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▶FREE THE NORTHWEST’S OLDEST AND LARGEST PUBLICATION FOR OLDER ADULTS

SOUTH VALLEY | FEBRUARY 2020

Date night! We have 46 ideas Page 4

HOT BOOKS When the weather outside is frightful Pages 10, 16

FAMILY TIES

Shirley Gauthier discovers her ‘new’ family Page 10

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editor’s note

Northwest

50 Plus

VOLUME 23 | NUMBER 2

OREGON’S OLDEST & LARGEST 50+ PUBLICATION 3 Editions serving adults aged 50 and older Portland-Metro-Vancouver, Marion-Polk-Coast, South Valley: Linn-Benton Lane P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 4923 Indian School Rd. NE, Salem, OR 97305 503-304-1323 | 1-877-357-2430 | FAX 503-304-5394 info@northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus.com Subscriptions $26/year | $49/2 years

MICHELLE TE General Manager & Managing Editor mte@northwest50plus.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggi White, Mary Owen, Vanessa Salvia, Barry Finnemore, Pat Snider, Grace Peterson, and B. Lee Coyne EAGLE MEDIA LAB Design production@eaglemedialab.com DOREEN HARROLD Office Manager/Sales Assistant dharrold@northwest50plus.com JOAN RILEY Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro joan4freedom@comcast.net LARRY SURRATT Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro-Vancouver lsurratt@northwest50plus.com ROBYN SMITH Advertising Sales, Marion-PolkLinn-Benton-Lane counties rsmith@northwest50plus.com Printed by Eagle Web Press, Salem, OR Northwest 50 Plus is published monthly and locally owned and operated by Eagle Newspapers, Inc. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Northwest 50 Plus. Any use of all or any part of this publication is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.

WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM ‘FAILURE’

A

BOUT A YEAR AGO, WE HOSTED AN INFORMAtion Fair. We wanted to share the news about our new magazine, especially to local businesses who might be interested in promoting their goods and services in our beautiful new product. We advertised the Information Fair in our magazine. We sent out emails, posted on our social media channels, announced it at networking meetings, and made personal phone calls and appointments. Even more, we invited our publishing partners — Eagle Web Press, Eagle Mailing Services and Eagle Media Lab — to participate. We were prepared to showcase the amazing talents and services our company provides. Need high-volume printing? How about direct mail or graphic design for your newsletter? We offer it all at very competitive rates. I’ve used each of these services personally, and I can attest to the professionalism and skill each division provides. Center 50+ in Salem generously provided conference space for our Information Fair. We set up tables, chairs and refreshments. With the significant outreach, I was confident this would be well attended. But as the minutes and hours ticked by, it became quite apparent. No one would be coming. The Information Fair had flopped. Upon reflection, I remembered that life is about the journey — building one day at a time, learning the lessons this life has to offer, no matter our age or circumstances. Don’t see your flops as stopping points or stumbling blocks. We try, we fail, we dust ourselves off and try again. The Information Fair taught us some valuable lessons, and we’ve been building on those over the past year. What have you learned from your failures? How did you overcome them? I’ll post this message on our social media channels and I invite you to join the conversation. Or send me an email. I really enjoy and appreciate your feedback. ☸ MICHELLE TE | General Manager/Editor

OUR FEBRUARY ISSUE DEPARTMENTS 8 10 18 22 22 23

Your Health Yard & Garden Calendar of Events Puzzle Service Directory Classifieds

SOUTH VALLEY | FEBRUARY 2020

16

8 SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  3


46

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RELATIONSHIPS

Great dates By M I C H E L L E T E

STUCK IN A RUT? HERE’S SOME IDEAS TO KEEP THE SPARK IN YOUR RELATIONSHIP

N

O MATTER HOW LONG you’ve been with your partner, you still need to make time for each other. Here’s a list of ideas for spending quality time together. 1. Do a random act of kindness for someone else. (Visit naturalbeachliving.com/best-random-acts-of-kindness-ideas for more than 200 ideas.) 2. Share positive traits you’ve learned about one another. 3. Create a couples bucket list together. 4. Play a board, card or dice game. 5. Go rock or rope climbing. 6. Write each other a poem, love or gratitude letter. (Check out a book from your local library if you need motivation.) 7. Get a couples pedicure and manicure together. 8. Binge watch a suspenseful and/or thrilling TV series.

9. Take a day trip to the beach. (Visit northwest50plus.com for a list of our favorite Oregon Coast spots.) 10. Cook a meal from scratch or try a new recipe together. 11. Go for a hike in a favorite spot or try out a new park. (Visit oregonstateparks.org or call 800-557-6949 for maps, hours and fees.)

42 12. Attend a paint-and-sip together. (Visit northwest50plus.com for some locations in Lane and Benton counties.) 13. Go to a pottery class and have fun painting pre-made pottery. 14. Go for a bike ride. (Try Row River Trail in Cottage Grove.) 15. Take a free online “love languages” test. (Try 5lovelanguages.com.) 16. Go paddle boarding, canoeing or kayaking. (Visit oregonstateparks/

4  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

14

thingstodo/letsgo for local classes in your area.) 17. Watch a favorite professional sports team on TV together. (Go Blazers!) 18. Go to a teahouse and have a fun conversation. 19. Have a discussion about sex. (Need a primer? Try prevention.com/ sex/a20504743/spice-up-sex-life.) 20. Volunteer at your local nonprofit. (Visit unitedway.org for organizations in your area.) 21. Get a couples massage, or give each other one. (Visit youtube.com for tutorials.) 22. Create a book of your love story. (Visit personalhistoriansnw.org if you need some professional assistance.) 23. Watch your wedding video or


look at your wedding pictures together. 24. Visit a water park or theme park and have some fun. (Visit tripadvisor.com for suggestions.) 25. Go to a drive-in movie. (Try 99w.com.) 26. Join a protest. (Try rallylist.com.) 27. Attend a high school or college event, such as a concert or sports game. (Get a schedule of all high school games at osaa.org/?year=2019.) 28. Host a bonfire party. (Don’t have a backyard? Find “bonfire” or “fireplace” on youtube.com, and snuggle in front of the TV.) 29. Go for an evening walk. 30. Watch a TEDx Talk and discuss what you learned from it. (Visit ted.com/watch/tedx-talks.)

The Shedd Institute www.theshedd.org - 541.434.7000

The Emerald City JAZZ KINGS

It’s All Right With Me The Songs of Ella Fitzgerald The Shedd (Eugene) - Thu, Sun Feb 6, 9 Corvallis Fri Feb 7 - Roseburg Sat Feb 8

10 The Sheffer Family

31. Attend a comedy show. (Try travelportland.com for upcoming events.) 32. Join a workout class, do yoga or play a sport together. 33. Attend a karaoke event. 34. Watch the sunset together. 35. Challenge each other to a video game. 36. Browse a bookstore. (Try Books Read Books New in Salem for a large selection of new and used books.) 37. Stargaze in your backyard. (Download a free stargazing app, like Star Tracker Lite-Live Sky.) 38. Re-create your first date. 39. Make a playlist of songs from when you first got together. (Spotify.com is a great way to make a playlist.) 40. Ride a carousel. (Both Salem and Albany have opportunities.) 41. Work on a DIY project together. 42. Take a mini road trip to visit a local festival or a new museum. (For ideas, check out the calendar listings on page 18 or visit northwest50plus.com.) 43. Spend an evening learning to say “I love you” in different languages. (Try the Duolingo app.) 44. Have a candlelit dinner. 45. Play rock, paper, scissors to see who gets to pick an old favorite movie. 46. Have a homemade pizza night. ☸

Ehud Asherie plays Gershwin

Rob Kovell & Liz Brack

Feb 12

Feb 27

Shirley Andress

Call Me Barbra The Making of a

Funny Girl, 1960-68 Corvallis - Feb 27 Eugene Feb 29, Mar 1 SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  5


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  FAMILY HISTORY

newfamilyties By VA N ESSA SA LV I A

SHIRLEY GAUTHIER AND HER HUSBAND BOTH DISCOVERED ‘SECRET’ FAMILY MEMBERS

T

O HONOR HER PARENTS’ wedding anniversary, Shirley Gauthier gave them an engraved silver platter. She had no idea the gift would cause such a stir in their small town of Sutherlin. Gauthier had surprised her parents with the gift at her younger sister’s high school graduation party on that day in 1975, where many family members were attending. “I thought in my head that since I was 25, it was a 25th wedding anniversary,” she says. “And since there would be people and family there, how nice it would be to recognize it. So, I had a rather large silver platter engraved.” When Shirley’s mother opened the package, her father looked at it, Taken this past Fourth of July in Billings, Montana: Dennis, Charlie, Patty and Shirley.

and said, “That’s not the year we got married.” It was obvious, Gauthier says, that the math didn’t add up. When the question typically came up in the past of how her parents met, they always told the same story: Her mother had gone to visit her sister in another part of Oregon, went to a dance at the local grange and met Shirley’s father. It was love at first sight and they were married two weeks later. “It was a wonderful, lovely story to tell us kids all the years,” Gauthier says. “But they were married in April — and I was born in October.” But it was just a story, and Gauthier quickly devised the truth — the man who raised her was not her biological father. There are many unknown details, including whether her mother’s new husband knew she was already pregnant when they met and married. Even decades later, there are few answers. “The only time I was alone with (her adopted father) to discuss anything was when he was dying in the hospital of cancer,” Gauthier says. “All he said to me was, ‘You must be really angry with

6  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

me.’” Rather than be angry, Gauthier says she felt sadness that the truth had been kept hidden. After she was married, Gauthier’s husband Mark also learned about a “secret” sibling in his past. His mother disclosed to him that she had been engaged to be married but was raped by a different man. The rape resulted in a pregnancy. His mother gave birth to a daughter then gave her up for adoption. “She just came out with it,” Mark Gauthier says. “She said she broke off the engagement and had to go away for a while. That’s what you did back then, you went away for a while and gave your baby up for adoption, or you got married.” His mother told him about the situation because she was afraid someone else in the family would tell him first. An adoption project undertaken by the University of Oregon estimates that from 1945 to 1973, 4 million parents placed children for adoption, with 2 million giving their babies up during the 1960s alone. Shirley and Mark know their story is not unique, and Shirley would like to encourage others


to reach out. “I want to get the message out that there’s a lot of lost siblings and it’s not too late,” she says. In 1983, Gauthier wrote a letter to her mother and asked for more information about the man she calls her “sperm donor.” Her mother replied, apologized for the deception and emphasized their love for Shirley. But her mother didn’t provide the requested details. Gauthier tried again in 1987, and this time her mother acquiesced. She told her daughter the man’s name was George. He was married at the time of the pregnancy, already had another child and didn’t want another one. Instead, he gave her money for a bus ticket out of town. Gauthier learned that George was the youngest of 10 children and when his family home burned down, the neighbors took care of George, later adopting him. He changed his last name from Hettick to Eddlemon. In 1994, Mark Gauthier traveled to the small town in Montana where George lived and brought back a local phone book. They didn’t know yet that George had changed his name, so Shirley started calling Hetticks in the Montana area. Once she connected with some of his relatives, she learned he had changed his last name and that finally gave her the connection she needed to find him. She called George and he answered. At first, he was reluctant to speak with Gauthier, but she eventually was able to meet him. Gauthier discovered that George had three children — Patty, Charlie and Dennis. She reached out to each of them and they accepted her right away. Even more, after George died his sons discovered letters showing their father was divorced from an earlier marriage and had a daughter named Mae, who lives in Florida. Mae knew George was her father, but didn’t know anything about her half-sister Shirley. “It’s a miracle to me that Charlie and Dennis were able

to find me,” says Mae, who was interviewed at the hospital awaiting the birth of her fourth great-grandchild. “But (they) got on the computer and one evening my phone rang. We talked and they were so welcoming. And then getting to know Shirley has been a very nice surprise.” Gauthier’s main concern was disrupting the lives of her newly-discovered siblings but, she says, they have all accepted her with open arms. Charlie, 58, feels a tinge of regret for so much lost time not knowing his other siblings. “You can’t go back and fix it because it wasn’t your choice,” he says. “So, you just forgive and then start working forward and that’s what I did.” His meeting with Mae two years ago went just as he’d hoped it would. “It was wonderful, everyone got along, and everybody was accepted with open arms,” Charlie says. “When we met Shirley she was just celebrating her 50th wedding anniversary, and it really hit me that we could have known her all that time. Fifty years of married life — we didn’t know her, but we could have.” Dennis agrees with his brother. “We feel awesome,” he says. “We all absolutely love Shirley and Mark. We’re so blessed.” For the Gauthiers, the experience of being united with longlost siblings has been a positive one, but she knows not everyone has good feelings about their lives being turned upside down with this new knowledge. However, simply knowing your roots and having access to important information such as a medical history can be very important and helpful. “I hope my story inspires and motivates other people to step out of that comfort zone and just (reach out) because even if there’s some hard adjustments, the rewards of getting to know your history and your family is worth it,” she says. “To me, I’ve never felt so included or felt so loved and, yeah, that’s pretty amazing.” ☸

Come see if this Caring Place feels like home... (541) 961-3237 www.CaringPlaces.com SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  7


YOUR HEALTH  |  SAMARITAN HEALTH

a quick

RESPONSE By SA M A R I TA N H E A LT H

JIM CLINE SURVIVED A HEART ATTACK, AND NOW LIVES LIFE TO THE FULLEST

J

IM CLINE HAD JUST ACHIEVED A PERSONal best on the strider machine at the SamFit gym in Newport. The next thing he knew, he was waking up in the Emergency Department. After being told he’d had a heart attack, he asked to call his wife. The doctor dialed the phone and handed it to Jim.

“Hi, honey. I’m in the Emergency Room in Newport,” Jim said when Amy Cline answered. “What did you break?” she asked. “I think I broke my heart,” Jim said. The event happened on a chilly and rainy Monday morning in December. Deborah Olff, a home health and hospice nurse Jim Cline spent nearly 25 years at Rogue Brewery in Newport. He’s now retired, keeping fit and traveling with his wife Amy. 8  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital, was working out at the SamFit gym for the first time in two years when she saw Jim Cline collapse. Her basic training kicked in as she rushed to his side and began chest compressions after she was unable to detect a pulse. Another gym member called 9-1-1. Jennifer Miller, the hospital’s Physical Rehabilitation Department manager, was also at the gym that morning and took over for Olff, who ran to get the Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). Detecting no heartbeat, the AED delivered two shocks in an attempt to restart Cline’s heart. It worked. Paramedics arrived within eight minutes and Jim again had a pulse. Though it was Olff ’s first time doing CPR, her quick action may have saved Cline’s life, and kept his heart from being damaged. Later, cardiologist Dr. Sridhar Vijayasekaran told Cline that


because CPR was rapidly started — within 10 to 15 seconds; and the AED was applied so quickly — within about 45 seconds — there was no detectable damage to his heart from the heart attack. The doctor told Amy her husband would be transferred to Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. The Clines live in Siletz, so Amy left her house and waited to meet the ambulance at the highway junction. “I followed him with my flashers on all the way over, including going through stop lights,” she says. “The ambulance stopped, and they told me I could not go through stop signs or red lights. I said, ‘They’ll have to catch me.’” At Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, three stents were placed in Cline’s coronary arteries and he was discharged in two days. He says the heart attack surprised him because he had no history of heart problems. “I was dumbfounded when I had the heart attack, because I thought I was doing the right things,” he says. “Because I had been working out regularly for years, my heart was strong. I think that helped my recovery a whole lot, because I wasn’t laying around getting a flabby heart.” Cline also credits cardiac rehabilitation at Samaritan Pacific Communities

Hospital for helping him recover. “They are enthusiastic and genuinely concerned about helping you get better,” he says. “At my first session, they asked me about my goals and I said that by the end of the program I want to be back physically to where I was when I started.” Cardiac rehab exercise specialist Nicole Schultz helped Cline reach his goals, in large part by setting limits for him. “At the first session, I asked if I could start lifting again,” Cline says. “She said no.” After two weeks closely monitoring Cline’s activity at the cardiac rehab gym, he was allowed to start lifting again — but at 50 percent of what he had been doing before. “By the end of cardiac rehab, I was at 95 percent of where I was, now I am above where I was,” he says. When Cline called his wife from the Emergency Department, he sounded fine, and even though he’d had a heart attack, it didn’t sink in right away. “I’m a pretty stoic and optimistic person,” Amy says. “I don’t think the whole thing hit me until three or four weeks later. It was kind of surreal to know what the consequences could have been.” Just a few months before his heart attack, Cline had retired from 24 years

in management roles at the Rogue Brewery in Newport. At 65, he was looking forward to enjoying retirement. Jim and Amy took a trip to the United Kingdom for a month, and they planned a variety of other trips both abroad and closer to home. He was excited to have the time to work on projects, rather than just trying to fit them into a weekend. He focused on maintaining good health — eating right and exercising. Since the heart attack, Cline is even more committed to staying healthy. Before, he worked out three days a week; now, he goes to the gym five days a week. He is more careful about meal choices. “I have not cut anything out,” he says. “I moderate a lot more than I used to — less red meat, more whole grains, more chicken.” Whether he is removing trees from his property to expand his gardens, spending time with his daughter and grandson, or going to a family reunion with Amy, Cline wants to be in good health and up to the task. “I want to be able to spend time with my wife and travel with her,” he says. “I worked a lot for a lot of years. We will have been married 40 years in September. I owe her what time I have left.” Learn more about Jim at samhealth. org/JimC. ☸

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SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  9

Creatmg em·tronments u·here moments of Joy, mde/Jendence, and u'ellness are the foClts ec1ch and et·ery day


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YARD & GARDEN

bright books in a cold winter By G RAC E P E T E R S O N

I

GARDENING BOOKS TO READ WHILE WE WAIT FOR SPRING

CONFESS, I’VE ALWAYS GOT A FEW GARDENING books on the table, waiting for me to read and review. During the warm weather months, I am too busy to do them justice. But now, with the holidays behind us and spring not quite here yet, it seems the perfect time for armchair gardening. I love the inspiration that garden books provide. Perhaps you’re conceptualizing a new garden or revamping part of an existing one. Maybe you’re not quite confident enough to take on that project and could benefit from some motivation. Even if you’re not sure about your goals, a garden book is sure to provide much insight. “GARDENTOPIA: DESIGN BASICS FOR CREATING BEAUTIFUL OUTDOOR SPACES” has been a pleasure to read. With 40-plus years as a professional landscape designer, author Jan Johnsen is an expert at “transforming tough sites into appealing landscapes.” Her book focuses on both large concepts and the small details. She breaks down her design principles with photos and an emphasis on how our mind perceives these specific features. You will find chapters on garden design and accent tips; hardscapes, such as walls, patios, walks and steps; special interest or theme gardens; color in the garden and lastly, a chapter on plants and planting. I was happy to read that I’ve already employed some of Johnsen’s design concepts, such as the Japanese miegakure: the “hide and reveal technique.” This simply means providing a half-hidden vista by partially screening a view or section of the garden with a strategically placed shrub or wall. This creates an illusion of distance that beckons us further into the garden. You’ll find information on using plants that have attractive 10  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

berries, moon gardens, fragrance gardens, placing rocks and decorative elements in the garden, and so much more. Learn more at janjohnsen.com. In our world of ever shrinking garden spaces, we are forced to come up with clever ways to squeeze more plants into our lives. So, I was intrigued to read “GARDENER’S GUIDE TO COMPACT PLANTS: EDIBLES & ORNAMENTALS FOR SMALL-SPACE GARDENING” by award-winning author, garden columnist and speaker Jessica Walliser. She defines compact (or “dwarf ”) plants: “Compact plants are those prized for their ability to start small and stay small, even when they reach full maturity. They’re selected and bred by plant breeders for their petite form and well-behaved growth habit. With maintenance needs far less extensive than their full-sized counterparts, compact plants are the perfect fit for anyone looking to create a beautiful small-scale garden and reduce the amount of time needed to maintain their landscape. These plants are also an ideal choice for container gardens since most require less room for both their top growth and their root system.” The author educates us on methods for selecting, planting and maintaining compact plants. You’ll be enchanted by her designs using compact plants such as a patio garden, a shady nook garden, even a compact kitchen garden. You can incorporate all or part of her designs into your own garden. There is a section on using compact plants in specific applications such as providing winter interest, screening an unsightly view, incorporating color or texture into the garden, even providing enough flowering plants to feed our pollinators. The color photos that go along with the author’s suggestions are delightful and inspiring. Finally, the book profiles hundreds of compact plants from trees to edibles that can be incorporated into the garden. ☸


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  MEDIA

Sounds -OF-nature ISLAND EARTH RADIO: A MUSICAL TRIP THROUGH NATURE

C

ONCERT PROMOTER Mike Meyer celebrates the sounds of nature through a new radio program titled Island Earth Radio, heard twice a week through Eugene station KRVM-FM, 91.9. He presents “songs celebrating our planet and its inhabitants,” he says. This includes folk, Native American and world music, as well as songs, sounds and poems that “inspire connection and much-needed respect and love for our environment,” Meyer says. There is “direct, primary affirming references to water, sky, flames, soil, animals and human experience (that) flow together in this collage of nature.” Meyer, who has been doing radio for nearly 40 years, says this is the “first radio show in the world of its kind,” and that “music with nature themes and sounds is collected from accomplished

songwriters, instrumental musings, various cultures, modern classics and indigenous roots. I’ve come to find that nature is becoming too specific in our culture Mike Meyer and it’s being marginalized. I’ve always had a lot of nature music and find music is most expressive with nature themes.” Island Earth Radio melds songs of nature with nature sounds and poems. “The planetary song and soundscape show evokes nature’s elements through artists such as Kate Wolf, Baka Beyond, Inkuyo, Laurie Lewis, Keola Beamer, Joanne Shenandoah, the Paul Winter Consort, and R. Carlos Nakai, (with) poems and quotes by Mary Oliver, Wendell Berry and Terry Tempest Williams,” he says. Island Earth Radio airs from 6 to 7 a.m. Sundays and 11 p.m. to midnight Thursdays. For more information, send an email to islandearthradio@gmail.com. ☸

Benton Health Center 530 NW 27th Street Corvallis, OR 97330 541-766-6835 East Linn Health Center 100 Mullins Drive, A-1 Lebanon, OR 97355 541-451-6920 Monroe Health Center 610 Dragon Drive Monroe, OR 97456 541-847-5143 Alsea Rural Health Center 435 E. Alder Street Alsea, OR 97324 541-487-7116 Lincoln Health Center 121 SE Viewmont Avenue Corvallis, OR 97333 541-766-3546 Sweet Home Health Center 799 Long Street Sweet Home, OR 97386 541-367-3888 Accepting New Medicare Patients www.bentonlinnhealthcenters.org Hours vary by location please call for an appointment.

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YOUR HEALTH  |  MEDICARE

Reminder: Open enrollment period By L I SA D. E M E R S O N

O

NEW YEAR MEANS SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE CHANGES

UR NEW YEAR IS OFF TO A GREAT START and the Oregon Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program wants to remind Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers about other enrollment periods they may be able to use to switch plans before the next Medicare Annual Election Period begins on Oct. 15. The Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period (MA OEP) is from Jan. 1 to Mar. 31. You must have an MA plan on Jan. 1 to use this enrollment period. Coverage will start the first day of the month after you enroll. You can: ▶ Switch MA plans (with or without drug coverage) ▶ Enroll in a stand-alone Part D plan (which returns you to Original Medicare.)

Medicare can be confusing

SHIBA is here to help

help...

Publicly-funded resource Free and objective information and assistance Help you compare Medicare health and drug plans Offers local classes year-round

Getting Part D is not guaranteed unless you were in an MA plan on Jan. 1. There is only one change allowed during this enrollment period. You cannot switch from one standalone PDP to another standalone PDP.

Special Enrollment Periods (SEP)

Special enrollment periods are opportunities to make plan changes outside of the standard enrollment periods. These are made available because you may be moving permanently outside your plan’s service area or start qualifying for any limited-income assistance. SEPs are generally 60 days but may vary. At these times, you may use your SEP to: ▶ Join a different Medicare Advantage plan. ▶ Switch to using only Original Medicare. ▶ Switch to Original Medicare and purchase a Medigap. Insurance companies may require that you undergo

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14  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

St. Vincent de Paul does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability status, familial status, national origin or marital status in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its federally assisted programs and activities.


underwriting unless you have guaranteed issue.

Star-rated SEPs

Medicare uses a star rating system based on complaints it receives. Five stars is excellent and one star is poor. ▶ Five-star SEP — You may enroll in a plan with five stars once from Dec. 8 to Nov. 30. ▶ Low-performing plan SEP — If you are in a low-performing plan you will receive a letter in late October. You must call 800-MEDICARE (633-4227) to enroll in another plan. If you need help comparing and enrolling in plans, consider contacting

a SHIBA counselor who can help you understand plan options and plan rules, such as how and when you may make changes. For a SHIBA contact in your area call 800-722-4134 (toll-free). Visit shiba. oregon.gov to view an online copy of the 2020 Oregon Guide to Oregon Medicare Insurance Plans. ☸ Lisa D. Emerson is an analyst for Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance and Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace in the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services.

Creating envionments

Creating envionments

where moments of joy,

where moments of joy,

ndependence, andand independence,

wellness are focus the focus wellness are the each and every day. each and every day. Creating envionments

where moments of joy,

independence, and

wellness are the focus each and every day.

Contact us for more information or to schedule a private tour today!

Contact us for more information or to schedule a private tour today! Contact us for more information

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  MEDIA

Access to Kanopy LIBRARY OFFERS ON-DEMAND FILM STREAMING SERVICE

T

HE POPULAR ON-DEmand film streaming service Kanopy is now available for free with a library card from Corvallis-Benton County Public Library via cbcpl.net/kanopy. Video can be streamed from any computer, and from most mobile devices and televisions with the Kanopy app for iOS, Android, AppleTV, Chromecast or Roku. With the motto of “thoughtful entertainment,” Kanopy provides Benton County patrons with access to more than 33,000 films of unique social and cultural value, including the Criterion Collection, The Great Courses, independent films, foreign language films and documentaries. The Kanopy Kids portal includes Weston Woods’ collection of animated picture books by Mo Willems and other popular authors, PBS shows like “Sesame Street” and “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” and children’s films. For more information, please contact the library at 541-766-6793. ☸

or to schedule a private tour today!

SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  15


a ’love’ for books

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  BOOKS

By A N DY N O RT H RU P

L

DELVE INTO THE COMPLEXITY OF RELATIONSHIPS

IBRARIANS LOVE READING and talking about books. You’d think that goes without saying. But at the Eugene Public Library, visitors who approach staff don’t always seem sure of this. “Can you do book recommendations?” they hesitantly ask, as if we’ll scold them for whispering too loudly and bothering us. The answer? Of course, we can. In fact, many librarians are thrilled to drop whatever else they are doing in favor of book talk. Among a million other things, that’s what librarians do. We track publishing trends, peruse countless professional reviews and read a lot of books — all so we can effectively connect patrons with their next great read. Whether it’s a personal recommendation from library staff or a list of books to match a certain time of the year, we’ve got you covered. Speaking of books for a certain time of the year, February is when we celebrate Valentine’s Day, which in turn may have readers looking for some great books about love and relationships. Traditionally, one may think of classics like “Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus,” “He’s Just Not That Into You,” “The 5 Love Languages,” and others. Those are perfectly good options and readily available at your public library. However, more

recently-published books are focusing less on traditional, romantic gender roles and more on love and relationships of all kinds. I’m recommending these books ANDY because they presNORTHRUP ent a nuanced and complicated view of relationships, with others and with ourselves. Readers will still find stories of dating and marriage, but also of parenthood, family, aging, and self-actualization. These books are refreshingly authentic, with a kaleidoscopic view of the connections we form with each other. They show how relationships are beautiful and necessary, but also messy, difficult and imperfect. And they aren’t just about relationships with others, but about discovering our own best selves in order to put something good back into the world. “Love Poems for Married People” by John Kenney Based on the author’s hugely popular New Yorker piece, this poetry collection is a poignant and laugh-out-loud funny look at the reality of married life. Don’t worry if you’re not typically a poetry reader, Kenney’s writing is accessible and easy to read. He covers anything from the foibles of parenthood, to the grind of daily

16  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

life, to the lack of spark in the bedroom. One titled “Are you in the mood?” goes like this: “I am./ Let’s put the kids down./ Have a light dinner./ Shower./ Maybe not drink so much./ And do that thing I would rather do with you than anyone else./ Lie in bed and look at our iPhones.” “I Miss You When I Blink” by Mary Laura Philpott Philpott, an Emmy-winning literary talk show host, offers an utterly charming collection of essays on her life as a daughter, mother, wife and successful business woman. The topics are wide-ranging and there’s something in here for everyone. In witty and sharp prose, Philpott candidly writes about her personal life while also tapping into a larger, shared human experience of striving for perfection and finding peace when we inevitably fall short of that unattainable goal. “Women Rowing North” by Mary Pipher Pipher, a cultural anthropologist, brings her expertise and personal experience to this landmark work about the myriad difficulties faced by aging women in our society. At first glance, this may not seem like a relationship book. But


within these pages, there is a heavy focus on the importance of community and connection while growing older. Also, this book isn’t just for women of a certain age. Their partners, sons, daughters and any other loved ones can benefit equally from reading it right alongside them. “What My Mother and I Don’t Talk About” by Michele Filgate (Ed.) Fifteen writers

provide unsparingly honest looks at their relationships with their mothers. The essays range from loving and sentimental to bitter and sad, but they’re all deeply emotional and likely to connect with readers of all ages. While hardly a fluffy or nostalgic ode to parenthood, this book is nonetheless a realistic and hugely rewarding read for parents and their adult children. “Modern Love,” revised and updated by Daniel Jones (Ed.) This collection from the New York Times “Modern Love” column got a revised and updated edition this past year to coincide with the TV series starring Tina Fey, Andy Garcia, Anne

Hathaway, Catherine Keener and other A-list stars. Those familiar with the previous edition can still enjoy old favorites along with fresh new additions. Anyone entirely new to “Modern Love” can experience 15 years of stories about love, connection and relationships. ☸ Andy Northrup is an adult services librarian at Eugene Public Library.

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RETIREMENT LISTINGS

Amenities: Independent Living  Assisted Living/RCF/Foster Care   Housekeeping Transportation   Utilities Included   Planned Activities   Memory Care Evergreen Campus of Continuum Care Independent | Assisted Living Memory Care 3720 N Clarey Street Eugene Oregon 97402 541.689.3900 www.evergreeneug.com

IAHTUPM Evergreen Senior Living Independent | Assisted Living Memory Care 3760 N Clarey Street Eugene Oregon 97402 541.607.9525 www.evergreeneug.com

IAHTUPM Timber Pointe Senior Living

Independent and Assisted Living 4865 Main Street Springfield, OR 97478 541-284-2865 www.timberpointesl.com

IAHTUP

Evergreen Senior Living is a community of continuous care, located near the cultural heart of Eugene. Our community offers, independent living, assisted living, and memory care with amenities that enhance our homelike environment, while encouraging the social interaction of community living. We offer weekly housekeeping, 24 hour maintenance, scheduled transportation, dining services, and social and recreational activities. Call today for a complimentary lunch and tour. Guided by Goodness, Loyalty, Faith, and Fun!

We are an independent living and assisted living community guided by goodness, loyalty, faith, and fun! We believe in the power of relationships, caring for one another in partnership, bringing a sense of joy and fulfillment to both the elder and the team helping to care for them. Join us for lunch and a visit! No Buy-In or long-term lease. Luxury apartments and cottages. Units are available!

SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  17


February 2020 FALL IN LOVE WITH THESE LOCAL EVENTS

JAN 31 —

“ARSENIC AND OLD LACE,” 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, through Feb. 16, Cottage Theatre, 700 Village Dr., Cottage Grove. $25/$15.

Radioreduxusa.com. TAKING CONTROL OF CREDIT AND DEBT, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. Free.

1 — MOSSBACKS VOLKSSPORT CLUB, 9 a.m. to noon, McMenamins Kennedy School, 5736 NE 33rd Ave., Portland. Mossbacks.org for more February walks.

AARP INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE, by appointment, Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Free. 541-682-5318 or getrec.org. a.m., Willamalane center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $15/$18. 541-736-4444.

6

THURSDAY

SCOTTISH SONGWRITERS SUSIE AND JIM MALCOLM

VIRTUAL DEMENTIA TOUR, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m., by appointment, Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Free. 541-682-5318 or getrec.org.

7:30 p.m., First Congregational Church of Christ, 4515 West Hills Road, Corvallis. $20$22. 541-753-8307.

LANE COUNTY PERS RETIREES, 10 a.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Topic: Would your PERS be safe in an economic downtown?

8 — AAUW, featuring Gustavo Balderas, superintendent of Eugene School District, 10:30 a.m., Westminster Presbyterian Church, 777 Coburg Road, Eugene. 541-556-8149.

5 — LOVE AND LOSS DURING VALENTINE’S DAY, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. Free.

7 — STAYING SOCIAL IN A CHANGING WORLD, 10 a.m., Willamalane center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Free. 541-736-4444. FIRST FRIDAY: HARRY POTTER BOOK NIGHT, 5 p.m., Downtown Eugene Public Library. 541-682-5450.

13 — FROM SEED TO SUPPER, beginning vegetable gardening course, 2 p.m., Willamalane center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Free. 541-7364444. 14 — PEARL BUCK CENTER’S BENEFIT BREAKFAST, 8 a.m., LCC Center for Meeting and Learning, Eugene. Free. RSVP by Feb. 4, events@pearlbuckcenter.com.

WHY DON’T THEY JUST GET IN LINE?, Immigrants and Immigration Policy, 3 p.m., Downtown Eugene Public Library. 541-682-5450.

4 — TAX SEASON PREP 101, 10

Free. 541-682-4103 or livingwell@lcog. org.

CREATING COMPASSIONATE KIDS, 1 p.m., Downtown Eugene Public Library. Free. 541-682-5450.

10 — EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES, regarding Alzheimer’s, 10:30 a.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW, Albany. Free. 800-272-3900.

OSU MUSIC A LA CARTE: OSU VOCAL AREA, noon, OSU Memorial Union Lounge, Corvallis. Free.

11 — SMJ HOUSE BOOK DISCUSSION, “The Woman’s Hour,” 6 p.m., Noble Estate Winery, 560 Commercial St., Eugene. Smjhouse. org.

RADIO REDUX: “SUNSET BOULEVARD,” 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Soreng Theatre, Hult Center, Eugene.

POWERFUL TOOLS FOR CAREGIVERS, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays, through March 17, Ulhorn Day Center, 1250 W. 18th Ave., Eugene.

18  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

OSU MUSIC A LA CARTE: OSU JAZZ ENSEMBLE, noon, OSU Memorial Union Lounge, Corvallis. Free.

15 — FRONTIER HERITAGE FAIR, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Feb. 16, Lane County Fairgrounds Events Center, Eugene. $5.

18 — BRAIN HEALTH, 9 a.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. Free. 541-917-7760. 19 — USING YOUR CALENDAR APP ON YOUR SMARTPHONE, 2 p.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $12. 541-682-5318 or getrec. org. WOMEN’S HEALTH, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. Free. 541-917-7760.

20 — RETIRED SENIOR PROVIDERS OF LANE COUNTY, “Commission for the Blind” with Robin Illers, 2 p.m., Sheldon Oaks Retirement, 2525 Cal Young Road, Eugene. Free. 541-342-1983. 21 — 40TH ANNIVERSARY SOIREE, dinner and silent auction, 6 p.m., Willamalane center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $40. 541-736-4444. FRIENDS OF THE CORVALLISBENTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY BIG BOOK SALE, through Feb. 23, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 541-602-0069. OSU MUSIC A LA CARTE: OSU


PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE, noon, OSU Memorial Union Lounge, Corvallis. events.oregonstate.edu.

22 — CONCERT: GUS RUSSELL QUARTET, 2 p.m., Downtown Eugene Public Library. Free. 541-682-5450. SUFFRAGE TEA, 1 p.m., Shelton McMurphey Johnson House, Eugene. Smjhouse.org/teas.

23 — EUGENE CONCERT CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA, “Beethoven Birthday Bash,” 2:30 p.m., Silva Concert Hall, Hult Center, Eugene. Pre-concert talk with Peter Van de Graaff, 1:30 p.m. 541-682-5000. 24 — NARFE, Lane County Chapter, noon, Sizzler Restaurant, 1010 Postal Way, Springfield. Speaker TBD. 541334-5108. LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S AND OTHER DEMENTIAS, Dementia Conversations, 10 a.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Free. 541-682-5318 or getrec.org. INTRO TO BEE KEEPING, 6:45 p.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $20. 541-682-5318 or getrec.org.

25 — PLANNING FOR FINANCIAL SECURITY, 5:30 p.m., Willamalane center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Free. 541736-4444.

26 — WILLAMETTE HIGH ALUMNI LUNCHEON, 1 p.m., Papa’s Pizza on Coburg Road, Eugene. For all ages.

736-4444. SHEILA ANDRESS: MY NAME IS BARBRA, 7:30 p.m., Austin Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. $28. 541-434-7000. ☸

Calendar submissions are due by the 6th of the month for events in the following month, to mte@northwest50plus.com.

FEBRUARY at the majestic! EXPERIENCE ART, MUSIC, DANCE, AND THEATRE!

Terry Pratchett’s Guards! Guards! Jan. 31- Feb. 9 at 2:30pm & 7:30pm |Tickets: $14-16 The Improv Jam: A Love Story Feb. 9 at 7:30pm | Tickets: $6 Ten Tiny Dances® Feb. 21 & 22 at 7:30pm | Tickets: $13-15 Majestic Readers’ Theatre Company presents The Tin Woman by Sean Grennan Feb. 22 & 23 at 3pm & 7pm | Tickets: $11-13

27 — ACRYLIC PAINTING PARTY: BONSAI, 6:30 p.m., Willamalane center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $32/$38. 541-

Eugene Coin & Jewelry We buy sell coins, & estate jewelry Do& YOU havevintage hidden treasures? in any hidden condition. DoGOLD YOU have treasures? Do YOU have hidden treasures? We buy any type of gold: new, used or broken,

DIAMONDS

Do YOU YOU have have hidden hidden treasures? treasures? Do

We buy all sizes & shapes. Price depends on quality, cut and size of diamonds.

GOLD

We buybuy any type gold: of We anyoftype of gold: gold: new, new, used used or or broken, broken,

We buy any type of gold: new, used or broken,

new, used or925 broken, in any We buy stamped sterling silver and condition. silver serving dishes and flatware.

in any any condition. condition. SILVER in We buy andWe sell collectible American and buybuy all sizes & shapes. COINS Do We sizes & international coins inhidden singleall pieces or collections. YOUPrice have treasures? &cutshapes. shapes. Price Price depends depends on on quality,& buy allonsizes shapes. Price depends on DIAMONDS Wedepends

DIAMONDS quality, cut andorsize of size of diamonds. size of diamonds. diamonds. We buyStreet, anyand type of gold: new,97401 used broken, 1416 Willamette Eugene, OR quality, cut and size of diamonds. GOLD in any condition.

541-683-8445 • eugenecoin@aol.com • eugenecoin.com

We buy stamped sterling We buy stamped sterling 925 925 silver andstamped silverdepends serving We buy stamped sterling 925 silver silver and and We buy all sizes & shapes. Price on We buy sterling 925 silver and dishes and flatware. quality, cut and size ofserving diamonds. dishes silver silver serving dishes and and flatware. flatware.

SILVER SILVER SILVER COINS COINS COINS

EUGENE’S LARGEST FULL SERVICE COIN DEALER - A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1924

DIAMONDS

silver serving dishes and flatware.

We buy and sell We buy stamped sterling 925 collectible silver and We buy and sell American and international silver serving dishes and flatware. We buy and sell collectible collectible American American and and We buy and sell collectible American and coins in single pieces or international coins in single pieces or collections. international coins in single single pieces pieces or or collections. collections. We buy andcollections. sell collectible American and in international coins international coins in single pieces or collections.

1416 Willamette Street, Eugene, OR 97401

1416 Willamette Street, Eugene, OR OR 97401 97401 Willamette Street, 14161416 Willamette Street, Eugene, OR 97401Eugene, 541-683-8445 541-683-8445 • eugenecoin@aol.com • eugenecoin.com •• eugenecoin.com 541-683-8445 •• eugenecoin@aol.com eugenecoin@aol.com eugenecoin.com 541-683-8445 • eugenecoin@aol.com • eugenecoin.com EUGENE’S LARGEST FULL SERVICE COIN DEALER - A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1924

EUGENE’S LARGEST LARGEST FULL SERVICE COIN DEALER -- A Eugene’s largestFULL full SERVICE serviceCOIN coinDEALER dealer! EUGENE’S SERVICE COIN DEALER A FAMILY FAMILYTRADITION TRADITIONSINCE SINCE1924 1924 EUGENE’S LARGEST FULL -A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1924 A family tradition since 1924

SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  19


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  HISTORIC PLACES

The Jewelry Girl, llc Lisa Russell 541-556-9598 Free Appraisals ... I’ll come to you

BUY & SELL Gold • Silver Costume Jewelry Men’s Jewelry Scrap Gold & Silver Pieces & Parts Even Junk

25 years+ experience

2001 Franklin, #3 • Eugene

Donate your Vehicle Locally!

• All procceds stay in the local community • We accept cars, trucks, RVs, running or not.

Santiam Ski Pass Lodge BUILT BY THE CCC IN 1939, IT’S NOW LISTED IN NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

T

HE SANTIAM PASS SKI Lodge in Linn County is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places. The U.S. Forest Service prepared and nominated this property to the National Register, and Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation supported the listing of this nomination. The National Park Service — which maintains the National Register — accepted the nomination on Oct. 18, 2018. The Santiam Pass Ski Lodge is representative of an important period of development that shaped public lands to facilitate access and usage for outdoor recreation for the general public. The lodge was constructed between July 1939 and February 1940 and was the result of collaborative efforts by the USDA Forest Service with Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) labor. Located on the Santiam Pass on Highway 20 in the McKenzie River

Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest, the Santiam Lodge was instrumental in creating a place for citizens to sleep and get meals in the mountains at a reasonable cost while they participated in winter sports activities around the area. It was operated in the capacity of a winter ski lodge from 1939 until 1958. This property is one of the few remaining extant Rustic ski lodge facilities built by the USDA Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest during the intensive building program between 1939 and 1941. The Santiam Lodge building was built in the Rustic style, an architectural style known for embracing a philosophy that is cohesive with the surrounding environment by using materials derived from local sources with a simple or natural finish. On May 10, 2018, the Willamette National Forest signed the operating plan and special use permit for the restoration of the Santiam Pass Ski Lodge. The new permittees, Susan and Dwight Sheets, will be working with community members and foundations to renovate the CCC-built lodge to its former condition. You can learn more about the work they are doing by visiting santiampassskilodge.org. ☸

Cars for a Cause

888-227-8223

Original and current photos of Santiam Ski Pass Lodge in Linn County.

20  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020


Classifieds UNITS FOR RENT HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities is currently accepting applications for our one bedroom waiting list. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Briarwood Manor, 643 Manbrin, Keizer, OR 97303, 541928-2545.

CEMETERY PLOTS

CASH FOR GOOD CONDITION reloading equipment & supplies. 541-905-5453. DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED.  Paying top dollar! Free local pickup. Call Sharon, 503-679-3605.

CASH FOR PRE 1980 sport & non-sport cards, model kits, comic books, pre 1960’s magazines. Private collector. 503-3137538.

PRIVATE PARTY 

25

$

Up to 20 words. $1.75 per extra word.

COMMERCIAL, REAL ESTATE 

50

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

BASEBALL & SPORTS MEMORABILIA wanted. Buying old cards, pennants, autographs, photographs, tickets, programs, Pacific Coast League, etc. Alan, 503-481-0719.

CEMETERY PLOTS 

60

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

FRIENDSHIP ADS 

40

$

Up to 30 words.

HOW TO SUBMIT AN AD:

IN SUNSET HILLS IN EUGENE, a double depth plot in Urn Garden. $500. Contact Patricia Spicer at pspicer@sonic.net for details.

WANTED

CLASSIFIED AD RATES

Mail your verbiage with payment to: Northwest50Plus, P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or email to

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this magazine is subject to the Fair

Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

classifieds@Northwest50Plus.com or call 1-877-357-2430. *Punctuation not included in word count. Phone numbers count as 1 word. Ad must be in our office by the 6th of the month PRIOR to publication. Ads cover Vancouver, WA to Lane County.

FRIENDSHIP AD ABBREVIATIONS M = Male F = Female S = Single D = Divorced W = White A = Asian

B = Black H = Hispanic J = Jewish C = Christian N/S = Non-smoker

N/D = Non-drinker ISO = In Search Of LTR = Long Term Relationship

WW = Widowed White WB = Widowed Black WA = Widowed Asian

WH = Widowed Hispanic LGBT= Lesbian/Gay/ Bisexual/Transgender

TO RESPOND TO A FRIENDSHIP AD:

Write the number of the ad you are responding to on the OUTSIDE of the envelope and mail to: Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309. SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  21


PUZZ L E A G E

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  SHOP LOCAL

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22  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

“No Job too Small” Piano & Safe Specialist

Scott Hahn

Serving all of Lane, Linn & Benton Counties

541-285-5392 or

541-461-0632


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  SHOP LOCAL NW Financial Insurance

Donna R. Green

REST AND REPAIR MASSAGE CLINIC

Licensed Insurance Agent

Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork

541-286-6443

Lymphatic Flow Therapy Shiatsu/Acupressure - Fully Clothed Home/Hospital Visits

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Monday - Saturday 9 am - 8 pm Cash or check accepted | Payment plans available

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“Helping You Adapt Your Home to Your Current Needs”

310 NW 7th St., Corvallis

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SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  23


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1 Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free. 2 Does not include cost of material. Expires 2/29/2020. 3 All participants who attend an estimated 60-90 minute in-home product consultation will receive a $25 gift card. Retail value is $25. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend and complete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 21 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer not sponsored or promoted by Lowe’s and is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 2/29/2020. ⁴All participants who attend an estimated 60-90minute in-home product consultation and choose to make a purchase will receive a $200 Best Buy gift card. Retail value is $200.00 Offer sponsored by Englert LeafGuard, Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 21 days of receipt of promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 2/29/2020. LeafGuard operates as LeafGuard of Oregon in Oregon under OR LIC # 223377

24  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  FEBRUARY 2020

Profile for Northwest50Plus

Northwest 50 Plus Febuary 2020 South Valley Edition  

Northwest 50 Plus Febuary 2020 South Valley Edition  

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