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▶FREE THE NORTHWEST’S OLDEST AND LARGEST PUBLICATION FOR OLDER ADULTS

MARION POLK | FEBRUARY 2020

Date night! We have 46 fun ideas Page 4

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FAMILY TIES

Shirley Gauthier discovers her ‘new’ family Page 10 VISIT US ONLINE: NORTHWEST50PLUS.COM  FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA


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Northwest

50 Plus

VOLUME 23 | NUMBER 2

OREGON’S OLDEST & LARGEST 50+ PUBLICATION 3 Editions serving adults aged 50 and older Portland-Metro-Vancouver, Marion-Polk-Coast, South Valley: Linn-Benton Lane P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 4923 Indian School Rd. NE, Salem, OR 97305 503-304-1323 | 1-877-357-2430 | FAX 503-304-5394 info@northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus.com Subscriptions $26/year | $49/2 years

MICHELLE TE General Manager & Managing Editor mte@northwest50plus.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggi White, Mary Owen, Vanessa Salvia, Barry Finnemore, Pat Snider, Grace Peterson, and B. Lee Coyne EAGLE MEDIA LAB Design production@eaglemedialab.com DOREEN HARROLD Office Manager/Sales Assistant dharrold@northwest50plus.com JOAN RILEY Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro joan4freedom@comcast.net LARRY SURRATT Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro-Vancouver lsurratt@northwest50plus.com ROBYN SMITH Advertising Sales, Marion-PolkLinn-Benton-Lane counties rsmith@northwest50plus.com Printed by Eagle Web Press, Salem, OR Northwest 50 Plus is published monthly and locally owned and operated by Eagle Newspapers, Inc. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Northwest 50 Plus. Any use of all or any part of this publication is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.

editor’s note

WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM ‘FAILURE’

A

BOUT A YEAR AGO, WE HOSTED AN INFORMAtion Fair. We wanted to share the news about our new magazine, especially to local businesses who might be interested in promoting their goods and services in our beautiful new product. We advertised the Information Fair in our magazine. We sent out emails, posted on our social media channels, announced it at networking meetings, and made personal phone calls and appointments. Even more, we invited our publishing partners — Eagle Web Press, Eagle Mailing Services and Eagle Media Lab — to participate. We were prepared to showcase the amazing talents and services our company provides. Need high-volume printing? How about direct mail or graphic design for your newsletter? We offer it all at very competitive rates. I’ve used each of these services personally, and I can attest to the professionalism and skill each division provides. Center 50+ in Salem generously provided conference space for our Information Fair. We set up tables, chairs and refreshments. With the significant outreach, I was confident this would be well attended. But as the minutes and hours ticked by, it became quite apparent. No one would be coming. The Information Fair had flopped. Upon reflection, I remembered that life is about the journey — building one day at a time, learning the lessons this life has to offer, no matter our age or circumstances. Don’t see your flops as stopping points or stumbling blocks. We try, we fail, we dust ourselves off and try again. The Information Fair taught us some valuable lessons, and we’ve been building on those over the past year. What have you learned from your failures? How did you overcome them? I’ll post this message on our social media channels and I invite you to join the conversation. Or send me an email. I really enjoy and appreciate your feedback. ☸ MICHELLE TE | General Manager/Editor

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46

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RELATIONSHIPS

Great dates By M I C H E L L E T E

STUCK IN A RUT? HERE’S SOME IDEAS TO KEEP THE SPARK IN YOUR RELATIONSHIP

N

O MATTER HOW LONG you’ve been with your partner, you still need to make time for each other. Here’s a list of ideas for spending quality time together. 1. Do a random act of kindness for someone else. (Visit naturalbeachliving.com/best-random-acts-of-kindness-ideas for more than 200 ideas.) 2. Share positive traits you’ve learned about one another. 3. Create a couples bucket list together. 4. Play a board, card or dice game. 5. Go rock or rope climbing. 6. Write each other a poem, love or gratitude letter. (Check out a book from your local library if you need motivation.) 7. Get a couples pedicure and manicure together. 8. Binge watch a suspenseful and/or

thrilling TV series. 9. Take a day trip to the beach. (Visit northwest50plus.com for a list of our favorite Oregon Coast spots.) 10. Cook a meal from scratch or try a new recipe together. 11. Go for a hike in a favorite spot or try out a new park. (Visit oregonstateparks.org or call 800-557-6949 for maps, hours and fees.)

42 12. Attend a paint-and-sip together. (Visit northwest50plus.com for some locations in Lane and Benton counties.) 13. Go to a pottery class and have fun painting pre-made pottery. 14. Go for a bike ride. (Try Row River Trail in Cottage Grove.) 15. Take a free online “love languages” test. (Try 5lovelanguages.com.) 16. Go paddle boarding, canoeing

4  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

or kayaking. (Visit oregonstateparks/ thingstodo/letsgo for local classes in your area.) 17. Watch a favorite professional sports team on TV together. (Go Blazers!) 18. Go to a teahouse and have a fun conversation. 19. Have a discussion about sex. (Need a primer? Try prevention.com/ sex/a20504743/spice-up-sex-life.) 20. Volunteer at your local nonprofit. (Visit unitedway.org for organizations in your area.) 21. Get a couples massage, or give each other one. (Visit youtube.com for tutorials.) 22. Create a book of your love story. (Visit personalhistoriansnw.org if you need some professional assistance.) 23. Watch your wedding video or look at your wedding pictures together. 24. Visit a water park or theme park and have some fun. (Visit tripadvisor. com for suggestions.) 25. Go to a drive-in movie. (Try 99w. com.) 26. Join a protest. (Try rallylist.com.)


27. Attend a high school or college event, such as a concert or sports game. (Get a schedule of all high school games at osaa.org/?year=2019.) 28. Host a bonfire party. (Don’t have a backyard? Find “bonfire” or “fireplace” on youtube.com, and snuggle in front of the TV.) 29. Go for an evening walk. 30. Watch a TEDx Talk and discuss what you learned from it. (Visit ted. com/watch/tedx-talks.)

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31. Attend a comedy show. (Try travelportland.com for upcoming events.) 32. Join a workout class, do yoga or play a sport together. 33. Attend a karaoke event. 34. Watch the sunset together. 35. Challenge each other to a video game. 36. Browse a bookstore. (Try Books Read Books New in Salem for a large selection of new and used books.) 37. Stargaze in your backyard. (Download a free stargazing app, like Star Tracker Lite-Live Sky.) 38. Re-create your first date. 39. Make a playlist of songs from when you first got together. (Spotify. com is a great way to make a playlist.) 40. Ride a carousel. (Both Salem and Albany have opportunities.) 41. Work on a DIY project together. 42. Take a mini road trip to visit a local festival or a new museum. (For ideas, check out the calendar listings on page 18 or visit northwest50plus.com.) 43. Spend an evening learning to say “I love you” in different languages. (Try the Duolingo app.) 44. Have a candlelit dinner. 45. Play rock, paper, scissors to see who gets to pick an old favorite movie. 46. Have a homemade pizza night. ☸

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MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  5


YOUR HEALTH  |  SAMARITAN HEALTH

a quick

RESPONSE By SA M A R I TA N H E A LT H

JIM CLINE SURVIVED A HEART ATTACK, AND NOW LIVES LIFE TO THE FULLEST

J

IM CLINE HAD JUST ACHIEVED A PERSONal best on the strider machine at the SamFit gym in Newport. The next thing he knew, he was waking up in the Emergency Department. After being told he’d had a heart attack, he asked to call his wife. The doctor dialed the phone and handed it to Jim.

“Hi, honey. I’m in the Emergency Room in Newport,” Jim said when Amy Cline answered. “What did you break?” she asked. “I think I broke my heart,” Jim said. The event happened on a chilly and rainy Monday morning in December. Deborah Olff, a home health and hospice nurse at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital, was working out at the SamFit gym for the first time in two years when she saw Jim Cline collapse. Her basic training kicked in as she rushed to his side and began chest compressions after she was unable to detect a pulse. Another gym member called 9-1-1. Jennifer Miller, the hospital’s Physical Rehabilitation Department manager, was also at the gym that morning and took over for Olff, who ran to get the Automatic External Jim Cline spent nearly 25 years at Rogue Brewery in Newport. He’s now retired, keeping fit and traveling with his wife Amy. 6  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

Defibrillator (AED). Detecting no heartbeat, the AED delivered two shocks in an attempt to restart Cline’s heart. It worked. Paramedics arrived within eight minutes and Jim again had a pulse. Though it was Olff ’s first time doing CPR, her quick action may have saved Cline’s life, and kept his heart from being damaged. Later, cardiologist Dr. Sridhar Vijayasekaran told Cline that because CPR was rapidly started — within 10 to 15 seconds; and the AED was applied so quickly — within about 45 seconds — there was no detectable damage to his heart from the heart attack. The doctor told Amy her husband would be transferred to Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. The Clines live in Siletz, so Amy left her house and waited to meet the ambulance at the highway junction. “I followed him with my flashers on all the way over, including going through stop lights,” she says. “The ambulance stopped, and they told me I could not go through stop signs or red lights. I said, ‘They’ll have to catch me.’” At Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, three stents were placed in Cline’s coronary arteries and he was discharged in two days. He says the heart attack surprised him because he had no history of heart problems. “I was dumbfounded when I had the heart attack, because I thought I was doing the right things,” he says. “Because I had


been working out regularly for years, my heart was strong. I think that helped my recovery a whole lot, because I wasn’t laying around getting a flabby heart.” Cline also credits cardiac rehabilitation at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital for helping him recover. “They are enthusiastic and genuinely concerned about helping you get better,” he says. “At my first session, they asked me about my goals and I said that by the end of the program I want to be back physically to where I was when I started.” Cardiac rehab exercise specialist Nicole Schultz helped Cline reach his goals, in large part by setting limits for him. “At the first session, I asked if I could start lifting again,” Cline says. “She said no.” After two weeks closely monitoring Cline’s activity at the cardiac rehab gym, he was allowed to start lifting again — but at 50 percent of what he

Doctor Helps

had been doing before. “By the end of cardiac rehab, I was at 95 percent of where I was, now I am above where I was,” he says. When Cline called his wife from the Emergency Department, he sounded fine, and even though he’d had a heart attack, it didn’t sink in right away. “I’m a pretty stoic and optimistic person,” Amy says. “I don’t think the whole thing hit me until three or four weeks later. It was kind of surreal to know what the consequences could have been.” Just a few months before his heart attack, Cline had retired from 24 years in management roles at the Rogue Brewery in Newport. At 65, he was looking forward to enjoying retirement. Jim and Amy took a trip to the United Kingdom for a month, and they planned a variety of other trips both abroad and closer to home. He was excited to have the time to work on projects, rather than just trying to fit them into a weekend. He focused

on maintaining good health — eating right and exercising. Since the heart attack, Cline is even more committed to staying healthy. Before, he worked out three days a week; now, he goes to the gym five days a week. He is more careful about meal choices. “I have not cut anything out,” he says. “I moderate a lot more than I used to — less red meat, more whole grains, more chicken.” Whether he is removing trees from his property to expand his gardens, spending time with his daughter and grandson, or going to a family reunion with Amy, Cline wants to be in good health and up to the task. “I want to be able to spend time with my wife and travel with her,” he says. “I worked a lot for a lot of years. We will have been married 40 years in September. I owe her what time I have left.” Learn more about Jim at samhealth. org/JimC. ☸

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A scene as it is viewed by a person without age-related macular degeneration

A scene as it might be viewed by a person with age-related macular degeneration

“People don’t know that there are doctors who are very experienced in low vision care.” Dr. Cusic happens to be one of only a few Low Vision Diplomates in the world, from the American Academy of Optometry. “In some states, Bioptic Telescopic Glasses can be

used to pass the vision test for driving,” says Dr. Cusic. “This can allow some with conditions like macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy to continue driving.” “Our job is to figure out everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning,” says Dr. Cusic. “Whether it’s

driving, reading, TV, seeing faces, check writing, bingo or bridge. We work with whatever is on the person’s ‘wish list.’ As for the cost of glasses, I’ve had patients spend $500 and others spend $4,000. It really depends upon the person’s vision, goals and number of pairs of glasses they get.” Dr. Cusic offers a free telephone interview to determine if low vision glasses will help.

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MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  7


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YARD & GARDEN

bright books in a cold winter By G RAC E P E T E R S O N

GARDENING BOOKS TO READ WHILE WE WAIT FOR SPRING

I

CONFESS, I’VE ALWAYS GOT A FEW GARDENING books on the table, waiting for me to read and review. During the warm weather months, I am too busy to do them justice. But now, with the holidays behind us and spring not quite here yet, it seems the perfect time for armchair gardening. I love the inspiration that garden books provide. Perhaps you’re conceptualizing a new garden or revamping part of an existing one. Maybe you’re not quite confident enough to take on that project and could benefit from some motivation. Even if you’re not sure about your goals, a garden book is sure to provide much insight. “GARDENTOPIA: DESIGN BASICS FOR CREATING BEAUTIFUL OUTDOOR SPACES” has been a pleasure to read. With 40-plus years as a professional landscape designer, author Jan Johnsen is an expert at “transforming tough sites into appealing landscapes.” Her book focuses on both large concepts and the small details. She breaks down her design

principles with photos and an emphasis on how our mind perceives these specific features. You will find chapters on garden design and accent tips; hardscapes, such as walls, patios, walks and steps; special interest or theme gardens; color in the garden and lastly, a chapter on plants and planting. I was happy to read that I’ve already employed some of Johnsen’s design concepts, such as the Japanese miegakure: the “hide and reveal technique.” This simply means providing a half-hidden vista by partially screening a view or section of the garden with a strategically placed shrub or wall. This creates an illusion of distance that beckons us further into the garden. You’ll find information on using plants that have attractive berries, moon gardens, fragrance gardens, placing rocks and decorative elements in the garden, and so much more. Learn more at janjohnsen.com.

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In our world of ever shrinking garden spaces, we are forced to come up with clever ways to squeeze more plants into our lives. So, I was intrigued to read “GARDENER’S GUIDE TO COMPACT PLANTS: EDIBLES & ORNAMENTALS FOR SMALLSPACE GARDENING” by award-winning author, garden columnist and speaker Jessica Walliser. She defines compact (or “dwarf ”) plants: “Compact plants are those prized for their ability to start small and stay small, even when they reach full maturity. They’re selected and bred by plant breeders for their petite form and well-behaved growth habit. With maintenance needs far less extensive than their full-sized counterparts, compact plants are the perfect fit for anyone looking to create a beautiful small-scale garden and reduce the amount of time needed to maintain their landscape. These plants are also an ideal choice for container gardens since most require less room for both their top growth and their root system.” The author educates us on methods for selecting, planting and maintaining compact plants. You’ll be enchanted by her designs using compact plants such as a patio garden, a shady nook garden, even a compact kitchen garden. You can incorporate all or part of her designs into your own garden. There is a section on using compact plants in specific applications such as providing winter interest, screening an unsightly view, incorporating color or texture into the garden, even providing enough flowering plants to feed our pollinators. The color photos that go along with the author’s suggestions are delightful and inspiring. Visit her website, savvygardening.com. ☸

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  FAMILY HISTORY

newfamilyties By VA N ESSA SA LV I A

SHIRLEY GAUTHIER AND HER HUSBAND BOTH DISCOVERED ‘SECRET’ FAMILY MEMBERS

T

O HONOR HER PARENTS’ wedding anniversary, Shirley Gauthier gave them an engraved silver platter. She had no idea the gift would cause such a stir in their small town of Sutherlin. Gauthier had surprised her parents with the gift at her younger sister’s high school graduation party in 1975, where many family members were attending. “I thought in my head that since I was 25, it was a 25th wedding anniversary,” she says. “And since there would be people and family there, how nice it would be to recognize it. So, I had a rather large silver platter engraved.” Taken this past Fourth of July in Billings, Montana: Dennis, Charlie, Patty and Shirley.

When Shirley’s mother opened the package, her father looked at it, and said, “That’s not the year we got married.” It was obvious, Gauthier says, that the math didn’t add up. When the question typically came up in the past of how her parents met, they always told the same story: Her mother had gone to visit her sister in another part of Oregon, went to a dance at the local grange and met Shirley’s father. It was love at first sight and they were married two weeks later. “It was a wonderful, lovely story to tell us kids all the years,” Gauthier says. “But they were married in April — and I was born in October.” It was just a story, though, and Gauthier quickly devised the truth — the man who raised her was not her biological father. There are many unknown details, including whether her mother’s new husband knew she was already pregnant when they met and married. Even decades later, there are few answers.

10  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

“The only time I was alone with (her adopted father) to discuss anything was when he was dying in the hospital of cancer,” Gauthier says. “All he said to me was, ‘You must be really angry with me.’” Rather than be angry, Gauthier says she felt sadness that the truth had been kept hidden. After she was married, Gauthier’s husband Mark also learned about a “secret” sibling in his past. His mother disclosed to him that she had been engaged to be married but was raped by a different man. The rape resulted in a pregnancy. His mother gave birth to a daughter then gave her up for adoption. “She just came out with it,” Mark Gauthier says. “She said she broke off the engagement and had to go away for a while. That’s what you did back then, you went away for a while and gave your baby up for adoption, or you got married.” His mother told him about the situation because she was afraid someone else in the family would tell him first.


An adoption project undertaken by the University of Oregon estimates that from 1945 to 1973, 4 million parents placed children for adoption, with 2 million giving their babies up during the 1960s alone. Shirley and Mark know their story is not unique, and Shirley would like to encourage others to reach out. “I want to get the message out that there’s a lot of lost siblings and it’s not too late,” she says. In 1983, Gauthier wrote a letter to her mother and asked for more information about the man she calls her “sperm donor.” Her mother replied, apologized for the deception and emphasized their love for Shirley. But her mother didn’t provide the requested details. Gauthier tried again in 1987, and this time her mother acquiesced. She told her daughter the man’s name was George. He was married at the time of the pregnancy, already had another child and didn’t want another one. Instead, he gave her money for a bus ticket out of town. Gauthier learned that George was the youngest of 10 children and when his family home burned down, the neighbors took care of George, later adopting him. He changed his last name from Hettick to Eddlemon. In 1994, Mark Gauthier traveled to the small town in Montana where George lived and brought back a local phone book. They didn’t know yet that George had changed his name, so Shirley started calling Hetticks in the Montana area. Once she connected with some of his relatives, she learned he had changed his last name and that finally gave her the connection she needed to find him. She called George and he answered. At first, he was reluctant to speak with Gauthier, but she eventually was able to meet him. Gauthier discovered that George had three children — Patty, Charlie and Dennis. She reached out to each of them and they accepted her right away. Even more, after George died his sons discovered letters showing their father

was divorced from an earlier marriage and had a daughter named Mae, who lives in Florida. Mae knew George was her father, but she didn’t know anything about her half-sister Shirley. “It’s a miracle to me that Charlie and Dennis were able to find me,” says Mae, who was interviewed from the hospital awaiting the birth of her fourth great-grandchild. “But (they) got on the computer and one evening my phone rang. We talked and they were so welcoming. And then getting to know Shirley has been a very nice surprise.” “You can’t go back and fix it because it wasn’t your choice,” Charlie says. “So, you just forgive and then start working

forward and that’s what I did.” Gauthier’s main concern was disrupting the lives of her newly-discovered siblings but, she says, they have all accepted her with open arms. And simply knowing your roots and having access to important information such as a medical history can be very important and helpful. “I hope my story inspires and motivates other people to step out of that comfort zone and just (reach out) because even if there’s some hard adjustments, the rewards of getting to know your history and your family is worth it,” she says. “To me, I’ve never felt so included or felt so loved.” ☸

MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  11


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  OUT & ABOUT

ReVamp

thrift store

By M A RY OW E N

YOU’LL BE AMAZED AT THE CHANGES TO THIS SILVERTON STAPLE

A

MERE WHIM OF AN IDEA by three Silverton women who love to bargain shop has turned into a reality for a local senior center. “The Silverton Senior Center Thrift Shop looked like a ripe opportunity to transform into something really special for our community,” says Arlea Gibson, one of the three. “The timing was perfect.” With a resounding “yes” from board president Darlene Blackstone and executive director Dodie Brockamp, Gibson, Kiki Hamilton and Molly Ainsley put their plan into action. “Over the years, the thrift shop became crowded with merchandise and parts of the building needed repair,” Opposite page: Molly Ainsley, Arlea Gibson and Kki Hamilton.

Brockamp says. “These three women stepped forward to ‘revamp’ the shop from head to toe. “We completely emptied the shop, storing the ‘good stuff ’ in donated space, selling much of the remaining merchandise at huge discounts, and donating the rest to selected area charities,” she adds. “We got our landlord to repair several pesky leaks in the roof and painted every inch of the walls and ceiling. Due to the generosity of one of our board members, who is also a licensed electrician, we were able to completely rewire the remaining space

12  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

to bring it up to code and to upgrade the lighting from a few ancient fluorescent bulbs to a ceiling full of energy-efficient LED panels and spotlights.” Brockamp credits “many hours, legions of volunteers, much ingenuity, and donations of all kinds” for the ability to pull off the transformation with a small $2,000 budget. “Now when people step through the door for the first time, it’s not unusual to hear a gasp followed by, ‘Wow, it truly is a different place,’” she says. “Since reopening, we have made up the revenue lost during the six-week shutdown, recovered the cost of the renovation, and greatly increased our ability to support the senior center.” Store manager Paula Pickering says the change took just over a month.


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Of note

▶ ReVamp currently operates with about 10 volunteers. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. ▶ “We are in need of more volunteers,” Pickering says. “For the place to run smoothly, it needs two staff on — one to deal with customers and one to deal with donations. And we don’t have a full staff for that yet.” ▶ Volunteer applications and donation guidelines are available at silvertonseniorcenter.org. For more information, call the center at 503-8733093 or ReVamp at 503-874-1154. The thrift store is located at 207 High St., between Water and First streets in Silverton.

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“We all worked hard and the outcome was night and day,” she says. Blackstone says the store’s name was officially changed to ReVamp Thrift to reflect the dramatic change in the look and feel of the shop and shift in merchandise mix, which now includes clothing for all ages and sizes, accessories, jewelry, home décor, home goods, small furniture and books. “We are unable to accept large furniture, electronics or appliances,” she says. All sales revenue, after rent and utilities, goes directly to support the senior center, one of the state’s few completely independent and self-sufficient senior programs, she says. “We are so grateful to the Silverton community — the small town with the big heart — for supporting both the shop and the center,” Blackstone says. “We are especially grateful to Arlea Gibson, Kiki Hamilton and Molly Ainsley for their vision and tenacious elbow grease in transforming the shop to the beautiful and welcoming space that makes our visitors say ‘wow.’”☸

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Contact the Waitlist Department at 541-743-7164 MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  13


YOUR HEALTH  |  MEDICARE

Reminder: Open enrollment period By L I SA D. E M E R S O N

O

NEW YEAR MEANS SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE CHANGES

UR NEW YEAR IS OFF TO A GREAT START and the Oregon Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program wants to remind Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers about other enrollment periods they may be able to use to switch plans before the next Medicare Annual Election Period begins on Oct. 15. The Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period (MA OEP) is from Jan. 1 to Mar. 31. You must have an MA plan on Jan. 1 to use this enrollment period. Coverage will start the first day of the month after you enroll. You can: ▶ Switch MA plans (with or without drug coverage) ▶ Enroll in a stand-alone Part D plan (which returns you to Original Medicare.) Getting Part D is not guaranteed unless you were in an MA plan on Jan. 1. There is only one change allowed during this enrollment period. You cannot switch from one standalone PDP to another standalone PDP.

low-performing plan you will receive a letter in late October. You must call 800-MEDICARE (633-4227) to enroll in another plan. If you need help comparing and enrolling in plans, consider contacting a SHIBA counselor who can help you understand plan options and plan rules, such as how and when you may make changes. For a SHIBA contact in your area call 800-722-4134 (tollfree). Visit shiba.oregon.gov to view an online copy of the 2020 Oregon Guide to Oregon Medicare Insurance Plans. ☸ Lisa D. Emerson is an analyst for Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance and Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace in the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services.

Medicare can be confusing

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Special enrollment periods are opportunities to make plan changes outside of the standard enrollment periods. These are made available because you may be moving permanently outside your plan’s service area or start qualifying for any limited-income assistance. SEPs are generally 60 days but may vary. At these times, you may use your SEP to: October 15 through December 7 ▶ Join a different Medicare Advantage plan. is the time to sign up or change Medicare ▶ Switch to using only Original Medicare. Advantage and prescription drug plans. ▶ Switch to Original Medicare and purchase a Medigap. canundergo help you compare plans Insurance companies may require thate you underand make enrollment changes. Use our online writing unless you have guaranteed issue.

We are here to help...

W

Call: 800-722-4134 Visit: shiba.oregon.gov Locator Tool to

Call 800-722-4134 (toll-free) find local help Star-rated SEPs visit near you Medicare uses a star rating systemor based on Shiba.oregon.gov complaints it receives. Five stars is excellent and oneSHIBA starprovides is poor. FREE, unbiased counseling and related issues year-round. ▶ Five-star SEP — You may enroll inonaMedicare plan with five We also help you fightstars fraud, waste and abuse. Ask us how! once from Dec. 8 to Nov. 30. Paid for in whole or in part through a grant from the ACL. ▶ Low-performing plan SEP — If you are in a

14  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

We also educate consumers about how to protect, detect and report Medicare fraud, waste and abuse. Ask us how!


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  WISHING WELL

In the legislative loop By B . L E E COY N E

MY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUNDING PROGRAMS THAT BENEFIT OLDER ADULTS

H

ERE ARE SOME IDEAS I’M PROPOSING that should be given serious consideration. I would like to see more funding appropriated for programs that connect our older adult population to the rising generation. Legislation must be passed to enable such ideas to be implemented as pilot programs, and then local boards could opt in as they see fit. Homebound testimony — Our shut-ins should not lose out due to their disabled status. Let’s permit modern technology to carry forth their voices via Skype or conference calling. They should be invited to the conversations. Career resources — Many older adults have gained valuable knowledge through successful careers. Meanwhile our high school youth are just starting to explore their options. I would like toservice see more classrooms retirees as A memorial should besolicit about memories,

A memorial service should be about memories, not high high prices. not prices.

speakers, so they can share their knowledge and experience. While it’s often about the hard skills, there are many “soft skills” that working adults can share with the upcoming generation. Both generations will benefit. School counseling — With schools facing suicide rates of crisis-proportion, as well as drug-addiction-related violence, students are backlogged in getting suitable counseling. Why not allow retired counselors and social workers to have provisional licenses to help fill that gap? Few retired social workers would pay the current heavy fees just to volunteer, and this creates a disincentive. Using retired social workers in our schools necessitates new statutes that requires the clinical social work board to establish a provisional license category and perhaps curtail the license fee for those pursuing non-income assignments. Retirement prep — Public employees often plan their retirement a year in advance. We can create retiree preparation seminars to discuss key medical issues that crop up. Even more, we could create memory-retention exercises. This will likely boost morale in working adults who continue their careers past the typical retirement age. Your lawmaker is the link in addressing our assorted elder concerns. We share that same boat. Let’s row in unison. To find your state senator, call 503-986-1851. ☸

A memorial service should be about memories,

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Book Discussion Groups Priced Out Documentary Film Oregon Humanities Conversations

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Salem Public Library Foundation | 503-588-6183 | www.splfoundation.org

and cremation container. The crematory fee is included. Prices may vary based on selections.

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MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  15


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MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  17


February 2020 FALL IN LOVE WITH THESE LOCAL EVENTS

JAN 31 — “REVOLT. SHE SAID. REVOLT AGAIN,” 7:30 p.m. through Feb. 29, M. Lee Pelton Theatre, Willamette University, 900 State St., Salem. $8+. Wutheatre.com.

1 — AARP TAX ASSISTANCE, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, through April 13, Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. Walk-in appointments only. 503-873-3093. SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE AND POTLUCK, 7 to 10 p.m. Saturdays, Keizer/Salem Area Seniors, 930 Plymouth Dr. NE, Keizer. $5.

wellness class, 11 a.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS, “What is hospice and home health and when is it really necessary?” 3 or 6 p.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. Free. 503-873-3093. SALEM READS 2020, “Piecing Me Together” author Renee Watson, 7 p.m., Historic Grand Theater, 187 High St. NE, Salem. Free. Splfoundation.org.

BREAKFAST, 8 to 10 a.m., Keizer/ Salem Area Seniors, 930 Plymouth Dr. NE, Keizer. $4.50.

3 — DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, Abigail Scott Duniway chapter, 10 a.m., Stayton Fire District meeting room. Speaker: Coast Guard Mother’s Support Group. 503-769-5951. GROUP, 6:30 p.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. OPEN MIC NIGHT, 7 p.m., Taproot Lounge and Café, 356 State St., Salem. 503-363-7668.

5 — SALEM READS 2020, “Piecing Me Together,” art exhibit opening, 5 to 8 p.m., Elsinore Fine Art Gallery, 444 Ferry St. SE, Salem. Splfoundation. org.

11 — SALEM READS 2020, Open mic night: Tell Your Truth, Part 1, 7 p.m., The Space, 1128 Edgewater St. NW, Salem. Splfoundation.org. 12 — OREGON HUMANITIES CONVERSATION, “What We Risk, Creativity, Vulnerability and Art,” 7 p.m., Salem Art Association Annex, 600 Mission St. SE. splfoundation.org.

13 — UNDERSTANDING ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA, 2:30 p.m., Kaiser Permanente, Keizer Station, 5940 Ulali Dr. Free. 800-2723900.

2 — ALL YOU CAN EAT PANCAKE

4 — CARING FRIENDS SUPPORT

Willamette University Chamber Orchestra, 3 p.m., Hudson Hall, Mary Stuart Rodgers Music Center, Salem. Willamette.edu.

15 SATURDAY

OREGON’S 161ST BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Oregon State Capitol, Salem. Free. The Oregon State Constitution Exhibit is on display at the Capitol from Feb. 3 to 15. The Capitol is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

18 — GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP, 9:30 a.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. 503-873-3093. BEGINNING LINE DANCING, 3 p.m. Tuesdays, through March 3, Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. $50. 503-873-3093.

19 — ”10 WARNING SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER’S,” 3 p.m., Salem Hospital, Bldg. D, CHEC Center, 890 Oak St. SE, Salem. 800-272-3900. SALEM READS 2020, Book and a Beer: “Piecing Me Together,” 7 p.m., Salem Ale Works, 2315 25th St. SE, Salem. Splfoundation.org.

8 — SONS OF NORWAY THOR LODGE 2-042, potluck and music, 3 p.m., Masonic Temple, 1625 Brush College Road NW, Salem. 503-3027973.

20 — DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS, “Advanced Directives,” 3 or 6 p.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, members sharing stories and heirlooms, noon to 1 p.m., VFW Building, 630 Hood St. NE, Salem. 503-363-0880.

SALEM READS 2020, AfricanAmericans in Oregon: A Unique Legacy, 7 p.m., Chemeketa Community College, Bldg. 2 Student Center, Salem. Splfoundation.org.

BINGO, 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. $1.50 per card or two for $2.

MICHAEL JR. COMEDY SHOW, 7 p.m., Elsinore Theatre, 170 High St. SE, Salem. Benefits Union Gospel Mission of Salem. 503-375-3574.

6 — HEART HEALTH, essential

9 — BIRDS IN THIS WOMAN,

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY INSTRUCTION, 6 p.m., Keizer Community Library, 980 Chemawa Road NE. Free. Bring your camera and manual. Free. 503-390-2370.

BINGO, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Keizer/Salem Area Seniors, 930 Plymouth Dr. NE, Keizer. $5.50. “10 WARNING SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER’S,” 3 p.m., Boone Ridge Senior Living, 2950 Boone Road SE, Salem. 800-272-3900.

18  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020


THE DOO WOP PROJECT, 8 p.m., Elsinore Theatre, 170 High St. SE, Salem. $38+. 503-375-3574.

21 — MOUNT ANGEL VOLKSFEST, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., through Feb. 23, Mount Angel Festhalle, 500 Wilco Hwy. $5. Mtangelvolksfest.com. 24 — 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE EXHIBIT, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., through March 26, Oregon State Capitol, Salem. Free.

26 — ”10 WARNING SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER’S,” 2 p.m., Heartwood Place, 2325 N. Boones Ferry Road, Woodburn. 800-272-3900.

• Ask about offers and rebates • Service on all brands • Senior citizen discounts • Ductless heat pumps

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29 — RESOURCE AND VOLUNTEER FAIR, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. ☸

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Send calendar submissions to mte@northwest50plus. com by 6th of the month for events in the following month.

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MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  19


a ’love’ for books

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  BOOKS

By A N DY N O RT H RU P

DELVE INTO THE COMPLEXITY OF RELATIONSHIPS

L

IBRARIANS LOVE READING and talking about books. You’d think that goes without saying. But visitors who approach staff don’t always seem sure of this. In fact, many librarians are thrilled to drop whatever else they are doing in favor of book talk. February is when we celebrate Valentine’s Day, which in turn may have readers looking for some great books

Doctor Helps

about love and relationships. I’m recommending these books because they present a nuanced and complicated view of relationships, with others and with ourselves. Readers will still find stories of dating and marriage, but also of parenthood, family, aging, and self-actualization. These books are refreshingly authentic, with a kaleidoscopic view of the connections we form with each other. “Love Poems for Married People” by John Kenney Based on the author’s hugely popular New Yorker piece, this poetry collection

is a poignant and laugh-out-loud funny look at the reality of married life. Don’t worry if you’re not typically a poetry reader, Kenney’s writing is accessible and easy to read. He covers anything from the foibles of parenthood, to the grind of daily life, to the lack of spark in the bedroom. One titled “Are you in the mood?” goes like this: “I am./

LEGALLY BLIND to Read & Drive

International Academy of Low Vision Specialists founding member helps macular degeneration sufferers with reading, driving, TV, & maintaining independence.

Visit Offices located in Vancouver, WA & Kirkland, WA Just because you have macular degeneration (or other visionlimiting conditions) doesn’t always mean you must give up driving or reading. Ever look through a pair of field glasses or binoculars? Things look bigger, closer, and easier to see. A Washington optometrist, Dr. Ross Cusic, is using miniaturized binoculars or telescopes to help people who have lost vision from macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or other eye conditions. “Some of my patients consider me the last stop for people who have vision loss,” said Dr. Cusic, a low vision optometrist who limits his practice to visually impaired patients.

A scene as it is viewed by a person without age-related macular degeneration

A scene as it might be viewed by a person with age-related macular degeneration

“People don’t know that there are doctors who are very experienced in low vision care.” Dr. Cusic happens to be one of only a few Low Vision Diplomates in the world, from the American Academy of Optometry. “In some states, Bioptic Telescopic Glasses can be

used to pass the vision test for driving,” says Dr. Cusic. “This can allow some with conditions like macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy to continue driving.” “Our job is to figure out everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning,” says Dr. Cusic. “Whether it’s

20  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

driving, reading, TV, seeing faces, check writing, bingo or bridge. We work with whatever is on the person’s ‘wish list.’ As for the cost of glasses, I’ve had patients spend $500 and others spend $4,000. It really depends upon the person’s vision, goals and number of pairs of glasses they get.” Dr. Cusic offers a free telephone interview to determine if low vision glasses will help.

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Let’s put the kids down./ Have a light dinner./ Shower./ Maybe not drink so much./ And do that thing I would rather do with you than anyone else./ Lie in bed and look at our iPhones.” “Women Rowing North” by Mary Pipher Pipher, a cultural anthropologist, brings her expertise and personal experience to this landmark work about the myriad difficulties faced by aging women in our society. At first glance, this may not seem like a relationship book. But within these pages, there is a heavy focus on the importance of community and connection while growing older. Also, this book isn’t just for women of a certain age. Their partners, sons, daughters and any other loved

ones can benefit equally from reading it right alongside them. “I Miss You When I Blink” by Mary Laura Philpott Philpott, an Emmy-winning literary talk show host, offers an utterly charming collection of essays on her life as a daughter, mother, wife and successful business woman. The topics are wide-ranging and there’s something in here for everyone. In witty and sharp prose, Philpott candidly writes about her personal life while also tapping

into a larger, shared human experience of striving for perfection and finding peace when we inevitably fall short of that unattainable goal. “What My Mother and I Don’t Talk About” by Michele Filgate (Ed.) Fifteen writers provide unsparingly honest looks at their relationships with their mothers. The essays range from loving and sentimental to bitter and sad, but they’re all deeply emotional and likely to connect with readers of all ages. While hardly a fluffy or nostalgic ode to parenthood, this book is nonetheless a realistic and hugely rewarding read for parents and their adult children. ☸ Andy Northrup is an adult services librarian at Eugene Public Library.

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The Heron Pointe family is a warm, loving community as different and special as the people who live here. It is a place of vibrancy and life; promoting meaning and joy in the lives of residents, families, and our care team. We believe people make the difference. Treating people well – with respect, trust, care, and good humor – can be quite contagious. Our mission is simple. We are guided by goodness, loyalty, faith, and fun. If these values resonate with you, we invite you to join us on this journey. MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  21


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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  HEALTHY LIVING

Medical Center Eye Clinic 655 Medical Center Dr. NE Salem, OR 97301 503-581-5287 www.mceyeclinic.com Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Ophthalmologists you can trust

Providing our Salem community excellent eye health care and full service optical amenities for over 50 years. • Routine and medical eye exams • Cataract care & Surgery • Diabetic eye disease • Dry Eye Syndrome • Glaucoma care & Surgery • Eye Muscle Surgery • Eye Lid Surgery

Classifieds UNITS FOR RENT

WANTED

HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities is currently accepting applications for our one bedroom waiting list. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Briarwood Manor, 643 Manbrin, Keizer, OR 97303, 541928-2545.

CASH FOR PRE 1980 sport & non-sport cards, model kits, comic books, pre 1960’s magazines. Private collector. 503-3137538. CASH FOR GOOD CONDITION  reloading equipment & supplies. 541-905-5453.

CEMETERY PLOTS IN SUNSET HILLS IN EUGENE, a double depth plot in Urn Garden. $500. Contact Patricia Spicer at pspicer@sonic.net for details.

CLASSIFIED AD RATES PRIVATE PARTY 

25

$

Up to 20 words. $1.75 per extra word.

COMMERCIAL, REAL ESTATE 

50

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

CEMETERY PLOTS 

60

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

FRIENDSHIP ADS 

$

40

Up to 30 words.

HOW TO SUBMIT AN AD: Mail your verbiage with payment to: Northwest50Plus, P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or email to classifieds@Northwest50Plus.com or call 1-877-357-2430.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this magazine is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Western Village Apartments • 1 Bedroom, 1 bath apartment $695 per mo/with 1 yr. lease • 2 Bedroom, 1 bath apartment $795 per mo/with 1 yr. lease • On-site laundry • Off-street parking • Non-smoking within unit • 55+ community CALL NOW

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED. Paying top dollar! Free local pickup. Call Sharon, 503-679-3605. BASEBALL & SPORTS MEMORABILIA  wanted. Buying old cards, pennants, autographs, photographs, tickets, programs, Pacific Coast League, etc. Alan, 503-481-0719.

55+ Community

Candalaria Plaza Apartments

• 1 bedroom/1 bath apartment $695/mo with 1 yr. lease • 2 bedroom/1 bath apartment $795/mo with 1 yr. lease • 2 bedroom/2 bath apartment $825/mo with 1 yr. lease

Private patios • Pet friendly w/restrictions On-site laundry • Close to all shopping Water/sewer/garbage Paid

For preview call:

503-585-6176

503-585-6176

*Punctuation not included in word count. Phone numbers count as 1 word. Ad must be in our office by the 6th of the month PRIOR to publication. Ads cover Vancouver, WA to Lane County.

MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  23


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FEBRUARY SPECIAL

99

¢

INSTALLATION2

Receive a

$200 Best Buy Gift Card with your

Protective Overhang/Trim ScratchGuard® Paint Finish

LeafGuard purchase!4

Receive a

$25 Lowe’s Gift Card with FREE in-home estimate!3

Call now for your Free Estimate!

503.470.3143

1 Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free. 2 Does not include cost of material. Expires 2/29/2020. 3 All participants who attend an estimated 60-90 minute in-home product consultation will receive a $25 gift card. Retail value is $25. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend and complete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 21 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer not sponsored or promoted by Lowe’s and is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 2/29/2020. ⁴All participants who attend an estimated 60-90minute in-home product consultation and choose to make a purchase will receive a $200 Best Buy gift card. Retail value is $200.00 Offer sponsored by Englert LeafGuard, Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 21 days of receipt of promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 2/29/2020. LeafGuard operates as LeafGuard of Oregon in Oregon under OR LIC # 223377

24  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  FEBRUARY 2020

Profile for Northwest50Plus

Northwest 50 Plus Marion and Polk Counties Edition February 2020  

Northwest 50 Plus Marion and Polk Counties Edition February 2020  

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