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VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

THE INAUGURAL ISSUE OF THE ONLY FOOD AND COOKING MAGAZINE AT NORTHWESTERN

BRUNCH THE FUTON OF FOOD (TWO IN ONE, SON)

/ FROM ETHIOPIA TO EVANSTON p. 28 / FOUR WAYS TO SERVE A SPUD p. 20 / BRING YOUR OWN p. 31

I DON’T GET WHY PEOPLE LIKE BRUNCH. WHAT’S THE BENEFIT OF COMBINING BREAKDANCING AND LUNCH? — TRACY, 30 ROCK


What can Shabbat be for you? Services and Free Dinner Every Friday NU Hillel ď‚&#x; 629 Foster St. www.nuhillel.org


LIVE LIFE, EAT HEALTHY, AND COOK SMART WITH SPOON

HELPING SUPPORT SPOON AND HEALTHY LIFESTYLES FOR ALL NORTHWESTERN STUDENTS

CO-FOUNDER, EDITOR IN CHIEF Mackenzie Barth CO-FOUNDER, CREATIVE DIRECTOR Sarah Adler PUBLISHER Danielle David

e nest onc ate bird’s

AD SALES DIRECTOR Clayton Webb MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR Lauren PHOTO DIRECTOR Danny Schuleman VIDEO DIRECTOR Kathryn Nathanson TREASURER Nadine Jachi

she has eaten intestines, and she pronounces them “intes- TINES”

Miceli

ate her first salad last year

MANAGING EDITOR Andrea Kang RECIPE EDITOR Hillary Lindwall RESTAURANT EDITOR Aurelie Corinthios COLLEGE EDITOR Megan Suckut FOOD FOR THOUGHT EDITOR Kendra Valkema DRINK/HOW TO EDITOR Maya Krasnow DESIGN EDITOR KK Rebecca Lai PHOTO EDITOR Lily Allen WEBMASTER Eric Castillo WRITERS

Izzie Baum, Alyssa Brewer, Amanda Gajdosik, Maggie Gorman, Jacob Greenberg, Michelle Loret de Mola, Julia Maguire, Blake Mandell, Courtney Marcusson, George Markoulakis Megan McCormack, Mary McGrath, Andrea Park, Abigail Reisinger, Alexa Santos, Justin Shannin, Madeleine Shannon, Shayna Starr, Jodie Taylor, Annie Trimber VIDEO TEAM

Aric Barrow, Ellen Garrison, Hayley Glatter, Andrea Kang, Jane Kim, Julia Maguire, Mary McGrath, Ariel Rothfield, Megan Suckut, Agneeta Thacker, Yiren Yang PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kelda Baljon, Ellen Barry, Kirby Barth, Hannah Lin, Justin Shannin, Bernard Wen, Sally Zhang DESIGNERS

Kyle Hancher, Ashley Wu MARKETING + PUBLIC RELATIONS

allergic to peanuts

Vickie Chi, Meredith Finsand, Somi Hubbard, Caroline Koppel, Sunny Lee, Treesa Leung, Katie More, Sam Spector AD SALES

Ajay Bakshani, Cassandra Coravos, James Hu, Youjin Lee, Dan Lesser, Cheyenne Lynsky, Yang Xu

Challah For Hunger NU Hillel’s most delicious student group! Every week students bake and sell challah to combat hunger and support disaster relief among impoverished people all over the world.

Come bake a difference:

Wednesday 4-5 pm, Thursday 4-6 pm Flavors Include: Plain, Chocolate Chip, Cinnamon Sugar, and Flavor of the week $5 Per Loaf of happiness

Questions? Contact: nu@challahforhunger.org


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VOLUME 1 \ ISSUE 1 \ FALL 2012

Spoon with us. People ask us why we are so adamant about printing this magazine. In an age when college students are online and most content is digital, some call it inefficient to spend time and energy funding and creating print content. Our answer, in two parts, is simple. For one, we believe in the pleasure of flipping through a tangible magazine, and we want to carve a place for ourselves in the tradition of print journalism. It’s an experience that the web cannot replace. More importantly, though, it’s about food. Food is something that is touched, held and experienced up close. We want to present food to college students in a way that is sufficiently vibrant, interactive and accessible. As college students, we don’t have fat paychecks or nice kitchens (if we have a kitchen at all), but we still manage to eat and love food. Spoon brings the passions, struggles and joys of food together into one book. We’re excited to share our first print issue with you, and we thank you for your continued support.

Happy eating,

facebook.com/SpoonMagazine pinterest.com/nuspoon twitter.com/nuspoonmag QUESTIONS? COMMENTS? Email

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info@nu-spoon.com

COVER PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

25

05 09 10 13 16 18 38


A HEALTHY SERVING OF BRAIN FOOD

Hair of the Dog This boozy brew is all you need to keep warm and awake on those chilly tailgate mornings. By Andrea Kang It’s tailgate season. That means when you wake up Saturday morning with a pounding headache, mouth dry as sand and still a little intoxicated, drastic measures must be taken to make it to the tailgate and (hopefully) the football game. Sure, you can always try to cure your hangover with a big glass of water and a hearty breakfast, but sometimes the only way to make it

through game day is by the hair of the dog a.k.a. just keep drinking. This spiked peppermint hot chocolate is perfect for pregaming on chilly fall mornings. It’ll warm you up and give you that buzz you’re looking for to cheer throughout the game. Load the hot chocolate into a giant cooler to serve a big crowd, or simply make a modest batch for you and your friends to share.

SPIKED PEPPERMINT HOT CHOCOLATE EASY

7 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

8 cups of milk 10 packets of hot chocolate powder 1 cup Captain Morgan rum 1 cup peppermint schnapps

HOSTING A PARTY? TOP OFF WITH CRUSHED PEPPERMINT AND WHIPPED CREAM TO IMPRESS YOUR GUESTS

HOW 1

BRING a pot of milk to a boil and when the first bubbles form, turn off the heat and stir in the hot chocolate powder. 2

ADD rum and peppermint schnapps and stir until combined.

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

TIP Be careful not to boil the milk for too long — you don’t want it to curdle.

BECAUSE I LIKE PEPPERMINT, AND IT’S FUN TO SAY SCHNAPPS. — PENNY, THE BIG BANG THEORY

NU-SPOON.COM |5


PHOTO BY JENNY STARRS, ILLUSTRATIONS BY ASHLEY WU

Italian Job

Mike Andino, head chef of Gigio’s pizzeria in Evanston, shares his tips and tricks for crafting a top-notch homemade pizza. By Maggie Gorman

igio’s is Evanston’s oldest pizzeria, serving traditional pizza and other dishes made from quality in-house ingredients since 1968. This unassuming local eatery is the stomping ground of head chef Mike Andino, who took over at Gigio’s after attending culinary school at Kendall College and serving as head chef at Oak Park’s Trattoria 225. Andino gives insider tips to help you make the best pizza you’ll ever craft in your apartment kitchen (or beyond).

G

DOUGH: “A truly good pizza starts with the

dough,” Andino says. If you’re wondering whether there’s a secret to expert dough, you may be surprised to learn that perfect dough is mostly achieved using sheer intuition. “It really just has to feel right,” Andino says. Still, there are a few standby techniques that are sure to result in reliably delicious, people-pleasing dough. “Use fresh yeast rather than dry yeast,” says Andino. “The flavor is better — it’s more responsive and you know exactly how much to use, unlike dry yeast.” You’ll know the dough is ready to bake when it is soft but not sticky and pliable enough to stretch without ripping. Stop kneading at that point, form the dough into a sphere, brush with a bit of olive oil and place in a covered container in the fridge to let rise. When it has risen, stretch out the dough as thin as possible.

SAUCE: Pizza sauce is a simple but overlooked factor that can change the whole flavor of your pizza. Andino recommends using the canned tomato variety of your choice for sauce. “The key is to keep it minimally processed and adjust to taste,” he says. That means taking canned tomato and mixing in basic flavorful ingredients like fresh garlic, olive oil, basil and a pinch of salt to form a tasty base that won’t overwhelm other flavors.

CHEESE: When it comes to cheese, “a little

bit goes a long way,” says Andino. “Even when it doesn’t look like enough cheese, it is.” So sprinkle sparsely, and to make a pizza like the pros at Gigio’s, sprinkle a bit of Parmesan atop the sauce before adding shredded mozzarella. But you don’t have to limit yourself to these classic cheeses.“I like to add a little provolone, and sometimes even Brie,” Andino says. 6|

ANDINO’S FAVORITE COMBOS GREEK PIZZA

+ SPINACH

“THREE WISE GUYS”

+

+ ARTICHOKES

OLIVES

TOPPINGS: A plain pizza pie can be a

masterpiece, but toppings often steal the show. Before you pile them on, follow these essential tips to avoid some common mistakes and get the extra gourmet edge for your pizza. Fatty meats like bacon should always be cooked before topping and the fat should be drained, says Andino. “If you don’t do this, your pizza will be really greasy.” Similarly, pre-cook mushrooms before topping to get the most flavor out of them. “Throw some in a sauté pan with a little olive oil and add in garlic at the end,” Andino says. But don’t overcrowd the pan — “the mushrooms will start to boil in their own juices, which you don’t want.” If you like sausage on your pizza, Andino recommends making your own. It’s easier than you might think: “Just chop up Italian sausage links and mix with fennel, garlic, salt and pepper.” As for pepperoni, it’s best to spring for pre-packaged or Italian deli fresh-sliced brands.

PANCETTA

+ PEPPERONI

SAUSAGE

COOKING THE PIZZA: Pizza assembly is a

delicate balancing act. It’s important that there’s an “almost even ratio of cheese to sauce to crust,” says Andino. “Too much cheese makes the pizza salty, messy and difficult to eat. Too little cheese makes the pizza dry.” Everyone loves cheese and toppings, but exercising some restraint puts you in the same league as Italian pizza-makers, “who just sprinkle on a little cheese and toppings.” Before cooking your pizza, get the oven as hot as possible. Use a floured, upside-down cookie sheet to slide the pizza onto the oven racks. Cook the pizza “hot and fast” for about 10 minutes. Remove the pizza and sprinkle with your choice of cold toppings, like arugula and other herbs. “I like a mix of rosemary, parsley and thyme,” says Andino. Wait a minute or two, and then slice. “Just play with different recipes,” says Andino. “Find things that work for you.”


FEED

SAUCE BOSS

SAUCES

Know how to pair your favorite pasta with the right type of sauce. By Hillary Lindwall

butter & oil meat

or college students, pasta is an obvious staple: you boil it, pour some sauce over it, done. It’s easy, tasty, filling and, most importantly, inexpensive. But with so many different kinds of pasta, which do you choose? And to further complicate things, which sauce belongs with which type of pasta? Pairing pasta and sauce correctly is important because each type of pasta captures and absorbs sauce differently. As a basic rule of thumb, thin, delicate noodles are made for lighter sauces, while stronger and more substantial noodles are built for heartier sauces. The following pasta and sauce pairings provide both accessibility and versatility —­­two qualities every college student needs.

F

ILLUSTRATIONS BY KYLE HANCHER

PENNE RIGATE

vegetable

creamy seafood tomato pesto

MACARONI

ZITI

ROTINI

ROTELLE

RIGATONI

MOSTACCIOLI

LINGUINE

JUMBO SHELLS

FUSILLI

CAMPANELLE

FETTUCCINE

ANGEL HAIR

FARFALLE

LASAGNA

NU-SPOON.COM |7


MEAT TENDERIZER

Use this tool to pound out raw meat to soften muscle fibers, making the meat easier to chew and digest.

COLANDER

Use a colander to drain pasta, rinse berries and make spätzle (look it up).

GRATER

Grate anything from cheese and vegetables to garlic and ginger, and zest citrus fruits with ease.

NUT CRACKER

Crack nuts. Crack lobster claws. Get crackin’. “Say crack again.”

KITCHEN DICTION We’ll be quizzing you afterwards.

POTATO MASHER

Invest in a potato masher for smoother mashed potatoes and creamier guacamole.

SALAD SPINNER

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

Spin-dry your salad after rinsing. The whirring is rather hypnotic.

GARLIC PRESS

Avoid tedious mincing and smelly hands with one simple squeeze.

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FEED

FOOD WITH SEOUL

Junior Sungsub Billy Choo teaches us the ins and outs of Korean cuisine. By Megan Suckut

arbecue for many Americans connotes a grilled rack of ribs slathered with dark, savory sauce. Korean barbecue, however, is a different story. We sat down with Billy Choo, a SESP student from Korea, to discover the best of Korean cuisine and what strange American customs he can’t quite stomach.

B

RICE: Korean food tends to be stew-based and eaten with rice. “Rice is a main dish in Korean cuisine, and everything else is a side dish. Basically you add taste to the rice,” Choo says. BACON: Korean bacon is very different from American bacon. While American bacon is very thin and usually crispy, Korean bacon is cut in a way that keeps it thick and less crispy. It’s also uncured and rarely marinated or seasoned. Koreans typically serve it with two sauces: one is ssamjang, a sauce made with red chili paste, soybean paste, sesame oil and green onion; the second is sesame oil with salt and a bit of black pepper.

FOR AUTHENTIC KOREAN FOOD, EAT OUT AT

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

CHEESE: Cheese is foreign to Korean cuisine.

SAN SO0 GAB SAN

“It’s new to me that people put cheese on everything they eat here,” says Choo. “I don’t get the merits of just macaroni, and with cheese on top it’s very weird. I don’t understand that or grilled cheese.”

5247 NORTH WESTERN AVENUE

MEAT PREP: Korean meat preparation is very different from the way Americans prepare meat. “You guys seem to cook it plain and put sauce on top of it at the end,” says Choo. “We don’t usually cook meat like that; it’s usually marinated in some way.” He says Koreans often use marinades like red chili paste (finely ground chili pepper mixed with rice paste) and soy sauce.

like sesame oil and soy sauce with sesame seeds on top.”

PICKLES: Americans have pickles and

SEASONING: Korean cuisine utilizes a

Koreans have kimchi. Kimchi is a staple side dish often made from pickled, fermented cabbage.

specific handful of flavors. Salt, soy sauce, sesame oil and pepper powder (which is a lot like chili powder) are the most popular seasonings in Korea.

SALAD: Salad in Korea isn’t raw like American salad. All vegetables are “put through a five-minute hot water bath” so that they are tender but not completely mushy, Choo says. “Then it’s usually prepared with seasoning

Ssamjang, primarily used in fresh lettuce wraps, is made of ground garlic, red chili paste, soy bean paste, sesame oil and green onion. It goes well with Korean barbecue, but it is also eaten as a dip for cucumbers and carrots.

SPICE: Koreans have their own definition of spicy. “The Korean version of spicy is very sweet and spicy. It’s not like wasabi. That’s a different taste. It doesn’t ache your nostrils.”

FAVORITE DISH: There are many variations of Korean barbecue, but Choo’s favorite kind is bulgogi, a type of barbecue characterized by its marinated, grilled, thinly sliced steak. His favorite way to eat Korean barbecue is in the form of a lettuce wrap. This involves forming a bowl with lettuce and putting a bed of rice inside it, topping it with dipping sauce (soybean paste mixed with red chili paste, sesame oil and green onions) and adding the barbecued meat on top. NU-SPOON.COM |9


The Truth About Cilantro Could your DNA determine your feelings about cilantro? By Aurelie Corinthios

W

LOVE IT

50.41%

HATE IT

DON’T MIND IT

*123 NORTHWESTERN STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY

goes, cilantro haters may have different receptor genes for the protein that interacts with the more pleasant smelling compound. While the evidence continues to grow that an aversion to cilantro may be genetic, scientists have yet to work out the specifics, such as which genes are responsible for this fierce hatred of the herb.

PHOTO BY MAGGIE GORMAN

10 |

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT CILANTRO?*

34.96%

“coriander” this word is traced back to the greek word for bedbug, koris, presumably because of the leaves’ aroma.

studied identical and fraternal twins’ preferences find out. Wysocki and his researchers asked pairs of twins to rate the “pleasantness” of cilantro. Interestingly, the twins tended to fall into clear-cut categories, either loving or hating it. Furthermore, only about 40 percent of fraternal twins gave like assessments, whereas identical twins’ similar ratings were closer to 80 percent. These results seem to suggest that cilantro preference may be a genetic trait, but Wysocki cautioned that there hasn’t been quite enough collection of data to reach a firm conclusion yet. Wysocki also speculated that the dislike of cilantro stems mainly from its odor rather than its taste, hypothesizing that those who don’t like it lack the ability to detect certain chemicals in the leaf. A gas chromatograph, which separates compounds, can be used to break down the molecules in cilantro so that researchers can analyze each compound individually with both the instrument and their sense of smell. When the cilantro is heated, the soapy odor is released, followed by the more pleasant lemony smell about 10 minutes later. Cilantro haters seem to be able to detect only the soapy smell. As Wysocki’s theory

14.63%

hether you know it as cilantro, coriander or Chinese parsley, you’ve probably seen this bright green herb pop up on restaurant menus. South American, Southeast Asian and Middle Eastern dishes have been using the feathery, branch-like leaves of cilantro for centuries. The Internet has been raging with debate about this controversial herb. Opposition groups forming on websites like “I Hate Cilantro” boast a community of almost 4,000 members that dub it “the most offensive food known to man.” On the other hand, some cilantro lovers created the “Fuck Yeah Cilantro” Tumblr to share their love for the leafy herb with the world. You can be sure that for every cilantro lover who relishes its strong, distinctly citrus-like flavor, there’s an equally opinionated cilantro hater who shudders in revulsion, denouncing its soapy and even bug-like taste. So how is this seemingly harmless green herb capable of producing such polarized debate? According to a well-known study by behavioral neurologist Charles J. Wysocki of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, we might be genetically predisposed to love or hate cilantro. Wysocki


FEED

5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT EGGPLANTS In addition to the traditional glossy, purple American eggplant, there are a variety of other types of eggplants ranging in color and size. These include the Chinese eggplant, Thai eggplant, Japanese eggplant, Toga eggplant and many more.

1

CHINESE EGGPLANT

AMERICAN EGGPLANT

An anthocyanin phytonutrient found in the skin of eggplants is a potent antioxidant known to protect brain cells and scavenge free radicals.

PHOTO BY JULIA MAGUIRE

2

TOGA EGGPLANT

BABA GANOUSH

Eggplant 101 Study up on one of nature’s strangest vegetables. By Julia Maguire

At first glance, eggplant can seem rather intimidating to cook. Thick purple skin encases the oddly lightweight vegetable, and when raw, the flesh has a slightly spongy texture. When cooked correctly, however, eggplant can transform into a creamy and flavorful addition to any chef’s weekly meal plans.

GRILLED CHINESE EGGPLANT MEDIUM SERVES

15 MINUTES

WHAT 1 Chinese eggplant cut into thin strips lengthwise cup peanut oil 1 tablespoon honey 1 garlic clove, minced teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper ¼ teaspoon salt

HOW 1

SLICE eggplant lengthwise into thin strips, place into a shallow baking dish and sprinkle on both sides with salt. 2

COMBINE peanut oil, honey, garlic, ginger, cayenne pepper and ¼ teaspoon salt into a small bowl and mix well. 3

POUR (or brush) marinade over the

eggplant to coat. 4

PLACE eggplant on grill over

medium heat and cook until lightly browned on both sides (approximately 4–5 minutes per side). Alternatively, bake in 350°F oven for 15–20 minutes. 5

SERVE hot or at room temperature.

MEDIUM SERVES

40 MINUTES

Baba ganoush is a Middle Eastern dip similar to hummus, made with creamy baked eggplant in place of chickpeas. Roasting the eggplant gives it a smoky flavor, creating a savory spread that tastes even better the longer it sits.

WHAT 1 large eggplant 1 garlic clove ¼ teaspoon salt (or more to taste) 2 tablespoons tahini 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1–2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley for garnish

HOW 1

PREHEAT oven to 450°F.

2

PLACE whole eggplant onto baking

sheet and prick all over with fork. 3

BAKE eggplant for approximately 30 minutes or until soft inside. 4

CUT eggplant in half lengthwise, draining any extra liquid, and scoop flesh and pulp into a food processor or blender.

Although eggplants look hardy, they are actually very perishable and ought to be handled with care. Once cut, eggplants should be used immediately, as the flesh will oxidize quickly after being exposed to air.

3

4

When shopping for an eggplant, choose one that is shiny and firm. Eggplant is sometimes known to have a bitter flavor. To avoid this, choose a smaller eggplant when cooking; small eggplants have fewer seeds and are often less bitter than their larger counterparts. You can also soak the eggplant in water and salt it prior to cooking to

5

minimize bitterness.

5

ADD garlic, salt, tahini and lemon juice and blend until smooth. 6

SEASON with more salt to taste.

7

GARNISH with parsley and a thin slice of lemon.

NU-SPOON.COM |11


RAISE YOUR GLASS

A beginner’s guide to wine By Madeleine Shannon THE GLASS

BOWL

A wine glass has three parts: the foot, the stem and the bowl. Red wine is typically served in a full, round glass. This shape allows more surface area of the wine to come in contact with air, which is important for flavor. A white wine glass, on the other hand, is taller and more U-shaped. This shape helps maintain a cooler temperature while still allowing for contact with the air.

SMELLING

FOOT

HOLDING

This should go without saying, but

FOOD PAIRING

To save yourself from food and wine pairing embarrassment, know the basic rules: reds complement stronger flavors and heavier meals (think steaks with rich sauces), while whites are lighter and should be paired with similarly lighter foods (think seafood or a lemony chicken dish).

SERVING

White wine should be kept in the fridge and tastes best when chilled. While the wine should not be served too cold, and never over ice, serving a cheap white wine (hello, college budget) colder than normal will improve the taste — mostly by smoothing the cheap, cutting flavor. Store grapes in the freezer or invest in reusable ice cubes so you can cool your wine in a time crunch. Contrary to popular belief, red wine is not supposed to be served at room temperature; it should be served cool. Store your wine in a cool area or chill the bottle for 20 minutes in the fridge before opening. Red wine should be poured to fill only half of the glass. White wine should fill one-third of the glass.

WINE TERMINOLOGY LEGS \ ‘legs also ‘lags\

Legs refer to the lines of wine that stay on the side of the glass after the wine has been swirled. The thicker and more visible the “legs” are, the higher the alcohol content of the wine. “Good legs” isn’t an indication of wine quality.

12 |

BODY \ ‘ba-de\

Body is used to describe how heavy a wine feels in your mouth. “Light body” indicates that the wine feels light and airy; “medium body” means the wine is flavorful but not too heavy; “heavy body” or “full body” describes the feeling of a dense, rich wine, typically high in alcohol content.

SOMMELIER \ s -m l-’ya\

A sommelier is a wine connoisseur hired by restaurants to help recommend food and wine pairings.

TIP: IF YOU SPILL RED WINE ON YOURSELF, POUR BAKING SODA ON IT (THE BAKING SODA WILL LIFT THE STAIN) THEN RINSE WITH HOT WATER.

CORKED \ ‘korkt\

If a wine is “corked,” it has been contaminated or tainted by the cork. This happens in about 5 percent of wine bottles, which is the reason behind tasting wine before accepting it at restaurants.

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN, ILLUSTRATIONS BY ASHLEY WU

STEM

We’ve all seen the classic cork smelling routine or the famous swirl-and-sniff gig, but why do people do it? Cork smelling originated as a way to detect counterfeit wine. Today, it is thought to be unnecessary and is discouraged by some wine enthusiasts. It’s more important to look at the cork instead. The bottom of a good cork should be stained with wine, indicating that the wine was stored horizontally or upside down and that no air was let into the bottle. Swirling, smelling and tasting the wine itself, however, is encouraged! To smell wine correctly, keep the wine glass on the table and gently swirl the glass around a few times. Then lift the glass to your face and take a whiff. While you may not be able to detect the subtle flavors just yet, you will be able to tell if the wine is off.

surprisingly it has been done: never hold the glass by the foot. That being said, never hold your wine glass by the bowl. It is more elegant to hold your wine glass by the stem. This way, the heat from your hand won’t affect the temperature, and therefore the taste, of your wine.


GOT A PROBLEM? HERE’S THE ANSWER.

P EM

TY

F

D RI

GE

quinoa is pronounced keen-wah

Something from Nothing

Satisfy your stomach even with an empty fridge. By Kendra Valkema

Let’s be real: it’s next to impossible to keep a fully stocked fridge. Recall the last time you found yourself staring into a colorful, overflowing, cold cornucopia. It probably only took a few overzealous meals to bring you right back to where you started. But the next time you stare into a nearly empty fridge, worry not. This recipe uses fruit you probably have sitting on your counter, and the quinoa can be substituted for whatever grain you have on hand. Once you restock, jazz up this recipe by adding toasted walnuts, goat cheese and fresh parsley.

APPLE-CITRUS QUINOA SALAD EASY

35 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

1 cup quinoa, dry 3 apples 2 cups spinach

3 tablespoons olive oil Juice from 2 oranges

HOW 1

POUR quinoa into a strainer and rinse under cool water until water runs clear. 2

BRING quinoa and 2 cups of water to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook quinoa until it has absorbed all of the water, stirring occasionally. 3

TRANSFER quinoa to a large bowl and place the bowl uncovered in the fridge to chill. 4

SLICE the apples into bite-sized pieces.

PHOTOS BY KENDRA VALKEMA

5

CUT each orange in half and squeeze over a bowl to catch the juice. Remove any seeds from the juice. 6

TOSS together quinoa, spinach, apples, orange juice and olive oil. 7

SERVE immediately or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two days.

NU-SPOON.COM |13


By Tiffany Chang

CLASSIC LAYS CHIP-TO-AIR RATIO 40:60 CRUNCH Crunchy yet airy BAG NOISE Too loud for class POST-CHIP RESIDUE Ocean of grease

TOSTITOS CHIP-TO-AIR RATIO 60:40 CRUNCH Crunchy BAG NOISE Back-row appropriate POST-CHIP RESIDUE Lingering salt,

lightly brush onto pants

Cruise Controlled Cooking Make a meal while you’re in class. By Annie Trimber

HOMEMADE KALE CHIPS CHIP-TO-AIR RATIO Depends on how many

you put in your Ziploc bag CRUNCH Lightly crispy BAG NOISE Pretty chill POST-CHIP RESIDUE Leafy bits

(watch out for teeth)

PAINT CHIPS CHIP-TO-AIR RATIO 100:0 CRUNCH Break-your-teeth crunchy BAG NOISE The silent killer POST-CHIP RESIDUE Lead poisoning

14 |

When we get busy, it’s easy to just stop at Chipotle and pick up a burrito for dinner. Trust me, I spent an entire quarter eating out for every meal. But after a while, the bills started adding up, and both my bank account and my parents were not pleased with me. Upon consulting my parents, friends and anyone else who would listen to my problem, I came across the Crock-Pot, and let me tell you, few things more magical exist. This one-pot wonder can make anything from soup to pulled pork to desserts. Chili in particular is super easy and great for a busy day out of the house. Simply throw the ingredients into the Crock-Pot before class, work hard all day and come home to a warm, comforting bowl of chicken chili. You’ll wonder why you hadn’t been doing this every night.

DA L L SA S A CL

CROCK-POT CHICKEN CHILI EASY

8 HOURS SERVES WHAT

1 pound boneless, skinless, chicken breasts 2 cans of white beans, drained and rinsed 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes 2 cups chicken broth 1 medium onion, chopped

3 medium carrots, chopped 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 bay leaf 1 ½ tablespoons crushed red pepper (optional) ¼ teaspoon salt Dash of pepper

HOW 1

PLACE chicken breast in Crock-Pot.

2

POUR remaining ingredients over chicken.

3

SET Crock-Pot on “low” and cook for 7 hours.

4

REMOVE chicken breasts from Crock-Pot. Shred chicken breast with two forks. The chicken will be extremely tender, so this will be easy! 5

RETURN chicken to Crock-Pot and cook for one more hour.

6

KEEP Crock-Pot on “warm” until you’re ready to eat.

PHOTO BY KELDA BALJON, ILLUSTRATIONS BY KYLE HANCHER

CHIP TIPS FOR CLASS

Y


SOLUTION

KISS THE COOK

A foolproof recipe for landing that second date By John Meguerian Esquire uses this recipe in the ‘Cooking for Men’ section and Cosmopolitan calls a variation of this dish ‘engagement chicken.’ What this means is that you should make this chicken if you don’t want to be forever alone. It’s easy, doesn’t require you to slave over the stove all night and looks freakin’ impressive.

ROASTED CHICKEN AND BROCCOLI RABE EASY

35 MINUTES SERVES

ROASTED CHICKEN

WHAT 4 tablespoons canola oil 2 ½ boneless, skin-on chicken parts Salt and pepper

HOW 1

PREHEAT the oven to 450°F.

2

SPRINKLE a generous amount of salt and pepper on all sides of chicken parts. 3

HEAT a cast iron pan over high heat, and add the canola oil.

4

BROCCOLI RABE

WHAT 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon canola oil 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 bunches of broccoli rabe ¼ cup water or chicken broth 2 tablespoons salted butter 1 lemon Salt, pepper and crushed red pepper flakes

ADD the chicken skin-side down when the oil is hot and cook 3–5 minutes on each side until crispy and golden. 5

REMOVE from heat and put the pan in the oven to cook chicken for 20 more minutes.

HOW 1

POUR oils into a pan over medium heat and sauté garlic until

golden. 2

TOSS broccoli rabe in the oil, add water or broth, and cover.

3

COOK until most of the water has evaporated, about 8 minutes.

4

REMOVE cover, season with salt, pepper and red pepper flakes. Drizzle with lemon juice and stir in butter. Serve with roasted chicken.

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PHOTO BY JOHN MEGUERIAN

DA

A WOMAN LOVES A MAN WHO CAN COOK, YEAH? BRINGING OUT THE BIG GUNS. — MATTHEW MACCONAUGHEY, HOW TO LOSE A GUY IN 10 DAYS NU-SPOON.COM |15


Party in Your Pasta

A fettuccine recipe with an unexpected buzz By Maggie Gorman ike runners preparing for the next day’s marathon, those who plan to drink should consume carb-based meals in large volumes to prepare for the strain their bodies are about to endure. Carbs are great to eat before you imbibe because they slow alcohol absorption, so you can consume more booze without the adverse effects. But if you’re short on time, have some extra booze on hand and would rather just skip the preparation and get straight to drinking, there’s an easy way to combine everyone’s favorite things (beer and eating, of course) without venturing out for a BYOB dinner. The Alfredo sauce in this recipe is made with beer, and when combined with mushrooms, peas, rosemary and a generous helping of bacon, it makes for a pasta dish that’s hearty and homemade with an unexpected (but not unwelcome) boozy twist. This simple recipe calls for ingredients you probably already have in your pantry, and if you’re missing something, it’s open to adjustments. Let the pasta pregame begin.

L

LE

F

V TO

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O BO

FETTUCCINE BEER-ALFREDO MEDIUM

40 MINUTES SERVES

WHAT 1 cup frozen peas 1 cup crimini mushrooms 5 slices bacon 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, chopped 4 ounces fettuccine noodles 1 quart water 2 cans beer 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1 package dry Alfredo sauce mix Salt, pepper and grated Parmesan cheese to taste

HOW 1

BOIL water and beer in two separate pots. Once water boils, toss in a pinch of salt. Once beer boils, mix in brown sugar. 2 FRY bacon in a large pan until crispy while waiting for liquids to boil. 3 REMOVE bacon and, using the same pan, sauté mushrooms and rosemary together until soft. Crumble bacon and set aside with sautéed mushrooms. 4 COOK pasta in boiling water according to package directions, or for 10–12 minutes. Meanwhile, microwave peas for 6–7 minutes. 5 BOIL beer and brown sugar mixture until liquid has been reduced to amount specified on Alfredo sauce mix package. Then make Alfredo sauce according to directions on the package, substituting the beer for any liquid called for in the recipe. 6 DRAIN cooked pasta and toss with sauce, cooked peas, sautéed mushrooms and crumbled bacon in a large bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste and serve hot, with grated Parmesan on top if desired.

ZE

PHOTO BY MAGGIE GORMAN

16 |

TIP: START YOUR BACON IN A COLD PAN; THE STRIPS WON’T SHRINK AND CURL AS MUCH.


SOLUTION

PHOTO BY KENDA VALKEMA, ILLUSTRATIONS BY KK REBECCA LAI

HA

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OV

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HANGOVER CURES By KK Rebecca Lai

COCONUT WATER Feeling parched the morning after partying? It’s important to replace the fluids you lost the night before. The electrolytes in coconut water are great for rehydration, and this natural drink doesn’t have added sugar like sports drinks.

Hangover Helper

What to make when your body aches By Kendra Valkema The next time you wake up with a pounding headache, groaning stomach and a bit of a buzz, pull your hand away from the unsatisfying box of Cap’n Crunch. Instead, recover from the night before by whipping up this banana bread pudding, which is easier to make than that shot across the table during your fourth round of beer pong. This bread pudding is chockfull of potassium, an electrolyte found in bananas, and cysteine, an amino acid in eggs that breaks down alcohol toxins. As it’s baking, chug some water, take a shower, then feel your boozy pains disintegrate as you dig your way through the sugar-crusted top and into the warm caramelized bananas.

BANANA BREAD PUDDING MEDIUM

45 MINUTES SERVES

WHAT

HOW

1 ripe banana

1

1 piece of bread (if it’s stale, even better)

2

SLICE banana. Cut bread into small cubes.

3

SPRINKLE small spoonful of brown sugar over bottom of a

cup milk 4 tablespoons brown sugar 1 egg 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

WHISK together egg, milk, 3 tablespoons of brown sugar and

vanilla in a small bowl. Pour half of mixture over layers in dish. 5

ADD another layer of bananas. Add another spoonful of brown sugar. Add another layer of bread cubes. 6

EGGS Eggs have chemicals that cleanse your liver of toxins. And who doesn’t love scrambled eggs after drinking all night? Throw in some bacon, mushrooms and spinach to create a satisfying meal.

PREHEAT oven to 375°F.

small ramekin or loaf pan (you can also split this between three muffin tins). Place a few banana slices over the sugar. Place a layer of bread cubes on top of the bananas. 4

SLEEP Your body is great at healing itself as long as you give it sufficient time to rest. Take the day off and sleep away your hangover (which can be a challenge at Northwestern).

PUT dish on small baking pan (to catch anything that bubbles over) and bake for about 35 minutes or until puffy and bread is golden brown.

VIRGIN MARY Opt for a Virgin Mary instead of a bloody one. The tomato juice will help your system dilute the alcohol. Plus, the celery stalk will make up for the beer calories you consumed the previous night.

NU-SPOON.COM |17


NUKE IT

NO

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Microwave a threecourse feast. By Michelle Loret de Mola

BACON-WRAPPED ASPARAGUS WITH GOAT CHEESE EASY

12 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

2 slices of bacon ¼ pound medium asparagus, tough ends trimmed (about 5) 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 ounce fresh goat cheese, crumbled 1 teaspoon lemon juice ¼ cup water Salt and pepper to taste

HOW 1

WRAP bacon in damp paper towels and microwave for 4–6 minutes, or until crispy. 2 CRUMBLE bacon and set aside. 3 LAY asparagus on damp paper towels on a microwaveable plate. 4 DRIZZLE with 1 teaspoon of olive oil. Salt and pepper to taste. 5 MICROWAVE on high for 3–4 minutes, or until crisp but tender. 6 SPRINKLE goat cheese and bacon on top of asparagus. 7 DRIZZLE with lemon juice and 1 teaspoon of olive oil. 18 |

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

Freshman year, when I realized dorms don’t come with fully stocked kitchens, things took a turn for the worse. I longed for the appliances to be able to cook my own meals creatively. Fast forward three years and I am living off campus with my own kitchen, but I rarely have the time and energy to break out the pots and pans. Enter the microwave, the only appliance necessary to create a gourmet three-course meal.

RISOTTO EASY

25 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

SHRIMP EASY

12 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

¼ cup butter ½ pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined Salt and pepper to taste Parsley for garnish Half a lemon, juiced

HOW 1

MELT butter (15–30 seconds on high) in small bowl. Add salt, pepper and lemon juice. Stir well. 2 COAT microwave safe casserole dish with non-stick cooking spray or a bit of butter. Arrange shrimp in a layer on dish. Pour butter mixture evenly over shrimp. 3 MICROWAVE on high for 2 minutes, then rearrange so that center shrimp are on outside, and vice versa. Microwave for another 2 minutes, and rearrange again. Then microwave for a final 2 minutes. TIP: Shrimp are ready when they turn pink.

1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon minced garlic ¼ onion, chopped ¼ cup vegetable broth ¼ cup uncooked Arborio rice ¼ cup white wine ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese

HOW 1

COMBINE the butter, garlic and onion in a microwaveable bowl. Cook on high for 2 minutes. TIP: Butter should simmer slightly and onions should be soft and translucent. Be careful not to burn the butter. 2 PLACE vegetable broth in another microwave safe dish. Heat on high until the broth is hot but not boiling (approximately 2 minutes). 3 STIR the rice and broth into the dish with the onion, butter and garlic mixture. Microwave covered for 6 minutes. 4 STIR in wine and microwave for 10 minutes. TIP: Most of the liquid should boil off. If rice seems dry, stir in water, wine or cream to reach the desired consistency. 5 STIR in cheese and add shrimp.

CHOCOLATE CAKE IN A MUG EASY

8 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

cup flour 4 tablespoons sugar 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1 egg white 3 tablespoons milk 3 tablespoons butter or vegetable oil ¼ teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract Dash of salt ½ teaspoon cinnamon

HOW 1

WHISK all ingredients in a mug until smooth. 2 COOK on high until puffed, about 1 ½ minutes. TIP: It is ready when it puffs up. Cooking it until its “dry” on top will make the cake spongy and dry.


SOLUTION

Mean and Green A vegetarian recipe that will make your meat-eating friends drool By Julia Maguire

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Tacos are the only dish I crave from my carnivorous friends. That is, until I discovered the mouth-watering raw taco recipe by my favorite food-blogger, Sarah Britton of the blog “My New Roots.” With the smoky chipotle flavor of the walnut taco mix, sweet and spicy salsa and a crunchy cabbage shell, you’ll never desire meaty tacos again. This version of Britton’s recipe is adapted slightly to make it a bit simpler to prepare.

RAW TACO MEDIUM

25 MINUTES SERVES

WHAT

HOW TACO MIX 1

TACO MIX 1 cup walnuts 1 teaspoon ground cumin ¼ teaspoon ground chipotle 1 tablespoon Braggs or soy sauce 1 teaspoon olive oil ADDITIONAL INGREDIENTS

1 small purple cabbage (for taco shells) 1 diced avocado

HOMEMADE SALSA 1 cup chopped cherry tomatoes ½ orange bell pepper, chopped finely ½ small red onion, minced ( 1 3 cup) ½ cup chopped mango ¼ cup cilantro (or substitute parsley) 1 garlic clove, minced Juice of half a lime 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt to taste

PUT all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until you have a medium-fine chop (similar to the texture of ground beef).

HOMEMADE SALSA 2

DICE cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, onion and mango into small evenly sized pieces and place in a mixing bowl. 3

ADD chopped cilantro (or parsley) and minced garlic to the bowl and combine.

4

ADD juice of half a lime and 1 tablespoon of olive oil, combine and let sit for 5 minutes. 5

SEASON with salt to taste.

ASSEMBLY 6

PLACE cabbage leaves on plate (two per person) and add a large spoonful of walnut mix to each.

7

TOP walnut mix with a large spoonful of salsa and diced avocado.

8

ADD any other of your favorite taco toppings and enjoy!

tip

if you don’t have a food processor or a magic bullet, chop the walnuts with a sharp knife and toss with the other

PHOTOS BY JULIA MAGUIRE

ingredients.

NU-SPOON.COM |19


PHOTO BY NINA LINCOFF WHO YOU CALLIN’ “SWEET POTATO?” I HAVE OVER 30 ACCESSORIES, AND I DEMAND RESPECT! — MRS. POTATO HEAD, TOY STORY 3

20 |


pe’tato pe’tato e

otatoes are not the most asthetically appealing of nature’s bounty — they’re mostly the color of earth, they burrow down underneath all that soil, and often they are mottled, wrinkly and specked with a couple tuber-moles. Even the few potatoes, that hide purple and starburst flesh

P

GARLIC BUTTER ROASTED POTATOES

e

BY NINA LINCOFF

underneath their skins are homely at best on the outside. However, the utility of the potato and the delicious richness and body it adds to any meal is much more than skin deep. Thankfully, accessing that wealth requires only a little preparation and patience. Here are four recipes that

USE: Yukon Gold, or another small, waxy potato

1>

PREHEAT oven to 375°F.

2>

BRING pot of salted water to a boil then reduce to

Roasting is the easiest way to tease the sweetness and nuttiness out of starches, vegetables and even fruits. Here, with just a few simple ingredients, Yukon Gold potatoes transform into creamy bites of heaven. Serve alongside any protein or dressed-up salad for a deliciously rustic dinner, or top with crumbled bacon and a fried egg for a lazy Sunday brunch.

3>

EASY

4>

5>

6>

55 MINUTES SERVES

2 pounds medium-sized Yukon Gold potatoes cup olive oil 2 tablespoons butter 6 cloves garlic, peeled and halved Salt and black pepper to taste

USE: Yukon Gold, or another small, waxy potato

SIMPLE POTATO SALAD WITH YOGURT HERB DRESSING

celebrate the potato in all its rich, earthen glory — two master recipes and two ways to adapt the leftovers into something as delicious as the original, yet completely different. Believe it or not, the humble potato has more than a few tricks to reveal underneath that rough skin. Which, as it turns out, you can eat too.

A great way to dress up any leftover vegetable or starch is to turn it into some sort of salad or salad component. In just a few simple steps, you can completely change the flavors, textures and even serving temperatures of a dish. Here, an easy yogurt-herb dressing adds another level of creaminess to the already garlicky potatoes, perfect for a potato salad. The fresh herbs, Dijon and lemon juice provide a nice zing which lightens the dish. This dressing is also incredibly multipurpose. Because it’s a thick, yogurt-based dressing, it makes a great spread for sandwiches and can be added as a dollop of richness atop many soups.

7>

a simmer. WASH and peel potatoes, then halve. ADD potatoes to water and bring back up to a boil. Then reduce to a simmer and cook for 5 more minutes. Drain and set aside. COMBINE the garlic halves, olive oil and butter in a 9” by 13” baking dish. Heat in oven until butter is melted. PUT the drained potatoes in baking dish with butter, oil and garlic and toss until completely coated. Season with salt and pepper (about ½ teaspoon salt and black pepper to taste). ROAST potatoes in oven for about 30 minutes, or until golden brown and tender when pierced with a fork. Let cool a couple minutes before serving.

EASY

10 MINUTES SERVES

Leftover garlic butter roasted potatoes ½ cup plain Greek yogurt 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ cup freshly chopped herbs (chives, parsley and green onions) 1 tablespoon lemon juice Salt and black pepper to taste 1> 2>

3>

BRING leftover potatoes to room temperature and place in

a large bowl. WHISK together the yogurt, mustard, olive oil, herbs and lemon juice in a separate bowl. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. ADD dressing a little bit at a time to the potatoes, roughly mashing them as you go but reserving large, inch-sized chunks until the salad is dressed to your liking. Serve immediately or refrigerate until further use.

NU-SPOON.COM |21


USE: Russet Potatoes

SIMPLE MASHED POTATOES 1 ½ pounds potatoes, washed, peeled and cut into large chunks About ¼–½ cup milk, cream or potato cooking liquid 4 tablespoons butter Salt and black pepper to taste Optional: Sautéed or roasted garlic, freshly chopped herbs like chives or parsley, sautéed shallots, couple tablespoons sour cream, ¼ cup Parmesan cheese or herbed cheese like Boursin

USE: Russet Potatoes Bubble and Squeak is a traditional English method of using leftover mashed potatoes and vegetables. It’s essentially a potato pancake and is a phenomenal way to repurpose leftover mashed potatoes. While we suggest the flavor combination below with a hint of onion and garlic, the bite of Parmesan cheese, and any sort of vegetable medley, Bubble and Squeak is an open canvas for all kinds of flavors. If you don’t have onion or garlic on hand, substitute with ingredients you have available. Green onions would work wonders, as would a dash of mustard. In place of the Parmesan, substitute any number of cheeses — pepper jack, cheddar, Gruyére, or put the all-American spin on these potato pancakes and top them off with Velveeta.

MEDIUM

1>

MINCE onion and garlic.

2>

MELT 1 tablespoon butter

35 MINUTES SERVES

At least 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes 2 tablespoons flour ¼ cup Parmesan cheese 1 cup chopped vegetables (frozen pre-cooked broccoli, cauliflower, peas, carrots, or fresh spinach, or any leftover pre-cooked vegetables you have on hand) ½ medium yellow onion 1 clove garlic 1 tablespoon butter, plus a bit more for frying Optional: ¼ cup fresh herbs like parsley or chives

22 |

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

3>

4>

in a medium-sized skillet. Sauté onion for 5 minutes over medium heat until translucent. Add garlic and sauté for an additional 3–5 minutes. Remove from heat. STIR together onion and garlic, leftover mashed potatoes, Parmesan cheese, chopped leftover vegetables, flour and fresh herbs in a separate bowl. MELT a bit of butter in the skillet over medium heat. Shape ¼ cup-sized balls of the potato mixture into ½-inch thick patties. Fry each patty until golden brown on each side, about 3–4 minutes each. Serve immediately.

Mashed potatoes are an essential side dish to have in your repertoire. The creamy, lush texture plays well with almost any stewed or roasted meat, and they are the ultimate sauce well building block. Best of all, mashed potatoes work wonders as leftovers. Pan-fried in Bubble and Squeak (see below), slapped in the middle of a hot turkey sandwich, or combined with a bit of bacon and cheese and deep-fried into fritters or croquettes, mashed potatoes are the foundation for any number of tuber-wonders.

MEDIUM

45 MINUTES SERVES

1>

BRING large pot of salted water to a boil.

2>

ADD potato chunks and boil for about

3> 4>

5>

20 minutes or until tender when pierced with a fork. DRAIN, reserving about 1 cup of cooking liquid, and return potatoes to cooking pot. ADD butter and ¼ cup of milk, cream or cooking liquid and mash potatoes together with a fork, whipping as you go. ADD more liquid if a looser consistency is desired. Season to taste with salt and pepper and add additions like roasted garlic, Parmesan cheese, fresh herbs, etc. Keep covered until ready to serve.


MONDAY $3 U-Call-Its

excludes craft beers, premium wines and non well liquor

$6 Bud & Bud Light Pitchers 25% off for all Frequent Diners

TUESDAY

$8 312 Pitchers and Honkers Pitchers $6 Pitchers of Bud and Bud Light $3 Domestic Bottles

WEDNESDAY

$7 Long Island Iced Teas $8 Pitchers of Goose Island & 312 $4 Guinness, Harp & Smithwicks 16 oz Drafts

THURSDAY

$6 Bud, Bud Light & Coors Light Pitchers $8 64 oz Growlers of Batch #19

$3 Southern Comfort Shots $4 Vodka Mixed Drinks traditional mixers only

FRIDAY

$5 Bacardi Red Bull Bombs

SATURDAY

$4 Grey Goose U-Call-Its traditional mixers only

$3 Bud & Bud Light 16oz Drafts

SUNDAY

$3 Corona Light Bottles $2 Bud & Bud Light Bottles $6 Sunday Shandy’s

NU students receive 10% off every day, all day. 1450 Sherman Avenue Tommynevins.com 847.869.0450

EVERYDAY

$4.25 Bud Light Bottles $4.25 Goose Island Honker Ale Bottles $4.25 Goose Island 312 Bottles $5.25 Stella Artois Bottles

MONDAY $7 Martinis

TUESDAY $3 & $5 Beer

WEDNESDAY $20 Wine

With a billiards space for Kellogg events, TVs for college and NFL football games and private event spaces, Pete Miller’s is the perfect setting for any occassion. BILLIARDS PHOTO COURTESY OF DEIVIDAS GAILEVICIUS

THURSDAY $7 Belgians

SUNDAY

$7 House Cocktails $3 Bud Light Bottles $3 Goose Island Honker Ale Bottles $3 Goose Island 312 Bottles $3 Stella Artois Bottles

847.328.0399 1557 Sherman Avenue Petemillers.com


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PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

best H C N BRU

THE

OF

Egg-cellent options to satisfy your meal-crossed cravings. By Amanda Gajdosik, Maggie Gorman, Hillary Lindwall, Megan McCormack, Shayna Starr and Megan Suckut

NU-SPOON.COM |25


bBReUstNCH OF

THE

BAT 17 If you haven’t been to Bat 17 yet, put down this magazine and go. Bat is a loud, college-friendly establishment that doubles as a nighttime sports bar, and, to many students’ surprise, it is also a popular brunch spot. In the morning hours (and until 10pm), stop in for Bat 17’s famous Balawat, a giant breakfast sandwich that comes in four varieties and is served on Bennison’s Bakery fresh sourdough bread. Though the breakfast sandwiches are certainly the way to go, Bat 17 also serves up sweet French toast dishes, savory corned beef hash ($12.39), and four kinds of flapjacks. The pub’s creative breakfast menu and free unlimited coffee bar make for a fun, filling and memorable brunch. Best of all, there will be leftovers, which makes up for the higher-than-expected prices. If you want to beat the crowds, show up early, since Bat doesn’t take reservations. And if you want to skip the wait altogether, order your breakfast Balawat to go.

 $$

HOTCAKES CAFE WILMETTE

BRUNCH Sun 10am–10pm, Mon-Thurs 11am–

10pm, Fri 11am–11pm, Sat 10am–11pm 1709 Benson Avenue — Chicago (847) 733-7117

DIXIE KITCHEN

M. HENRY

BAT17 THE LUCKY PLATTER

MORTON GROVE

EVANSTON SKOKIE

ROGERS PARK LINCOLNWOOD

M.HENRY TRE KRONOR FOREST GLEN

ANDERSONVILLE

LAKE VIEW BELMONT

MERCADITO SUNDA OAK PARK

Located just a few blocks from the Bryn Mawr El stop, m. henry is an Andersonville establishment that has mastered the art of both sinfully sweet and satisfyingly savory brunch dishes. The lengthy menu means difficult decisionmaking but the staff is attentive and always happy to answer questions. And it doesn’t hurt that they provide endless streams of Chicagoroasted coffee. In addition to the extensive breakfast, lunch and brunch menus, m.henry offers daily specials that embody the restaurant’s slogan, “chow for now,” advocating fresh, seasonal and local ingredients combined in inventive ways. Fannie’s Killer Fried Egg Sandwich ($9.25) is a must-have. The fresh-baked sourdough bread has just the right amount of chew to complement the thick-cut bacon in all its crispy glory. The richness of the impeccably fried eggs is balanced by slices of ripe Roma tomato and the salty kick of crumbled gorgonzola. The sandwich comes with crispy house potatoes covered in the chef’s special seasoning blend and topped with garlic, green onion and red pepper. On the opposite end of the brunch spectrum sits the much-acclaimed blisscakes. These cakes are offered in a variety of flavors and come in half orders too, allowing for ample sharing. Fluffy and thick cakes swim in a sauce bursting with berry flavor and are topped with crunchy granola that adds textural contrast. The cakes would have been too sweet if not for the layer of vanilla mascarpone sandwiched between them.

 CHICAGO

$$

BRUNCH Tues–Fri 7am–3pm,

Sat–Sun 8am–3pm 5707 North Clark Street — Chicago (773) 561-1600 26 |


THE LUCKY PLATTER MERCADITO The Lucky Platter, an eclectic restaurant that’s perfect for a lazy morning brunch, is located on Main Street just a few minutes from campus. The restaurant’s brunch items may look standard, but they far exceed any brunchfanatic’s expectations. The cinnamon raisin French toast ($7) is prepared with thick, crusty whole grain bread, making it filling, hearty and never soggy. The French toast is paired with Lucky Platter’s homemade apple cider syrup, which complements the rich cinnamon and sweet raisins in the bread, and the dish is topped with sweet, fresh strawberries. The fried green tomato benedict ($8.50) is another excellent choice for a hearty brunch. The crispiness of the fried tomato contrasts the runny yolk inside the poached egg, and the Hollandaise sauce has a rich but balanced saltiness. The Benedict is served on the restaurant’s famous cornbread along with a side of warm vegetables. The Lucky Platter also offers vegetarian options, making this a place that can please both the pickiest and most adventurous eaters.

 $

Mercadito is well known for fusing traditional Mexican flavors with original interpretations of local and seasonal ingredients, resulting in well-crafted, upscale Mexican dishes. Lucky for us, brunch time is no exception. Mercadito’s pancakes ($12) tie together sweet and savory, where the strawberries and cinnamon marry a light, milky Mexican cheese, allowing the flavors to dance on your palate long after the meal ends. The menu also offers Mexican-inspired egg dishes in unique combinations like the sunny side up eggs with rosemary skirt steak and cactus salad ($12). Mercadito serves brunch on Saturdays and Sundays and its energetic yet laid-back atmosphere makes for a great start to any weekend. If you find yourself in downtown Chicago on a Friday or Saturday night instead, stop by Mercadito for its decadent late night brunch selection.

 $$$

BRUNCH Sat 11:30am–3pm

Sun 11:30am–4pm 108 W. Kinzie Street — Chicago (312) 329-9555

BRUNCH Everday 7:30am–2pm

514 Main Street — Evanston (847) 869-4064

DIXIE KITCHEN Dixie Kitchen offers a brunch menu filled with authentic, hearty Southern comfort food. With its spirited 1930s bait-shop aesthetic, walls decked in New-Orleans-inspired décor, and lively blues music soundtrack, Dixie Kitchen is just jaunty enough to keep your head from dropping to the table in a biscuit-and-gravy-induced coma. The stars of the brunch menu are dishes meant to fuel the day-long labor of a burly bayou fisherman, so indulge at your own risk — order with gusto, and your day might go from soulful to sleepy. It’ll be hard not to get stuffed, with options like fried catfish and eggs ($10.95) and Dixie Hash ‘N’ Chicken ($9.95) tempting you to create the ultimate Southern brunch experience. And if fried green tomatoes are intimidating at such an early hour, Dixie offers brunch classics like egg whites and oatmeal with a tasty Southern spin. Dixie Kitchen offers home-cooked comfort food for an incredible value in a spunky atmosphere. If you want to experience New Orleans, ditch the Mardi Gras travel plans and instead take a gastronomic trip within the comfort of our very own Midwestern town.

 $$

BRUNCH Sat–Sun 9am–2pm

825 Church Street — Evanston (847) 733-9030

HOTCAKES CAFÉ Tucked away on a small corner of Wilmette Avenue near Green Bay Road, the small and unassuming facade of Hotcakes Café is easy to miss. However, the lucky few who notice it and are savvy enough to go inside know it is the perfect place to grab a tasty and, most importantly, affordable brunch. The menu consists of classic breakfast and lunch fare like pancakes, salads and hamburgers, mixed with a few special items. The tamale corn flapjacks ($9.25) are one of the more unique menu items and have even been mentioned in the Chicago Tribune. These cornspecked flapjacks are crusty on the outside, soft and moist on the inside, covered with melted cheese and served with a side of sour cream and salsa. And if you want to save a few dollars, the short stack only costs $7.95 and is definitely large enough to fill you up. The banana bread french toast ($7.95) is also a special menu item that will help you start your day off right. The thick slices of banana bread are griddle-fried and covered in butter and powdered sugar, creating a golden crust with a soft, banana center. It’s not on the permanent menu, however, so if you’re not lucky enough to order them, Hotcakes’ cinnamon raisin ($6.95) and bread pudding French toast ($7.95) is a delicious alternative. The only possible drawback to having a meal at Hotcakes Café is that credit cards are not accepted. If you decide to make the short journey to Hotcakes, be sure to bring cash and take a chance on any menu item that stretches the limits of normal brunch — you’ll be glad you did.

 $

SUNDA Sunda’s Asian-fusion menu is one of the best in Chicago, and unlike many other Asian restaurants, it is open for brunch. The creative brunch menu features an “East Meets West” section where diners can choose from Asian- or American-inspired dishes. The “Eastern Flavors” include dishes like tempura French toast ($12), tofu scramble ($11) and a Thai omelet ($12) made with shrimp, pork, watercress, bean sprouts and chili. The must-have Eastern item, however, is the braised pork belly, served on crispy rice patties and topped with poached eggs and Sunda’s special sauce. The “Western Flavors” offer more standard American brunch items, but with an added twist on Asian flavors. Sunda’s version of granola ($10) is ginger and mango infused, served with passion fruit yogurt and seasonal fruits. The rest of the menu includes incredible handmade sushi, salads, dim sum options, and even a build-your-own Bloody Mary bar ($7). No small plates here — the brunch portions are big enough to fill you up until dinner. Sunda’s atmosphere is intimate enough for a date, yet trendy enough for a group gathering. Either way, make sure you get a reservation, because the tables here are in high demand.

 $$$

BRUNCH Sun 10:30pm–3pm

110 West Illinois Street — Chicago (312) 644-0500

TRE KRONOR If you are looking to venture into Chicago for a new cuisine, Tre Kronor, an authentic Swedish restaurant, is the perfect place. Located on West Foster Avenue, Tre Kronor offers a variety of Scandinavian specialties like Swedish pancakes served with lingonberry, a sweet berry used in many Scandinavian dishes, and of course freshly baked Danishes. Tre Kronor has been serving up homemade and reasonably priced dishes since doors opened in 1992, and its recent feature on Diners, Drive-ins and Dives attests to its quality. For just $2.95, you can order the Swedishstyle Cinnamon Rolls, filled with plump raisins and drizzled with lemon icing. The vanilla and orange French toast ($6.95), another sweet treat, is made with thickly sliced egg bread, spread with homemade orange butter and piled high with powdered sugar. For a more savory meal, try Tre Kronor’s fresh quiche ($7.95), which comes in at least four different varieties every day. Dishes are large enough to leave you with a full belly and cheap enough to leave you with a full wallet, too.

 $

BRUNCH Mon–Sat 7am–3pm, Sun 9am–3pm

3258 West Foster Avenue — Chicago (773) 267-9888

BRUNCH Mon–Sat 6:30am–­2:30pm,

Sun 7am–2:30pm 1195 Wilmette Avenue — Wilmette (847) 256 2099

NU-SPOON.COM |27


A CHEF WITH A STORY By Aurelie Corinthios

PHOTO COURTESY OF DEMESSEW ASSEFA

Chef Demessew Assefa of Evanston’s Addis Abeba shares his journey of war, guns and hunger.

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PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

emember a single bullet is worth ten lives." Demessew Assefa was 10 years old when his grandfather presented him with this golden rule and his first rifle. The Ethiopian Revolution was in full swing and his father had just been executed. Nearly 40 years later, Assefa finds himself as the owner and chef of Addis Abeba, the only Ethiopian restaurant in Evanston, named after Ethiopia's capital city where Assefa was born and raised.

Demessew Assefa, now 48, descends from a long line of men he proudly calls warriors. He says there was never a day in his childhood when he wasn’t exposed to a weapon of some sort. Assefa believes learning about weapons at such a young age allowed him to develop a better understanding of them. “Guns can save you, your family, your flag and your country,” Assefa says, his voice clear and deep. His air is surprisingly serene for someone with such a tumultuous background. He leans back in his chair, crossing one long leg over the other. He is a tall man with large hands that he thoughtfully runs across his hairless head. “People are often horrified when they hear about this aspect of my life. They think I have ulterior motives because of today’s image of guns,” Assefa says. “I get into a lot of debates. But I always come out on top,” he says with a laugh.

FROM WAR GUNS TO KITCHEN KNIVES Fueled by his strong desire to protect, Assefa’s childhood dream was to become a soldier. “For a long time, I thought it was my calling,” Assefa says. “But some godsend type of obstacle always got in the way.” These obstacles have led Assefa to a profession where he uses his hands just as much as a soldier would, but in a very different way. “When I left home, my biggest worry was what I was going to eat,” Assefa says. “So I made sure to bring my spices with me.”

Not surprisingly, one of Assefa’s favorite hangouts as a child was the kitchen. “I was always hungry. I spent so much time in there I picked up on a lot of tricks and eventually acquired my own skills.”

Oh wow, an Ethiopian restaurant! I wonder what they're serving ­— some water and sand? Assefa decided to put his skills to use. He partnered with his cousin and another Ethiopian friend to open Evanston’s Addis Abeba with the goal of exposing traditional Ethiopian food to a wider audience. This, however, was a more difficult task than Assefa had hoped. Most people have no idea what Ethiopian food is all about, so it was challenging to attract customers at first. “When the restaurant first opened, you would hear certain comments,” Assefa says. “Mostly along the lines of, ‘Oh wow, an Ethiopian restaurant! I wonder what they’re serving — some water and sand?’”

FROM ETHIOPIA TO EVANSTON Assefa says it is important to introduce Ethiopian culture to people who know nothing about the country and its food. As we speak, the warm aroma of yessiga wot and injera (beef stew with traditional Ethiopian bread) lingers in the air. The basics of Ethiopian cuisine are meat, vegetables and grains, and the most vital ingredient is onion, which is found in

almost every Ethiopian dish. Assefa says Ethiopian food is different from other African cuisines because it uses a wider variety of spices and utilizes many Middle Eastern and Indian cooking techniques. Addis Abeba speaks to the traditional Ethiopian customs that Assefa brought back from his birthplace. Food here is served in colorful mesobs, which are hand woven wicker baskets, and the walls are covered in paintings of characters with large, round eyes, a common characteristic of Ethiopians, according to Assefa. “He’s a wonderful chef,” boasts Endalkachew Haile-Mariam, Assefa’s partner and cousin. “He really does bring a taste of Ethiopia to the area.” Assefa now lives in Chicago with his 18-year-old daughter, Almaz, which means diamond in Amharic, Ethiopia’s official language. “Almaz is adamant about being Ethiopian, even though she’s never been to my country,” says Assefa, with a touch of fatherly pride in his voice. “I can’t wait to bring her there.” 1322 Chicago Avenue (847) 328-5411

ASSEFA'S ROAST LEG OF LAMB MEDIUM SERVES

35 MINUTES

1 leg of lamb, bone-in (don’t trim the fat, it gives it more flavor) 2 cloves of garlic 1 nub of ginger root 1 jalapeño pepper (optional) 2 sprigs of dried rosemary Olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 1

PREHEAT oven to 375ºF.

2

PREPARE your seasonings: finely chop the garlic, then peel, slice and chop fresh ginger. If you’re using jalapeño, slice that up as well. 3

WITH a fork, pierce small holes in various areas of the lamb. 4

STUFF holes with the garlic, ginger and jalapeño. 5

RUB lamb thoroughly with olive oil, massaging it into the meat, and pinch holes so they seal. 6

PAT dried rosemary onto the lamb, coating it entirely. 7

BAKE lamb for about 20 minutes for medium-rare meat, 30 minutes for well-done. 8

SERVE with steamed broccoli, grilled asparagus and rice. 9

ENJOY with a glass of nice Cabernet.

NU-SPOON.COM |29


COMING SOON! Frontera Fresco is coming to the ground floor of Norris! Explore the amazing flavors of Mexico! Created by celebrity Chef Rick Bayless, Frontera Fresco features hand-crafted tortas and tacos. Frontera Fresco combines high-quality ingredients from top local providers with recipes based on the incredible fare found in Mexico. For more information, visit nuCuisine.com


PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

BRING IT EATING OUT CAN RACK UP QUITE THE BILL. SAVE SOME DOUGH BY DRINKING YOUR OWN BOOZE. BY ELLEN BARRY, IZZIE BAUM, ANDREA KANG, AND MEGAN MCCORMACK * IF YOU’RE UNDER 21, CLOSE YOUR EYES

NU-SPOON.COM |31


FAMILIAR PLACES

I HIM SAS HIMI SAS

JOY S ’ YEE

IVE OL IN THE UNTA MO

I

OK OR

TOD

t hot spo

easy ’ n ‘ k c i qu SASHIMI SASHIMI

JOY YEE’S NO FEE

Sashimi Sashimi serves up creative, delicious sushi at college budget-friendly prices, and believe it or not, it is BYOB too. Lunch combos, which include two maki rolls, a bowl of miso soup and a salad with ginger dressing, cost anywhere from $7.50 to $10.95. The best item on the menu, however, might fly under your radar. Sashimi’s Shiitake Mushroom Maki is bursting with flavor, costs just $4.25 and is a wonderful option for vegetarian friends. This quaint, casual sushi dive is a great place to grab some sushi to accompany your own bottle of wine. If you’re not of legal drinking age, Sashimi Sashimi also offers a variety of bubble teas including mango, passion fruit, red bean, lychee and coconut. No matter your age, there’s something here for everyone.

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$ Mon–Fri 11:30am–10pm, Sun 1pm–9pm 640 Church Street — Evanston (847) 475-7274

NO FEE

Joy Yee’s has everything. No, seriously, everything. Dishes from every Asian cuisine are packed onto this huge menu, from Thai curry rice noodle ($9.95-10.95) and Malayasian Beef ($11.95) to Korean BBQ short ribs ($12.95). The menu isn’t the only large thing here: the dishes, which cost around $10, are enough to feed two people, and the bubble teas are big enough to douse a small fire. If you run into trouble deciding on a dish, you can’t go wrong with the sesame chicken ($9.95), but the real stars at Joy Yee’s are the beef cubes with tomato sauce rice ($9.50) and governor’s chicken ($9.95). Just trust us. The service is fast, but the place can get really crowded some nights, so be ready for a rowdy time. Add in a couple bottles of beer and a few friends and it’s sure to be a good time.

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$$ Mon–Thurs 11:30am–10pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am– 10:30pm, Sun 12pm–10pm 521 Davis Street — Evanston (847) 733-1900

taly I e l t it L Chicago’s CARO MIO

NO FEE

The Olive Mountain is a Middle Eastern restaurant focused on bold flavors and quality food. The prompt and friendly wait staff creates a relaxed and inviting dining experience and the refined but casual ambiance makes you want to linger. Olive Mountain is the perfect location for a meal after a ten-hour stint in the library, especially because its menu truly caters to the college crowd. The restaurant serves a variety of Middle-Eastern options like baba ganoush, Jerusalem salad, hummus (which is killer here), tabouleh, falafel and kabobs, and the portions are large enough to leave you with leftovers. As an added bonus, Olive Mountain offers WildCard discounts so meals end up being pretty inexpensive. Plus, bringing your own beer or wine allows you to forego jacked up alcohol prices. Check out the website before you go — the restaurant offers printable coupons.

The atmosphere of Caro Mio is intimate and relaxed. The scene is great for a group dinner with friends or for a romantic evening. All of the food is outstanding, but two standout appetizer dishes are the pizza bread ($6.95), which is baked with mozzarella, Parmesan, tomatoes, oregano and marinara sauce, and the polenta al sugo ($8.95), which is grilled polenta topped with ragú sauce and Parmesan cheese. The pizza bread is crunchy with just the right amount of oil, and the texture on the polenta is firm with a light touch of cheese to balance out the flavors. As for main courses, the gnocchi gratinati ($19.95) with Bolognese sauce and baked mozzarella cheese is a true delight paired with a glass of pinot noir, and the pasta carbonera ($16.95-$20.95) with pancetta, egg yolk and Parmesan has a rich, hearty texture. Apart from a wide selection of pasta, the salmone portofino ($20.95), sautéed with balsamic, honey, green onions and pine nuts satiates a sweet tooth, and the pollo vesuvio ($17.95), prepared with potato wedges, extra virgin olive oil, garlic and white wine is light, juicy and refreshing. While it’s challenging not to gorge yourself on Italian entrées and appetizers, save room for Caro Mio’s chocolate soufflé ($7) and espresso sorbet ($7). If you plan a party here, check out the special party menu, which is $33.95 per person. The restaurant holds up to 45 people on weeknights and will even rent out the entire restaurant for a larger occasion.

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honey booze of milk ‘n’ THE OLIVE MOUNTAIN

NO FEE

$ Mon–Fri 11am–9pm, Sat 12pm–9pm, Sun 12pm–8pm 610 Davis Street — Evanston (847) 475-0380

YOU GO TO A PART Y, IT’S BYOB. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? BRING... YOUR... OWN... [WOMAN: ...BITCH?] — JAY LENO

$$$ Mon-Thurs 4pm–10pm, Fri–Sat 4pm–11pm, Sun 3pm–9pm 1825 West Wilson and Wolcott Avenue — Chicago (773) 275-5000


RO CA O MI

taco loco LA SIERRA

NO FEE

Serving an eclectic mix of Ecuadorian, Mexican and South American dishes, La Sierra is definitely not your average taco joint. The restaurant uses fresh, highquality ingredients to make authentic dishes and has quick, friendly service to boot. Start off with the creamy guacamole with homemade tortilla chips ($6.50) and the humita ($2.50), a traditional Ecuadorian food similar to a tamale stuffed with cheese. For entrées, order the carne asada ($12.99), and if you want to go the Ecuadorian route, the carne con maduros ($12.99), which is strip steak served with sweet plantains, white rice and salad. This BYOB joint has all the perks: great food, no corkage fee and a liquor store conveniently located right down the street. There’s surprisingly never much of a wait for this hidden gem, and with the decent prices, clean interior and easy nearby street parking, it’s a destination to visit. $$ Mon–Thurs 5pm–10:30pm, Fri 5pm–11:30pm Sat 3pm–11:30pm, Sun 12pm–11pm 1637 West Montrose Avenue — Chicago (773) 549-5538

TODOROKI

$10 FEE

Todoroki is an upbeat hibachi and sushi restaurant nestled in the heart of Evanston. The establishment offers a variety of seating options including Japanesestyle tables low to the ground, traditional tabletops, bar seats and the hibachi grill. With so many options, you can have an intimate dinner, a loud birthday celebration, or a fun BYOB gathering with friends. What makes Todoroki unique is its “All-You-Can Eat” menu, which clocks in at just $19.95 with your WildCard. If you can’t stomach that big of a meal, order anything from hot appetizers, soups and salads to sushi (rolls and sashimi) from the regular menu.



GO TAN UR S

OUTSIDE THE BOX

BI SA WA

here p s i m e h southern

TANGO SUR

NO FEE

If you’re looking for a dark, trendy restaurant, quality ethnic food and a good cut of meat that all falls within a college budget, this Argentine steak house is for you. With seven different parilla (grill) options, like the asada de tira (short ribs) and the churrasco (12 oz. sirloin steak), Tango Sur will certainly satisfy your hunger for beefy goodness. If you’re not a beef fan, there are delicious chicken options and pastas to choose from as well. For starters, we recommend the jamon crudo con palmito y salsa golf, which is hearts of palm wrapped in prosciutto, and the beef empanadas, which are Argentine turnovers. Tango Sur doesn’t take reservations and the line can get long, but once your name is on the waitlist, use the extra time to swing by Jewel to pick up a bottle of wine. If you came prepared, you can simply wait in the sitting room, where you can enjoy the drinks you brought until your table is ready.



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hi) c a b ( ! i h

LA A RR SIE

$$$ Mon-Thurs 11:30am–10pm, Fri-Sat 11:30am–11pm, Sun 12pm–9:30pm 526 Davis Street — Evanston (847) 750-6565 Note: No fee on Mondays, and no BYOB Thurs–Sun

$$ Mon–Thurs 5pm–10:30pm, Fri 5pm–11:30pm, Sat 3pm–11:30pm, Sun 12pm–11pm 3763 North Southport Avenue — Chicago (773) 477-5466

ek r t t s longe WASABI

NO FEE

Forget those sad instant ramen bowls stacked in the corner of your dorm room. Authentic Japanese ramen is a whole other experience altogether, and Wasabi offers some of Chicago’s best. Try the popular spicy garlic miso ramen ($14), which comes with springy egg noodles, tender pork, egg and other delicious goodies swimming in a rich pork bone broth that takes more than 20 hours to develop. Customers have the option to add extra ingredients to their ramen for an additional cost, so you can customize your dish any way you want. Along with the ramen, try the flavorful uni shooters ($5) or the agadashi tofu ($6.50), which is deep fried tofu with dashi broth. Wasabi also offers standard sushi fare, but the real star here is the ramen — ­ and the fact that it’s BYOB.

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$$ Mon–Thurs 5pm–10:30pm, Fri 5pm–11:30pm, Sat 3pm–11:30pm, Sun 12pm–11pm 2539 North Milwaukee Avenue — Chicago (773) 227-8180

NU-SPOON.COM |33


KEEP YOURSELF ALIVE.

PHOTO BY KIRBY BARTH

TIP

ASK THE CHEF AT THE SANDWICH STATION TO HELP YOU OUT — THEY’LL BE GLAD TO LEND A HAND

Fruitful Dining Get creative to integrate your daily dose of fruit. By Jacob Greenberg

It’s hard enough to find time to make your bed, let alone get your necessary servings of fruit every day. Since your pockets are only big enough to smuggle a precious apple or two out of the dining hall, we recommend getting creative and incorporating fruit into your regular meals. Here are a few ways to sneak in an orange or banana slice where you might not expect.

ORANGE INFUSED GRILLED CHICKEN WRAP EASY

6 MINUTES SERVES HOW

WHAT 1 grilled chicken breast 1 peeled orange 1 spinach wrap Lettuce Tomato slices Honey mustard

1

TAKE a freshly grilled chicken breast and a peeled orange to the sandwich station. 2

GET a spinach wrap and place the chicken and a few slices of orange in the middle. 3

SPREAD lettuce and tomatoes across the wrap. 4

DRIZZLE honey mustard on top for a savory finish.

BREAKFAST

SNACK

DESSERT

APPLE-BANANA BROWN SUGAR OATMEAL

MIXED FRUIT COTTAGE CHEESE PARFAIT

DINNER

CREAMSICLE

PINEAPPLE STIR FRY

WHAT Hot oatmeal Apple chunks Banana slices Brown sugar

34 |

WHAT Cottage cheese (substitute: yogurt) Prepackaged fruit cup (in tray next to cottage cheese) Granola flakes

WHAT Vanilla frozen yogurt Orange slices Orange juice

HOW Take pineapple to the stir fry station to add a tangy flavor and some extra nutrients to your dinner.

NU-SPOON.COM NU-SPOON.COM |34|34


NOURISH

LIQUID CALORIES What was last weekend’s calorie count? By Megan Suckut t’s not easy to conceptualize the calories of alcoholic drinks, and most of the time we choose not to think about it. But now it’s time to put it all into perspective and compare Northwestern students’ favorite drinks to dishes from their favorite restaurants. The lesson? Drinking calories count too.

I

THE RED SOLO CUP

1

2 glasses of Sauvignon Blanc

tortilla from a Chipotle burrito (290 calories)

1

1 glass of red wine

6

honey barbecue wing from Buffalo Wild Wings (88 calories)

1

shots of gin, vodka, rum or whiskey

plain bagel from Einstein’s with honey and almond shmear (383 calories)

1

9 glasses of champagne

cantina burrito from Taco Bell (760 calories)

1

5 cans of Busch Light

12OZ. BEER

1

va l

ue

gin and tonic

ILLUSTRATIONS BY KYLE HANCHER

3 6

As many of us learned during Wildcat Welcome alcohol safety ENU, the red Solo cup is a fantastic tool for measuring our intake in terms of standard drinks. The lines on the side indicate the value of one standard drink respectively, starting with hard liquor and moving to wine, then beer.

value-sized fries at Burger King (240 calories)

iced caramel macchiato from Starbucks (230 calories)

1

glasses of Merlot

1OZ. LIQUOR

1 1

glasses of white wine

5OZ. WINE

plate of chips and salsa from Chili’s (480 calories)

2

regular-sized bacon cheeseburger from Five Guys (920 calories)

1

cans of Coors Light

half-sized smoked turkey breast on country bread at Panera (210 calories)

NU-SPOON.COM |35


The Eat This, Not That campaign sounds like the perfect weight-loss plan, but sometimes choosing food with a higher fat content is actually the better option. By Sara Dunberg ealth guru David Zinczenko’s nutritional message, “Eat This, Not That!” is marketed as a no-diet solution to weight loss that gained rapid success upon its introduction. It sounds like a no brainer. According to Zinczenko’s campaign, simply choosing dishes with less calories or fat equals less weight gain. But the definition of healthy living isn’t that clear cut. We need to focus on the origins of our food and our relationships with our bodies. With this in mind, Eat This, Not That ought to remain on the shelves of Zincenzenko’s home library rather than ours. The reality is that we’ll have healthier bodies and more appreciation for our indulgences if we eat quality foods. And yes, this might

H

1

2

THE SUBSIDY SWAP

Soy is one of the largest government-subsidized crops, and as a result, small farmers who compete with massive producers are forced to shut down their farms. Additionally, soy milk slows iron absorption in our bodies, which can be harmful to those with preexisting iron deficiencies. So skip the government-backed soy lattes at Starbucks. A low-fat mocha without the whip provides comparable calories, rejects detrimental policy for our nation’s farmers, and still provides your daily jolt of jitters.

mean occasionally choosing food with the higher fat content. Baked! Lay’s chips are not kettle-cooked chips; Skinny Cow will never be Ben & Jerry’s. Hey Arnold fans might remember thickheaded Harold’s return from weight-loss camp, when the gang had to explain that “Twelve low-fat Mr. Fudgies is the same as six regular Mr. Fudgies.” It’s hard to fool ourselves into preferring these substitutions and not to mention, disregard potentially dangerous side effects of the chemicals used to reduce their calorie, fat and carbohydrate content. So the reality check is: stick to the real stuff. Here are some easy ways to swap certain foods and drinks for those that will leave you safe, satisfied and healthy.

3

THE SATISFACTION SWAP

Open bars and all-inclusive resorts that dilute their beer with water have been doing it wrong for decades. Make it your mission to find a bar with Blue Moon and Guinness on tap, and order yourself a Black-and-Blue. The roasted, bitter lager of the Irish sits atop the orange ale. Half-hearty, half-refreshing, when the glass tilts back you’re getting two real brews for the caloric-intake of one with an added gift of Guinness’ iron boost. (Visit the Celtic Knot, 626 Church Street, Evanston)

THE SAFETY SWAP

Eating raw sushi increases your risk of contracting foodborne disease. Its sourcing environment, the distance traveled to get to your plate, and the cleanliness of handling contribute to these risks. The CDC reported over 250 cases of salmonella infection last May. Opt for seared scallops. They are prepared as a cooked option in many sushi bars. The high heat sear reduces bacterial populations on the surface, and if prepared properly, their centers will still remain raw.

THE CRAZIEST THING I’VE EVER EATEN

Alejandro Pallares, Medill 2014 Guinea Pig (“Cui”) in Peru

Annie Weiss, Weinberg 2013 Fried Scorpion in Beijing, China.

Northwestern students weigh their most unusual eats from across the globe. By Megan McCormack

My dad, who is from Ecuador, took our family on a tour of his homeland and neighboring Peru. When we saw ‘guinea pig’ at a restaurant in Cusco, my dad explained that the Andean guinea pig is a regional delicacy. He then told us that it is killed by having its nose pinched until it suffocates. The animal itself was brought out whole, cooked and brown, kind of like a pig on a spit, only without the spit...it was surprisingly delicious. Imagine a very tender, juicy meat that tastes like the skin of a heavily spiced and seasoned chicken wing.

I went to Beijing with my high school class and one night we stumbled upon a scorpion vendor. There were so many scorpions, some live and crawling on the vendor’s arm, some on sticks, and some frying in peanut oil. There were four scorpions to a stick, so I bought one and slowly each of my classmates started trying them. I thought to myself, ‘When’s the next time I’m going to be in China?’ so someone counted to three and I closed my eyes and ate it. It was crunchy and tasted like peanuts.

Heather Evans, Weinberg 2015 Chocolate Covered Crickets in Katonah, NY For Halloween at my high school one year, they had a chocolate covered cricket eating contest, for which they drew names from a jar. I put in my name as a joke and they Peru picked me. It was not good. Once you got past the tasty chocolate coating, they were definitely crickets. The texture was gross: crunchy and sort of filled with air. And all the legs got stuck in my teeth. Needless to say, I lost the contest, but it was an interesting experience. 36 |

Katonah, NY

Beijing, China

ILLUSTRATIONS BY SARAH ADLER AND KYLE HANCHER

GET REAL


ILLUSTRATION BY KYLE HANCHER

NOURISH

Something to be Thankful for Is there really such thing as a healthy Thanksgiving feast? By Abigail Reisinger hanksgiving, a holiday focused on food, is obviously a Spoon favorite, but we constantly ask ourselves: what is the price of that full stomach at the end of the day? Am I doing myself any favors? In all honesty, probably not. The typical Thanksgiving dinner is about 4,000 calories. Your best option is to go into the big day with discerning eyes and the knowledge that there is something to be gained other than an extra inch on your waistline. The traditional meal actually has several components that are healthful, and as long as you don’t feast in this fashion every single night, it’s perfectly acceptable to enjoy your holiday favorites. Turkey, always the main event, is a lean protein with no saturated fat and is full of the antioxidant selenium. Just one serving can provide half of the recommended daily amount (RDA) of folic acid and 32 grams of protein — perfect for fueling up for the family football game after dinner. Leave the skins on your mashed potatoes to utilize the

T

fiber and potassium they have to offer. Five ounces of the dish has 27 milligrams of vitamin C (45% of the RDA) and if all else fails, remind yourself over and over: it’s a vegetable, it’s a vegetable… Cranberries are packed with antioxidants that are great for your digestive system. One-eighth of the canned version only has 86 calories and 0.1 grams of fat, and if you go homemade, you’ll cut sugar and take advantage of the infection-fighting benefits the fruit has to offer. Sweet potatoes have 330% of the RDA of vitamin A, which is significant enough to persuade me to put two types of potato on my plate. And since we’re all convinced that having even a hint of green in our meal is our calorie-saving grace, you’ll be happy to discover that green beans are full of beta-carotene (which promotes healthy vision, skin and immune system) and lots of B vitamins. Add these to your plate (casserole counts, in my book) to relieve any Thanksgiving guilt. When it comes to dessert, the classic pumpkin pie has some surprising health benefits, with 4.2

grams of fiber and 288 milligrams of potassium. A five-ounce glass of wine contains the antioxidant reservatrol, which reduces bad cholesterol and can prevent blood clots. Make sure to limit yourself to one glass so you’re not consuming excess liquid calories and becoming the subject of an embarrassing family story for next year. Approach Thanksgiving with a mind of moderation: don’t deny yourself favorites that only come around in the holiday season, but don’t set the bar at passing out at the table into your plate (not surprisngly, this is my older brother’s goal every year). This new Thanksgiving mindset, combined with the knowledge that you’re feeding your body nutrients it loves, will help you focus on being thankful for the things that mean the most to you, which includes, for me at least, family, health, Jon Hamm, double shot espresso and red velvet cake.

THE TYPICAL THANKSGIVING DINNER IS ABOUT 4,000 CALORIES.

SOURCES: MAYOCLINIC.COM AND SHAPE.COM

NU-SPOON.COM |37


Eat like a pro. By Maya Krasnow

CALORIES NEEDED FOR DIFFERENT SPORTS CALORIES

SPORT

minimum maximum

K I T TA E S

30 60

MI

FAST FACTS

NU

DAILY CALORIC INTAKE:

Barbecue pulled pork or ribs

CALORIES

TYPICAL BREAKFAST:

KAIN COLTER

POSITION: Quarterback/Wide Receiver HEIGHT: 6’0’’ WEIGHT: 190 lbs. TOTAL OFFENSIVE YDS: 2,647* MAJOR: HOMETOWN: Denver, Colo.

Psychology

Hashbrowns, eggs, bacon and yogurt

Mexican food or baked potatoes

carb-loading with pasta

TYPICAL LUNCH: CLASS:

TOTAL TOUCHDOWNS:

31*

Junior

TYPICAL DINNER:

SEDENTARY MODERATELY ACTIVE ATHLETE

Vanilla ice cream

FEMALE

MALE

IDEAL FITNESS ROUTINE 30 MINUTES OF

AEROBICS 5 DAYS A WEEK

+ STRENGTH TRAINING 2 DAYS A WEEK

*stats as of 10/29/12

38 |

I MEAN, STANDING IN LINE FOR FORT Y MINUTES IS HARDLY AEROBICALLY EFFECTIVE. I DOUBT I’VE WORKED OFF THE CALORIES IN A STICK OF CAREFREE GUM. — CHER, CLUELESS

**Data from Andrea Lerios of the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, and NPR.org

3000

2500

2000

1500

1000

GUILTY PLEASURE:

CALORIES FOR DIFFERENT LIFESTYLES 500

Steak, sweet corn and scalloped potatoes

I

CALORIES

0

RC

250

FAVORITE FOOD:

FAVORITE FOOD TO COOK:

OF EXE

TO BURN

5,000

Twice baked potato, Grandma’s mac and cheese and fried chicken

TES

SE

TO

BEST HOME COOKED MEAL:

8000

6000

5000

4000

3000

2000

0

T

1000

hose of us who split our time between watching Modern Family and walking up and down Sheridan Road might not be able to burn off fried chicken and buffet-style dinners every day. But powerhouse Kain Colter can afford to eat that and more. His intense workout regimen allows him to indulge in his favorite foods and still be a top quarterback in the Big Ten. We caught up with Colter to find out about the average diet of a college football superstar.

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN, ILLUSTRATIONS BY SARAH ADLER AND KYLE HANCHER 7000

TIMEOUT WITH KAIN COLTER


NOURISH

PHOTO BY MAGGIE GORMAN

THE KITCHEN SINK COOKIE*

*Want the recipe? Scan away.

NU-SPOON.COM |39


L L STI

Y? R G N HU

Feed your heart and soul, too. CHECK OUT OUR

Student Mass! Every Sunday, 9 PM www.WeAreSheil.org


Spoon — Fall 2012