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Vol. 28 Issue 36 issue #1237

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ON STANDS WEDNESDAY, 12/07

BUSMAN'S HOLIDAY CELEBRATES HOLIDAYS

MAJOR TAYLOR

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‘CROSS CUP UCI C2 WEEKEND & OVCX FINALE

CLIMATE CHANGE NEWS FOR 2017 by NUVO Editors


8WORDS: Best way to treat yourself in indy YOU:

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THE LGBTQ FUTURE UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP

ince Donald Trump was announced as President-elect, many of my friends and family have been panicking. Over the past eight years under President Obama, the LGBT community has made amazing strides — abolishing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” lifting the ban on HIV-positive individuals entering the US, condemning conversion therapy, appointing a trans person into the Obama administration and, of course, legalizing same-sex marriage. Although we’re far from where we’d like to be in terms of equality, things are looking pretty good. Many of us awoke on Wednesday, November 9 wondering if all our work was for nothing. What lies ahead of us once Trump changes the address on his calling cards to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue? Will the rights we fought so hard for be eroded by a newly appointed executive branch? As one of the couples making history at the Indiana Statehouse when Hoosier marriage was triumphantly legalized, my wife and I aren’t overly concerned about the legitimacy of our marriage being overturned. It is, however, certainly a possibility. In regard to job equality, our Presidentelect, who doesn’t shy away from strong reactions, has said he doesn’t think some-

one’s sexuality “should be a reason” for them to be fired. He doesn’t think? Our concerns were even more solidified when Trump said he would sign the First Amendment Defense Act (FADA), which would legalize anti-LGBT discrimination. Employers, landlords, healthcare providers and business owners could refuse to show equality to LGBT individuals as long as they’re motivated by their religious beliefs. President Obama’s executive order prohibiting this same discrimination would be effectively overturned. My biggest worry, however, is for transgender rights. Trump has flipped

CHRIS PAULSEN EDITORS@NUVO.NET Chris Paulsen is the campaign namager for Freedom Indiana.

each individual state to decide. But it goes beyond bathrooms. I worry that Title IX’s prohibition against sex-based discrimination will not include gender identity. This could The fact that Pence is leading Trump’s make school transition team is troublesome to all of us. a dangerous place for trans students. And, no one knows better like a pancake on this issue. He first about the danger of our Vice Presidentsupported Obama’s efforts to allow elect than an LGBT Hoosier. Mike students to choose their bathroom, Pence has a long history of LGBT disthen supported the law in North Carocrimination, starting with publicly oplina that pushed individuals to use the posing Obama’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” restroom that coincides with their birth legislation, then moving into requesting certificate. Lately he’s saying he wants

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public funding of conversion therapy. And who can forget his support of the bakery refusing to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex wedding? This knowledge wasn’t lost on Trump, and his choice of Mike Pence as his running mate is beyond disturbing. The fact that Pence is leading Trump’s transition team is troublesome to all of us. I would hope all Americans, not just the LGBT community, are concerned about an overall feeling that our country has given the thumbs-up to a person who hated and name-called and bullied his way into the White House. That suddenly it’s alright to discriminate against, poke fun at and dislike someone just because they’re different than you are. Sometimes it’s the unknowns that are the scariest, and a country under President Trump is filled with them. But there’s still hope. We need to point our efforts toward winning the midterm elections and placing moderate legislators in office in 2018. This alone could help us control LGBT legislation. We know that time is on our side and that we must prioritize continuing education around LGBT issues. Eventually, the American public will demand equal rights for gay, lesbian and transgender people. Regardless of who sits in the Oval Office. n


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ADVICE FOR OUR NEXT GOVERNOR

H

e didn’t ask, but I have some advice for our incoming governor, Eric Holcomb. I’ve had advice for all our governors since 1970, but none has been taken. Nonetheless, we press on. What do so many Hoosiers like? Our convenient smaller towns. What do folks beyond our borders think of, if they think of Indiana? The 500, corn, Larry Bird and small town life. What are we trying to attract? Imaginary people: millennials who have a perverse passion for trolley cars and the skills to earn $90,000 a year, the first year out of college. These people, we think, want to live downtown, in quaint, restored old buildings, riding bicycles to work, buying groceries from small neighborhood shopkeepers, but having elevators so they don’t have to lug baby and carriage upstairs, in the unlikely event they ever have a baby. Yet what do we have in abundance? Our convenient smaller towns losing, or struggling to gain, population. Do we promote those places? No. We have no specific program to encourage businesses and their workers to locate in Logansport, Peru or Wabash. Economic development goals at the IEDC (Indiana Economic Development Corporation) are satisfied if firms pick Fishers, which is already overburdened with people and the problems of rapid growth. Policies that utilize the resources already invested in our many troubled cities and towns are not in the toolbox of the IEDC. The General Assembly, more properly known as the Private Assembly, gives no assistance to the 111 Hoosier cities and towns that have lost a combined population of 113,000 persons in the past 15 years. Hoosiers may think we’re doing

MORTON MARCUS EDITORS@NUVO.NET Morton Marcus is an economist, writer, and speaker who may be reached at mortonjmarcus@yahoo.com.

fine, but when compared to the average growth of the U.S. in that period, Indiana comes up nearly 325,000 persons short. Our state has good places the size of Evansville, South Bend and Muncie on down to Hartford City, Portland and Sullivan. These places could offer a quality of life deemed acceptable by our elite state economic developers if a program of incentives removed the blemishes caused by stagnation and decline. Just visit from Michigan City on to Gary, East Chicago and Hammond with your eyes open to the opportunities rather than the blight. The existing infrastructure in Marion, Connersville and Richmond is too important to continue deteriorating while new infrastructure is built to solve the congestion caused by past policies favoring Carmel, Noblesville and Westfield. A new administration can change the heading of this ship of state listing in dangerous shallows. Instead of having a thriving state from Lake Michigan to the Ohio River and from Ohio to Illinois, we continue to be the butt of jokes, dominated by a single second-class (not world-class) metropolitan area. It’s time to prove that we are A State that Works, a state of diverse living opportunities, friendly to people as well as to business. n NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 11.30.16 - 12.07.16 // VOICES 5


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CARING FOR CREATION

A U T H O R S : MITCH HESCOX AND PAUL DOUGLAS $14 .9 9 A M A Z O N , B A R N E S & N O B L E , A N D YOUR LOCAL CHRISTIAN BOOKSTORE CARINGFORCREATIONBOOK.COM

me asking him about his work. PAUL DOUGLAS: We are not satisfied with the current state of accuracy of U.S. weather forecasts. In this era of climate volatility and weather disruption, new times call for new tools. We basically come up with a user-friendly and developer-friendly way to integrate weather into apps, websites and company supply chains and infrastructures to try and create new efficiencies. NUVO: That sounds impressive! PD: As an entrepreneur you have to be open to data. You have to go where the data goes. You can’t just see the things you want to see. If you screen out the things that make you uncomfortable, you go out of business. NUVO: And it was data that got you paying attention to climate change?

CARING FOR CREATION

Meterologist Paul Douglas talks climate change under Trump

E

B Y JIM PO Y SE R EDITORS@NU VO . N ET

xactly four years ago, NUVO published my profile of Paul Douglas, a Minneapolis-based meteorologist who was slated to be keynote speaker at Hoosier Environmental Council’s Greening the Statehouse event. Douglas is an evangelical Republican and has made it his life mission to convince the GOP to embrace science and reckon with the disturbing reality of climate change. He does this through his work as a meteorologist and now in the form of a book, co-authored with Mitch Hescox, entitled Caring for Creation.

Four years ago, the environmental community was aching for President Obama to get moving on significant action, and the world was pining for a meaningful global agreement. Those four years turned out to be pivotal in the fight to preserve the planet for present and future generations with the Paris Agreement and the Clean Power Plan. While both have been met with resistance, now, with President-elect Trump, we find ourselves with a new administration that threatens to dismantle any progress made. Just before Thanksgiving, Douglas spoke to me from his Minneapolis-based office of Aeris Weather (http://www. aerisweather.com). We started off with

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PD: It was the data that tipped me off — actually, the weather tipped me off. We’ve always had extremes, but by the late '90s, early 2000s, it became apparent that weather patterns had shifted so significantly, so far outside the realm of average, that we had entered a new regime, and I was seeing the symptoms of climate change. I was and am a meteorologist. I am just trying to get the forecast right. Trying to keep my businesses afloat and successful. Speaking out about climate change was not something I aspired to. It just came about organically as I looked at the weather and tried to connect the dots. NUVO: There are so many books about climate change. Why yours, why now? PD: In my travels in the past twenty years, talking to evangelicals and conservatives about climate change, it dawned on me that the story has not been told in a way that resonates with core evangelical fundamental values and spirituality. Piling on science doesn’t necessarily help and it may actually hurt the process. Accusing people of being stupid or knuckleheads becomes self-

defeating. This Methodist minister, Mitch Hescox, and I, decided to team up to write a book, framing the story uniquely for conservatives and evangelicals, under the guise of creation care and stewardship and following Christ’s commandments. Even if you don’t believe the climate scientists, will you believe meteorologists or ministers? In the end, are you going to believe your own eyes? The symptoms will become, over time, harder and harder to dismiss and deny. NUVO: Yet the United States has just elected an avowed climate denier. PD: It is going to be really hard to keep that whole hoax mentality going as the symptoms become more frequent and egregious. Climate change is a slowmotion transformation. The seas are rising slowly. Seasons are getting longer, and that’s been a gradual process. But we’re getting clubbed over the head with greater frequency. The United States has seen six separate 1000-year floods since October of 2015. My first instinct is to give Presidentelect Trump a chance. Give him the space to adapt his worldview. He may decide the costs are too high to pulls out of the Paris Agreement, or the costs are too high to pull out of the Clean Power Plan. On the same level, it doesn’t matter who’s in the White House or heading up the EPA. The clean energy economy … that train has left the station and it is not going to be derailed. And the reason is pure economics. Decarbonization is not going to come about through a political kumbaya moment in Washington D.C. Decarbonization is going to come about because of economics and energy security. NUVO: Every new administration person Trump’s proposed thus far is a climate denier. PD: I don’t believe that position is sustainable. A significant majority of Americans will see through that. Let’s not forget it was Richard Nixon who launched the EPA. It was the first George Bush who brought the Clean Air Act to life. There are still a lot of Teddy Roosevelt conservatives out there who believe that conservation should in fact apply to the very thing that sustains us. Ronald Reagan in 1981 talked about the need to balance the economy with the environment. If in fact this becomes a rabid, climate


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“Speaking out about climate change was not something I aspired to. It just came about organically as I looked at the weather and tried to connect the dots.” — PAUL DOUGLAS, METEOROLOGIST

change-denying administration, it will go against the grain of much of what the GOP has done in previous incarnations. Will there be a critical mass of Democrats, Independents and environmentally conscious Republicans? I think so. Climate change is a threat and an opportunity. An opportunity to reinvent this country. We should create new technologies we’ll ultimately export to the rest of the world. NUVO: Here’s one of my most favorite quotes from the book: “We love our kids. We want to protect them. Keep them safe. Give them every opportunity to succeed. Life is tough enough. Why would we make it any harder on them?” PD: We are united in the fact that we love our kids and want to do what’s best for them. We want to set them on the right foot. We don’t want to live a life of regrets when it comes to our kids

and their kids. At some point your kids or grandkids are going to come to you and ask: What did you know when, and what did you do? I think they are going to be pissed that we didn’t do more. That we were so stuck in our bubbles that we didn’t take action. We have been given an amazing gift from God. We don’t own this. We lease everything. We are just passing through. If someone gives you a gift, chances are you aren’t going to trash it. We find a new way to worship the Creator when we respect what He’s built. What would Jesus do? I can’t pretend to know, but having read the New Testament, he might ask two questions: Did you defend my Father’s home? Did you defend His children? We have an obligation to our kids and to future generations to find the courage to do the right thing. n

I asked Paul what he would suggest we do to encourage our local broadcast meteorologists to talk more about climate change and he answered: “I think they should send a copy [of NUVO] to their local meteorologist and ask them, humbly, respectfully, to help them connect the dots. A vast majority of TV’s meteorologists acknowledge that the climate is changing.”

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WHERE WILL YOUR CUSTOM DESIGN LEAD YOU?

Nelson Jewelers Since 1958

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Petitioners seek clean water in coal-plant transition After decades of burning coal, the Harding Street Station in Indianapolis was converted to natural gas in February, but coal ash and other waste remain. Under federal rules, Indianapolis Power and Light is required to develop a plan to close the ash ponds and protect public health and the environment. Clean-power advocates celebrated after the final rail shipment of coal was dumped at the site, and Wyatt Watkins, the chairman of the board of Hoosier Interfaith Power and Light, said they’re now rallying to get the state to take the lead in cleanup efforts. This month, Watkins’ group delivered petitions asking the state and the utility company to remove toxic coal ash from the unlined pits and store it in a lined landfill on dry land to protect the White River and drinking-water sources from further contamination. Signatures are still being collected on those petitions until the comment period on the cleanup plan ends on December 5. After 85 years of relying on coal, the utility switched to natural gas and said it’s committed to providing safe and affordable power. Watkins said it’s a big step and, while coal is touted by some as a cheap source of power, there’s more to it than that. “The fact is that it’s not as cheap as it appears,” he added. “It’s quite expensive to the environment and, if you factor in the prices to clean up, if you factored in all those hidden costs, you would get a truer picture of what a coal economy really looks like.” In Watkins’ opinion, the coal-ash lagoons that litter the state are denying people a basic human right. New Leaders Urged to Make Hunger a Priority While many of us attend holiday parties that center around food this time of the year — and maybe worry about eating too much — it can be easy to overlook the fact that people around us may not have enough to eat. One in six Hoosiers doesn’t always know where their next meal will come from. According to Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry, this is a year-round problem, but it’s at the forefront during the holidays. “We see the holidays as an opportunity to start that conversation with the public and with newly-elected officials, to say, ‘Here’s what’s going on in our communities and here’s who’s in need, and there are people experiencing hunger, and that’s unacceptable,’” she said. Weikert Bryant said everyone can help, either through food or cash donations or by volunteering at a local food pantry. Now that the election is over, it’s time to let lawmakers know that hunger should be a top priority, she added. When it comes to food insecurity, the Food Research and Action Center ranks Indiana 23rd in the nation, with nearly 20 percent of households with children reporting they are unable to afford enough food. — INDIANA NEWS SERVICE

MAKING THE ENERGY ARGUMENT THROUGH THE ECONOMY

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A national business group launches its Indiana chapter with a jobs report

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pparently Indiana is a lot savvier when it comes to advanced energy than people realize. National business group Advanced Energy Economy released a report indicating the economic impact the advanced energy industry has on the Hoosier state. According to AAE’s research, advanced energy jobs account for 48,000 jobs in Indiana. That figure is second only to the auto industry which boasts 60,000 jobs around the state. That’s 5,000 more jobs than machine manufacturing and almost twice as many as the number employed by colleges and universities. So, what are we talking about when

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we say “advanced energy”? Essentially, advanced energy is everything associated with energy supply and demand in every way you can think of. In terms of supply, it includes the generation, delivery and management of electricity as well as fuel delivery and production. When you think of demand, think of transportation, energy efficiency (how it is used effectively) and industry (the manufacturing of machinery and process equipment). And out of the 48,000 advanced energy jobs in Indiana, 77 percent of them are in the area of energy efficiency — things like building design, heating and lighting, appliances and electronics and enabling IT/ demand response. Only 9 percent of the advanced energy jobs are in electricity generation.

While the industry expects to add over 900 more jobs in Indiana, there are challenges to its expansion. Ninety percent of firms in the industry expressed difficulties in hiring a competent workforce. That means there are immediate and long-term needs in the state in this rapidly growing field, especially as more

Of advanced manufacturing firms report difficulty in hiring qualified workers


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and more large corporations express the desire for energy-efficient options. As an association of businesses, AEE seeks to transform public policy to enable the rapid growth of advanced energy to meet the needs of its member businesses. In Indiana, that means educating the public as well as government officials on the importance of advanced energy in terms of economic impact and facilitating conversations on the opportunities that exist. And the initiative is being led by Hoosiers both nationally and locally. Former Fort Wayne mayor Graham Richard serves as the CEO of AEE. Former Indianapolis mayor Greg Ballard serves as a senior fellow for the Indiana chapter. Both men see the value and opportunity advanced energy already has in Indiana and are working to eliminate the obstacles that prevent growth. “I keep saying we are in the middle of an energy transformation, people just don’t realize it yet,” says Ballard. “Our mission here is to represent the companies that are looking for this kind of energy.”

70 percent of AE workers are in Energy Efficiency

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Of AE workers are in Advanced Electricity Generation Indiana could be doing itself as a state a disservice if the obstacles preventing energy growth are not addressed. Energy efficiency and reliability are bigger concerns companies are looking for when selecting a location to build and expand than people realize. Indiana was among the top 10 states for power outages in 2015 — thanks in part to an aging system reliant on coal-fired power plants. That’s not an encouraging statistic for companies looking for more options and a reliable delivery system. However, Ballard says that means there is opportunity here for modernizing the infrastructure and improving the reliability, cost and diversity of electric power options in the state. “There are some changing of minds in the public [that need to happen], but also there will have to be policy objectives to make sure the legislature, the rules, the policies are allowing this new technology to take hold,” says Ballard. “Because if you break down barriers, then the jobs will flow. What we are trying to do is make sure the jobs are there and that the companies get the type of energy that they want and that we can have more freedom, frankly, in the energy markets.” n

“Our mission here is to represent the companies that are looking for this kind of energy.” — FORMER INDIANAPOLIS MAYOR GREG BALLARD, ADVANCE ENERGY ECONOMY FELLOW

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INTERESTING NOTES FROM THE ACLU: “Trump has pledged to round up and deport the entire undocumented population, by some estimates 11 million people, within two years. Trump’s mass deportation scheme would mean arresting more than 15,000 people a day on immigration charges, seven days a week, 365 days a year.” “It is worth noting that Trump’s suggestion that the ‘good’ immigrants could come back betrays a surprising ignorance of U.S. immigration law. He fails to understand that immigrant visas are not readily available and that for individuals from certain countries — even close relatives of U.S. citizens — wait times for a visa can reach into the decades. For example, for a married adult son or daughter SUBMITTED PHOTO

of a U.S. citizen, the government

PREPPING FOR THE POLITICAL APOCALYPSE

is currently processing visas for Mexican and Filipino nationals who applied in 1994.” Trump’s proposal to register all

What local policy leaders and activists are doing to get ready for 2017

Muslims in a “database” is likely to violate federal privacy law — perhaps the Privacy Act of 1974 for example. These notes are pulled from the ACLU’s The Trump Memos that was published earlier this year.

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BY EM I L Y TA Y L O R ET A Y L O R @ N U V O . N E T

n January 20, 2017, Donald Trump will stand in Washington D.C., raising his hand to a sea of thunderous applause, announcing the top items on his presidential to-do list. And Indy organizers will be ready with a list of their own. Local activists (who are already

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weatherproofing their respective organizations) will be prepared for the 2017 legislature. So far, it’s expected that legislation will cover everything from criminalizing abortions to restrictions on which bathroom a transgender person can use. Earlier this month on Organization Day, when new legislators are sworn in and sketch out the next legislative session, Freedom Indiana wasted no time.

The group presented a petition to Republican Governor-elect Eric Holcomb, asking for the addition of sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s civil rights code in the hopes of preventing hate crimes (which have gone up 6.8 percent from 2014 to 2015, according to the FBI). “We can’t see Indiana move backwards,” says Chris Paulsen, executive director of Freedom Indiana. “… We could


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have been North Carolina. Our bills were very similar.” Paulsen told NUVO that during the 2017 session there will likely be similar bathroom bills to the one that passed in North Carolina [in 2016] targeting trans individuals — which has cost the state $700 million so far. Editor’s note: Paulsen penned an op-ed for NUVO this week on PAGE 4. “Anything negative that happens in human rights … drives people away, drives business away,” says Paulsen. The economic argument will be one of the key talking points for Freedom Indiana this session. Right now though, Paulsen is working on educating people about transgender issues. “It’s not about bathrooms and wedding cakes, it’s about people’s lives,” says Paulsen. Freedom Indiana will likely follow similar strategies that they used in the fight for marriage equality — getting constituents to call their legislators and physically going to the Statehouse. “It’s a representative government; we need to be there representing ourselves if the legislators aren’t representing us,” says Paulsen.   Their phone calls last year resulted in 140,000 voicemails being left for lawmakers. “Normally, if a legislator gets 10 phone calls, that’s huge. We were filling their voicemail boxes every night,” says Paulsen. The work was not without reward. Last year the two bathroom bills were halted along with a “super RFRA.” However, the passage of HEA 1337 — one of the most restrictive abortion bills in the nation — was monumental. Especially for Patti Stauffer, the vice president for public policy at Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky. Stauffer worked for Planned Parenthood in the mid '80s and returned in 2012. During her first stint with PP, she saw what appeared to be a deliberate placement of pro-life candidates in the community that would eventually lead to the state capitol. “They didn’t start out with taking statehouses,” says Stauffer. According to her, it began with folks who are now lawmakers (who are also adamantly anti-abortion) sitting on school boards, civic advisory groups and simply talking to people. Today, she hopes to do the same — find volunteers who can be spokespeople in their communities and identify organizations that have memberships (like business groups and faith leaders). “It has to do with relationship-

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building,” says Stauffer. “And that takes a lot of on-the-ground hard work. It can’t be a centralized effort. It has to be decentralized.” Stauffer adds that right now, new lawmakers “need to hear from their constituents that there is a large segment of people living in their districts who do not believe that way and really feel that there needs to be compromise and dialogue with their issues.” Stauffer, like so many working to change public policy, is in limbo with newly elected Donald Trump. “Some things that we do know is that President-elect Trump has never held an office before,” says Stauffer. “He has never had a chance to show his hand on how he might move forward with public policy.” He has made it clear that he will rely on Pence. “That is problematic to us,” says Stauffer. Stauffer is preparing for the worst — a slow chipping away in the courts at Roe vs. Wade. “We are expecting a race amongst states to put forth legislation that then ultimately works its way up the federal court system to be the challenge to Roe.” Stauffer notes that there are around 100 federal judge positions waiting to be filled along with the SCOTUS seat, all of which are positions that can forever change women’s rights in America. Planned Parenthood isn’t alone in prepping for inauguration day. “We will see what a Trump/Pence administration will attempt to do,” says Jane Henegar, executive director of the ACLU in Indiana. The ACLU already successfully contested the ban that Pence placed on Syrian refugees entering the state. Today, they are preparing for an immigration ban based on religion. “We believe that would be a violation of the establishment clause, disadvantaging a particular religion,” says Henegar. “Across the country, we are preparing the arguments [against immediate deportation promised by Trump],” says Henegar. “… It’s an outrageous claim that he could do it immediately” She stated that the ACLU’s first step, if that happens, is getting an injunction to halt dragnets and racial profiling. At the end of the day, all three of these organizations are not only preparing for the worst, they are searching for volunteers and community leaders to step up. “You need to be involved,” says Paulsen. “Not just outraged, but take that anger and use it for good.” n NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 11.30.16 - 12.07.16 // NEWS 11


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Department of Public Words works with middle school girls and IMPD on the Houghville public art.

PHOTOS BY JOEY SMITH

Middle school girls have drawn self-portraits that will spell out the word “courage” for a mural on the Westside.

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BY REBECCA B E R F A NG E R ARTS@NUVO . N ET

fter school, on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving, a group of almost two dozen middle school girls and several other guests met in the cafeteria for a quick snack before cramming into a classroom at IPS Daniel Webster School 46, which is located less than two miles southwest of Lucas Oil Stadium in downtown Indianapolis. The girls and their guests — Holly and Dave Combs of the Department of Public Words, staff members from the Department of Justice and officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department’s Southwest District — met up as they had during the fall semester, as the girls drew self-portraits and the adults encouraged them. This project started several months ago as an idea for IMPD to have a mural in its Southwest District building in Houghville, a building that is often open to community events. “I contacted a representative from MCCOY, Inc., Marion County Commission on Youth to see if they could guide us in the right direction,” said IMPD Field Training Officer Monica Hodge, who had the idea and worked with District Commander Mike Spears. “I was given the contact Andrew Lee with Art with a Heart. … After some work, [Lee] came up with the great idea of

matching us up with a program though the Department of Justice and the Department of Public Words.” Before IMPD started attending these sessions with the students this Fall, Doris Pryor at the U.S. Attorney’s Office at the Department of Justice, had worked with the school on a similar mural project during the Spring 2016 semester. That project involved a different group of middle school girls drawing self-portraits under the tutelage of the Department of Public Words. The resulting mural reads “You Are Beautiful” and hangs at the entryway to the school. That project, says Pryor, came about after she attended a career day. She wanted to help the students learn that they could become professionals, particularly in the legal field, even though it was unlikely they knew any. Some of those girls continue to have lunch buddy relationships with staff and attorneys from Pryor’s office. Following that project, Pryor and the Department of Public Words hoped to do something similar with other middle school girls. Mostly because “middle school is a turning point when girls are physically maturing and also experiencing a lot of self-doubt,” Says Pryor. “... We wanted for the girls to become leaders in the school. These girls represent a mixture of academic scholarship and leadership among their classmates.” When Pryor learned that Hodge and IMPD wanted to work with them, she was

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delighted at the opportunity. “A big part of public safety is to go into the community,” says Pryor. “When this project was initiated in June 2016, the climate was unsettling for those in law enforcement. … This project is about building relationships.” Hodge agrees: “I feel that our district has a strong relationship with our community and has for years. Having this relationship is imperative to our job, we cannot do what we do without the community’s help. We rely on each other. The southwest community, both adults and children, and the police cannot work separately.” Hodge and Pryor also agree that what happened in the classroom was what really mattered, not just the mural. Holly Combs says that at the first session, one of the girls told them she was afraid of the officers and wrote on a piece of paper that her dad was taken away by the police. “So I told her to stay close to me,” says Combs. “I told her it’s fair she has fear. Five or six other students said they had reservations about these armed cops in the classroom.” She adds that many of the girls were afraid of drawing self-portraits and even had trouble looking at the photos of their own faces that they received in the second session. To help them, Dave Combs taught the girls about the technical and artistic aspects of how to draw, such as the proportions of

facial features, and how to shade and color hair and eyes. Holly Combs had a different task. “I help them understand that beauty has nothing to do with what you look like and everything to do with how you treat yourself and others,” she says. One week she asked them to each talk to a kid who sits alone at lunch, another week she asked them to come up with a list of what they are grateful for. Eventually the girls warmed up to the officers, says Officer Hodge. “When we began the project, the girls were very reserved around the officers that were involved and spoke very little to those in the room,” she says. “As the weeks progressed, we were able to develop and strengthen a personal relationship with the young women. The communication between the girls and the officers involved developed and blossomed as their talents began to do the same in their art work.” Adds Holly Combs about the last session: “Every single girl presented their work. Even if they were a little shy, they pushed through and presented with huge smiles on their faces. Our goal is not that they create an amazing work of art; our goal is that they grow in confidence and love for themselves. When they present, you can see all the work we’ve done, and you can see that our deepest priority is growing their souls.” The mural will be completed and set up at the IMPD Southwest District in January. n


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B Y SETH JO H NSO N ARTS@NUV O . N ET

t was the fall of 2010, and Indy artist Bill Price found himself in the midst of an introspective excursion out west exploring some of his favorite places in the country. One day while driving up from Missoula, Mont., along the Flathead Valley, the self-described “Lewis and Clark geek” found himself trapped in a perilous staring match with the western sky. “I kept looking at the sky, and was like, ‘Oh, my God. That’s just incredible,’ and then [I realize] I’m drifting off the highway,” Price recalls. “I couldn’t take my eyes off of it, and I literally did say out loud, ‘I can’t stop looking at the sky,’ out of frustration. Finally, I just said, ‘Okay, people die this way. I’ve gotta stop. I just can’t look over there anymore.’” This memory is at the heart of Price’s latest project, appropriately titled I Can’t Stop Looking at the Sky. An expansive, multidisciplinary effort, I Can’t Stop Looking at the Sky consists of two CDs of music, a 120-page journal, a 160-page book of poems, short stories and essays, two 36-page oversized lyric booklets and more. A native of Indianapolis, Price grew up on the city’s west side, where he attended Ben Davis High School. During junior high, Price discovered his love for music, although he wouldn’t seriously pursue it for many years. Instead he focused on graphic design work. “I went to the University of Cincinnati and got a degree in graphic design, so my bread and butter is really graphic design,” he says. Eventually, however, he would begin to write songs, both on his own and in a group with local blues veteran Gordon Bonham called The Brains Behind Pa. “When I was in high school, everybody that liked what then was called ‘commercial art’ wanted to design album covers,” says the 55-year-old Price. “So I joke with people that I had to start my own band so that I could design my own album covers.” Never before had Price pursued anything as expansive as I Can’t Stop Looking at the Sky. The project is a culmination of his many artistic passions, and

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The journey behind writer and musician Bill Price’s I Can’t Stop Looking at the Sky

it’s something that just happened organically, he explains. “As I got into recording the album, I thought, ‘It’d be cool to do some more writing,’ and then the book evolved,” says Price. In an effort to keep the lyrics open-ended, he decided to publish his journal from the trip as well, also including that in the I Can’t Stop Looking at the Sky package. “I thought, ‘I don’t really want to talk about what these songs are about, even though people love that,’” he says. “The lyrics are somewhat open-ended, and I would just like people to go on their own journey. So I thought, ‘If they really wanna know, I should include this journal. It’s not very direct, but it would give them a general sense of where all this came from.’” Within the music and writings, Price explains that one overarching theme is time. This, in particular, has a lot to do with where he was mentally when he traveled out west. “My mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, so that was a seven or eight year process,” he remembers. “She passed away, and my father passed away. So I thought, ‘I really need a change, both geographically and mentally.’” With this in mind, he decided to take a trip out west — making a special point to stop at both the Black Hills and Glacier National Park. “I didn’t take a camera, I didn’t take a guitar, and I didn’t listen to any music,” he remembers. “I just rolled down the windows and drove through the Great Plains.” After spending so much time with the serene scenes that surrounded him, Price eventually rediscovered his inner child, rekindling an overwhelming excitement that he hadn’t had in some time. “On that trip, I was as alive as I have ever been in my entire life,” he says. “[I’ve realized] that sort of enthusiasm about being alive needs to be a bigger part of my life.” In addition to the lessons he learned through his trip, Price is also thankful for the fact that it prompted I Can’t Stop Looking at the Sky, of course. “It’s what I wanted to do, and it basically turned out how I envisioned it,” says Price. n

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“I didn’t take a camera, I didn’t take a guitar, and I didn’t listen to any music. I just rolled down the windows and drove through the Great Plains.” —BILL PRICE

Price on his trip west.

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December TREAT YO’ SELF IN

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his, friends, has been a rough year. We lost Sharon Jones, Leonard Cohen, Gwen Ifill and Florence Henderson — and that was just in November. We fought each other through a bitter election season that revealed deeper divides between Americans than perhaps ever before — and it’s not over yet. Police shootings. Zika. Brexit. Hate crimes. Syria. White nationalism. Record-high temps. The Pulse nightclub massacre. Standing Rock. Bowie. Prince. Trump. It’s exhausting, honestly, and we can all feel it. What’s the solution? Of that, we’re not entirely sure. But, like Tom Haverford and Donna Meagle taught the heartbroken Ben Wyatt in season four of Parks and Recreation, there exists a small balm. Treat. Yo. Self.

On our beloved, Hoosier-based Parks and Rec, that meant setting aside a day to buy cashmere socks, designer fragrances and full-body Batman suits. But after this year, we think you deserve more than just one day, so we compiled a list of 31 ways to treat yourself and others this December. Consider it your non-denominational, existential 31-day advent calendar of ways to recharge, to get to know Indy a little better and to share a little joy. It’s the season of giving, after all. The best part? All our suggestions are free or under $15, or thereabouts. Readers, Happy Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/Christmas/Winter Solstice/End-of-the-trash-fire-thatis-2016. We’ll see you on the other side.

— KATHERINE COPLEN

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December 4

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Lace up for the all-hip-hop, adult-only Adult Skate at Skateland in Lafayette Square. Don’t fall over when you’re dropping it low.

Dust off your library card and head to Central Library. Pick the coziest chair by the window and grab a thick book. (Don’t have a library card? Treat yo’ self to one. All you need is proof of address and an ID.)

Tour the Indiana Medical History Museum’s medicinal plant garden, the Teeny Statue of Liberty Museum, the War Memorial’s USS Indianapolis Museum or Joyful Noise’s Museum of Psychphonics. (Or all of them.)

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Get a half dark meat chicken with rice and beans at Jamaican Style Jerk — and you’ll have money left over for antacids, if you need them.

Carefully pick six pieces of chocolate from Best Chocolate in Town. Tie your box with a ribbon. Try not to eat all of the pieces at once. Fail.

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Buy yourself an absolutely gigantic mug of hot chocolate from the Chocolate Cafe on Monument Circle. Add extra marshmallows. Don’t burn your tongue.

Take the elevator up to the City County Building’s observatory,\ and see Indy’s skyline from a brand new angle.

Watch the sunset across Eagle Creek Reservoir from the Rick’s Cafe Boatyard deck, glass of wine in hand. The sun will set at 5:20 p.m. on this night.

18 Fill three growlers at Fountain Square Brewing Co. for $5 each. Give two away.

Challenge a str tal Kombat at T games (except free, so you’ll h buy them a bee

Order a whiske the Red Key, id wearing somet Remember: cas

Pick out a singl tiny succulent Don’t overwate

W

25 Release the idea that there is such a thing as perfect gifts for everyone in your life and just share things that bring you joy — or donate to a nonprofit that shares your values in your loved ones’ names.

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26 Bundle up and tour the Super Bowl XLVI murals along the canal. Take a selfie in front of every single one.

START OF KWANZAA

27 Sidle up to Milktooth’s bar and carry out a cup of pourover coffee. Grab one of Zoe Taylor’s perfect pastries, too.

Brew a mug of mint tea, fill yo bubbles, and w documentary in Don’t drop you


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Skip work and go see the 1:45 p.m. matinee of Moonlight at Landmark Keystone Art.

Grab your winter coat. Head to the Indiana Farmers Coliseum. Enjoy highquality puck action as the Indy Fuel celebrate Indiana’s 200th birthday.

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ranger to MorTappers. All pinball) are have money to er, too.

Spend a full day at Game Paradise in Fountain Square. Build the longest road in Catan. Be a benevolent overlord.

Buy the INDPLS guide from PRINTtEXT and a green tea from SoBro Cafe across the street. Learn something new about your city.

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Roam the floors of Midland Art & Antique Mall. Want to buy everything, but pick something small and perfect — and cheap.

Go to Monument Circle late at night in a heavy coat. Lay down and look up at the sky through the Circle of Lights. Remember your life is a blip in the grand scheme of human history. Make it the best blip.

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le, perfect, from Habig’s. er it.

Go to the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Winter Solstice party and make friends with a reindeer.

Snag a coconut donut from General American Donut Co. (Maybe two.) Bring them to Crown Hill Cemetery for a picnic next to John Dillinger’s grave.

Find a showing of It’s a Wonderful Life on basic cable and watch it with someone you love. Remember that there really is no one better than Jimmy Stewart.

ey sour at deally while thing fancy. sh only.

WINTER SOLSTICE

3 Rummage through the used record bins at Irvington Vinyl, Indy CD and Vinyl, LUNA Music or your favorite thrift shop and find a record you used to listen to when you were young.

10 Take yourself on a field trip to the Rhythm Discovery Center and hit the giant gong at the entrance as loudly as you can.

17 Unfollow Donald Trump on Twitter.

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pepperour tub with watch a Netflix n the bath. ur computer.

Bring a friend to the Garfield Park Conservatory and find a new favorite exotic tree. It will probably be the Powder Puff Tree, which is objectively the best tree in the whole place.

Switch your phone to airplane mode for the day. Write that letter you’ve been putting off to that person you haven’t talked to in too long and actually send it this time.

Wake up early, drive to Eagle Creek Park and hike the 6.75mile Red Trail around the reservoir. Contemplate the year to come. Take a deep breath of cold air. Make a resolution to treat yourself more.

NEW YEAR’S EVE NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 11.30.16 - 12.07.16 // COVER STORY 17


STAGE

REVIEW

PHOTO BY GARY NELSON

SPAMALOT FROM FOOTLITE MUSICALS

e

Mounting a production of Spamalot is a bold move for Footlite Musicals. The show is based on Monty Python and the Holy Grail, a 1975 movie that garnered a cultish following, and that following, along with Broadway trivia buffs, helped make the musical a smash hit on Broadway, even if Terry Gilliam did call it “Python-lite.” Plus, the original cast included Tim Curry, Sara Ramirez, Hank Azaria and David Hyde Pierce, among others. Given the show’s history (and having seen it twice in touring productions), scaling back my expectations was difficult at first, especially when the sound was distorted and the lighting was off. However, on more objectively evaluating Footlite’s production, it really is a remarkable success. Cast and crew are made up completely of volunteers, but this did not stop them from turning out a production with ingenious costuming, well-executed sets and a cast packed with talent. Rich Baker leads the knights and ladies through this show of carefully orchestrated silliness. And while Arthur is the central figure of the eponymous legends, the first laurels must go to Rebecca DeVries McConnell as the Lady of the Lake. Her ability to bring down the castle in “The Diva’s Lament” would make Sara Ramirez proud, and her scatting in “Knights of the Round Table” is spoton, as is “Find Your Grail.” That said, Drew Duvall most certainly holds his own as King Arthur, especially in his rendition of “I’m All Alone” with his loyal, and hilarious, manservant Patsy, Vince Accetturo, who shines in “Always Look at the Bright Side of Life.” Arthur’s knights — Christopher Jones (Sir Robin), Christian Condra (Sir Lancelot), Tony Schaab (Dennis/Sir Galahad), Clint Buechler (Sir Bedevere), and Sam Surette (Sir Bors) — individually create distinct and inherently outrageous characters while collectively adding to the dynamic humor of the show (like in “Knights of the Round Table”). Jones pulls off a perfectly cheeky “You Won’t Succeed on Broadway,” and Condra is screechingly funny in his complete embrace of the rainbow in the too-brief “His Name Is Lancelot” (with help from THAT CODPIECE. Thank you, costume designer Jeff Farley, and for all your other masterworks here.). There’s so much good here that it overwhelms many of the production’s flaws. And even mistakes can add to the entertainment — some bumbled dismembering of the Black Knight on Sunday made the scene even more comical. — LISA GAUTHIER MITCHISON Dec. 1-11, various times, $23, footlitemusicals.wildapricot.org

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LOVE HIM OR LOATHE HIM, DROSSELMEYER IS BACK NoExit performs another twisted classic

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This year, the show theme is a suprise. Buckle up.

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B Y REBECCA BERF A N G ER ARTS@NUVO.NET

or those who have attended NoExit Performance’s take on the Christmas standard The Nutcracker — something the theatrical organization has been performing most holiday seasons since 2010 — chances are the egotistical clown Wolfgang Drosselmeyer stands out more than anyone or anything else in that show. Perhaps those same audiences thought they were safe from interacting with him outside of that world, only to see him out and about in Indianapolis, including at First Friday events, last year’s holiday cabaret show various magic shows, an IndyFringe show, or pop-up appearances around town. Love him or loathe him, Drosselmeyer is back. Only this time it won’t be in The Nutcracker. Drosselmeyer’s alter ego — and NoExit Performance’s newly named Artistic Director Ryan Mullins and

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SHOW

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W H E N : D E C . 2 - 10 , V A R I O U S T I M E S WHERE: TUBE FACTORY ARTSPACE, 112 5 C R U F T S T . T I C K E T S : $2 5, NUTCRACKERTWISTEDCLASSIC.BPT.ME

Executive Director Lukas Schooler — won’t say what the show will be until opening weekend. It could be ’Twas the Night Before Christmas, The Brave Tin Soldier, How the Grinch Stole Christmas or A Christmas Carol. Regardless of which show they produce at Big Car’s Tube Factory artspace, Mullins and Schooler will say there are only 40 seats available per show. Some of the characters from past iterations of The Nutcracker will either be referenced or make appearances, but those who are unfamiliar with past shows will be able to keep up, and audiences can still expect the show will be anything but standard holiday fare.

“It’s still relevant [to the holidays], but the moral you get away from our story is not the happy-go-lucky good vibes you might feel when leaving the other Christmas shows,” says Schooler. “It’s a little more raw, a little more real to the season. It balances the other holiday theater offerings.” Even though it is set in the Land of Sweets, says Mullins, “It’s the kind of candy that makes you a little sick; the sugar is a little unrefined and there is a sour element there.” Also unlike traditional holiday shows, this one is somewhat improvised and set in the present, making each performance slightly different than the rest. “The moment you come to see the show is when the show is set,” says Mullins. “There’s no direct references to any current political standings, but you can’t help but watch it and not think of familiar things from the past six months.” Drosselmeyer will also directly inter-


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a whole lot of me that’s put into that act with the audience. character,” says Mullins. “Some of that “The fourth wall was never built in I’m ashamed to admit, but a lot of it this show,” says Schooler. comes from things I don’t want to be “It’s very adaptable,” says Mullins. that I funnel into him. … Because of “As a performer, my favorite part is taithe way that he responds to what is loring it to the audience without forcaround him, it’s always something new ing them to be involved just by reading and interesting. It’s very much a reflectheir energy and reactions. They might tion and a comment on what’s hapthink something is hilarious; you can pening in the world, so that’s somepush that further. If they are not into thing that continuously draws me to it something, you can move right along. as an actor.” That’s a big luxury of the show.” Following the holiday show, Mullins Audrey Stonerock, who has perand Schooler say they will continue formed as a member NoExit’s The Nutto strengthen cracker ensemble NoExit’s status in since the first the arts commushow in 2010, is “The fourth wall was never nity, including looking forward their longstandto the interaction. built in this show.” ing relationship “A smaller space with Big Car, means we can — LUKE SCHOOLER their 2016 stint really play with with House Life the audience. In Project and a larger venue, those in the back might miss out on the educational opportunities with Arts for Learning. They will announce the 2017 magic,” she says. season in January. Which can be a good thing or a bad “Now more than ever, we have so thing, depending on how audience much fuel to keep creating for our members feel about the emcee. audiences,” says Mullins. “Whether it’s “Drosselmeyer is not a nice characa response or a distraction, both are ter,” says Schooler. “Mullins trained in necessary. I think in my lifetime, there’s buffoonery, a type of clowning where been no more important time to be a the audience is drawn into the comtheater artist, and there’s also never plete ugliness of the buffoon,” which been a more important time to be a is depicted in what the character says theater supporter and audience memand does. “At the end, it’s flipped on ber. I think it’s easy to get caught up in them, and they learn what they’ve fed the news cycle and forget to see what’s into. It’s like looking into a mirror.” being interpreted from that or to get a “It’s definitely gotten to the point break from that.” n of building Drosselmeyer that there’s

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FILM EVENTS Kelly Reichardt: A Keen and Subtle Eye December 2, 3 p.m. A highly regarded auteur in the indie film world, Kelly Reichardt is at the top of her game right now. Her most recent film is this year’s critically acclaimed drama Certain Women, which stars Laura Dern, Kristen Stewart and Michelle Williams. Before and after her free lecture on December 2 at 3 p.m., IU Cinema will show some of Reichardt’s films, which “help us recognize the poetry, politics, struggle and beauty in our day-to-day lives.” Certain Women is screening on December 1 and 3 at 7 p.m. Then, on December 2 at 6:30 p.m., IU Cinema will show Reichardt’s directorial debut, River of Grass, a “sun-drenched film noir.” Afterward, at 9:30 p.m., it will screen Night Moves, which stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists. The last film in this Reichardt fest is Wendy and Lucy, which stars Michelle Williams as a loner who drives to Alaska in the hopes of starting a new life with her dog, Lucy (Reichardt’s real-life dog).

SCREENS

The Historic Artcraft Theatre, 57 N. Main St. (Franklin), $5 adult, $4 senior/student, $3 kids 12 and under, historicartcrafttheatre.org White Christmas December 4, 6 p.m. Remember that scene in Christmas Vacation in which Clark Griswold says, “We’re going to have the hap-hap-happiest Christmas since Bing Crosby tap-danced with Danny Fuckin’ Kaye!” This is the movie he’s talking about. As with all screenings at the Buskirk-Chumley Theatre, costumes are encouraged, so wear your best holiday attire! The Buskirk-Chumley Theatre, 114 E. Kirkwood Ave. (Bloomington), $5 for adults, $3 for youth 12 and under, buskirkchumley.org

NUVO.NET/SCREENS Visit nuvo.net/screens for complete movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes

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MANCHESTER BY THE SEA SPEAKS TO THE HUMAN CONDITION One of the very best movies of the year

IU Cinema, 1213 E. 7th St. (Bloomington), $3 for all screenings, cinema.indiana.edu

A Christmas Story December 2 and 3, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. each day; December 4 at 2 p.m. only. This film usually sells out at the Historic Artcraft Theatre, so it will have five showings this year! You’ve probably seen this one a billion times already, but it never gets old. The tale of a boy’s dysfunctional family and his desperate desire for a Red Ryder BB gun, A Christmas Story is a perfect film, regardless of when you watch it.

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he TV commercial currently running for Manchester by the Sea stresses how funny the film is. Certainly there is humor in the movie, but it is about as far from being a comedy as a movie can get. Critic David Edelstein opens his review of the film by noting that the trailer he saw was also unusually unrepresentative. Unfortunately, the publication he writes for opted to saddle his piece with the headline “Manchester by the Sea is Unrelenting in Its Bleakness,” which goes too far the other way. Now it’s my turn to try to give you an idea of what the film is about. Manchester by the Sea is a small film about grief, loss and the awkwardness that usually accompanies a crisis. That all sounds very sad, of course, but the story is realistic enough to include the humor many of us use to deal with pain, along with the clumsy, comical moments that life provides pretty much all of the time. The film is rich because it is so wellobserved. It’s one of the very best movies I’ve seen this year. The film is written and directed by Kenneth Lonergan, the man behind You Can Count On Me and Margaret. It stars Casey Affleck as Lee, a handyman tending to a group of apartments. As we watch him work on wiring and plumbing while navigating through conversations with the tenants, we have no idea he is living in self-imposed exile. The film opens with a scene from happier days: Lee, his beloved older brother Joe (Kyle Chandler), and his nephew

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REVIEW

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (2016)

O P E N S : THURSDAY AT KEYSTONE ART RATED: R, q

on the family fishing boat, the Claudia Marie, in the waters outside their Massachusetts hometown. Lee is about to be forced to return to Manchester-by-the-Sea. Joe has had a heart attack. This isn’t a huge surprise; Joe, his wife Elise (Gretchen Mol) and the rest of the family were informed a while back that he had a serious heart condition. That knowledge does not lessen the blow when Lee makes the drive home, arrives at the hospital and finds out that Joe has died. Lee breaks the news to Joe’s son, 15-year-old Patrick (Lucas Hedges). They end up arguing, and arguing, in such an ugly fashion that a stranger passing them on the street facetiously remarks, “Great parenting,” setting off a new argument parallel to the one that sparked the comment. (Fun Fact: The wiseass passerby is writer-director Lonergan.) The anger builds when Lee and Patrick meet the lawyer for the reading of the will. Joe has named Lee as his desired guardian for Patrick. The men are flattened. When the dust settles, Lee decides that, if this is going to happen, then Patrick will move to where he lives. Patrick wants none of that. He has a life in Manchester-by-the-Sea, with a rock band and two girlfriends. So why doesn’t Lee just move back home? Surely there are plenty of apart-

ments in need of repairs in his home town. Something happened, something that causes people to whisper Lee’s name when he passes. Something that relates to Lee’s ex-wife, Randi (Michelle Williams, excellent as usual). I won’t say what happens, of course, but I want to stress that it doesn’t feel like a dramatic contrivance. The story has Lee at odds with most everybody, including himself. The incident clarifies his behavior without tying anything in a neat little bow. The acting is topflight across the board, with Affleck doing perhaps his best work yet in a role first offered to John Krasinski and then Matt Damon. Glad they turned it down. (Krasinski is an executive producer for the film; Damon is a producer.) Lesley Barber’s score is well-disciplined except for one scene where it gets a little pushy. That’s easy to forgive in a film dealing with life and death and forgiveness of yourself and others. Manchester by the Sea is eloquent about a group of people that, for the most part, tend to sputter or stammer while incorporating the word “fuckin’” a lot. Kenneth Lonergan has crafted a film that speaks to the human condition without getting pretentious. Insight is rarely this accessible. Note: Manchester, Mass. became Manchester-by-the-Sea in 1989, when local resident Ed Corley convinced town leaders that just plain Manchester wasn’t enough to convey the uniqueness of the community. Many locals consider the suffix snooty and refuse to use it. n


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FAR FROM POLITICALLY CORRECT Call Bad Santa 2 a parody of bad behavior

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his year is a strange time for a Bad Santa sequel. The whole shtick of the first film is its gleeful neglect of political correctness. So it’s jarring to see the protagonist return over a decade later to a world in which people are now pushing harder for political correctness than ever before. At the same time, we’ve elected leaders who are normalizing the inhumane behavior that Bad Santa satirizes. Will audiences see Bad Santa 2 as a parody of bad behavior or an endorsement of it? Billy Bob Thornton reprises the role he was born to play — lovable asshole Willie Soke. When he’s not cracking safes, the bitter boozer seeks solace in sex and whiskey. In the first film, he poses as a department store Santa during the holiday season in an effort to rob shopping outlets on Christmas Eve. In this second go-round, he reunites with his sidekick (Tony Cox) to rip off a Chicago charity organization. When they arrive, Willie angrily utters, “Are you kidding me?” And for a second, we sense that he’s growing a conscience and therefore has a problem with stealing from the less fortunate. But then, of course, he says, “There’s no way these assholes have two million bucks.” Little does Willie know, his estranged mother (Kathy Bates) is the mastermind behind the heist. Seeing Bates sport a spiky haircut and spew one crude comment after another is a real hoot. She and Thornton share an electric chemistry as a dysfunctional mother and son on the fringe of polite society. They have a

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BAD SANTA 2

SHOWING: IN WIDE RELEASE RATED: R, t

knack for making you love these characters even as they say and do horrible things. They give you a sense that deep down, these people have a little bit of warmth and light in their cold, black hearts. They have moments of tenderness without making the film too sappy. Bates and Thornton are the film’s saving grace. Christina Hendricks is largely wasted as the head of the charity organization, and many of the other characters are forgettable. Bad Santa is clearly a stronger ensemble comedy. It’s a stronger comedy, period. But this one is a decent serving of leftovers. If you’re a fan of the first film, you’ll bask in the warm familiarity of this one. Bad Santa 2 isn’t as refreshingly unPC as its predecessor. That’s probably because we’ve been drowning in news of derogatory remarks and disrespectful acts across the country. Unfortunately, many moviegoers will probably take this film as a cue to keep acting crude and rude. But for those who understand that it’s actually criticizing bad people, Bad Santa 2 makes for effective comic relief. Although we’ve been cringing for months at the same kind of comments with which this film is filled, it’s nice to hear them filtered through a satirical lens rather than a sincere one. Right now, we live in a time in which we have to laugh to keep from crying. n

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CRAFT BEER WHERE YOU LEAST EXPECT IT Sean Manahan’s return to his hometown, Monticello, will liven things up considerably with the addition of his new brewery Kopacetic Beer Factory. Here’s Sean Manahan’s story: “My family owns and operates The Scoreboard in Monticello. It’s a pizza and wings joint we opened in 2012. I was brewing at People’s at the time and told my old man that we needed to carry craft beer at the restaurant. Back then, the craft beer boom was still relatively new and hadn’t quite made it to Monticello. I wanted to share my passion with my hometown. It was slow at first, but interest has really grown, and we now have a constant supply of rotating draught options and 20-odd bottles/cans of craft available. After my wife and I realized we were pregnant with our first child, we knew we wanted to move back home. After brewing for seven years with big breweries and [differing] distribution models, I’ve gained invaluable experience and knowledge. All of which I am happy to finally bring home and share with the community that has shared so much with me. I came up with the Kopacetic Beer Factory back in 2011. It was a full-on faux brewery I ran with my roommates while working at PBC [People’s Brewing Company]. It was fun to ‘play brewery’, but I knew someday I’d turn it into a reality. Initially, I thought I was planning on building a large brewery like the ones I’ve worked with. However, I’ve grown tired of big systems and expensive distribution. I have loved watching the nanobrewery model grow over the years with such success stories as Bier, Burn ‘Em, Books and Brews, Wabash and many more. After talking with these outfits and brewing a collaboration with Wabash, I’m certain that this is the model I want to pursue. We’re combining The Scoreboard with the Kopacetic Taphouse for Monticello’s first brewpub. My hope is to bring the area a brewery it can be proud of much like LBC and BRBP have done with outstanding success over the years. People can follow along with my progress at @ KopaceticBeer on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. — RITA KOHN

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Sitka Salmon Shares brings sustainable fish to your doorstep

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inding quality sustainable fish in the Midwest has always been pretty much an impossibility, especially for home consumers. And then, as if out of nowhere, I started hearing a name pop up: Sitka Salmon Shares. In the past few months I’ve been to two meals featuring their fish. And it was phenomenal. Jonathan Brooks and the team at Milktooth made a dish featuring king salmon and king crab that may have been the best bite of food I’ve ever had, and it was made with Sitka Salmon Shares’ products. I had to get to know more about this product, and luckily Audrea DiLiberto, a local Indy lover of food, had all the information I needed and got me in touch with the President and Chief Salmon Steward of Sitka Salmon Shares, Nic Mink. “Everything that we do is about creating a transparent and traceable chain of custody,” Nic tells me over the phone. He seems highly passionate when talking about his company. “It’s where we’re really kind of creating an innovative supply chain. Our fishermen own the company, the company owns the processing plant, the company owns the shipping infrastructure, the company owns the mar-

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Fisherman Drew Terhaar shows off one of his catches of the day.

keting infrastructure, the company owns everything up to that moment the fish is handed off to the consumer. We spent a lot of time and a lot of money investing in that supply chain. But when you look at the problems we see in our seafood system with labeling, with fish fraud [a

recent study by Oceana found that 39% of the restaurants and fish purveyors in NYC committed fraud], with poor quality, we think that all goes back to a lack of transparency in the way in which seafood is typically harvested and processed and delivered.” This transparency he is talking about is just one aspect that sets the company apart. The company’s fishing fleet is comprised of small boat fishermen in Sitka, Alaska. The fishermen are all hookand-line fishermen, and through SSS they are fishing in a different way than any other fishermen. Nic explains what sets their fishermen apart from others: “What we do isn’t for everybody. You have to be one to do marketing, you have to be able to reach out to people that are buying your fish, you have to feel good about Instagramming and taking photos and blogging and all the kind of stuff that our fishermen do to help create a more transparent and traceable system. And also the fishing is a little different; Our fishermen all have to spend more time handling their fish, they all have to spend more time ashore. You know, we ask our fishermen to take shorter trips. They have to deliver to certain specs that are a little bit different than how other fisherman deliver in Sitka.”


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These practices are what lead to the fish tasting fresher, which I can attest to from the two times I’ve had it. Audrea has been a member of the program for two years now, and she has nothing but great things to say about her experience. She first heard about the program from a Chefs’ Night Off dinner at Recess, and she signed up after meeting Nic and one of the fishermen and Vice President of the company, Marsh Skeele. “I've been nothing but impressed,” she says. “The quality is great, the communication is timely, the cost is less than I'd pay locally and it's conveniently delivered to my home monthly. I rarely purchase seafood at the fish counters around town because any given time of the year I have 5-8 different species of fish in my freezer ready to use within a day. “I put a high importance on knowing where the food I eat comes from. All of Sitka Salmon Shares’ seafood is wildcaught in Alaska. I don't have to search for wild caught seafood in stores. It takes the hunt out of purchasing seafood in a landlocked state; instead, it just shows up automatically.” Nic and the Sitka Salmon Shares team recognize the change in Indianapolis’ food scene and how many of us, like Audrea, are placing importance on knowing where our food is coming from and if it is sustainable. Nic lived in Indianapolis for a few years and taught at Butler University, and he tells me he sees the changes happening here: “Really in the last three months we decided it was really time to start focusing a lot more on Indianapolis. We think that there’s a growing food scene, I mean, you know, you’ve seen it, right? Even from when I moved in 2012, now in 2016 it’s a totally different food world. People are beginning to wake up to a lot of the issues that industrial food production is causing to farmers and the environment, and people are really beginning to wonder in Indianapolis where the food is coming from, and we thought that it was a good time to refocus our efforts in Indianapolis and to start reaching out in Indianapolis in a way we haven’t really done.” Hence the slew of events featuring Sitka Salmon Shares lately. In fact, there is another one coming up on December 8 at the newly opened cidery, Ash and Elm. The event will highlight a burgeoning partnership between Goose the Market and Sitka Salmon Shares. Nic tells me, “We got to know Chris [Eley of Smoking Goose/Goose the Market] pretty well. We were both in Food and Wine in 2014, we were named one of America’s Top Food Artisans the same year that he was, and in the process we

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to try out. Nic says of their recipes, “We spent a lot of time and invested a lot of resources in creating a culinary program to go along with our fish. It has recipes for people that are novices and for people who are foodies and have a better understanding of ingredients. There is a little something for everybody.” It truly is an incredible opportunity for us in Indianapolis. Not only are we getting fresh, quality salmon, crab, halibut and more, but we’re helping fishermen that care. “The members that we have are making a difference in the lives of fishermen who want to fish more sustainably, more thoughtfully and fish in a way that really honors this amazing food, this amazing creature,” Nic tells me. “I mean, there is probably no better, healthier wild food in the world than salmon. Setting up a system that allows consumers to want to support fishermen to ensure the integrity of the ingredient all the “The members that we have are way down the supmaking a difference in the lives ply chain is just great. of fishermen who want to fish “Hook-and line-fishermen, more sustainably.” community-based fishermen are — NIC MINK, the best stewards PRESIDENT OF SITKA SALMON SHARES of the resource. They’re the ones that are looking to take care of it over “We can get it into people’s hands, the long term, they’re looking really perfectly-handled fish, perfectly to hand down their operations bled; some of it’s fresh, some of it’s flash to their kids, they’re not lookfrozen. We have a flash freezer that is state ing to just fish everything and of the art and pretty much top-of-the-line leave. Which unfortunately flash freezing technology that allows us to is how most of the world’s freeze fish in a way where you practically oceans are fished, where you see no difference from a fresh product. have someone who catches a Frozen fish has a really bad rap because bunch of fish and leaves and it’s frozen poorly, for one, but it’s always they don’t care if that fish is frozen at the end of its shelf life. If you there for the next person to take a fish and flash freeze it perfectly fish it. When you’ve got smallright at the beginning of its shelf life, you scale fishermen who live in deliver a fish that is perfect. That is what the communities where they we strive to do, and we do it for chefs, and fish, they’re invested in the you know what’s cool is we do it for home resource over the long time. consumers as well.” I think that’s the ultimate exThe program is simple: You sign up pression of sustainability. It’s for the amount of fish you’re wanting for more than just the fish itself; your family, which is all laid out for you it’s the fishermen and the on their website, and then it is delivered community, and that’s really to your door monthly. Not only do they what our members are doing deliver the fish, with photos of it and the is creating opportunities and fishermen (and sometimes the fishermen creating better opportunities deliver it themselves to your door), but for that way of life, for that they also have recipes for the fish for you way of fishing to exist.”n got to talking and began having discussions of what it might be like. “We’ve sent him a few pallets of salmon and he’s been kind of experimenting, and yeah, we’ve got some really great stuff coming out right now with some of these sausages that he’s created and these artisan, handcrafted salmon patties, and that partnership has just been great.” At $22 a person, it is the perfect way to try some of their products and to get a taste of Chris’ concoctions and Ash and Elm’s ciders. But when it comes to Sitka Salmon Shares, the important part of the product is the home delivery option. As Nic points out, “You know restaurants are getting better fish than home consumers; at restaurants you’re usually eating fish that is usually fairly well-handled and only seven or eight days old. At home it’s likely poorly-handled and 12 or 13 days old.” But with the Salmon Shares program, there is a major difference.

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King salmon is a thing of beauty.

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​1 NUVO’s NightCrawler went out this past weekend to “treat himself.” Our cherished metalhead photographer decided to go to Kuma’s for food and an all-ages black metal show. 2 Before the show he enjoyed the delicious “Sleep Burger” — basically Thanksgiving on a bun — and whiskey from the tap before going over to Kuma’s event space. 3 Bands Choking, Wolvhammer and Tombs absolutely tore the place up. 4 Tombs lead singer Mike Hill growled and howled. It was a killer show.

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Curry for lunch and Midland Antique Mall shopping.

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Milkshake at BRICS!

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Busman’s Holiday release Popular Cycles on Joyful Noise Recordings

BY K YL E L O NG MUSIC@NU VO . N ET

he Bloomington brothers known as Busman’s Holiday released new LP Popular Cycles in mid-October. Next week, they'll celebrate that new release with a show at their label's headquarters. Popular Cycles finds Addison and Lewis Rogers taking aim at a huge pop sound — and we’re talking Brian Wilson or George Martin huge. And, to the duo’s credit, their arrow has zeroed in on that bullseye. The sound here is indeed big. The intricately crafted arrangements on Popular Cycles make use of a 21-piece orchestra, in addition to a range of other arresting choices in instrumentation. But beneath the massive soundscapes and layered vocals lies the soul of Busman’s Holiday: carefully written and lovingly performed pop songs overflowing with unique melodic and lyrical turns. When all these elements come together, the effect is magical, as evidenced on the nostalgic “Make Believe,” or the Beatles-esque “Evening Flows.” I caught up with Addison and Lewis in advance of their December 10 holidaythemed album release party at Pioneer. I was pleased to find the Rogers brothers to be every bit as bright, fun and engaging in conversation as they are in performance. NUVO: You guys are known for your frequent performances busking around Bloomington. It seems to me that busking has been a big influence on your approach to making music. You have a very simple live presentation. Lewis, you often perform on acoustic guitar, and Addison, you're known for playing on a sort-of-makeshift drum kit built around a piece of Samsonite luggage. ADDISON ROGERS: Yeah! [laughs] One piece of Samsonite which I use as my bass drum and for a high hat type of sound, and then just a snare and cymbal.  I don't know how much that has shaped our music, but certainly it's shaped our approach to entertaining and having a relationship and dialogue with the audience, for sure. LEWIS ROGERS: Well, I've actually always thought that a big reason we sing how

setup as it is, the records need to be exactly that or they need to be wildly different from that. So we've stuck to wildly different for a while.  NUVO: Your 2014 LP A Long Goodbye was a significant step forward for Busman’s Holiday. It’s an impressive record with ambitious arrangements and production.  You recorded the LP in Canada with Mark Lawson, who is most know for his work engineering Arcade Fire’s 2011 LP The Suburbs, which won a Grammy for Album of the Year in 2011.  I heard a really interesting story surrounding your work with Mark Lawson that started with an inheritance you received from an uncle. Can you elaborate on that? 

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we do is because I've trained my voice to singing on the street. You have to be loud. I think that for a while on a lot of our songs I was singing super loud.  David Byrne has that theory that music is shaped by its environment, and I think that's really true. I think that's one thing that's interesting about how we've evolved. As we've started playing different venues we started using microphones more, and the approach to music starts to change. Now I can have a song where I whisper. Before, we couldn't have a song where I whisper, because we were on the street and you can't play that way on the street. I've always thought that we've been molded by the busking.  NUVO: It’s interesting to me that your live setup is so simple and basic, and the stuff you're doing in the studio is extremely complex. Can you talk about the gap between these two very different sides of the band?  LEWIS ROGERS: I've always wanted the songs to work in both of those setups.

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So you can explore this totally different world in the studio, but at the end of the day when you play it live for people, they understand that with just the chords and melody and a basic setup the song can also work.  I've always enjoyed when artists don't sound live like they do on the record. I know other people don't necessarily agree with that, but I totally do.  ADDISON ROGERS: It settled into me at some point that we should not try to replicate what's on the record. If you want that experience, just listen to the record. The live show should be something you can't get otherwise and something that is as true as it can be.  We decided a long time ago, with our

ADDISON ROGERS: Our mother's father died early on in her life, and she always wanted us to spend time with our great-uncle because that was the closest thing she had to her father. Unfortunately that didn't really come around. Then he passed away, and we got this inheritance. So we were trying to figure out what we should do with it.  We were having a late-night meal with our buddy David Woodruff at Steak 'n Shake, and we were thinking maybe we should get some equipment to make some videos. David said, "You're thinking about making this record. Have you thought about getting a producer for it?" Lewis said, "Well, there's probably only one producer we'd want to work with and that's Mark Lawson." At that point he'd just received a Grammy for working with Arcade Fire. So we're thinking there's no way he's going to work with us. [laughs] That is a total pipe dream.  At that point David was working at Fort William, and in the morning he told me to check my email. We found out that he’d sent a message to Mark saying, "These guys are orchestral pop, would you be interested in working with them?" Mark writes back, "Oh yeah, orchestral pop. That sounds great. Send me the demos."  We sent him some songs and gave him Lewis' phone number. Then out of the blue one day Lewis gets a phone call from California; he answers the call only to find out it's Mark Lawson.


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LEWIS ROGERS: I was just driving and I picked up the phone and someone said "Hi, is Lewis there? This is Mark Lawson." That sobered me up.  So then we started talking, and he thought we'd already recorded the whole thing and just needed it mixed. I said "We actually need the whole thing recorded." He said "OK, come up to the studio. I've got the keys to Arcade Fire's studio. Come up and we'll make this happen." I told him we didn't have that much money really. He just said "Well, we'll not worry about that right now." It totally worked out and he's just a super nice guy. He got us. It was nice to find someone really talented who got you. That was a touching moment. You don't find that very often, especially with someone who is really going to do you justice. It was synchronicity. ADDISON ROGERS: He had us up there for a week and arranged really fantastic musicians for us. Some that had recorded and performed with Islands, which is the group that came after The Unicorns. That's how we got into Mark Lawson. We didn't really know Arcade Fire very much. But we were both big fans of The Unicorns who were a super tight, three-piece, indie pop group Mark had produced. They were really funky, quirky and terrific. Lewis and I had seen them live. They came through Rhino's at one point, maybe a couple times. They performed amazingly.  We recorded in Farnham, Quebec which is about 45 minutes outside of Montreal. The recording space was crazy; it was an old Masonic temple. So it was like a huge church with great stained glass. A beautiful mixture of this decaying structure and this warm energy there.  We really hadn't had an experience like that before. We'd had recordings that had their own sense of space and experience. We recorded our EP before that at a friend's house and everybody was sort of new to recording strings and that type of process. But to be submerged into this entirely different environment was just terrific.  LEWIS ROGERS: Well, we'd just never been in a studio before. In my mind I thought "I've recorded albums. I've been in studios." But then you realize "I haven't been in a studio once!" So it was odd to go into this scenario where you're just thrown into things.  But luckily we were with someone who was a total professional. He'd say "Hey, you guys should just take your time and warm up." I think he sensed we were both kind of nervous. 

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NUVO: So this brings us up to date to your new LP Popular Cycles. I think this is a remarkable album. The songwriting and production are brilliant. There’s some fascinating instrumentation on the record, including arrangements utilizing a 21-piece orchestra. And again you’re working again with Mark Lawson. Did you return to Quebec for the recording of Popular Cycles?  LEWIS ROGERS: This time Mark came down to Bloomington. It was interesting because we did it in both Bloomington and Montreal. It was cool because on the last record we were going into this foreign place, so it was nice for Mark to come into our spot that we were most comfortable in and record us there. He stayed at our parents’ house. He specifically asked for home-cooked meals. We showed him around and made him feel like family. I think that it really helped us.  Then we went to Montreal and stayed with his family. We picked his kid up from preschool a couple times. I think that bonded us more. It was a really good experience.

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ADDISON ROGERS: On the first record we did with him, he at times specifically stated that he didn't want to touch what we were doing, he just wanted to record it. This time around there was much more collaboration and he took on more of a co-producer role.  LEWIS ROGERS: The first one isn't technically produced by Mark, it was just recorded by him. So on this one he added his flavor to it. Especially "Evening Flows"; that's the one he was involved in shaping the most. n NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 11.30.16 - 12.07.16 // MUSIC 27


SOUNDCHECK

Newcomer’s latest is The Beautiful Not Yet, another poetic, harmonyfilled release with banjo player/ producer Jayme Stone producing. The Church WIthin, 1125 Spruce St., $25, all-ages LOCALS The Why Store 20th Anniversary Show 8 p.m. Here’s what we wrote about The Why Store in June of 2002 — 14 years ago!

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Lol Tolhurst, Saturday at Indy CD and Vinyl

NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK SUBMIT YOUR EVENT AT NUVO.NET/EVENT DENOTES EDITOR’S PICK

WEDNESDAY

The King Khan and BBQ Show, The Gartrells, The Bishop (Bloomington), 18+

Fitz and The Tantrums, Phantogram 7:30 p.m. Here’s a portion of our review of Fitz and the Tantrums’ 2014 stop at the Egyptian Room: “The room crackled with electricity from the band, exuberant fans cast in a torrent of sound and light. The show was forceful and energetic from start to finish with Fitz and co-lead Noelle Scaggs dancing, jumping around and generally using every inch of the stage. Even a stripped down and slower version of ‘Last Raindrop’ was absolutely captivating and energetic. The passionate back-and-forth between Fitz and Scaggs is a potent re-imagining that allowed both the band and the crowd to catch their collective breaths. This is a band that knows how to engage its audience and deliver a potent and impressive performance.” — BRYAN GILL

Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., $29.50 - $75, all-ages

Emerson Theater, 4634 E. 10th St., $20 advance, all-ages LOCALS

The Funk Quarter, Jazz Kitchen, 21+

POP

fundraiser for childhood cancer research.

Christian Taylor, Travis Champ, Longriver, Evan Snyder and The Nouveaurees, State Street Pub, 21+

THURSDAY Jimmy Eat World, Bishop Briggs, Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, all-ages Mac Miller, The Whooligan, ClockworkDJ, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages Bruce Katz Band Out From The Center CD Release Tour, Slippery Noodle Inn, 21+ Andy Shauf, Chris Cohen, The Hi-Fi, 21+ Seven Lions, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages

FRIDAY FUNDRAISERS Mosh for a Cause 5 6 p.m. Power Trip, Burn, Harm’s Way and Jesus PIece play this

28 MUSIC // 11.30.16 - 12.07.16 // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Spark Joy Shakes Indy 9 p.m. Good cause alert: Money raised at this event supports Girls Inc. Indy. Bands on the list include Ryan M. Brewer, Sam Law, Grey Lamb and Saint Aubin. White Rabbit Cabaret, 1116 E. Prospect St., $7, 21+ LEGENDS John Carter Cash and Ana Cristina 7 p.m. Here’s the press copy: “As the sole offspring of the Johnny Cash-June Carter union, John Carter Cash is carrying on the family tradition quite well, thank you. He’s not only a fivetime Grammy Award-winning producer and songwriter, but a performer as well.” He’ll play with Ana Cristina, who will fill in on the June Carter parts — but expect plenty of originals, too. The Warehouse, 254 1st Ave. SW, prices vary, all-ages LOCALS Carrie Newcomer 8 p.m. Bloomington darling Carrie

“Sometime at the dawn of the ’90s, lead vocalist Chris Shaffer, guitarist Mike Smith and bassist Greg Gardner got together at Ball State University and decided to move to Indianapolis and take their musical ideas to the people. They picked up Charlie Bushor and started a Wednesday night gig at Chubby’s Club Lasalle during the month of January. Bucking the glut of cover bands that dominated the city’s top clubs at the time, The Why Store continued to play and, eventually, on the strength of Shaffer’s sparkling original compositions and their eccentric and electric live performances, they were packing numerous clubs in the city.” — JEFF NAPIER

The Vogue, 6258 N. College Ave., 21+ Harbour, Harpooner, Shannon Hayden, The Hi-Fi, 21+ Steel Panther, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages

SATURDAY BOOK SIGNINGS Lol Tolhurst 6 p.m. We have an interview with The Cure co-founder — who stops at Indy CD and Vinyl for a book signing and Q&A — online at NUVO.net. Indy CD and Vinyl, 806 Broad Ripple Ave., FREE, all-ages HIP-HOP The Holiday Affair with Ginuwine 7 p.m. We’re a member of the Tom Haverford School of Romantic Love: If your boo don’t know Ginuwine, don’t let that person be your boo. Indiana Farmers Coliseum, 1202 E. 38th St., prices vary, all-ages ROOTS Joe Pug 8 p.m. The Virginia Avenue Folk Fest headliner returns for another Indy date. Last time he was here, we asked Pug to dive into the boundaries of folk and soul, which his new album Windfall intersects. He said, “The genre itself is a lot more malleable than it used to be, a lot more accepting and laid back than it used to be. Me playing with my band on this new record was not exactly Dylan at

BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

the Newport Folk Festival with Pete Seeger, axe in hand, trying to cut the microphone cord. I think the folk community is a lot more diffuse than it used to be, and a lot more hard to pin down as to exactly what it is. I think that it’s found it’s way into a lot of other genres at this point. I think a lot of what people are considering Americana music right now wouldn’t have been considered folk music even 15 years ago, 20 years ago.” The Hi-Fi, 1043 Virginia Ave. Ste. 4, $15 advance, $17 doors, 21+ Noble Roots CD Release with Cara Jean Marcy, Logan Street Sanctuary, all-ages Warm Your Heart, Broadway United Methodist Church, all-ages Winter Gift featuring Patrick Ball, Lisa Lynne, Aryeh Frankfurter, Indiana Historical Society, all-ages Joe Bonamassa, Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, all-ages Stolen Faces: A Grateful Dead Experiences, The Vogue, 21+

SUNDAY Reggae Revolution, Casba, 21+ Dynamite!, Mass Ave Pub, 21+ Marshmello, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages Rob Dixon and The Tucker Brothers, Marrow, all-ages

NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK


SAVAGELOVE

QUICKIES

My boyfriend of almost two years is wonderful, and we have had very few issues. But there is one thing that has almost been a deal breaker. He fiddles with his penis almost constantly — in front of me and in front of our roommates. I’ve confronted him about it a number of times. He said he should be able to fiddle with his dick in every room of the house if he wants to, and he should feel comfortable doing so. I told him that he is being “comfortable” at the expense of the comfort of those around him. We’ve had a number of confrontations about this, and he does it a lot less, but he still does it. If he doesn’t stop when I tell him to, I just leave the room. My question to you: Is this behavior unacceptable or am I being unreasonable? — FRUSTRATED WITH THE FIDDLING

DAN SAVAGE: Until a few weeks ago, I would’ve said that neo-Nazis “Sieg Heil!” ing around Washington, D.C., was unacceptable and any elected official or pundit who didn’t immediately condemn neo-Nazis would be finished politically and professionally. But it turns out that neo-Nazism is just another example of IOIYAR — “it’s okay if you’re a Republican” — and relativism reigns. In other words: “Unacceptable” is a relative concept, not an objective one. That said, FWTF, I don’t think you’re being unreasonable: Fiddling with your dick in every room of the house is inconsiderate and childish. It sounds like you’re doing a good job of socializing your boyfriend — better late than never — and I encourage you to keep it up. I’m a straight man in a mostly healthy marriage. Our sex life is average, which I understand is better than some people can hope for, and we communicate well. For example, I felt comfortable admitting to my wife a few weeks ago that I would like more blow jobs. She in turn felt comfortable admitting to me that she would prefer if I showered more often. So we made a deal: I would shower every day and she would blow me twice a month. But the first month came and went with no blow jobs in sight. I’ve showered every single day. Should I bring this up to her? — BATHE LONGER OR WITHHOLD SEX

SAVAGE: Your wife doesn’t wanna suck your cock, BLOWS, squeaky clean or stinky cheese. I would recommend outsourcing non-birthday blow jobs — if your wife is okay with that, BLOWS, which she won’t be. I’m a mid-30s bi woman in an incredible poly marriage with a bi guy. A few months ago, I learned that one of my closest friends (also poly) has a crush on me. I also have always had a crush on him. My crush-friend needed to ask his other partners how they felt about him being involved with me. Three months have gone by, and he’s not yet told me how his other partners feel. One of those partners is under a lot of stress — not the best time to bring up potential new partners to her — but my friend has dated other people in the past three months. I think if he really wanted to do something with me, he would have asked by now. I know you can’t ask someone to give you closure. I’ve also got a shit ton of pride that prevents me from asking him directly how he feels. Should I just move on? — CONFUSED AND PATHETIC

SAVAGE: Yup.

VOICES

THIS WEEK

NEWS

ARTS

been having issues with getting caught up in her head when I am pleasuring her. This has been causing dysphoric feelings for her. We have had a few discussions about what we can do about the situation, but we are feeling lost. We know there isn’t going to be a quick fix, but what do we do about this?

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

DAN SAVAGE Listen to Dan’s podcast every week at savagelovecast.com @fakedansavage

— CONFUSED AND NERVOUS TRULY CAN’T OVERCOME MUCH EXASPERATION

SAVAGE: Pot. I’ve been in a long-term relationship with the girl I’m going to marry. While I’ve had a few relationships in the past, she has had only one other relationship before me, who also happened to be her only other sexual companion. My girlfriend is very vanilla in the bedroom, which is fine for me, but the issue is that currently the only way for her to have an orgasm is to grind (dry hump) on my boxer shorts until she climaxes. This obviously causes her a little bit of embarrassment, along with some heavy rug burn on both of our ends. My question for you: Is there any toy or something that may help with this? — GIRLFRIEND DRYLY HUMPING

SAVAGE: Pot and sex toys — they might not help, but they couldn’t hurt.

I’m a woman with a small build who has never had children. During sex, my Odds are good he’ll notice a current partner frequently “Squeeze your pussy,” difference even if you’re not doing says, and expects me to do Kegel anything differently, so great is the exercises during sex (and hold it), which I will not do power of suggestion. because it’s not pleasurable for me to tense up like that during sex. He doesn’t have the biggest or the smallest I am a queer trans woman in my middick I have ever had, and I’ve never had 20s, and I am in a monogamous relation- this comment before. I’ve actually been ship with a queer cis woman. We have told many times how “good and tight” been dating for about three months now. I feel. We both enjoy anal, so we tried We have had an absolutely amazing sex that. Same request: “Squeeze.” I have no life since day one, except for one caveat: abnormalities. I’m not sure if there is a She has never in her life had an orgasm. work-around for this, other than doing For most of the time she has been sexuKegels every minute of my life. Help! ally active, she has felt ambivalent about — SEX PARTNER’S ANNOYING REQUESTS getting off. It has only been in the past month that she has started feeling a SAVAGE: You have two options: You “sexual awakening,” as she calls it. We can tell your current sex partner you have been making progress, but she has

aren’t going to “squeeze” his dick with your pussy or your ass, as the sensation isn’t pleasurable for you, or you can lie to him. Tell him you’re squeezing your pussy/ass — you’re squeezing so hard — without actually squeezing your pussy/ass. Odds are good he’ll notice a difference even if you’re not doing anything differently, SPAR, so great is the power of suggestion. I had to write after reading your recent Savage Love Letter of the Day from a woman who spotted a friend’s husband on Tinder and didn’t know whether she should say something to her friend. My (single and Tindering) friend has been mistaken for his identical (married and non-Tindering) twin brother more than once on the app. They live in Seattle and Los Angeles, and so most people in their lives don’t realize they have a twin. My friend has freaked out his sister-in-law’s friends by popping up on their Tinder feed. It came out after the sister-in-law posted a photo of the twins together on social media and multiple people expressed extreme relief that her husband was not a cheater but an identical twin!! — DELUDED ACQUAINTANCES NEEDED ANSWERS

SAVAGE: Thanks for sharing, DANA!

Question? mail@savagelove.com Online: nuvo.net/savagelove

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with the kinksters from the NoSafeWord podcast: savagelovecast.com.

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Policies: Advertiser warrants that all goods or services advertised in NUVO are permissible under applicable local, state and federal laws. Advertisers and hired advertising agencies are liable for all content (including text, representation and illustration) of advertisements and are responsible, without limitation, for any and all claims made thereof against NUVO, its officers or employees. Classified ad space is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow,” wrote naturalist Henry David Thoreau in *Walden,* “to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.” I’d love to see you summon that level of commitment to your important rendezvous in the coming weeks, Aries. Please keep in mind, though, that your “most important rendezvous” are more likely to be with wild things, unruly wisdom, or primal breakthroughs than with pillars of stability, committee meetings, and business-as-usual. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For you Tauruses, December is “I Accept and Love and Celebrate Myself Exactly How I Am Right Now” Month. To galvanize yourself, play around with this declaration by Oscar-winning Taurus actress Audrey Hepburn: “I’m a long way from the human being I’d like to be, but I’ve decided I’m not so bad after all.” Here are other thoughts to draw on during the festivities: 1. “If you aren’t good at loving yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone.” - Barbara De Angelis. 2. “The hardest challenge is to be yourself in a world where everyone is trying to make you be somebody else.” - E. E. Cummings. 3. “To accept ourselves as we are means to value our imperfections as much as our perfections.” Sandra Bierig. 4. “We cannot change anything until we accept it.” — Carl Jung. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are your collaborative projects (including the romantic kind) evolving at a slower pace than you expected? Have they not grown as deep and strong as you’ve wished they would? If so, I hope you’re perturbed about it. Maybe that will motivate you to stop tolerating the stagnation. Here’s my recommendation: Don’t adopt a more serious and intense attitude. Instead, get loose and frisky. Inject a dose of blithe spirits into your togetherness, maybe even some high jinks and rowdy experimentation. The cosmos has authorized you to initiate ingenious surprises. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I don’t recommend that you buy a cat-o’-nine-tails and whip yourself in a misguided effort to exorcize your demons. The truth is, those insidious troublemakers exult when you abuse yourself. They draw perverse sustenance from it. In fact, their strategy is to fool you into treating yourself badly. So, no. If you hope to drive away the saboteurs huddled in the sacred temple of your psyche, your best bet is to shower yourself with tender care, even luxurious blessings. The pests won’t like that, and -- if you commit to this crusade for an extended time -- they will eventually flee. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Nobel Prize-winning novelist Gabriel García Márquez loved yellow roses. He often had a fresh bloom on his writing desk as he worked, placed there every morning by his wife Mercedes Barcha. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to consider initiating a comparable ritual. Is there a touch of beauty you would like to inspire you on a regular basis? It there a poetic gesture you could faithfully perform for a person you love? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “For a year I watched as something entered and then left my body,” testified Jane Hirshfield in her poem “The Envoy.” What was that mysterious *something*? Terror or happiness? She didn’t know. Nor could she decipher “how it came in” or “how it went out.” It hovered “where words could not reach it. It slept where light could not go.” Her experience led her to conclude that “There are openings in our lives of which we know nothing.” I bring this meditation to your attention, Virgo, because I suspect you are about to tune in to a mysterious opening. But unlike Hirshfield, I think you’ll figure out what it is. And then you will respond to it with verve and intelligence.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reporter at the magazine *Vanity Fair* asked David Bowie, “What do you consider your greatest achievement?” Bowie didn’t name any of his albums, videos, or performances. Rather, he answered, “Discovering morning.” I suspect that you Libras will attract and generate marvels if you experiment with accomplishments like that in the coming weeks. So yes, try to discover or rediscover morning. Delve into the thrills of beginnings. Magnify your appreciation for natural wonders that you usually take for granted. Be seduced by sources that emanate light and heat. Gravitate toward what’s fresh, blossoming, just-in-its-early-stages. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to traditional astrology, you Scorpios are not prone to optimism. You’re more often portrayed as connoisseurs of smoldering enigmas and shadowy intrigue and deep questions. But one of the most creative and successful Scorpios of the 20th century did not completely fit this description. French artist Claude Monet was renowned for his delightful paintings of sensuous outdoor landscapes. “Every day I discover even more beautiful things,” he testified. “It is intoxicating me, and I want to paint it all. My head is bursting.” Monet is your patron saint in the coming weeks. You will have more potential to see as he did than you’ve had in a long time. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A journalist dared composer John Cage to “summarize himself in a nutshell.” Cage said, “Get yourself out of whatever cage you find yourself in.” He might have added, “Avoid the nutshells that anyone tries to put you in.” This is always fun work to attend to, of course, but I especially recommend it to you Sagittarians right now. You’re in the time of year that’s close to the moment when you first barged out of your mom’s womb, where you had been housed for months. The coming weeks will be an excellent phase to attempt a similar if somewhat less extravagant trick. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hundreds of years ago, the Catholic Church’s observance of Lent imposed a heavy burden. During this six-week period, extending from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, believers were expected to cleanse their sins through acts of self-denial. For example, they weren’t supposed to eat meat on Fridays. Their menus could include fish, however. And this loophole was expanded even further in the 17th century when the Church redefined beavers as being fish. (They swim well, after all.) I’m in favor of you contemplating a new loophole in regard to your own self-limiting behaviors, Capricorn. Is there a taboo you observe that no longer makes perfect sense? Out of habit, do you deny yourself a pleasure or indulgence that might actually be good for you? Wriggle free of the constraints. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The Pacific Ocean was overflowing the borders of the map,” wrote Pablo Neruda in his poem “The Sea.” “There was no place to put it,” he continued. “It was so large, wild and blue that it didn’t fit anywhere. That’s why it was left in front of my window.” This passage is a lyrical approximation of what your life could be like in 2017. In other words, lavish, elemental, expansive experiences will be steadily available to you. Adventures that may have seemed impossibly big and unwieldy in the past will be just the right size. And it all begins soon. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I have a deep fear of being too much,” writes poet Michelle K. “That one day I will find my someone, and they will realize that I am a hurricane. That they will step back and be intimidated by my muchness.” Given the recent astrological omens, Pisces, I wouldn’t be shocked if you’ve been having similar feelings. But now here’s the good news: Given the astrological omens of the next nine months, I suspect the odds will be higher than usual that you’ll encounter brave souls who’ll be able to handle your muchness. They may or may not be soulmates or your one-andonly. I suggest you welcome them as they are, with all of their muchness.

Homework: If you had a baby clone of yourself to take care of, what would be your child-rearing strategy? Tell me at Freewillastrology.com. NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 11.30.16 - 12.07.16 // CLASSIFIEDS 31


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Help to incubate Veteran Industries and Arts. Contact Jeff, jeff@ovrthere.com or 317.946.8365

The First Church of Cannabis

3400 S. Rural St., Indianapolis, Church Services: Wed @ 7pm, www.Cannaterian.org, (317) 986-6972 The Comedy Grinder: Fri @ 8pm Streaming live @ OttoNation.Club/Live

BMV Hearings and Appeals Court Imposed Suspensions All Moving Traffic Violations and Suspensions

Christopher Grider, Attorney at Law

FRESH DAILY AT NUVO.NET

indytrafficattorney.com • FREE CONSULTATIONS

(317) 637-9000

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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - November 30, 2016