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LOCAL news for boomers and seniors

THE NORTHWEST’S OLDEST AND LARGEST PUBLICATION FOR OLDER ADULTS

SOUTH VALLEY | DECEMBER 2019

Happy Holidays! inside: housing options | preserving your memories

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editor’s note

Northwest

50 Plus

VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 11

OREGON’S OLDEST & LARGEST 50+ PUBLICATION 3 Editions serving adults aged 50 and older Portland-Metro-Vancouver, Marion-Polk-Coast, South Valley: Linn-Benton Lane P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 4923 Indian School Rd. NE, Salem, OR 97305 503-304-1323 | 1-877-357-2430 | FAX 503-304-5394 info@northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus.com Subscriptions $26/year | $49/2 years

MICHELLE TE General Manager & Managing Editor mte@northwest50plus.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggi White, Mary Owen, Vanessa Salvia, Barry Finnemore, Pat Snider, Grace Peterson, and B. Lee Coyne EAGLE MEDIA LAB Design production@eaglemedialab.com DOREEN HARROLD Office Manager/Sales Assistant dharrold@northwest50plus.com JOAN RILEY Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro joan4freedom@comcast.net LARRY SURRATT Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro-Vancouver lsurratt@northwest50plus.com ROBYN SMITH Advertising Sales, Marion-PolkLinn-Benton-Lane counties rsmith@northwest50plus.com Printed by Eagle Web Press, Salem, OR Northwest 50 Plus is published monthly and locally owned and operated by Eagle Newspapers, Inc. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Northwest 50 Plus. Any use of all or any part of this publication is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.

I

N SEPTEMBER, OUR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER’S world completely changed — the last of her three older siblings left to college and she is now the only child left at home.

She knew the day was coming, and she even felt a little bit excited. Finally, she’d have her own bedroom and no competition for the bathroom. She would have straight access to her parents, the Wi-Fi and the fruit snacks in the pantry. But the change has been a little harder than she imagined. She’s felt a little lonely, a little lost. And why wouldn’t she? She’s never known a day in her life without them there. It’s more noticeable when the clothes on the floor or all the shoes in the entryway only belong to her. It’s quieter without older teenagers coming and going from the house, and she’s started high school without the benefit of any older siblings to lean on for support and guidance. Thanks to modern technology, she communicates with her sister and brothers on an almost daily basis, and it helps to fill that void she feels. But it’s not the same. The change has been hard. Here at Northwest50Plus, we’ve experienced our own changes. Not only did we change our format from a newspaper to a magazine, but we changed our name as well. That has taken some getting used to — for us and for you. We felt comfortable with the status quo, but in order to stay fresh and relevant, we knew comfortable wasn’t good enough. We did away with some labels. We upgraded our look and feel, even how you hold the publication in your hands. We’ve taken to the streets, meeting you where you’re at, talking about why you should read Northwest50Plus, and how you respond to what you see on the pages. To be a successful print publication in today’s digital environment is a challenge. The competition for your time, money and effort is fierce. Fortunately, we’re up for the challenge. Every month, we seek to find new ways to inform, educate and entertain you. We’ve added a puzzle page and a comic strip. We beefed up our Medicare Guide. Our editorial designs are crisp and easy to follow. We seek out advertisers that reflect your needs. Every month is a new start, an opportunity to bring you closer to the goods, services and people in this great part of our state. But we can do better, and we need your help. Would you take a few minutes to complete the survey right next to my comments? When you’re done, please mail it back through the post office, email or you can even take a picture of it and send us a private message through our Facebook page. Your input and feedback is so valuable. If you’d prefer, visit our website and take the survey there. Then, share the magazine with your friends. Keep it on your coffee table for visitors. Respond to the articles and the advertising. Let’s keep a good thing going. Happy reading! ☸ MICHELLE TE General Manager/Editor Mail: PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 Email: mte@northwest50plus.com Facebook: Northwest50Plus

2  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019


Please take this survey Help us provide content that really meets your needs

▶ Your county: ☐ Benton ☐ Multnomah ☐ Polk

☐ Clackamas ☐ Clark ☐ Lane ☐ Lincoln ☐ Linn ☐ Marion ☐ Tillamook ☐ Washington ▶ What age are you: ____________________ ▶ Are you retired: ☐ Yes ☐ No ▶ Type of housing: ☐ Own ☐ Rent ☐ Retirement community ☐ Assisted Living ▶ Number of people in your household: ☐ 1 person ☐ 2-3 people ☐ 4 or more ▶ Do you own a vehicle (check all that apply): ☐ Car ☐ Motorcycle ☐ Boat ☐ RV/Trailer ☐ None ▶ How many hours per week do you spend: Working at least one job ________Volunteering ________Traveling ________ Spending time with grandchildren ________ ▶ Do you use (check all that apply): ☐ Bank

☐ Credit Union ▶ I own a (check all that apply): ☐ Desktop computer ☐ Tablet ☐ Smart phone ▶ How many hours per week are you online: ____________________ ▶ How many times per week do you eat out (any meal): ☐ 0-2

☐ 3-5 ☐ 6 or more ▶ Where do you pick up Northwest 50 Plus: ☐ Grocery store ☐ Senior Center ☐ Library ☐ Hospital ☐ Restaurant ☐ Retirement Community ☐ Doctor’s Office ☐ Bank ☐ Other _______________________ ▶ Please check the types of articles that interest you (check all that apply): ☐ Health ☐ Fitness ☐ Travel ☐ Local personalities ☐ History ☐ Products/services ☐ Entertainment ☐ Hobbies ☐ Other ___________________________________________ ▶ What type of advertising is most relevant to you (check all that apply): ☐ Retirement communities ☐ Products ☐ Services ☐ Travel ☐ Entertainment ☐ Sporting Events ☐ Casinos ☐ Medical ☐ Prescription Drugs ☐ Restaurants ☐ Other_____________________________ ▶ Do you use coupons: ☐ Yes ☐ No ▶ Do you often use senior discounts: ☐ Yes ☐ No ▶ Favorite way to travel: ☐ Car ☐ Bus tours ☐ Camping ☐ Cruises ☐ Adventure Travel ☐ RVs ☐ Package Tours ☐ Destination Resorts ▶ Are you a full or part time caregiver: ☐ Full ☐ Part ☐ I receive caregiving services ▶ How often do you visit a senior center: ☐ Daily ☐ 1-3 times a week ☐ Occasionally ☐ Never ▶ What hobbies do you regularly engage in? (check all that apply): ☐ Books ☐ TV ☐ Collecting ☐ Restoring ☐ Arts/Crafts ☐ Investing ☐ Sports ☐ Travel ☐ Eating Out ☐ Movies ☐ Clubs/organizations ☐ Church ☐ Gardening ☐ Other ________________________________________ ▶ What’s on your bucket list (check all that apply): ☐ Destination Travel ☐ Adventure Travel ☐ Big purchase ☐ Sporting Event ☐ Entertainment ☐ Other _____________________________________ ▶ Do you have a financial advisor: ☐ Yes Name of company ____________________________________ ☐ No ▶ Are you living with a chronic condition: ☐ Yes, Please indicate _______________________________ ☐ No ▶ How likely are you to visit a retirement community in the next 6 months, either for yourself or someone else:

☐ Definitely ☐ Likely ☐ Not likely ☐ I live in a retirement community ▶ I plan to make a car purchase: ☐ Next 6 months ☐ Next 2 years ☐ Next 5 years ☐ Never

Please return this survey as soon as possible to Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or take a picture and email it to mte@northwest50plus.com

SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  3


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  HOUSING

Advocates for change By M I C H E L L E T E

STATEWIDE ORGANIZATION HELPS OWNERS IN MARINAS, MOBILE HOME PARKS

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HEN RESIDENTS IN NANCY INGLEHART’S Gresham neighborhood learned their rent would be increasing by $40 a month, they had decisions to make. Would they pay their electric bill, cut down back on medications or skip meals? It was a difficult choice for these homeowners in a mobile park adjusting to the price increase. “I bought my home in 1999, and I’ve been here 20 years,” Inglehart says. “The elderly gentleman who owned the park turned it over to his daughter and son-in-law who lived out of state. They came at us with a heavy hammer, scaring us and making demands.” Inglehart says she understands the interests of a for-profit mobile park, and that the owners want to see income from their investment, “but he didn’t go about it the right way,” she says. “So, I pushed back a little.” Eventually, she found herself in mediation with the park owners, a remedy that didn’t have the outcome she expected. However, it led Inglehart to find a new mission as an advocate. Because of that experience, she’s now on the board of directors for Manufactured Housing-Oregon State Tenants Association (MH-OSTA), as well as a mediator for the city of Gresham. Residents of manufactured homes long have battled their own interests with that of property owners, and often felt they had little recourse. Oregon legislation in the past 10 years has given these homeowners an increased presence, a stronger voice and more rights as homeowners. “We’re an advocacy group for homeowners who live in manufactured home parks,” says Inglehart, OSTA treasurer and board member. “We are protected under ORS Chapter 90 and afforded certain laws that now protect our rights. We provide education, visit parks in Oregon, and talk about the rights and responsibilities of owners and residents.” Individuals who own manufactured homes in parks are considered tenants because they rent the space their home 4  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019

sits on. This is also true for floating homes in marinas, which will be covered by ORS Chapter 90 beginning Jan. 1 due to the passage of SB 586. There are currently 1,900 manufactured home parks in Oregon, consisting of more than 62,000 homes. Although many of these homes are built to be moved, Inglehart says that many are too old and cannot survive being moved, especially those with aluminum wiring. This presents a concern when a park owner decides to sell the property, effectively leaving homeowners in the park without recourse because they can’t move their home to another park, and it can’t be sold because the park is closing. Even more, there have been no new manufactured home parks built in Oregon for many years. SB 586 calls for mandatory mediation between park residents and the park owner. “These homeowners have invested all this money into their homes, the homes can’t be moved, and they have no place to move it to if they could move it,” Inglehart says. “We need to preserve these parks; it’s an affordable lifestyle for seniors, those on fixed incomes, and those with disabilities.” ☸

Do you live in manufactured housing? Manufactured Housing-Oregon State Tenant Association advocates for you

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  SAMARITAN HEALTH

goals for 2020 By A N G E L A S M I T H , C PT, SA M F I T

F

OR MANY OF US, JANUARY IS A TIME TO reflect on the previous year and look forward to what is to come.

Contemplation of the future during the new year is a common, yet troubling proposition. It often brings painful memories of past mistakes and failed resolutions, but by following a few simple steps all year long, you will succeed in achieving your fitness goals in 2020. Perhaps the simplest, yet most effective tool to achieve a New Year’s resolution is to employ a process of gradually challenging standards that are well defined to increase your chances for positive outcomes. In short, set yourself up for success with a bulletproof strategy. 1. Decide where you want to be. Let that sink in for a moment. Where do you really want to be? This means being honest with yourself. What do you want out of the upcoming year? Do you want to run a triathlon, be able to go on a hike with family or friends, or simply feel better? 2. Diversify your goals. Set both process and outcome goals. Process goals are those where you have a high amount of control. For example, aim to have a positive attitude each time you show up at the gym. Outcome goals are those where you have little control. Since outcome goals are normally typified by social comparison, an example would be to win a 5k race. Competitive goals can increase motivation. 3. Attach a time frame. Designate a date by which you will achieve each of your goals and tell a friend, family member or workout partner. Deadlines provide a clearly defined time table to help during periods of waning motivation. 4. Hire a professional. Everyone needs a little expert help once in a while. Consider hiring a personal trainer, dietitian or life coach. From individual training appointments to semi-private sessions and group classes, there is a fitness style for everyone, and learning new techniques can make a big difference in helping you set realistic and attainable goals. 5. It’s all about the journey. Ask any successful individual what they remember the most. Was it the endless nights of practice and preparation honing their skill, or that exact moment in time they finally achieved their goals? The answer may surprise you. Remember, success begins and ends in your personal journey. The end result is simply a product of your journey. There will never be a perfect time. Do not wait for that right moment. It will never come. Sometimes, you must make things happen. Remember, success begins with a single solitary step into the unknown. Embrace it. ☸

The Shedd Institute www.theshedd.org - 541.434.7000

Shedd Theatricals 2019 presents

Dec2 6 -2

A Jazz Kings Christmas 2019 www.theshedd.org

A Holly Jolly Christmas Dec 12 & 15 The Shedd Dec 16 LaSells, Corvallis Dec 17 Jacoby, Roseburg

Coming up next at The Shedd (select)… 12.8 Shedd Choral Society: Gustav Holst Songs 12.10 Mat Kearney (sold out) 12.31 Eugene Opera! Benefit

1.9 1.23 1.25 2.27

Blues Harmonica Blowout Afro-Cuban All Stars John Pizzarelli Lyle Lovett - Acoustic Group

The Shedd Choral Society -

Sundays at 6:30

SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  5


THEATER

SPOTLIGHT YOUR GUIDE TO STAGE ENTERTAINMENT IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY

Majestic Theatre

Keeping spirits bright The holidays are fast approaching and The Majestic Theatre in Corvallis has your entertainment needs covered throughout the month of December. We’ve got “Making Spirits Bright” on Dec. 7, a variety dance concert that features local dance groups. On Dec. 8, our improv comedy friends bring a night of hilarity with “The Improv Jam: A Holiday Special.” After the comedians and dancers shuffle off, one of the biggest nights of The Majestic’s season takes the stage in “The Majestic Holiday Spectacular.” This variety show at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 14 showcases our local artists and helps raise monies toward our fundraising goal. Along with the entertainment, there will be a silent auction and bake sale. This year, the Guardians of The Majestic, an independent group of anonymous donors, pledge to match every dollar donated until our $130,000 goal is met. Every dollar matters, so come on out and support your local arts. Chintimini Brass and Friends brings its holiday concert to the theatre on Dec. 20, performing holiday classics with jazzy flair. And we close out 2019 with an Oscar Wilde classic done in Readers’ Theatre style, “The

Importance of Being Earnest” on Dec. 28 and 29. To get your tickets to all of the shows we’ve mentioned, visit majestic.org or call the box office at 541-738-7469 from noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Friday. ◊

THE HOLIDAYS at the majestic! MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT: A WINTER DANCE CONCERT Dec. 7 at 3:00pm & 7:00pm | Tickets: $13-15 THE IMPROV JAM: A HOLIDAY SPECIAL December 8 at 7:30pm | Tickets: $6 MAJESTIC HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR Dec. 14 at 7:30pm | Tickets: $20 CHINTIMINI BRASS AND FRIENDS Dec. 20 at 7:30pm | Tickets: Prime $17 Non-Prime $13-15 THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST BY OSCAR WILDE DIRECTED BY RICHARD WAGNER | December 28 at 3:00pm December 29 at 3:00pm & 7:00pm |Tickets: $11-13

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Ask about elder--directed living

Call today to schedule a personal visit 541-744-7000

Call today to schedule a personal visit 541-744-7000

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Cottage Theatre

THEATER SPOTLIGHT | SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

All ready for ‘Oliver’ Cottage Theatre concludes its 2019 season with the endearing classic musical about the lovable orphan who dares to utter, “Please, sir, I want some more.” Lionel Bart’s “Oliver!,” based on the novel by Charles Dickens, features a large multi-generational cast led by 12-year-old Creswell resident Audriahna Jones in the title role. The show runs for three weekends in Cottage Grove, Dec. 6-22.

Join young Oliver Twist as he navigates the Victorian London underworld, searching for a home, a family, and — most importantly — for love. “Oliver!” audiences will be the first to try out Cottage Theatre’s new seats, which were installed in November as part of the theatre’s multi-year remodeling project. When the project is fully complete in 2021, Cottage Theatre will have added 50 additional seats, made a variety of technical upgrades, and updated the lobby.

COTTAGE THEATRE

The goals of this bold “ACT III” project are to improve the patron experience, enable Cottage Theatre to serve more people (musicals like “Oliver!” routinely sell-out the current 150-seat capacity), and strengthen the future financial health of the 37-yearold community theatre. “Oliver!” performances begin at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, and at 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are available at cottagetheatre.org or by calling 541-9428001. ◊

2020 Season Tickets NOW

ON SALE

JANUARY 31 – FEBRUARY 16

AUGUST 14 – 30

A tale of merry mayhem and murderous aunts

A playful medley of beloved comic characters

by Joseph Kesselring

Based on the comic strip “Peanuts” by Charles M. Schulz Book, Music, and Lyrics by Clark Gesner

APRIL 3 – 26

OCTOBER 2 – 25

The seductively fun musical sensation

A powerful musical of obsession and redemption

Music and Lyrics by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson

Music by Alan Menken Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz Book by Peter Parnell

And some songs with Stig Anderson, Book by Catherine Johnson, Originally conceived by Judy Craymer

Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney film. Originally developed by Disney Theatrical Productions.

JUNE 5 – 21

DECEMBER 4 – 20

A gripping new drama about truth and identity

A sparkly holiday jingle

by Glenn Rust West Coast

Book by Thomas Meehan and Bob Martin, Music by Matthew Sklar, Lyrics by Chad Beguelin Based on the New Line Cinema film by David Berenbaum

PREMIERE

Seniors (60+) SAVE 30% with season tickets! 700 Village Drive, Cottage Grove Oregon ● 541-942-8001 •

www.cottagetheatre.org SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  7


Helpinghands

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  INNOVATION

By VA N ESSA SA LV I A

IMPROVING THE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM VIA CATHETER HELPS PATIENTS IN MULTIPLE WAYS

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HEN GLENDA DENNIS ARRIVES FOR HER interview, this 70-year-old nurse is, as expected, dressed in scrubs. It’s been her way of life for decades.

Dennis’s commitment to her profession has meant not only treating patients with the highest level of care, she also began practicing a new procedure for inserting PICC lines that she now offers in a mobile service. While working as a nurse at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center in 2008, Dennis became the first person to bring the procedure for inserting peripherally inserted central catheter, or PICC, to the United States. When drugs or medications are delivered, much of the time in a hospital setting, they are administered by standard IV lines which are usually inserted into a vein in your wrist, elbow or the back of a hand. A standard IV line can be kept in place for up to four days, which means that medications can be administered with no more “pokes.” While IVs have advantages that work well for short-term needs for pain medications or antibiotics, they don’t work for long-term drug delivery such as chemotherapy or longterm feeding needs, because the pH of the chemicals that are injected eventually destroys the vein tissue. In this case, the patients receive a central venous catheter (CVC) instead of a standard IV catheter. A CVC is inserted into a vein in your neck, chest, arm or groin area. It can stay in place for several weeks or even months. A PICC has a long line that sends medication from the area of insertion, through your blood vessels, all the way to a vein near your heart. A PICC is typically placed in a vein above your elbow in your upper arm. “The catheter goes to the vena cava, which is the major Glenda Dennis’s commitment to nursing led to an improved procedure for placing PICC lines.

8  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019

circulation point for blood flow to your heart,” Dennis says. “There is enough blood flow there that it dilutes the substance, so it doesn’t mess up a person’s veins.” The placement of catheters was done only by a physician in a hospital setting. In the early 1990s, nurses began performing the procedure, which required the nurse to keep the insertion site sterile while the nurse and the patient waited for the mobile radiology unit to visit the patient’s bedside to show that the catheter was in the right spot. “This was difficult for a few reasons,” Dennis says. “It was more expensive for the patient, it exposed them to more radiation, and the chest X-ray did not always show a very precise location. Also, there was a delay


in getting the patients their medications as we had to wait for the positioning confirmation. This new method changed all that completely.” The new method, which Dennis learned from physician colleague Dr. Peter Rothenberg, utilized a catheter with a small wire on the end of it that transmitted signals from the heart via electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) patterns transmitted through small electrode patches. “By using ECG to place the catheter you could do it bedside without the X-ray and it saved the patient the cost for the radiologist to read it,” Dennis says. “And it’s actually more precise than the chest X-ray because it’s a two-dimensional thing. It saved me a huge amount of time because sometimes I’d stand there for a half hour, 45 minutes, trying to keep the area sterile.” In 2009, Dennis presented her new-found knowledge to the staff at McKenzie-Willamette — with a mixed reception. Some physicians outright discouraged her from sharing this knowledge or using this technique. Dennis didn’t realize it at the time, but she was the first nurse in the United States to use ECG guidance to place PICC lines. Soon, she was inserting PICC lines into the patients of these skeptical doctors, and this placement method has become the new gold standard. “When I realized I was the first I was astounded, but then I was excited because it does so much good for the patient and we can reduce time and money involved in putting in a PICC line and they can stay in for up to two years,” she says.

A family of nurses

Dennis grew up on a dairy farm and her early life might not have seemed like it would lead to this remarkable achievement. Yet, she comes from a family of nurses. “It’s a genetic thing,” she says, with sincerity. Both of her daughters are nurses, P H OTO BY VA N ESSA SA LV I A

along with both grandparents, her mother, her aunt and also an uncle. Dennis’s grandmother, who graduated in 1914, was one of the first registered nurses in the state of Missouri. She met her husband while they both were nurses at the sanitarium (hospital) in that state. Dennis knew from a young age that nursing would be her career. She raised her children while working, which included 25 years in the intensive care unit. At one point she transferred to management, then went back to the ICU after realizing that working directly with patients was what made her happiest. She retired in 2013, and brought together a small team who had expressed interest in her PICC work. Dennis and her colleagues formed a business this past January, delivering these services to a location convenient for patients. Dennis’s daughter, Robyn Smith, also a PICC nurse, came on board. AIMS Vascular Access is named to honor a close friend and fellow nurse, Elizabeth Ames, who passed away without getting to be part of the company. “Elizabeth was a dear friend who had worked with me for many years in the intensive care unit, then joined me in starting the vascular access team,” Dennis says. AIMS contracts with several physicians to do PICCs at their offices, and the physicians they have on staff also refer patients in extended care facilities and in the hospital. They have contracted with several specialty pharmacies who refer patients to them who don’t need to go to a hospital for catheter insertion and infusions. With her interview completed, Dennis packed up and headed back to work— ready to help another patient with a PICC line insertion. “I truly have a passion for the IV therapy and bringing it to the patient, so that patients can stay where they’re comfortable, whether they are in their home, in their doctor’s office or in a hospice setting,” Dennis says. “It feeds me.” ☸

Aims Vascular Access, LLC We provide mobile vascular services

Meeting the needs of our patients in their environment-safely and comfortably

Contact us for more information

541.505.7386 Website: aimsvascularaccess.com

We are a team of medical professionals who work to bring mobile vascular access and other skilled nursing services to patients in Eugene/Springfield and surrounding areas in Oregon.

SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  9


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RETIREMENT LIVING

Housing options By M AG G I W H I T E

WHEN YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE TO MOVE, REFERRAL AGENTS CAN BE YOUR BEST FRIEND

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ITH SO MANY RETIREment housing options, knowing where to begin can be a challenge, especially when searching for adult care homes. There are many resources to help you find what you need. Most of these are trustworthy, some are not. The Oregon Senior Referral Agency Association provides information, education and resources for consumers, senior referral agencies, and companies serving the senior population that do not provide referral services. Consumers may access the site to find accredited referral agencies. Agencies can become members of OSRAA to gain access to more education through networking, workshops and conferences.

Additionally, the website offers insight into current laws regarding adult care, opportunities to post vacancies in adult home care, assisted living, residential care and memory care. OSRAA members work diligently to establish industry standards that protect vulnerable older adults. They have helped pass regulations for long-term care referral agents and ethical standards. For example, they pushed for legislation requiring all referral agencies to register with the Department of Human Services to oversee complaints, give the public a source for complaints and report abuse. “We lobbied from grass roots to state legislature for oversight to protect vulnerable seniors because some communities do not do their jobs,” says Liz Fischer, a certified senior advisor and OSRAA president and founding member. The organization hosts conferences open to both members and the public. Learn more at osraa.com.

Referral services

Fischer owns Right Fit Senior Living Solutions, a senior referral agency, and knows first-hand what is needed to assist in the process of moving from your home to residential care. Referral agents provide a multitude of services, she says, including giving tours of residential care homes and communities, and offering other referrals and resources related to the transition. They are insured and must provide disclosure statements to their clients. Agents do not endorse or

“Most people don’t plan ahead because they don’t want to deal with death. They wait until a crisis and have no time to look at the many options and resources.” LIZ FISCHER CERTIFIED SENIOR ADVISOR

recommend any specific community and do not charge clients for their services. Instead, they are paid by the home or community when a family makes the choice that best fits the needs of their loved ones. Fischer talks of concerned families who independently toured 20 places to find something that fit their needs, “and we could have found them help by visiting one to three.” They also help you locate organizers who assist with downsizing and packing the home before the move; affordable lawyers to create estate plans, advance directives and other necessary documents; and leading you to an accredited claims agent who helps veterans and their families pay for long-term care. Agents can refer clients to nursing and care managers who are advocates for the aging, and can even go with a person to doctor and hospital appointments to ensure they receive the care they need. “We take a lot of stress away by helping families through trying times because we know where to get help for them,” Fischer says. Visit ltcr.oregon.gov/agents to determine whether the agent you are


working with is accredited. Agents help find solutions for people in financial need and have a lot of experience in dealing with stressful situations. Fischer shares the example of a man in his 80s who was left with no place to live because he and his wife sold their home to pay for her care. “Most people don’t plan ahead because they don’t want to deal with death,” Fischer says. “They wait until a crisis and have no time to look at the many options and resources. They don’t know what to ask, what to look for in choosing a community. It is hard to think when the situation hits you in the face without warning.” Unfortunate decisions are often made because the loved one is being released from rehab or a hospital, she says, and must be immediately housed to receive the necessary care. “The process of making a decision in a time of need can be emotionally and physically draining when they run out of money where they are and need to find a new place, move all their belongings and furnish a new place,” Fischer says. Referral agents also have access to a database that informs them of complaints regarding abuse, mismanagement and more. “Our code of ethics requires that we visit all facilities and are aware of state surveys,” Fischer says. “On tour we ask the questions most families do not know to ask and point out things that are important.”

Adult home care

Because of new rules and regulations, adult foster care, also known as adult home care, has become a much more popular and viable care option for older adults. “They provide a homelike environment and the same caregivers are there the entire time whereas in other communities they are there by shifts, day and night,” Fischer says. “Therefore, they notice the little things. They have staff that can treat some things right way and not have you sent to a

hospital or rehab.” There are only five beds in these homes, so the downside is the lack of socialization or activities that larger facilities can provide and that are important elements of care, she says. And even at the cost of $4,500 to $5,000 a month, they usually charge extra for help with taking showers, dealing with incontinence, oxygen and other needs.

Doing it on your own

If you choose to tour communities on your own, Fischer advises looking for cleanliness, smell, whether residents look happy, state records, and whether it just “feels right.” Just because a retirement community looks slick, it doesn’t necessarily offer the care that someone needs. Be sure to understand what the caregiving staff is willing — and not willing — to help with. For more assistance, contact Fischer at RightFitSenior.com or call 503-567-7268. ☸

HOLIDAY STAIRLIFT SALE HAPPENING NOW!

Call us today for your free estimate!

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  PRESERVING MEMORIES

memoir Writing a

By M AG G I W H I T E

YOUR LIFE HAS MEANING

E

VERY ONE OF US HAS A story. Even more, our stories need to be recorded and shared. Do you remember the scene in “The Bridge of Madison County” when the children of Meryl Streep’s character discover a chronicle of her life after she had died? In her memoirs, they learned their mother had a brief interlude with a traveling photographer (played by Clint Eastwood) and they were quick to condemn her. She likely knew her journal would be Retired professor Susan Kirschner says we all have stories inside that need to be written down and shared.

to keep the family together by staying married to a man who needed her? Do memories of the past whisper to you? Does your narrative inspire a memoir? Our lives don’t have to be as dramatic as the story told in “Bridges of Madison County” to be of value to our legacy. Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel once said, “Without memory there is no life.” Michel de Montaigne, a key figure in the French Renaissance believed to be the father of the essay, composed many letters to Étienne de la Boétie, with whom he formed a close and lasting friendship. The death of Boétie left a painful void in Montaigne’s life. It is said Montaigne began writing to Boétie to help him cope with the loss of a friend. He wanted to be known as he really was. Those letters were saved and later published.

Reasons why

Susan Kirschner is retired as a senior lecturer in the humanities department at Lewis and Clark College, where she taught creative nonfiction, including memoirs. She says we record memoirs for a variety of reasons, including to help read, so why do you think she spoke her us overcome and heal events of the truth? past. It gives us perspective when we Perhaps it was to share the reality Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, OR 97321 back. of her life and the sacrifice she made 6500 look www.linnbenton.edu/foundation COLLEGE FOUNDATION LINN-BENTON COMMUNITY

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“Memories can be unreliable,” she says. “Some people check and re-check their recall and talk to people involved, others look up documents that may trigger memories.” Kirschner says it’s helpful to understand how memories work. Implicit memory works in the subconscious, taking in texture, sound, touch of clothes and smells. Explicit memory is in the conscious — it records what you do and feel. “The brain is enormously efficient taking in all stimuli and places that we can retrieve,” Kirschner says. “All we need is a stimulus that triggers a memory, such as the smell of a roast in the oven, things closest to the center in the brain. All senses control memory and if you want you can recover them.” Write a memoir to chronicle the amazing life you’ve led, she says. Write to keep family history alive, to feel heard or to explain certain conflicts from your perspective. It could give your own life more meaning because you share facts of your life that aren’t discussed in the present, for whatever reason. Perhaps you suffer from misunderstandings or regrets and you want to explore your intentions at the time, and you want your memoir to be discovered when you are gone. Writing a memoir gives you an opportunity to imagine your life from another’s point of view. You may wish to control your own narrative and be the primary source of that story, Kirschner says.

a journal about thoughts and feelings that have meaning in your life. “There is no one way to write a memoir or to stimulate memory,” Kirschner says, so if you join a memoir-writing group, don’t be discouraged if someone criticizes you. Their purpose might just be to encourage your efforts. Pick one happening in your life and start writing. Make a list of your early memories. They can help you put your life in order and make sense of it to children and other family members. Intuitively pick one memory and write the story behind the memory. Keep a list of memories recalled as you write. A memoir can give you a sense of purpose when your once active work life is finished. Written memories are immortal. Begin to answer questions about your ancestry, home and family life, education, relationships, children, vocations and words of wisdom. See page 14 for more specifics. ☸

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How do you get started? “Start writing,” she says. “As you write you could remember more and more. Ask a sibling or other family member their memories and in time a narrative will unfold. He or she could have a totally different perspective.” Perhaps a friend could describe a room, or what was going on at a particular time. “Writing has the power to be intimate but distant,” Kirschner says. “When you know who you are, you are not lonely.” Keep notes, tickets to events and places you’ve been. Keep

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SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  13


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  PRESERVING MEMORIES

T

Ask yourself ...

RENA CLELAND IS A PERsonal historian in Eugene who helps individuals and families write life stories, compile family histories, create legacy books, and more. She offers these topics to help get the gears of your memory in motion.

Ethnic identity, ancestry, heritage

▶ Where did your ancestors come from? How, when and why did they emigrate to the United States? ▶ What do you remember about your grandparents? ▶ What were your parents like? Describe each of them. ▶ What were some of the prevailing attitudes and beliefs in your family?

Home and family life

▶ Describe your childhood home and neighborhood. ▶ Who was in your household, including pets? What do you remember

about your toys and games? Did you have chores? ▶ What were some typical meals (and do you have favorite recipes)? How were holidays celebrated? Did your family go on vacations?

years of your relationship. ▶ When and where were your children born? How did you choose their names? ▶ Describe the personalities of your children. What are you proud of?

Education/schooling

Vocations and avocations

▶ Did you like going to grade school? Any favorite teachers? ▶ How did you get there? What did you wear? Did you take your lunch? ▶ When you were in high school, what was going on in the world? ▶ Did you play sports or an instrument? As a youngster, what were your interests?

Courtship, marriage and children

▶ At what age did you being dating? What did people do on dates? ▶ How did you and your spouse meet? ▶ What did you love most about your spouse when you met? Describe your wedding, if you had one, and the early

▶ What were some of your early jobs? Which jobs have been the best fit? ▶ Do you have favorite hobbies?

Other memories and reflections

▶ How has the world changed from the time you were a child? ▶ Do you have a spiritual or religious path that is meaningful to you? ▶ What family heirlooms do you possess? ▶ Are there family traditions you would like to see carried on?

Visit trenacleland.com for more questions and assistance in recording your personal history. ☸

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14  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019


3

Tips

For avoiding that 2. dreaded holiday weight gain

B y M AC I E L E A

T

HE HOLIDAY SEASON IS UPON US. FOR many, this means baking, shopping, decorating and social gatherings as well as many other opportunities to enjoy seasonal treats. With the business of the season, many people start skipping their workouts. They also tend to eat out more. All this can lead to holiday weight gain. But holiday weight gains are avoidable, as long as you have a plan. Here are three tips to help you walk into the New Year ahead of everyone else. Drink your water With the colder weather, hot chocolate and flavored coffees start sounding tempting to our tastebuds. The average 16-ounce flavored coffee has 400 calories and 43 grams of

1.

sugar. This is the same amount of sugar in a 16-ounce soft drink. Most of us don’t drink enough water in the winter months which can lead to dehydration. So instead of ordering a sweet treat opt for a glass of water or tea. Schedule your workouts With our busy schedules between work, shopping, decorating, and holiday festivities our workouts are often skipped this time of year. Regularly engaging in a complete workout, including cardio and strength training can help avoid the extra pounds by burning those calories. Muscle is the most metabolically active tissue in the body, so be sure to schedule your workouts. This is an appointment so be sure to treat it like a doctor’s appointment or meeting with your boss. Carve out some “me” time It is easy to get lost in the holiday rush. Each year there seems to be a million things to do and not enough time to do them all. This can leave you feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Our body’s natural response to stress is to release a hormone called cortisol, which helps the body store fat. People also tend to reach for comfort foods when their stress levels rise. Great ways to reduce stress (without food) are taking a bubble bath, taking your dog for a walk, and reading a book. ☸

3.

(Macie Lea is operations senior manager of science and programs at Curves in Eugene.)

SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  15


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YARD & GARDEN

Holiday arrangements

By G RAC E P E T E R S O N

BRING OUT THE RED AND GREEN IN YOUR HOLIDAY DECORATING

A

NOTHER GARDENING year is behind us. Isn’t it true that the older we get, the faster time flies? But the news is not all negative. There is an upside to this whole speed of time deal, especially when it comes to gardening. I like to arrange a green and red centerpiece for my dining room table and maybe one or two more for gifts or for other spots in the house. Clipping greens from my garden saves me money and guarantees freshness. As much as possible, I will make inconspicuous cuts on my conifers and broadleaf evergreens such as boxwood or camellia and whatever else strikes my fancy. I’ll also snip some berries

to add to my arrangements. Once I’ve gathered everything, I’ll bring it indoors for arranging. The only caveat to making holiday arrangements is that some of the plants we choose could be toxic and harmful or deadly if ingested by children or pets. Although I don’t have dogs, I have four indoor cats that — fortunately — don’t seem interested in snacking on my arrangements. One of my favorite shrubs to grow for berries is a small China rose called “Angel Wings.” (Rosa chinensis ‘Angel Wings’). I first laid eyes on it many summers ago while touring a florist’s garden. It had hundreds of the cutest pink, dime-sized flowers blooming in terminal clusters above disease resistant foliage. The florist told me that despite its summer allure, she was growing angel wing rose for the bee-sized, deep red hips it produces in fall. And then she

surprised me by telling me that she grew her rose bush from seed. Sure enough, I bought seed and it germinated within weeks and grew quickly. The hips start out green, morph to orange and finally to deep red. Perfectly winter hardy here in the Pacific Northwest, the plant stays small, only topping out at approximately two feet tall and two feet wide. I have mine in a large container, but it works just as well as an in-ground planting, close to the front of the border. And maybe the best news is that the rosehips are not toxic to animals so we can bring it indoors without risk of poisoning our furbabies. There are many websites that provide good information on plants toxic to dogs and cats. One that I found helpful is The Spruce Pets. (thesprucepets.com/ poisonous-holiday-plants-3385528) If you are at all concerned, it’s a good idea to do your research.☸

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December 2019 THINGS TO EXPERIENCE BEFORE THE NEW YEAR

1 — (THROUGH DEC. 31) DONATE

President St., Eugene. Free.

TO THE EUGENE SYMPHONY GUILD’S “NON-EVENT,” with the goal to raise $7,000. Visit eugenesymphonyguild.org for details.

(THROUGH DEC. 8) HOLIDAY BOOK SALE, Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis.

(THROUGH JAN. 1) PASTEGA CHRISTMAS LIGHT DISPLAY, 5 to 10 p.m., Benton County Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53rd St., Corvallis. Canned food donations taken.

WINTER’S EVE CORVALLIS, 5 to 9 p.m., Madison Avenue between 2nd and 3rd streets. Benefits Assistance League of Corvallis. $40+. Assistanceleague.org.

TRADITIONAL JAZZ SOCIETY OF OREGON, Storyville Jazz Band, noon to 4:30 p.m., Springfield Elks, 1701 Centennial Blvd.

and Pakistani modern and traditional music, 7:30 p.m., Tsunami Books, 2585 Willamette St., Eugene. CORVALLIS COMMUNITY BAND HOLIDAY CONCERT, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church Community Center, 1165 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. Free. EUGENE SPRINGFIELD COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA CONCERT, 4 p.m., Springfield High School. Escorchestra.org.

9 — CATARACT AND YOUR EYES,

3 — MOSSBACKS VOLKSSPORT

2 p.m., Campbell Community Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Free. Getrec.org.

CLUB, 9:45 a.m., JC Thriftway Market, 336 NE US-20 Business, Toledo. Mossbacks.org for more December walks.

11 — HOLIDAY LUNCHEON, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Campbell Community Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $6. Getrec.org to register.

4 — FUN FUNCTIONAL FITNESS, 3 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, Newport 60+ Activity Center. Newportoregon.gov/sc.

14

LEARN MORE ABOUT ALZHEIMER’S, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. CORK’S CREW, 6 to 8 p.m., The Embers, 1811 Hwy. 99N, Eugene. (ALSO DEC. 18) DANCSING THE DIVINE DRAGON, 6:30 p.m., Knights of Pythias Hall, Eugene. $5-$20 donation. Mike Meyer, 541-222-0632.

6 — (THROUGH DEC. 10)

SATURDAY

HOLIDAY PIE SALE Kiwanis Club of Corvallis Sunrisers Club annual frozen holiday pie sales, noon to 5:30 p.m., in a new yellow trailer, corner of 9th and Circle, Corvallis. Cash/check only. Sale ends Dec. 24.

7 — CASCADIA QUEST’S FIFTH

CORVALLIS NATIVITY FESTIVAL, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 4141 NW Harrison Blvd., Corvallis. Free. Features Heart of the Valley Children’s Choir.

ANNUAL SEASON OF LIGHT, “An Evening on the Wild Path: Medicine Stories for Our Time,” 7 to 9 p.m., WOW Hall, 291 W. 8th Ave., Eugene. $10+. Bespacepdx.com.

CORVALLIS-OSU SYMPHONY HOLIDAY CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. $22+. Cosusymphony.org.

EUGENE HOTEL ANNUAL HOLIDAY BAZAAR AND HIGH TEA, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., 222 E. Broadway, Eugene. Free. 541-343-8574.

(THROUGH DEC. 8) EUGENE COMMUNITY CRECHE EXHIBIT, 5-9 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday, 3-8 p.m. Sunday, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1155

HOLIDAY GREENS DECORATIONS SALE, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Eugene Garden Clubhouse, 1645 High St., Eugene. 541-485-5772.

8 — KIRAN AHLUWALIA, Indian

18  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019

FALL PREVENTION, 12:30 p.m., Brookdale Heritage Plaza, Albany.

13 — HILLTOP BIG BAND, 7:30 p.m., The Old World Deli, Corvallis. (ALSO DEC. 20) PRESTON AND GWEN, 6:30 p.m., Eugene Elks.

16 — LANE COUNTY CHAPTER, NARFE, noon, Sizzler Restaurant, 1010 Postal Way, Springfield.

18 — SHOULDER PAIN, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. Free. 19 — HOLIDAY BANQUET, noon, Albany Senior Center, 11:30 a.m., 489 Water Ave. NW. $14. 541-917-7760.

20 — CAMPBELL BRIDGE TOURNAMENT, 12:30 to 4 p.m., Campbell Community Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $7. Getrec.org. 31 — THE LAST POOL GAME OF THE YEAR, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Campbell Community Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Free. Getrec.org. ☸ Submissions for January events due Dec. 6 to mte@northwest50plus. com.


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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RETIREMENT LISTINGS

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adopt me DUCK

The Cat Rescue and Adoption Network presents Duck, a fluffy little black-and-white tuxedo female kitty about 5 years old. She’s a sweet and affectionate girl who loves to snuggle, and once you sit down, she will jump into your lap purring and making biscuits. She will need a quiet home with someone who is gentle and understanding. Duck has tested positive for FIV (the feline immunodeficiency virus), but she is in excellent health, and FIV kitties can live a normal lifespan with good

care as indoor-only cats. The virus can’t be passed to dogs or to people, and only to other cats through a deep bite wound — thus Duck should be an only cat (which she prefers). She is spayed, up to date on vaccinations, microchipped, has been defleaed and dewormed, and is negative for Felv. Her adoption fee is $60, which allows us to continue to provide care for other kittens and cats in need. To meet Duck, please call 541-2254955 option 1 or send an email to adoptinfo@CatRescues.org. ☸

Creating envionments

Creating envionments where moments of joy,

where moments of joy,

Benton Health Center 530 NW 27th Street Corvallis, OR 97330 541-766-6835 East Linn Health Center 100 Mullins Drive, A-1 Lebanon, OR 97355 541-451-6920 Monroe Health Center 610 Dragon Drive Monroe, OR 97456 541-847-5143 Alsea Rural Health Center 435 E. Alder Street Alsea, OR 97324 541-487-7116 Lincoln Health Center 121 SE Viewmont Avenue Corvallis, OR 97333 541-766-3546 Sweet Home Health Center 799 Long Street Sweet Home, OR 97386 541-367-3888

independence, andand independence,

wellness are focus the focus wellness are the each and every day. each and every day. Creating envionments

where moments of joy,

independence, and

wellness are the focus each and every day.

Contact us for more information or to schedule a private tour today!

Contact us for more information or to schedule a private tour today! Contact us for more information

Accepting New Medicare Patients www.bentonlinnhealthcenters.org

or to schedule a private tour today!

Hours vary by location please call for an appointment.

SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  21


The Jewelry Girl, llc Lisa Russell 541-556-9598 Free Appraisals ... I’ll come to you

BUY & SELL Gold • Silver Costume Jewelry Men’s Jewelry Scrap Gold & Silver Pieces & Parts Even Junk

PUZZ L E A G E Christmas

25 years+ experience

2001 Franklin, #3 • Eugene

Donate your Vehicle Locally!

• All procceds stay in the local community • We accept cars, trucks, RVs, running or not.

Cars for a Cause

888-227-8223 22  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY 

JACK FROST ANGEL CHRISTMAS SNOWFLAKE GIFTS PRESENTS

FAMILY SCROOGE MERRY MANGER CRACKERS GRINCH

JOLLY FRIENDS TREE CANDY CANES

© thewordsearch.com PLAY THIS PUZZLE ONLINE AT: HTTP://THEWORDSEARCH.COM/PUZZLE/124/


Classifieds UNITS FOR RENT HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities is currently accepting applications for our one bedroom waiting list. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Briarwood Manor, 643 Manbrin, Keizer, OR 97303, 541928-2545.

MISCELLANEOUS NEED A WILL? CALL Sal Catalano, “The Lawyer That Makes House Calls,” for an appointment in your home. 541-525-2884. Powers of Attorney-Advance DirectivesTrusts. www.CatalanoLawPC.com.

WANTED BASEBALL & SPORTS MEMORABILIA wanted. Buying old cards, pennants, autographs, photographs, tickets, programs, Pacific Coast League, etc. Alan, 503-481-0719.

CASH FOR GOOD CONDITION reloading equipment & supplies. 541-905-5453. WANTED: MOTORHOME OR TRAILER.  Must be 1995 or newer. I have CASH. If needs work, that’s ok. 503-269-2947. CASH FOR PRE 1980  sport & non-sport cards, model kits, comic books, pre 1960’s magazines. Private collector. 503-3137538. DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED.  Paying top dollar! Free local pickup. Call Sharon, 503-679-3605.

FRIENDSHIP ADS CUTE, SPOILED, PETITE LADY, age 71, would like to meet a kind and congenial true gentleman. W, C, N/S and N/D. Salem area please. #5741 WWM, 84, SEEKING A WF  for a companion friendship relationship. I am a Christian and belong to The Salvation Army Church. Would like a N/D and N/S. #5742

CLASSIFIED AD RATES PRIVATE PARTY 

25

$

Up to 20 words. $1.75 per extra word.

COMMERCIAL, REAL ESTATE 

50

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

CEMETERY PLOTS 

60

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

FRIENDSHIP ADS 

40

$

Up to 30 words.

HOW TO SUBMIT AN AD: Mail your verbiage with payment to: Northwest50Plus, P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or email to classifieds@Northwest50Plus.com or call 1-877-357-2430.

*Punctuation not included in word count. Phone numbers count as 1 word. Ad must be in our office by the 6th of the month PRIOR to publication. Ads cover Vancouver, WA to Lane County.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this magazine is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

FRIENDSHIP AD ABBREVIATIONS M = Male F = Female S = Single D = Divorced W = White A = Asian

B = Black H = Hispanic J = Jewish C = Christian N/S = Non-smoker

N/D = Non-drinker ISO = In Search Of LTR = Long Term Relationship

WW = Widowed White WB = Widowed Black WA = Widowed Asian

WH = Widowed Hispanic LGBT= Lesbian/Gay/ Bisexual/Transgender

TO RESPOND TO A FRIENDSHIP AD:

Write the number of the ad you are responding to on the OUTSIDE of the envelope and mail to: Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309. SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  23


24  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  DECEMBER 2019

Profile for Northwest50Plus

Northwest50Plus Lane December 2019 edition  

Northwest50Plus Lane December 2019 edition  

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