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Community Planning & Urban Design


NV5 is a provider of technical consulting services, offering solutions for public and private infrastructure, real estate, and the environment. NV5 plans, designs, and manages the construction of the built fabric of our communities: buildings, infrastructure and the public and private open spaces that bind it all together. Offering broad, interdisciplinary services and expertise to our clients, and with our personal and professional commitment to the places where we live and work, we operate beyond engineering. We anticipate changes and uncover trends to identify new opportunities for investment. Deploying our broad capabilities to provide creative and sustainable solutions, we work across the country, with our offices and staff being the local links to the communities and regions we serve.

Community Planning & Urban Design NV5’s Community Planning & Urban Design professionals understand both the challenges and rewards of planning for the future. Community Planning starts with understanding the civic framework of a place—the agencies, organizations, institutions, and residents that shape places. It means working collaboratively with public and private stakeholders that make things happen. Planning entails substantive engagement to learn how people and institutions value places; to identify their expectations, aspirations, and concerns; and to communicate and clarify objectives and possible results. We engage public and private stakeholders through various media and generate clear, compelling visuals to communicate findings, ideas, strategies, and concepts and to generate excitement about the future. We view Urban Design as a process of understanding, organizing, and shaping the relationships between buildings, streets, open spaces, landscape elements, and natural features to create successful places and re-energize communities. The principles of urban design operate within all place types, from rural to metropolitan. Urban design is a multidisciplinary effort; we work collaboratively with architects, engineers, landscape architects, economists, and other technical and creative professionals to uncover new paths and possibilities.


Table of Contents Visioning & Master Plans

2

Neighborhood Plans

5

Redevelopment Plans

8

Plans for the Public Realm

11

Mobilize to Thrive

14

Rewriting the Rules

17

Civic Engagement

20

The Community Planning & Urban Design Team

24

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A roundtable group at a citywide visioning workshop in West Haven, CT


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Depiction of traffic improvements along Market Street in Old City Philadelphia

Visioning & Master Plans The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision. — Helen Keller


Downtown Westport Master Plan Town of Westport, CT Westport’s downtown has evolved from a local civic and commercial town center into a destination that attracts visitors from across the region for its small town character, picturesque riverfront, and upscale offerings. With several new development projects underway, Westport wanted to know: How much more activity can downtown handle? Where should the town begin to reinvest in its infrastructure? How should investments be coordinated and managed? What values and goals should guide these investments? NV5 staff led a multi-faceted public outreach campaign that resulted in key values that guided the development of the plan and the discussion of specific ideas and concepts for downtown through town-wide events open to the public. The resulting plan serves as a guide for future public and private investments in downtown. The town has since formed a committee that has been working to implement the projects identified in the plan. COLLABORATORS

NV5 Landscape Architecture and Traffic, Transportation & Mobility

“Your firm has done a remarkable job of preparing a plan that I believe will guide future actions of the City and help to market its unique attributes. Thank you for your attention to detail and the needs of the community. - First Selectman Jim Marpe

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A Vision for Downtown Wyandanch Town of Babylon, NY - Wyandanch, NY Wyandanch is a suburban Long Island hamlet located less than an hour’s commute from Manhattan by train. The Town of Babylon saw the land located around the Wyandanch LIRR rail station as a strong opportunity to turn around the hamlet’s fortunes while also creating a real “place.” The initiative, dubbed “Wyandanch Rising,” aimed to transform an underdeveloped downtown area into a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly, mixed use neighborhood, with rail access being the catalyst for change. NV5 produced a concept plan for a downtown that incorporated mixed-use development, structured parking, traffic and transit enhancements, streetscape improvements, and pedestrian and bicycle accommodations. A public plaza would be located near the station, with new buildings lining one side of this open space. The plan has since been advanced to preliminary and final design and a developer has already completed several construction projects. COLLABORATORS

NV5 Engineering (Civil) and Landscape Architecture


Master Plan City of Englewood, NJ NV5 (formerly Brown & Keener) led an extensive visioning process to develop a new master plan for this diverse city located across the Hudson River from Manhattan. Downtown is one of the focal points of the plan, which recommends overhauling the zoning to permit residential development on upper floors. With the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail slated to extend into Englewood, the plan presents concepts to guide development around the proposed stations. The plan also presents a contemporary vision for the South Englewood industrial area and, in the circulation element, uses the framework presented in the Smart Transportation Guidebook (NJDOT/PennDOT) to identify roadway types. The Master Plan served as the basis for an almost complete rewriting and re-characterization of zoning and zoning districts in the city, which stimulated several significant real estate development projects in downtown and in other parts of the city.

Recipient of a New Jersey Planning Officials (NJPO) Award

COLLABORATORS Regional Plan Association

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Plan of Conservation & Development City of West Haven, CT

Your firm has done a remarkable job of preparing a plan that I believe will guide future actions of the City and help to market its unique attributes. Thank you for your attention to detail and the needs of the community. - Assistant Planner David Killeen

Despite having a beautiful coastline, a picturesque downtown with a large green, and quiet residential neighborhoods, the City of West Haven has been struggling to stimulate redevelopment, especially of several vacant and marginal properties adjacent to the beach. The process of producing a new master plan, called a Plan of Conservation & Development (POCD) in CT, was an opportune moment to come up with strategies for reviving the city’s economy. NV5 led a year-long process to create a POCD for West Haven. The plan is structured around the city’s primary areas of economic development, which includes, among them the beachfront and the Allingtown section, which is home to the University of New Haven, where there are several private development projects underway. This first of two main sections of the plan is called “Plans for Places.” The thrust of the second main section of the plan, called “Making Connections,” is to improve multi-modal connections among the city’s economic engines, or “places.”


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Houses in the Mt. Airy section of Philadelphia

Neighborhood Plans The American Dream starts with neighborhoods. — Harvey Milk


Old City Vision 2026 Old City District - Philadelphia, PA Philadelphia is growing for the first time in decades. Greater Center City is leading that growth and the Old City neighborhood is full of opportunity for current and future residents, workers, and visitors, alike. Such opportunity comes with growing pains and the need to make important decisions about the future. NV5 prepared a plan for Old City envisions public and private investment over the next decade. It is called “Version 1.0” to suggest that it is a living document that should be adapted over time. The plan includes a broad vision for highest and best uses in subdistricts and corridors; a “civic checklist” for considering proposed development; recommendations for street life, public realm, and connectivity improvements; and strategies and site-specific approaches for rehabilitation or infill of critical development sites. COLLABORATORS NV5 Traffic, Transportation & Mobility + Atkin Olshin Schade Architects Vision 2026 is “a profound shift in thinking” - Inga Saffron in The Philadelphia Inquirer

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Mt. Airy 2025 Mt. Airy USA - Philadelphia, PA Mt. Airy USA, a community development corporation, embarked on a collaborative effort with neighborhood partners, funded by a grant from the Wells Fargo Regional Foundation, to create a multi-faceted neighborhood plan. Dubbed “Mt. Airy 2025,” the plan includes a 10-year vision for the future of the neighborhood along with implementation goals for the first 5 years. It identifies and prioritizes neighborhood revitalization strategies and provides a timetable for implementation. The plan became part of an application for implementation funds. NV5 designed and deployed the public engagement process, which included a logo design, a website, several public workshops, and a series of task force meetings on specific topics. NV5 also conducted a cursory physical assessment of housing conditions and advised on topics related to senior living, community safety and placemaking, homes and housing, and youth engagement. Mt. Airy USA has since been awarded a $1 million implementation grant. COLLABORATORS Urban Partners


Housing (cont.)

Powelton Village “Directions” Neighborhood Plan

GREAT BLOCKS “great blocks” are blocks that tend to retain the historical integrity of the neighborhood through the preservation of historic architecture and a clear dedication to building and property maintenance. typically occupied by homeowners or homeowners who have one or more tenants, these blocks create a core district in the heart of the neighborhood. many residents consider these blocks to epitomize the “village in the city” character that makes Powelton such a beautiful place to live.

University City District & Powelton Village Civic Association - Philadelphia, PA Powelton Village is an historic West Philadelphia neighborhood located next to an expanding Drexel University. Residents have been struggling to preserve the physical and social qualities that make Powelton Village such a remarkable place. While the neighborhood has many spectacular historic homes and diligent homeowners, it also has many deteriorated homes carved up for college students into rental units that are typically bereft of basic upkeep and owned by absentee landlords. NV5 (formerly Brown & Keener) produced a plan that recommends strategies for promoting homeownership and better maintenance practices. It is also holistic in its approach to neighborhood preservation and improvement; it presents strategies for bringing more resources to improve neighborhood schools and ways to improve the adjacent Lancaster Avenue commercial corridor. COLLABORATORS Urban Partners

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BLOCKS ON THE FRINGE “blocks on the Fringe” represent blocks located at Powelton’s physical border and a hypothetical tipping point. these blocks are located at transition zones into neighboring communities and institutions, and have come to define what many perceive to be Powelton Village. blank walls, clearly visible service entrances and parking lots, and a much higher degree of rental units than the “great blocks” are commonplace in many of these blocks. with the exception of the fraternities and sororities on Powelton avenue and on 34th Street, investors who defer necessary maintenance and upkeep of these historic buildings are the primary owners of these homes. as a result, these blocks paint a poor portrait of Powelton Village and do not fairly represent the true quality of Powelton’s core. these blocks are far from lost and with proper upkeep and meaningful investments in the public realm, a transition from the fringe to becoming “great blocks” can begin.

BLOCKS AT RISK block type

adjacent Streets

drexel-Owned buildings Block-by-block Analysis of Powelton’s Housing

“blocks at risk” are blocks that have undergone a profound and rapid change from owner-occupied residences to investor-owned properties. these blocks are at serious risk for redevelopment, be it by drexel University or property management companies looking to make a profit renting to students. given the proximity of these blocks to drexel University, the likelihood of these blocks being developed into student-oriented housing is eminent. additionally, drexel University is already the primary landowner and has incorporated some of these blocks into future development plans. the PVca should actively pursue measures to preserve historic housing in these blocks, such as deed restrictions and negotiations with drexel and investors to rehabilitate poorly maintained homes.

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Route 9 Innovation District Plan New Castle County, DE NV5 staff worked with the New Castle County Dept. of Community Services’ Community Development & Housing office to prepare a neighborhood revitalization concept for a traditionally underserved, unincorporated section of the county. NV5 defined a district of more than 200 acres that includes the site of the County Library & Innovation Campus, a catalytic investment that serves as the center of the proposed Route 9 Innovation District. Among the overarching goals of the concept are to improve neighborhood services through commercial redevelopment and create senior housing to allow for “aging in place.” The idea for the revitalization concept comes from Plainsboro, NJ where a town green was created in front of the library around which new mixed-use buildings were constructed, creating a feeling of a commercial and civic center. COLLABORATORS Marcus Reinvestment Strategies


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A redevelopment concept and phasing plan for Bensalem Township, PA

Redevelopment Plans The secret of change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old, but on building the new. — Dan Millman


Transit-Oriented Development Project Bensalem Township, PA Located just north of Philadelphia, Bensalem Township has two stations along the Trenton line of the SEPTA Regional Rail system. The areas around the stations are the subject of Bensalem 2018: River Renaissance in New Bensalem Master Plan and Regulating Code. The focus of the plan was to present a predictable process to guide parcel transactions and redevelopment. To support a market analysis and financial feasibility study, NV5 staff examined site constraints and opportunities for mixed-use redevelopment for station area parcels and for transportation improvements. The team determined the appropriate balance of components, proposing several types of residential and commercial development along with alternative roadway designs. NV5 also calculated cost information for infrastructure investments for each phase of the project. COLLABORATORS NV5 Engineering (Civil) + 4ward Planning

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Webster Street Block Redevelopment Norwalk Redevelopment Auth. - City of Norwalk, CT South Norwalk comes alive at night as people from around the region flock to its art galleries, restaurants, and historic buildings and streets. The city carefully manages parking in order to accommodate daytime users, nighttime visitors, and the transition in between. Many people use the Webster Lot, a surface lot located behind Main Street, which is part of a group of properties called the Webster Street Block. Norwalk tasked NV5 to update a prior master plan to envision a future where the entire block is redeveloped to include structured parking and a grand new gateway transit-oriented development. The resulting concept plan negotiates the need to provide parking with the phasing of construction. The concept would be achieved in two phases, with an initial structure coupled with limited mixed-use development. Once operational, the new garage would accommodate demand so that the remaining surface parking can be removed incrementally as construction begins on subsequent phases. COLLABORATORS 4ward Planning + Level G Associates


South Bethlehem Eastern Gateway Redevelopment City of Bethlehem, PA The Eastern Gateway section of Bethlehem’s South Side neighborhood is at the nexus of a greenway, a skate park, two major roadways, a residential neighborhood, and the new Sands Casino built at the former home of Bethlehem Steel. NV5 staff advanced design concepts prepared during a previous visioning process for the Eastern Gateway. While NV5’s landscape architects and environmental graphics partner collaborated to design the streetscape and architectural gateway treatments, planners and architects worked with a real estate market analyst to prepare redevelopment concepts for several adjacent sites. NV5 reviewed the city’s zoning code to inform the conceptual site plans and prepared preliminary architectural layout and massing alternatives. The conceptual illustrations also show new traffic calming measures, streetscape elements, and environmental graphics. COLLABORATORS 4ward Planning 10

Waterbury Active Transportation & Economic Resurgence Project (WATER) City of Waterbury, CT NV5 developed an ambitious urban waterfront and downtown revitalization plan for this Connecticut city, which was submitted to USDOT/FHWA for a 2014 TIGER grant. Along with a 30-page application, NV5 produced renderings, illustrations, preliminary design plans, construction cost estimates, environmental screening, and economic analysis. The work supported a proposed $19.5 million award for a planned $30 million capital project to build the second phase of a waterfront greenway trail and several strategic inland infrastructure upgrades. These include reconstructed “complete streets” and a new bridge for pedestrians and bicycles. Waterbury was awarded the TIGER grant, after which NV5 started final design, NEPA analysis, and construction administration related for the transformation of streets in the waterfront and downtown.

Recipient of a TIGER Grant

COLLABORATORS NV5 Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Traffic, Transportation & Mobility


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Photo simulation of Main Street in the Manayunk section of Philadelphia

Plans for the Public Realm In every detail a city should reflect that human beings are sacred and that they are equal. — Enrique Peùalosa


CIVIC CORE / SOUTH GATEWAY

CIVIC CORE / SOUTH GATEWAY

COMMUNITY SHOPPING ZONE

SUNSET PARK

Main Street Redevelopment Plan

NORTH GATEWAY

NORTH GATEWAY

City of Asbury Park, NJ REPRESENTATIVE PLAN DRAWING

City Limits to Springwood Ave

Springwood Ave to Summerfield Ave

Summerfield Ave to 5th Ave

5th Ave to Sunset Ave

CART WAY

STREETSCAPE

REPRESENTATIVE CROSS SECTION DRAWING (shows only half of the street)

SIDEWALK

min. 10 ft.

min. 14 ft.; patterned

min. 12 ft

min. 5 ft

GRASS VERGE

n/a

n/a

n/a

min. 4 ft.

STREET TREES

30 ft. o.c.; London planetree

30 ft. o.c.; London planetree

30 ft. o.c.; green ash or honey locust

n/a

STREET LIGHTS

n/a

60 ft. o.c.; post-top

60 ft. o.c.; post-top

60 ft. o.c.; post-top Y

BENCHES

n/a

Y

n/a

TRASH RECEPTACLES

Y

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BICYCLE RACKS

n/a

Y

Y

n/a

BUS SHELTERS

n/a

Y

Y

n/a

PARKING LANE

n/a

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8 ft.

8 ft.

BICYCLE LANE

5 ft.

5 ft.

5 ft.

5 ft.

TRAVEL LANE

11 ft.

11 ft.

11 ft.

11 ft.

ROADWAY MEDIAN

MEDIAN TREATMENT

EDEVELOPMENT PLAN

14 ft. Raised planted (native grasses/shrubs)

Double-arm roadway lights

14 ft. Raised planted (native grasses/shrubs)

Double-arm roadway lights Banners

14 ft.

10 ft.

Pavement markings to denote possible loading zone

Raised planted (trees/grass); hackberry and tupelo

If the waterfront is the heart of this storied seaside city, then Main Street is its spine. Asbury Park’s principal thoroughfare, Main Street is a gateway into the city and to the waterfront. It also serves as a transit Sunset Ave to Seventh Ave hub, a focal point for government and civic activity, and a neighborhood shopping district. The need to expand the municipal building, capitalize on the presence of a train station, and encourage reinvestment along min. 8 ft. Main Street prompted TBD the city to explore the redevelopment process min. 4 ft. TBD within the Main Street corridor. In New Jersey, the redevelopment 30 ft. o.c.; London planetree TBD 60 ft. o.c.; post-top n/a process allows for thinking strategically about not only the development, n/a use,n/a design, and siting of buildings, but also about the design of streets Y n/a and Ystreetscapes. NV5 n/a (formerly Brown & Keener) created several new n/a character-based zoningn/a districts within the Main Street corridor and 8 ft. TBD recommended corresponding changes and enhancements to the con5 ft. TBD 11 ft. TBD figuration of the street and the streetscape. 10 ft.

COLLABORATORS

Raised planted (native grasses/ shrubs)

TBD TBD

Urban Partners + Charles Carmalt ASBURY PARK MAIN STREET REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

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Public Infrastructure Prioritization Study Borough of Berwick, PA With many miles of streets and a limited pool of funds to repair and refresh them, this central Pennsylvania community needed to assess the condition of its infrastructure and prioritize streets and sections of streets to target for reinvestment. NV5 (formerly Brown & Keener) developed criteria for assessing the conditions of the Borough’s sidewalk, curbs, curb ramps, and street trees, and worked with an engineering firm to develop criteria for assessing the conditions of streets. Field assessments were conducted on iPads and iPhones equipped with Cartographica, a GIS software for designed for Macs. The results provided the Borough with a series of maps that served as clear and vivid decisionmaking tools for identifying priority street segments for repair. COLLABORATORS URS Corporation (now AECOM)


Design of the Spring Garden Street Connector Delaware River Waterfront Corp. - Philadelphia, PA The Delaware River Waterfront Master Plan identified critical streets that connect people to the waterfront that merit special treatment. One of these “connector� streets is Spring Garden Street. NV5 designed streetscape improvements to this street between 2nd Street and Columbus Boulevard. The design widens sidewalks and introduces street trees, attractive pavement materials, benches, decorative lighting elements with flags and banners, and wayfinding signs. Decorative architectural lighting was also added under the highway overpass, where there is a SEPTA Transit Station entrance. COLLABORATORS NV5 Engineering (Civil) and Landscape Architecture

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Spring Garden Street SEPTA Station Public Art & Lighting Delaware River Waterfront Corp. - Philadelphia, PA As part of the Spring Garden Street Connector project, NV5 led the design of an installation that has transformed a long, dark tunnel under I-95 through which the street passes. At the center of the tunnel is the SEPTA Spring Garden station entrance. NV5 developed the design concept and coordinated the work of lighting and graphic designers and engineers. The computer-controlled lighting design welcomes SEPTA station users and also provides a much more welcoming passage to connect pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists to the neighborhoods on either side of the tunnel. COLLABORATORS NV5 Landscape Architecture + Cloud Gehshan + The Lighting Practice


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A street cross-section diagram from the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway Master Plan

Mobilize to Thrive Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. — H.G. Wells


Downtown Mobility & Parking Action Plan Village of Port Chester, NY NV5 studied the thriving downtown section of this Westchester County community to assess and enhance the mobility of all modes of transportation. With a Metro North train station, a thriving evening and weekend economy, and several new developments underway, the Village wanted to ensure that its downtown can accommodate all modes of travel and that parking is adequately supplied and managed. NV5 recommended a range of short- and long-term circulation and parking strategies and a comprehensive plan of action for all modes. The bicycle plan leverages the East Coast Greenway (ECG), which runs through downtown. The final action plan also included a wayfinding concept plan for downtown and a Complete Streets policy for the Village. COLLABORATORS

NV5 Traffic, Transportation & Mobility

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Waterbury Active Transportation & Economic Resurgence (WATER) Naugatuck River Greenway City of Waterbury, CT Department of Public Works NV5 provided conceptual through preliminary design services in support of a 2014 TIGER grant application to fund the construction of a 2.3 mile extension of the Naugatuck River Greenway. The trail is an amenity that will help catalyze revitalization of the area. Final design is complete for Phase 1 from the Waterbury City Line north to Eagle Street. The extension will carry the trail north along the river’s edge and connect it directly to Waterbury’s downtown core and historic train station via Freight Street and West Main Street. This section of the river currently contains underutilized and vacant industrial lands. COLLABORATORS

NV5 Landscape Architecture and Engineering (Civil)


Union County Transportation Master Plan Union County, NJ

1

Union County has 21 diverse municipalities linked to jobs, retail, medical facilities, parks, and schools by an extensive transportation system that includes roadways, highways, passenger rail, bus, freight rail, sidewalks, trails, aviation facilities, and a major port marine terminal—all located close to New York City. The condition of the transportation network is critical to the economic vitality and quality of life in the County. NV5 was selected to prepare the Union County Transportation Master Plan in coordination with the County, municipal officials and representatives, regional and state agencies, and local residents. The plan provides a strategic vision, goals, and objectives for all elements of the transportation system and establishes a critical framework for making future transportation planning and investment decisions over the next 10 years. COLLABORATORS

Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. + VHB

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Washington Street Complete Street Redesign City of Hoboken, NJ Washington Street is the bustling heart of Hoboken’s downtown, but the streets and sidewalks are in dire need of reinvestment. The city turned to NV5 to refresh and redesign the street as a “complete street.” The redesign aims to improve functionality, safety, convenience, and comfort for walkers, bicyclists, drivers, buses, loading and unloading operations, emergency vehicles—everyone who uses the street for accessing businesses and residences. The design concept plan focuses on 16 blocks from building face to building face, incorporating improvements to sidewalks and street-to-street furnishings. The plan describes design elements and functions in addition to phasing and cost estimates to guide future project development phases, beginning with preliminary design and engineering. COLLABORATORS

NV5 Landscape Architecture and Engineering (Civil) Bird’s Eye Perspective of Washington Street


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Zoning Code Rewrite City of Englewood, NJ Following the adoption of a new master plan, which was developed by NV5 (formerly Brown & Keener), the City of Englewood tasked the firm with overhauling its antiquated zoning code. NV5 led the rewrite process, guided by a zoning working group consisting of city officials, members of Council and the Planning Board, and the city’s land use attorney. An interdisciplinary team of architects, planners, and engineers participated in the zoning code rewrite. As this was the first major update of the code in several decades, a character-based approach, as opposed to a strict form-based approach, was preferred. Downtown was separated into several different subdistricts based on characteristics such as height and front yard setbacks. The industrial area was rezoned to promote contemporary industry that includes small manufacturing, with the larger areas including a broader range of medical uses that leverage proximity to Englewood Hospital. This zoning overhaul has led to several million dollars of new real estate investment in the city.

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Downtown Hammonton Form-Based Code Town of Hammonton, NJ Known as the “Blueberry Capital of the World,” the Town of Hammonton has a compact downtown that local officials and residents wanted to help become more prosperous. NV5 (formerly Brown & Keener) conducted public workshops and open houses that drew broad and diverse participation. A bus tour took stakeholders to locations within the planning area to think through what the existing zoning would allow and how a form-based approach to zoning could offer an improvement. Based on resident feedback, the underlying zoning ordinance was also streamlined and enhanced. The mayor initially was concerned that the resulting code would constrict developers’ options, but eventually supported its adoption, realizing that for developers and citizens alike a code that specifies what a community wants—not just what is allowed, —can encourage the right type of development.

Recipient of a New Jersey Smart Future Award


Montgomery Township

Princeton Neighborhood Character & Zoning Initiative

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Strong demand, combined with contemporary tastes and preferences in design and lifestyles, has led to the demolition of small houses and the development of new, larger houses. Princeton residents are concerned Hopewell by the impacts of new houses, not only on the character of their neighbor-Township hoods, but also on the environment and on affordability, as new houses fetch upwards of $1 million. The zoning code for single family homes— written decades ago—generally does not match what’s on the ground. NV5 led a process to develop policy and regulatory strategies to shape future single family home development so outcomes better complement the traditional character and form of Princeton’s residential neighborhoods and streets. NV5 conducted focus groups to work through potential short-term zoning measures and also to engage in a broader discussion of the future of Princeton’s residential neighborhoods.

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Sign regulations should be tailored to the typical building dimensions of a place (i.e., width, height, and setback) and to the types of land uses permitted. Furthermore, they should include images to help readers readily understand the technical terms that are typically associated with sign types and technologies. NV5 created new sign regulations for the City of Englewood that embody these principles. The regulations include images of each type of sign permitted and a table that indicates whether it is permitted or not in each of the city’s zoning districts. Furthermore, the regulations are tailored to the typical dimensions of buildings in each district. For example, in downtown, buildings are typically narrow and line the sidewalk, while in the industrial districts buildings are much wider, taller, and set back from the street. Maximum letter heights and total sign area should be greater in the industrial districts than in downtown districts. The types of signs permitted also varies among districts. Projecting signs are permitted in downtown districts, which are pedestrian-oriented, but not in the industrial districts.

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Resident comments on aspects of downtown Westport, CT

Civic Engagement Civic engagement means working to make a difference in the civic life of our communities and developing the combination of knowledge, skills, values, and motivation to make that difference. — John F. Kennedy


Planning starts with understanding the civic framework of a place— the agencies, organizations, institutions, and residents that shape communities. We work collaboratively with public and private stakeholders that make things happen. Planning entails substantive engagement to learn how people and institutions value places; to identify their expectations, aspirations, and concerns; and to communicate and clarify objectives and possible results. We engage public and private stakeholders through various media and generate clear, compelling visuals to communicate findings, ideas, strategies, and concepts and to generate excitement about the future. The following are some of the tools, techniques, and methods we use to reach out to, educate, and engage people. LIVE, IN-PERSON ENGAGEMENT METHODS

ʹʹ Steering Committees ʹʹ Stakeholder Interviews ʹʹ Focus Groups & Small Group Conversations

DOWNTOWN Westport Master Plan T O W N O F W E S T P O R T, C O N N E C T I C U T

ʹʹ Workshops ʹʹ Charrettes ʹʹ Walking Tours ʹʹ Open Houses ʹʹ Special Community Events ON-LINE , TECH-FOCUSED TOOLS OF ENGAGEMENT

ʹʹ E-Updates ʹʹ Websites ʹʹ Social Media ʹʹ Surveys ʹʹ Community Mapping ʹʹ Crowdsourcing OTHER TOOLS & TECHNIQUES

ʹʹ Branding ʹʹ Promotional Materials ʹʹ Radio Spots ʹʹ Smartphone Engagement

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Westport Rail Commuter Survey

A brief online survey to help collect information for the Don’t miss the bus!

SAVE THE DATE SOMERS POINT VISION PLAN

Wednesday, May 4 th OR Saturday, May 7 th

Westport Rail Stations Parking Study. Bus Tour Starting Point: Council Chambers 1 West New Jersey Avenue, Somers Point, NJ 08244 10:00am

The City’s 2021 Vision Plan is underway. Please join us on next week’s mobile workshop. Hosted by the Somers Point Planning Board together with a visiting team of city planners, the tours will begin at City Hall Council Chambers at 10:00 with an introduction to the city’s 2021 Plan and will continue by bus along a planned route with stops at five locations across the city. We’ll be visiting city Neighborhoods, Green Places, and Streets, as well as our Retail Centers and Seasonal Attractions. Afterwards, we plan to get together over lunch and talk about Somers Point challenges. Your participation is greatly encouraged. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. If you are not able to join the first tour, seating may be available for the second.

Please contact Katie Winkler at Brown & Keener Urban Design with any questions or to reserve a seat. Phone: 215.751.1133 Email: katie@bkurbandesign.com

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Learn more about the next citywide plan. Share your ideas for the future.

www.planwesthaven.com contact@planwesthaven.com

To take the survey, use your smart phone to scan the QR code. If you are not able to scan the code, visit http://tinyurl.com/westportcommutersurvey


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The Community Planning & Urban Design Team VICTOR MINERVA AICP PP victor.minerva@nv5.com

Director of Community Planning & Urban Design, Victor has more than 25 years of experience in a range of topics, including comprehensive planning, economic development, environmental analysis, and transportation. He frequently leads or participates in master plans, parking, transit, mobility, downtown, and transit-oriented development studies for public sector clients and is adept at engaging and interfacing with municipal leadership, departments, advisory committee members, and residents.

NEIL DESAI AICP PP

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Neil is a planner and urban designer with an eclectic portfolio of professional experience spanning 15 years. He has managed and produced a wide range of plans, including master plans, strategic plans, redevelopment plans, transit-oriented development plans, wayfinding plans, and zoning codes. He formulates and implements public engagement strategies in collaboration with clients and committees. Neil is also a graphic designer and web designer; he utilizes these skills for clients and to support NV5’s marketing and business development activities.

CHRIS LUCAS AICP LEED AP ND Chris is a planner with a focus on multi-modal transportation planning and design. He has managed projects involving greenway trails, on- and off-street bicycle facilities, traffic calming, surface transit, and pedestrian amenities. He is a certified instructor for the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), the National Complete Streets Coalition, and the National Center for Safe Routes to School. Chris also has specialized expertise in wayfinding, having managed the design and implementation of New York City’s wayfinding system for pedestrians.


BETTINA ZIMNY AICP PP bettina.zimny@nv5.com

Director of Planning for NJ, Bettina specializes in multi-modal transportation planning and design projects and has led corporate-wide efforts throughout the Northeast for more than 25 years.

RACHANA SHETH Rachna is a planner and urban designer who works on projects at a variety of scales: local, regional and statewide. She has significant experience in the areas of bicycle and pedestrian master planning and conceptual design and pedestrian safety studies. Rachana is adept at data analysis, graphic design, cartography, and designing and conducting public engagement and outreach activities. Trained as an architect, Rachana also contributes her skills to redevelopment plans, urban design guidelines, and zoning analyses.

AYAKO OKUTANI Ayako is an architectural and urban designer skilled at developing maps, conceptual diagrams, illustrations, photo simulations, and schematic designs for planning, urban design, architecture and landscape architecture projects, in addition to interdisciplinary endeavors. She is adept at using a range of programs such as AutoCAD and SketchUp to produce clear and compelling graphics.

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COLLABORATING PROFESSIONALS

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GREG DEL RIO PE

MICHAEL DANNEMILLER PE

Greg is a traffic engineer who frequently collaborates on transit-oriented development plans for municipalities and on traffic and parking studies for downtowns and corridors.

Michael is a civil engineer and planner who collaborates on the planning and design of trails, Complete Streets, bicycle/pedestrian master plans, traffic calming, and roadways. Michael is an instructor certified by the National Complete Streets Coalition.

DAN MCGOVERN AIA PP

JACKSON WANDRES RLA

Dan is an architect who coordinates a variety of building types from programming through design, contract documents, and construction administration. He often collaborates on building reuse and redevelopment studies.

Jackson is an urban landscape architect and city planner who collaborates on public realm improvement projects including streetscapes, plazas, trails, parks and recreation facilities, green infrastructure, historic preservation, and public art.

JIM BRIGHTON AIA

JIM BRAZEL

Jim is an architect with a wide range of experience ranging from planning and program development through construction administration for new, rehabilitated, and existing structures.

Jim is an expert in environmental planning and permitting. His areas of expertise include assessment studies and environmental impact studies and permitting for local, state, and federal agencies.


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NEW YORK

LONG ISLAND

PHILADELPHIA

CONNECTICUT

NEW JERSEY

32 Old Slip, Suite 401 New York, NY 10005 212.741.8090

40 Marcus Drive, Suite 201 Melville, NY 11747 631.891.3200

1315 Walnut Street, Suite 900 Philadelphia, PA 19107 215.751.1133

60 Unquowa Rd, Suite 208 Fairfield, CT 06824 203.956.0515

7 Campus Drive, Suite 300 Parsippany, NJ 07054 973.946.5600

Profile for NV5 Brochures

NV5 Community Planning & Urban Design Brochure  

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