURING SUCCESS Is the initiative working? Based on stories from the field from educators, it is working. Teachers meet a few times a year to connect and bring their experiences, and work samples from students in their classrooms to the table. The RBI also goes into schools to talk to students about what they’ve learned. They might be asked to do a writing exercise explaining what happened in a book they’ve read to glean what they’ve learned. Children are engaging and becoming invested in new ways because they are looking at school and learning in a way they haven’t had access to in the past.

Photo courtesy of Zac Goodwin

SOME FACTS As of the 2011-12 school year, the RBI is working with 31 schools in five school districts in the tri-county area, and is charted to be in up to 45 schools next year. 54% of students in these schools receive free and reduced lunch. 19% are English language learners, and 590 teachers were served with professional development. GET INVOLVED Want to get involved or bring the RBI to your kids’ schools? Introduce your school district to get the ball rolling. Tell teachers and principals of the successes seen in the classrooms where the RBI has made an impact. Visit, therightbraininitiative.org for a wealth of information on how they’re making change and fostering a culture of creativity in Portland area schools. Or simply volunteer your time in schools where the program is active.

Illustrations courtesy of Jen Wick 12 | NW Kids Magazine


NW Kids Magazine | 13


back to school

lunch box breakdown Did you know that almonds are botanically considered a fruit? This nutrient rich food is high in vitamin E and is an antioxidant making it a perfect food to add to lunch. Try adding cinnamon and roasting them for those kids who need a little convincing.

Packed with phytonutrients and antioxidants, carrots are great for the cardiovascular system and kids generally love them. Pack them with lunch along side hummus or a protein rich nut butter. For the young skeptic, steam them and add butter and honey or include them in freshly baked carrot raisin bread.

Cows fed with 100% grass, and dried forages like hay, means yummy milk with higher nutritional content. Grassmilk contains naturally occurring omega-3, CLA and calcium, and is non-homogenized so the cream rises to the top.

Goodbyn Lunch Box

at Meringue Boutique, $25

We know kids may protest if they’ve never tried quinoa, so we say start them early on this protein rich grain. It’s a great substitute for white rice and pasta. Make it tasty by adding a favorite sauce or cooking in coconut milk and adding apples and raisins.

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A gluten free and fabulous option for the lunch box, Lara bars are one of our kiddos favorites and have been for a few years. They are simple and packed with pure ingredients like peanuts, cashews and almonds. An excellent snack or protein add any time of day.

Do the kids a favor and pack their lunches with sandwiches made on whole grain or sprouted breads. Both are rich in fiber and contain nutrients like selenium, potassium and magnesium, lost in the milling process for refined breads. We love Dave’s Killer Bread (local) and Ezekiel.


back to school A new gluten free favorite, Late July chips are well liked by kids and are a great alternative to traditional potato chips in the lunch box. Truthfully, we love them all, but the Sea Salt by the Seashore and Dude Ranch have become family must-haves.

Love them and most kids we know do, too. These little gems are a nutrient powerhouse with vitamins B, E, K, fiber and folate. They are great on a sandwich, raw with a little olive oil, salt and pepper or prepared as guacamole, if you can keep it cold. Yum!

As much as PB & J is a lunch staple, kids will benefit from the protein found in lunch meat. Appelgate Organics meats are organic, antibiotic and hormone free. They’re also über tasty and make an excellent sandwich. Try the smoked chicken.

OOTS! Lunchbox

at Spielwerk Toys, $30

100 % real unprocessed American cheese has been long overdue. Really, what kid won’t like this cheese? And parents can rejoice because it’s certified organic and made with Organic Valley milk produced without antibiotics, synthetic hormones, toxic pesticides or GMOs. Awesome.

The standby for many a lunch box, the apple is an excellent source of fiber and vitamin C. Kids love apples for their sweetness, but they are a perfect lunch box add because they are filling and nutritious. Back to school is apple season, so check out the lesser known varieties that can only be found at this time of year.

Eat lunch

NW Kids Magazine | 15


back to school

Smart Eating for a

Successful School Year by connie evers

Photos courtesy of Emma Easley Darden

“Eating habits — just like study habits — need to be practiced year round,” says Jay Rosenbloom, MD, PhD, a pediatrician at Pediatric Associates of the Northwest. “Preparing for back to school is a good time to review your child’s eating habits,” he adds. For best results, keep it positive and explain to your child how healthy habits can lead to success, whether in the classroom, on the playing field, or in the music room. BREAKFAST For optimal school performance, breakfast is a “must-have”. Whether your child eats at home, at school, or munches on a baggie of berries and peanut butter/whole grain toast at the bus stop, fueling up is a necessity to recharge brain cells to full capacity. While researchers can explain the scientific importance of breaking the fast, teachers can tell you firsthand about the impact breakfastskipping makes on late-morning behavior and school performance. Kids need a balance of nutrients, so include sources of complex carbohydrates in the form of whole grains, a protein source (dairy and fortified soy beverages count too), and nutrient-boosting fruits or vegetables as part of the breakfast plan.

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SCHOOL MEALS The news about school lunch is mostly good, especially for students in Portland Public Schools. New USDA child nutrition regulations as well as awareness from initiatives such as letsmove.gov and others has resulted in more fresh, healthy choices at school. Long a national leader in school nutrition, Portland school meals include whole grains, unlimited fresh fruits and vegetables, and nonfat and 1% milk. Students serve themselves from a fruit and veggie bar that has two types of vegetables and two types of fruit and fresh salad greens. Over 30% of the food served by Portland Public Schools is from a local source. PLANNING FOR SNACK ATTACKS Afternoons are perhaps the hungriest time of day for school kids. Children often head off the bus and straight into the kitchen. Take advantage of this hunger surge by offering plenty of healthy snack choices. Keep foods such as fresh fruit, cut-up veggies, string cheese, hummus, bean dips, nut butters, and whole grain breads and crackers within easy reach. Add fresh citrus slices to a pitcher of water to encourage kids to drink water over sweetened beverages. See the sidebar on the next page for ideas on stocking your kitchen for healthy snacking.


back to school FAMILY MEALS Family meals are a must-have for healthy, well-adjusted kids. According to Dr. Rosenbloom, “We know that families that make the time to sit down and eat together at home tend to eat healthier and the children tend to do better in school and get into less trouble.” Plan ahead for those times when family activities leave you scrambling to get dinner on the table. Prepare healthy soups, stews, lasagna and enchiladas in double batches and freeze, or serve sandwiches on whole grain bread with simple side dishes such as fruit, salads and yogurt. Finally, remember that parents are the ultimate role models for healthy habits. Make nutritious, whole food choices part of your daily routine and your children will become better eaters as well.

Stocking your Kitchen for Healthy Snacking Refrigerator: • Airtight containers filled with cleaned fresh vegetables such as carrots, baby squash, broccoli florets, pea pods, celery, radishes and jicama slices • Fresh guacamole, salsa, hummus, or bean dips for dipping vegetables • Airtight containers filled with washed fruit such as grapes, melon balls, berries & kiwi chunks • Fat-free yogurt (Greek has more protein) • Reduced fat cheese sticks • Nonfat or 1% milk (or fortified soy milk • 100% fruit juice (limit to 6-8 ounces total per day for school-aged children) • Pitcher of chilled water Pantry: • Canned pineapple chunks, mandarin oranges, refried beans, chunk light tuna nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, pistachios and peanuts • Dried fruit such as raisins, and apricot halves • Whole grain crackers • Low-sugar breakfast cereals • Whole grain bread, mini-bagels, pita bread and tortillas (whole grain corn or flour) Freezer: • 100% fruit Juice Pops • Frozen grapes Counter: • Bowl of fresh fruit • Bowl of grape tomatoes

Connie Evers is a registered dietitian with Pediatrics Associates of the Northwest. She is also the author of How to Teach Nutrition to Kids, 4th ed. (©2012, 24 Carrot Press). Learn more about Connie at nutritionforkids.com

Snack times should be planned as “minimeals”, emphasizing nutritious foods and beverages. Encourage your child to include at least two of the five major food groups at every snack.

NW Kids Magazine | 17


goods

Eco Lunch Tray

at Spielwerk Toys, $15

Snack Taxi Sacks

(various sizes) at Mirador Community Store, $8-$10

Cupcake Bike Bell

by Kikkerland at New Seasons Market, $16

Stainless Steel Bottle in Robot by Crocodile Creek at Child’s Play (matches the lunch box!), $12

Cup Cozy by The Cozy Project on Etsy.com, $16 18 | NW Kids Magazine

SoYoung Brown Birds Cooler Bag

Melissa and Doug Beeposh Backpack

Stacking Caterpillar Containers

Eco Lunch Box at

at Blackwagon, $30

by Boon at Child’s Play, $14

Found Around Town

Assorted School Lunch Napkins

by Lemon Thread on Etsy, $9

Sigg Water Bottle at New Seasons Market, $16-$20

at Coffee Kids, $20

Spielwerk Toys, $25

Neat-os Customizable Snack and Sandwich Bags at Bella Stella, $8-$12

Robot Lunch Box by Crocodile Creek at Child’s Play, $18

Kiddie Play Back Pack by

SugarBooger at Bella Stella, $22


NW Kids Magazine | 19


back to school

Allergy Free Lunches Made Easy by Laura Jost Packing lunches for my daughter was at one time a pretty easy task; one I even managed to accomplish before going to bed. Being that she was a picky eater, I had my old standbys and they served me well. But that all changed when she was diagnosed with a chronic disease related to inconclusive food allergy testing. We had to immediately eliminate dairy, soy, wheat, egg, fish, seafood, tree nuts, and peanuts. I completely and totally freaked out (if you saw me crying in the grocery store, I apologize) and then I got to work. The trickiest part is not just making food that your child CAN eat, it’s making food that they WILL eat. The good news is that packing lunches can still be easy; it’s just that you have to find new standbys without breaking the bank. The best advice that I received was “Don’t try to find like items for old favorites (because they’ll never be the same or they will cost an arm and a leg); find new favorites!”

Tips and tricks:

Try new foods at home before you pack them in a lunch. Food can be very emotional for an allergic child; limit surprises. 20 | NW Kids Magazine

Photos courtesy of Laura Jost

Pack an extra snack. I pack a granola bar. You never know when there might be a class celebration that includes foods that your child can’t have or a shortage of snacks that your child’s school usually provides. Gluten-free carbs do not last like others. Make sure that your bags are sealed tight and put your breads in the freezer within two days. Microwave each slice for about 30 seconds for an instant thaw. Split single containers of more expensive processed foods like alternate yogurts. Add fresh fruit or granola at mealtime to get more bang for your buck. Alternate milks can be fun! Especially while your child is adjusting to the taste of new milks, try different varieties and add chai concentrate or syrups to create fun new warm or cold drinks. Do not stock up unless you know it’s a hit. It doesn’t matter how many great reviews or recommendations you get; make sure that it works for your family. Get out there! I have about six different types of grocery stores on my usual routes and I have investigated every last one of them to see what they have to offer. There is a lot


NW Kids Magazine | 21


back to school Sides: Applesauce, sliced/dried veggies/ fruits, veggies with hummus, air pop with melted coconut oil and sea salt, roasted seaweed, allergen-free crackers/chips, yogurt and fruit/granola, trail mix with seeds/nuts/ fruit/sunspire chocolate chips, Nature’s Path granola bar. Drinks: Fruit smoothies, chocolate almond milk, orange juice, iced green tea, sparkling water. Guilty pleasures: Newman’s Own wheat and dairy free sandwich cookies, Jello cook and serve pudding made with coconut milk, gluten-free rice krispie treats made with Nucoa buttery sticks, The Craving’s Place Ooey Gooey Chocolatey Chewy brownies.

more out there than you think, from premade to bulk ingredients (purple rice was a nice surprise); you just have to know where to get it. Allergyeats.com is a great site for determining which local restaurants can cater to your needs. Get out your apron. Here is your opportunity to nourish your child with food that you made from scratch. Be careful when making gluten-free baked goods; they tend to scorch. Check out glutenfreegoddess. blogspot.com, nourishingmeals.com, and even your favorite recipe sites for allergenfriendly recipes and substitutions.

Ideas for a packed lunch: Mains: Lundburg rice cake with seed/nut butter and fruit/spread/sunspire chocolate chips, meat on New Cascadia allergenfree bread/bagel with mustard/vegenaise, meat and veggie roll ups, Daiya “cheese” quesadillas, quinoa noodles with olive oil and nutritional yeast, brown rice with chicken breast and coconut aminos, quinoa with steamed veggies.

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I found the most success playing with color and texture and making my daughter’s lunches something fun to open. Special containers, utensils, and lunch bags and putting fresh foods in her lunch really did the trick. Now that she feels better, she better understands how important it is to nourish her body properly. Food allergies certainly are not easy, but they are like any other adventure; full of possibility, discovery, and maybe even fun. Laura Jost is a stay-at-home mom of two in Portland, OR. She has spent more time in the kitchen in the last year than any other year of life and counts her silpat among her most prized possessions. You can contact her at newjost@gmail.com.


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calendar

Music & Performances Thurs in Aug

Kruger’s Farm – Farm Tunes

Bring a picnic and enjoy sweet melodies on beautiful Sauvie Island with a different band every week. $10/car, 6:30-9:30pm. krugersfarm.com

Aug 9

Washington Park Summer Festival – Wanderlust Circus

Portland’s own bohemian circus troupe, complete with acrobatics, jugglers, aerialists, stilts, and more. Free, 6pm. portlandonline.com/parks

Aug 11 & 25

Gresham Arts Plaza – Musicalu

Washington Park Summer Festival - Bodyvox

A summer music series featuring local kid and kindie bands. Aug 11: The Snail People, Aug 25: The Toy Trains. Free, 11am-12pm. greshamoregon.gov/artsplaza

Aug 3-5, 24-26

Summer Fairs/ Festivals

Aug 2

A breathtaking combination of dance, movement, and theater sure to thrill all ages. Free, 6pm. portlandonline.com/parks

Ping Pong’s Pint Sized Puppet Museum – No, No, No, Pinocchio A charming marionette puppet show in the garden at Sellwood’s newest attraction. $6 for kids 3 and up, Fri 7pm, Sat 3pm & 7pm, Sun 3pm. puppetmuseum.com

Aug 5

Open Arms SDA Church – Asante East African Children’s Choir

Asanta Children’s Choir is comprised of children from Burundi and is dedicated to fundraising for orphans in East Africa. Donations welcome, 6:30-8:30pm. asantechoir.org

AUG 3 - 5

Pickathon 2012

14th Annual Indie Roots Music Festival. Music + Pendarvis Farm = Love Kids 12 and under are free. Tickets $100 + pickathon.com

Aug 3-12

Clark County Fair

Carnival rides, monster trucks, kid-friendly concerts, jousting – the ultimate summer fun! Admission $7-10 (kids 0-7 free), add’l cost for carnival rides. Opening Fri 8am11pm, Sun-Thurs 10am-10pm, Fri-Sat 10am11pm. clarkcofair.com

Please confirm calendar events and performances as scheduling changes may occur. 24 | NW Kids Magazine


calendar

Events Aug 4

Fremont Fest

Shopping, bike and pet parade, carnival games and bouncy houses, a pub crawl… what more could you ask for? 10am-6pm. businessonfremont.com

Aug 10-11

Tualatin Crawfish Festival

Two days of fun: crawfish feasts, kid and adult eating competitions, a dog show, parade, and more. $1-4, kids 0-2 free, Fri 5-10pm, Sat 7:30am-11pm. tualatincrawfishfestival.com

Aug 10-12

The Bite of Oregon

Enjoy a smorgasbord of food and drink from all over Oregon, including live demos, music, and Iron Chef Oregon! $5, Fri-Sat 11am10pm, Sun 11am-8pm. biteoforegon.com

Aug 11

15th Annual Alberta Street Fair

Spend the day in our beautiful Alberta Arts district, with a kids’ parade at 11am, 250 vendors, live entertainment, and a kids’ corner! Free, 11am-7pm. albertamainst.org/street-fair

Aug 26

Hawthorne Street Fair & Sunday Parkways

Visit funky Hawthorne and shop with local vendors, see live music, and enter giveaways. This year it’s also Sunday Parkways, a walk and bike friendly celebration! 10am-5pm. hawthornestreetfair.com

All Aug

Portland Children’s Museum – KidsBuild:2012

A new exhibit that teaches kids all about construction, creativity, and community, using natural, sustainable, and recyclable materials. Every day until Sept 3. $8-9, 9am5pm. portlandcm.org

Suns in Aug

Alpenrose Dairy – Dairyville

Visit a quaint, miniature town and see model trains in action, then enjoy a fresh, delicious ice cream treat. Free, 1-4pm. alpenrose.com

AUG 1, 5, 18 & 23

Multnomah County Library Adventures with Bugs

Join the Bug Chicks, two female entomologists (bug scientists), in exploring the world of insects, spiders and their relatives. You can even hold, pet and look at all sorts of crazy creatures including tarantulas, cockroaches, scorpions and more! For locations and times, visit events.multcolib.org/

Aug 3, 10, & 17

Pioneer Courthouse Square – Flicks on the Bricks

Catch a movie at dusk on the square downtown! Aug 3: Clueless, Aug 10: A League of Their Own, Aug 17: E.T. – bring snacks and a blanket. Free, 8:30pm. thesquarepdx.org

Aug 5

OMSI - $2 Days

Science is fun! $2, 9:30am-5:30pm. omsi.edu NW Kids Magazine | 25


calendar

Aug 5

Aug 11

Pre-movie entertainment at 6:30, movie begins at dusk. Free! portlandonline.com/parks

A live-action version of the scavenger hunt game. All proceeds benefit Portland Public Schools. $3-5, 11am-2pm. waldogamepdx.com

Sellwood Park – Movie: The Muppets

Aug 7-8, 14-15, 21-22 Regal Movie Theaters $1 Summer Movie Express

See a kid-friendly movie for just $1! At participating Regal theaters all around town; see website for showtimes. 10am. regmovies.com/summermovieexpress

Aug 8 & 22

Oregon Zoo – Sunset at the Zoo

A special after-hours offering with live music, food, animal demonstrations, arts and crafts, and more. $7.50-10.50, 5-9pm. oregonzoo.org

Aug 9 & 23

Artemisia Collage with Nature – Terrarium Workshop Kids learn how to make their own unique “nature collages” – neat! $20 covers all materials, 11:30am-12:30pm. collagewithnature.com

Aug 10

Quaking Grass – Family Dance Party Bring the whole family for a shakin’ and groovin’ good time! $6, 5-7pm. quakinggrass.org

Pioneer Courthouse Square – Where’s Waldo?

AUG 11

Streets of Tanasborne Kid Safety Day and Sidewalk Sale

Enjoy live music from Mr. Hoo and Shwing Daddies, inspect fire and police equipment, learn about the Safe Assured ID Program, sample food, make crafts and more. 10am4pm, free. streetsoftansaborne.com

Aug 11 & 25

PSU Farmers Market – Kids Cook at the Market

A unique experience for kids to learn about local and seasonal ingredients and make their own delicious creations. Registration required (see website), $5, 8:30-10am. portlandfarmersmarket.org

Aug 13

Oaks Park & Big Brothers Big Sisters NW – Family Fun Night

Enjoy an evening at Oaks Park and visit the Kids Health and Home Safety Fair, see vintage and modern fire trucks. Free admission, $7.50-15 for ride tickets, 4-9:30pm. showclix.com/event/oakspark

Aug 14

Aug 11

Oregon Zoo – Second Tuesday

Join the author of “Hey Little Baby!” for a baby focused storytime during the Alberta Street Fair. 2pm. greenbeanbookspdx.com

Aug 17

Green Bean Books – Storytime with Heather Leigh

Visit the animals for just $4! Kids 0-3 free, 9am6pm. oregonzoo.org

Irving Park – Movies in the Park: Hugo

A beautifully made and moving story about a 26 | NW Kids Magazine


French boy and his automaton. Don’t miss this one! Free, 6:30pm. portlandonline.com/parks

Aug 19

Mississippi Pizza – All Ages Karaoke

Calling all singers and budding rock stars! Take the stage, grab the mic, and croon with the whole family. Free, 4pm. mississippipizza.com

Aug 22-26

Portland Parks – Dive-In Movie

Watch a movie… in the pool? You bet! Bring an inflatable to float on the temperaturecontrolled water and catch a family-friendly flick. Aug 22: Montavilla Community Center, Aug 23: Creston Pool, Aug 24: Sellwood Pool, Aug 25: Wilson Pool, Aug 26: Grant Pool. $3-5, 8pm. portlandonline.com/parks

Aug 24

Fulton Park – Ice Cream Social

Make your own ice cream! Also a rock wall, face painting, and more. Free, 6:30-8:30pm. portlandonline.com/parks

Aug 25

Mississippi Pizza – Aaron Nigel Smith CD Release Party

Come preview Aaron Nigel Smith’s newest release, to come in September! Suggested donation $5/person or $15/family, 4pm. aaronnigelsmith.com

Aug 31

Mt. Scott Community Center – End of Summer Bash

Say one last good-bye to summer with open swim, water play, food, and music! Stay in the evening for a movie in the park and free popcorn. Free, 1-10pm. portlandonline.com/parks

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books

best

Back to School Reads Reviews by Elizabeth Pusack of Green Bean Books Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons by Eric Litwin ( HC $16.99) You’ll love the cool as a cucumber comeback of Pete the Cat. Pete’s as suave and stylish as ever with buttons and his tried-and-true groovy cat demeanor! This, the third book in the hilarious and refreshing series (Pete the Cat: I Love my White Shoes and Pete The Cat: Rockin’ in my School Shoes), offers an especially fun, painless and SINGABLE first look at subtraction as adventuring buttons pop off Pete the Cat’s coat. Wumbers by Amy Krouse Rosenthal (HC $16.99) “Here’s the plan: I’ll climb 2 the s2L and go str8 to the cookie jar. You be on the lookout 4 mom!” Wumbers is a wacky and 1-derful 2-torial on peppering your words with nifty numerals! Cute and car-2-ny, this book’s myriad digit-bedazzled scenarios will charm and enchant even the most reluctant mathematician. There’s no d9ing it. Put on your 2-2 and your thinking cap, and get ready to be el-8-ted! The Lonely Book by Kate Bernheimer (HC $17.99) A dreamy and tender book about the loveliness of libraries and the perils of being a bibliophile. A small girl becomes fast friends with a dog-

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eared and world-worn picture book about life beneath a toadstool, a book once loved and lauded as the most popular listing in the card catalog. The little reader cherishes her story for weeks until one fateful library visit when she forgets to renew; it happens to the best of us! Undaunted, the loyal bookworm goes searching for her treasure again at the library book sale.
 Wonder by RJ Palacio (HC $15.99)
 An astoundingly awesome book about a boy named August entering middle school (his first school ever) with a serious facial deformity. This book is heart-wrenching and hilarious, and so accurately portrays the acute pains and joys of taking risks and navigating new seas during adolescence. Everybody is going to love and learn from Auggie’s story, which would make a great all-class read. Readers even get to experience the perspectives of his big sister Via, and a few of his friends. Their experiences are as tender and true as his are. Wonder is one of the most insightful and inspiring books I’ve read this year, grown-up books included.

1600 NE Alberta Street 503-954-2354 greenbeanbookspdx.com


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profile

Awesome NW K id Meet Awesome NW Kid Estee Rosenberg. She is 13 years old and is organizing an “Opening Night Fashion Show” for the nonprofit Project Lemonade to benefit foster kids in Multnomah County. The fashion show will be held on August 19th and the following day Project Lemonade will open a store in downtown Portland where foster kids can shop for shirts, shoes, jeans, bags and accessories for free. We think that’s downright awesome! Likes: Singing, acting, songwriting, baking, painting, writing, shopping, and hanging out with friends. One word to describe you would be? Creative. Favorite color? Blue Favorite song? I have too many but I am big fan of indie pop music. Also, my friends and I love the group One Direction. My favorite member is Harry. Favorite book? I think my all time favorite is Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli What’s one of the best things about being a kid? Getting to let your imagination go wild. What is your favorite thing to do? Why? I love going to the beach and songwriting because it’s a place to escape reality for a short time and destress. What do you think you will be doing 10 years from now? I hope to be some sort of actress/singer. People say I should be on Broadway but I’m 30 | NW Kids Magazine

not sure yet. I’d also like to be a philanthropist and humanitarian on the side. What do you like about organizing a Fashion Show and volunteering for Project Lemonade? I love meeting the foster kids; going shopping with them is super cool. They all have amazing stories and are very inspiring. What do you want people to know about Project Lemonade/Fashion Show? That it’s an amazing store and the event is going to be awesome. We are changing kids’ lives in the process. Also how they feel about themselves for their first day of school. Where/How can readers donate to Project Lemonade? Please go to the website volunteer link: projectlemonadepdx.org/how-you-can-help/ A great way to donate is to give clothes, accessories, and shoes. At the moment, we are hoping for more winter coats.

Do you know an Awesome NW Kid under the age of 13 who’s totally extraordinary and doing something cool in our community? We want to hear from you. Please email: awesomekid@nwkidsmagazine.com


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NW Kids Magazine August 2012