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VOLUME 2 ISSUE 2 WINTER 2014

STEAKS UNDER

+

Cooking with BEER

TWO Ingredient Cocktails Meet the Man behind DMK Restaurants


You’re missing out on some

DELICIOUS EVENTS

in the dining halls.

Fix your FOMO with a

10 meals and 25 points for $100 Order online at www.dining.northwestern.edu


22

26

30

VOLUME 2 \ ISSUE 2 \ WINTER 2014

Step Up to the Plate There seems to be a firm belief that there is a limit to what college students can cook and eat. We have meager budgets, small, illequipped kitchens and minimal culinary knowledge capped at microwaving Easy Mac. But forget all of that. This issue, we wanted to encourage you (and ourselves) to challenge that self-prescribed assumption. You can look like a pro behind the bar with our recipes for two-ingredient cocktails, and we’ll show you how to prepare a home-cooked steak dinner for less than $10. Try cooking a pasta that goes beyond spaghetti with Prego, and even experiment with beer in your next batch of cupcakes. Tons of people ask our staff members if our food is actually real — do we buy things pre-made or use art supplies to make the food look good? Or they say, “That looks awesome, but my version would never turn out like that.” But the thing is, we really do make every dish featured in the magazine (and we definitely eat them too!). The point of Spoon is that we are students just like you, and everything we make, you can too. So next time you feel a little intimidated by a recipe, we dare you to try it — you might be surprised by the results.

facebook.com/NUSpoon

Happy eating,

instagram.com/nuspoonmag pinterest.com/spoonuniversity

Andrea Kang Editor in Chief

twitter.com/nuspoonmag QUESTIONS? COMMENTS? Email

nu.spoonuniversity@gmail.com NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |3

COVER PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

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06 08 13 19 37 35 43


SPOON

WHAT’S YOUR ITE FAVOR R BEE ?

UNIVERSITY

EDITOR IN CHIEF Andrea Kang CREATIVE DIRECTOR KK Rebecca Lai PUBLISHER Caroline Koppel

Goose Island Green Line

Nitro Milk Stout

MANAGING EDITOR Aurelie Corinthios AD SALES DIRECTOR Dan Lesser TREASURER Nadine Jachi MARKETING/PR DIRECTOR Jade Chen PHOTO DIRECTOR Daniel Schuleman VIDEO DIRECTOR HyoJin Park WEB PHOTO DIRECTOR Lily Allen

Lagunita

SENIOR WRITERS

Hoega

s IPA

EDITORS Kendall Siewert, Eilis Lombard, Sophie Jacob, Isadora Baum PRINT EDITOR Megan Suckut DESIGN EDITOR Ali Tomek

Maggie Gorman, Kendra Valkema

arden

WRITERS

George Markoulakis, Maddy Shannon, Abby Reisinger, Lauren Feld, Michelle Laszlo, Ashley Gilmore, Liza Keller, Stephanie Marshall, Leanna Smith, Francesco Guerrieri, Chelsea Renter, Hannah Kliot, Sarah Munger, Jenny Schackett, Emily Wickwire, Arielle Cooper, Angela Lin, Tara Longardner, Jessica Yang, Annie Trimber, Kai Huang, Jack Wiefels, Katherine Dempsey, Alyssa Brewer, Amanda Gajdosik DESIGNERS

Guinnes

Ashley Wu, Kyle Hancher, Liv Marcus s

VIDEO TEAM

Anna Kranwinkle, Joanne Lee, Samantha Guff, Elena Besser

Cider hard Hard Angry Orc

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kirby Barth, Bernard Wen, Hannah Lin, Alex Tom, Christine Chang, Emily Kim, Malia Hu, Ina Yang, Gregoire Durand, Astrid Goh, Naib Mian, Piril Dobrucali, Yair Sakols, Kai Huang onti Bom MARKETING/PR TEAM

Andrea Cladek, Allison Stenclik, Arielle Miller, Ashley DuBois, Breanna Lucas, Genna Krecicki, Hannah Levitan, Kristin Mathuny, Mariel Falk, Rachel Hirsch, Sam Spector, Samantha Meltzer, Marissa Karen, McKenzie Maxson, Somi Hubbard, Sarah Rense AD SALES TEAM

Lori Janjigian, Margaret Kuo, Cory Young, Kate Gladstone, Kathy Hong FACULTY ADVISOR

Maria Mastronardi Spoon Magazine is an extension of Spoon University, an online campus food community founded by Northwestern alumni Sarah Adler and Mackenzie Barth. nu.spoonuniversity.com

craving attention?

advertise with us.

contact Dan Lesser DANIELLESSER2015@U.NORTHWESTERN.EDU

to buy advertising space for your business online or in print (or both!) Support student publications and we’ll spread the good news about your business! WWW.NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM

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YOUR HEALTHY SERVING OF MIND-SNACKS

Get Toasty Be fancy for breakfast without even trying. By Abby Reisinger Making breakfast can be more than pouring milk and opening a box. In a few short steps, you can have a breakfast worthy of teatime at the Drake without having to take off your pajamas. Great for brunch with friends or just a decadent moment to yourself, this honey ricotta toast will fool your taste buds into thinking you have triple the amount in your bank account.

HONEY RICOTTA TOAST EASY

5 MINUTES SERVES WHAT 1

TOAST bread to your liking.

2

SLICE strawberries thinly while the bread toasts. 3 ALLOW toast to cool slightly. 4 SPREAD ricotta generously on toast. 5 TOP with strawberries and drizzle with honey.

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

1 piece of your favorite bread Ricotta cheese 6 strawberries, sliced A drizzle of honey

HOW

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |5


DRUMSTICK

CHICKEN 101 Everyone’s favorite protein, deconstructed By Liza Keller

THIGH

Chicken is a staple lean protein in many recipes because of its easy preparation and great taste, but it’s not as simple as it may seem. Unsure of the difference between light and dark meat, or how to tackle a whole chicken? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

1. BREAKING DOWN A ROTISSERIE CHICKEN

1

2

BREAST

WING

2. COOKING TIPS TIP

Learn the lingo and a few tips to become a chicken-cooking expert.

3

4

5b

[1] Hold the leg steady with a fork, and cut through the skin between the leg and body using a large knife. Slice through the hip joint and remove the leg from the body. Repeat with the other leg.

[4] Place a leg skin-side down and cut through the joint between the drumstick and the thigh. Repeat with other leg.

[2] Bend the wing away from the body, and remove it with the knife. Cut off the tips, if desired. [3] Chicken with the legs and wings removed.

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[5a] To remove the breast meat, make a cut down the center near the breastbone. [5b] Cut along one side of the breast, gently pulling the breast away from the bone and slicing against the bone as you go. Repeat with the second breast.

3. SANITATION TIPS Chicken, like all meat, carries the risk of transmitting dangerous bacteria such as salmonella. Here are a few tips for preventing bacteria growth. Keep raw chicken cold to touch; never allow it reach room temperature. Fresh, raw chicken can be stored in its original packaging for up to three days in the refrigerator. If you do not plan to use it within two days, you can freeze the chicken for up to two months. Thaw frozen chicken in the refrigerator; do not use a countertop or microwave. Pieces of the chicken such as the breast or thigh will take three to nine hours to thaw. Do not rinse raw chicken because it increases the risk of dangerous bacteria spreading in your kitchen. Heat the chicken to an internal temperature of at least 165°F to effectively reduce bacterial risk.

PHOTOS BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

5a

Like your chicken crispy? Pat the meat and skin dry with a paper towel to reduce excess moisture for a crisp exterior. Add chicken stock, butter and wine to the leftover bits of chicken stuck to the pan to make an easy sauce. Flatten your chicken by pounding it to quicken cook time and ensure the chicken cooks evenly. Rubs: Dry rubs are seasoning blends massaged onto foods and often include coarsely ground black or white pepper, paprika, garlic powder and crushed herbs. Paste rubs are dry seasonings held together with wet ingredients like oil, mustard or soy sauce. Marinades: Try marinating chicken in a plastic bag overnight to avoid a messy clean up and to allow the flavor to sink in. Commonly used marinades include wine, lemon juice, buttermilk, oil and herbs. Basting: Brush or pour liquids over the chicken as it cooks to preserve moisture and add flavor. Melted butter, pan drippings and broth can be used to baste chicken.


FEED

Five Wines Under $10 Pour yourself a glass that only tastes expensive. By Lauren Feld

ot all cheap wines are created equal. We scoured the wine racks for five of the most affordable bottles that give you the biggest bang for your buck. Next time you’re looking to give your shot glass a break, here are a few inexpensive wines to try.

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SPIRITO D’ITALIA PINOT GRIGIO 2012 $7.99 The crisp acidity mixed with a touch of lemon creates an almost bitter flavor. A solid choice if you’re looking to stray from the usual, perfumed Pinot. Where to buy: Whole Foods

4 PHOTOS BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

LA FERME JULIEN ROSÉ, AOC VENTOUX, FRANCE $5.99 This blush rosé manages to be sweet without being cloying. An easy-drinking wine reminiscent of summertime. Where to buy: Trader Joe’s

1

EARTHSTONE MERLOT 2009 $8.99

Soft and rich, this wine is a reasonably priced Merlot that leaves nothing to be desired. Where to buy: Whole Foods

3

REX-GOLIATH PINOT GRIGIO 2013 $6.99 Infused with citrus and pear, this wine is light and subtle. A fragrant Pinot at a fabulous price. Where to buy: Whole Foods

5

GEORGES DUBOEUF, MALBEC: GRAIN NOIR 2009 $8.99 A rustic, fruity start with a velvety mouthfeel — just what you’d want from a Malbec. Where to buy: Whole Foods

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |7


Boil, sauce, toss, repeat. There’s a reason we fall back on pasta time and time again — it’s just that easy. But the true beauty of pasta is its versatility. This guide provides simple, fresh recipes that use the noodle’s full potential. By Madeleine Shannon

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PHOTOS BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

PASTA LA VISTA, BABY


FEED

1

2

3

4

5

SAUSAGE, KALE AND ZUCCHINI BOW TIES

CARBONARA WITH PEAS AND BACON

AGLIO E OLIO WITH A FRIED EGG

CREAMY TOMATO AND TUNA PENNE

SPAGHETTI WITH MARINARA

italian sausage

minced garlic cloves

tbsp. olive oil

minced garlic cloves

6-ounce can tomato paste

1

shredded kale leaves

3

sliced yellow zucchini

½

2

diced bacon strips

2

4

minced garlic cloves

¼

pinch red pepper flakes

1

4

cup of peas

1

2

pinch red pepper flakes

1

14-ounce diced tomato

1

6-ounce can tuna

1

customize

add one or more of these

salt and pepper minced garlic diced onion minced garlic cloves

2

egg yolk

1

fried egg

1

cups tomato soup

3

dried thyme red pepper flakes dried oregano dried rosemary

¼ cup parmesan

cup parmesan

cup parmesan

cup parmesan

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |9


Presidential Plate-Up 6

THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT MORTY SHAPIRO

1

He’s not a foodie, but he does have favorite restaurants all over the world.

PHOTO BY BERNARD WEN

Morty talks keeping kosher, traveling the world and frozen margaritas. By Aurelie Corinthios

“There’s maybe 15 or so of them that I go to regularly and keep dragging people back to. Beijing, San Francisco, Tokyo, Jakarta, Paris, Shanghai, Boston…there’s one in every city.”

2

He loves frozen margaritas at That Little Mexican Cafe in Evanston.

“My wife and I love That Little Mexican Cafe and their frozen margaritas. But the best frozen margarita I’ve ever had is at the San Angel Inn in Mexico City. You’ve gotta be a tourist to ask for it frozen, but I do it.”

3

He hasn’t had a hamburger in decades.

4

The best meal he’s had recently was carrot cake and a glass of bourbon.

“I changed my diet to a kosher diet about 13 years ago, so there’s a whole lot of things I can’t eat. I also choose not to eat any red meat, and I’m not really a fish person. So honestly I end up eating a whole lot of yogurt, granola and tofu.”

“About a year ago I was at one of those hot, ritzy restaurants in New York City. There was a lot of heavy food on the menu and stuff I just can’t eat. So — and now this is going to sound strange — but I ended up ordering one glass of bourbon on the rocks and a piece of carrot cake. And I just sat there and ate it and it was one of the best meals I’ve ever had.”

5

6

He only uses chopsticks.

“Around 25 years ago, I gave up utensils for chopsticks. The reason for this is because of my background in economics, I spend a lot of time in Africa and Asia. And so I would watch people eat, and there was something about the way people using chopsticks just enjoy their food so much more. They eat more slowly. They savor it. So I made the switch. And I recommend the readers of your fine magazine to do the same. I have an incredible chopstick collection.”

…But he pretends he doesn’t know how to use them.

“I’m a very uncoordinated person; I’m a terrible athlete. But one thing I am great at is using chopsticks because I’ve been using them for so many years. So what I love to do when I’m offered chopsticks at dinners is pretend I don’t know how to use them. They always assume I won’t know what I’m doing, but I’m a master at this. Then I use the chopsticks to pick up a single grain of rice — and it’s just priceless.”

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facts about

morty

HOMETOWN: Union, New Jersey ALMA MATER: Hofstra University (undergraduate) University of Pennsylvania (graduate) MAJOR: Economics FIRST KITCHEN SKILL: Toasting bagels FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT ON CAMPUS: Kosher stand at Allison dining hall BEST THING HE’S EVER EATEN: Key lime pie at a restaurant in Palm Beach


FEED

KITCHEN TOOLS FOR THE BROKE

Make use of household items that can do double duty in the kitchen. By Alyssa Brewer

PHOTOS BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN, ILLUSTRATIONS B ASHLEY WU

1

Instead of a rolling pin, use a wine or beer bottle. Simply clean it and take the label off before rolling out your dough.

2

Don’t worry about buying a whisk. Some quick stirring with a fork works just as well any time a recipe calls for whisking eggs or batter.

3

Hate using knives? Sometimes kitchen shears are the right replacement. Cut slices of pizza, pieces of meat, herbs and scallions with scissors.

5

Replace a baking sheet with tin foil. Make a little box with the tin foil and use it to roast vegetables or bake small batches of brownies.

4

Don’t own a colander or sifter? Use a wire mesh strainer for draining pasta or sifting flour instead.

6

Replace a cutting board with a thick brown paper bag. Lay the bag flat on a countertop and slice away without scratching up the counter. The best part? Now you only have to wash the knife.

7

Overturn a cup or wine glass onto dough to use it as a cookie or biscuit cutter.

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |11


POTS AND PANS AND SKILLETS, OH MY! Everything you need to know about cookware By Jessica Yang

WOK A round-bottomed vessel used to cook food quickly over extremely high heat. Most commonly used for stir-fries, but also great for deep-frying. The tall, sloped walls keep splattering under control.

DUTCH OVEN A thick-walled, cast-iron or clay pot used for slow-cooking meals. Great for making roasts, stews and casseroles.

STOCKPOT A tall, narrow pot that’s perfect for cooking stock. Can also be used for boiling, making porridge or steaming shellfish.

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

SAUTÉ PAN + NON-STICK SKILLET If a recipe calls for a pan, it’s usually referring to one of these. Can be non-stick or stainless steel.

SAUCEPAN An all-purpose pan that comes in a number of different sizes. Its depth allows for boiling pasta and making soups, stews or braises. 12 |

CAST-IRON SKILLET Durable, cast-iron cookware made from a single sheet of metal and able to withstand very high temperatures. Great for searing steak, toasting paninis or even baking cake or cornbread.


WHAT’S YOUR PROBLEM? HERE’S THE ANSWER.

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SHAKE YOUR SHUKA Put all your eggs in one basket. By Danielle Zhu Let me count the ways I love shakshuka. It can warm you up on a cold winter’s day. It’s perfect for breakfast, lunch or dinner. And it’s all made in just one skillet. So step out of your comfort zone with this Middle Eastern dish, and you might just find yourself a new comfort dish.

MEDIUM

35 MINUTES SERVES

SHAKSHUKA

¼ cup olive oil 1 jalapeño, seeded and minced ½ green bell pepper, chopped 1 small yellow onion, chopped 5 cloves garlic, minced 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes 4-6 eggs 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon paprika Salt to taste

HOW

PHOTO BY YAIR SAKOLS

WHAT

1

HEAT oil in large skillet over medium heat.

2

COOK onion, green pepper and jalapeños until soft, about 6 minutes. Add garlic and spices, and cook for another 2 minutes. 3 POUR in tomatoes. Simmer for 15 minutes. Season with salt to taste. 4 CRACK eggs over sauce. Cover skillet and cook until eggs are just set, about 5 minutes. 5 SERVE with pita bread.

NU-SPOON.COM |13 NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM


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Hook, Line and Dinner No muss, no fuss By Sarah Munger Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, salmon packs in roughly 40 grams of protein per serving and will fill you up without a calorie overload. Cooking fish might seem complicated, messy and time-consuming, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Baking salmon in a tinfoil packet gives you a fast fish recipe you can make anywhere with an oven.

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PHOTO BY GRÉGOIRE DURAND

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BAKED SALMON WITH LEMON EASY

30 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

6-ounce salmon fillet (skin on or off — ­ your choice) 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon oregano ½ teaspoon olive oil ½ lemon Tinfoil

HOW 1

PREHEAT oven to 400ºF.

WHAT TO DO WITH LEFTOVER SALMON 1

SALMON SCRAMBLED EGGS

2

CREAMY LINGUINE WITH SALMON Sauté minced

Scramble eggs with salmon, chopped chives and splash of heavy cream. Serve over toast.

garlic. Then add lemon juice, heavy cream, butter and Parmesan to make cream sauce. Toss with pasta, salmon and parsley.

2

WASH and pat salmon dry with paper towel. Place it on sheet of tinfoil large enough to wrap around fish. 3

SPREAD olive oil over fish.

4

SPRINKLE with salt, pepper and oregano.

5

SQUEEZE lemon over fish.

6

WRAP tinfoil over salmon until it’s sealed and place in oven. Bake for 25 minutes.

3

SALMON CAKES Sauté

chopped onion, celery, red onion and red bell pepper with butter. Mix salmon with bread crumbs, cooked vegetables, hot sauce, mayo, mustard and eggs. Form into patties and fry.


SOLUTION

GRO

CER

Give Chicken Breast a Rest

Y S AV V Y

Come join the dark side. By Jenny Schackett

EASY

25 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

4 chicken thighs 2 teaspoons olive oil 3 garlic cloves, chopped 1 14-ounce can crushed tomatoes ¼ cup chicken stock Salt to taste

HOW 1

PAT chicken thighs dry with paper towel and season with salt. 2

HEAT olive oil in large pan over

medium heat, then brown chicken in one even layer, five minutes per side. If it doesn’t all fit, do a second batch.

4

SAUTÉ garlic until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Mix in canned tomatoes, chicken stock and season with salt. Bring to a simmer. 5

PLACE chicken thighs in pan and cover with lid. Cook for 20 minutes.

tip overcrowding the pan prevents browning and steams the meat

3

MOVE chicken onto separate plate, and remove most of the rendered fat with paper towel, leaving a little behind.

PHOTO BY KIRBY BARTH

Switch up your chicken dish by buying dark meat instead of white — you’ll be happy to hear that chicken thighs are half the price and twice as flavorful. This inexpensive recipe comes together in five short steps.

BRAISED CHICKEN THIGHS

TELL ME DANA, HOW IS YOUR CHICKENNU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM BREAST? WAITRESS: OH, |15 IT’S GREAT. IT’S SERVED WITH OUR WORLD FAMOUS WING SAUCE. MICHAEL SCOTT: MMMM, SOUNDS YUMMY. I WILL HAVE A CHICKEN BREAST, HOLD THE CHICKEN. — THE OFFICE MICHAEL SCOTT:


PHOTOS BY MAGGIE GORMAN AND NAIB MIAN

the stir-fry to rice ratio should be around 1:2

Love Your Leftovers

Upgrades so good you’ll want to make-out with your takeout By Maggie Gorman and Angela Lin he scenes are frightening but familiar: a forlorn, half-eaten Cinnapie peers sadly from its cardboard grave after last night’s boozy bacchanal. Its once-glistening icing is now a sad, dry ghost of its former glory. Or there’s the shame of uneaten fries, abandoned when you passed out before you could even shovel them from their greasy paper bag to your mouth. You want only to dispose immediately of these offenses, and with them any remaining morning-after regret. But leftovers harbor hope for the broke, hungover and hungry. These leftover makeovers are designed with empty fridges in mind, utilizing the inherent flavorful-ness of takeout. No need to show your face to the outside world on a grocery run — score! On days when Chinese fried rice is the best option, it’s small victories like this that keep you going.

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CHINESE FRIED RICE EASY

8 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

Leftover Chinese (meat or vegetable dish) White rice 1-2 teaspoons of oil 2 teaspoons soy sauce 1 egg

HOW 1

HEAT oil in pan over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add leftover Chinese and sauté until heated through. 2

ADD rice and soy sauce. Sauté to coat rice with sauce. 3

ADD egg and scramble.


SOLUTION

CINNAPIE FRENCH TOAST 8 MINUTES SERVES

EASY

EASY HOW

WHAT Remains of one Cinnapie 4 large eggs 1 cup heavy cream or milk 2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter Maple syrup (optional)

FRENCH FRY HASH

1

WHISK together eggs and cream or milk in large bowl. 2

BREAK Cinnapie into sticks and soak each one in egg mixture, flipping over to thoroughly coat each side. 3

MELT butter in medium skillet over

medium-high heat. 4

PLACE sticks in skillet and cook

6 MINUTES SERVES HOW

WHAT Leftover French fries, chopped Fresh vegetables like bell peppers or onion, chopped 1 egg Deli meat like turkey or ham, chopped Shredded cheddar

until light golden-brown on each side, about 3 minutes per side.

1

SAUTÉ vegetables and meat in pan over medium heat until vegetables are tender, about 4 minutes. 2

ADD chopped fries and crack in

egg. 3

SCRAMBLE on low heat until eggs have just set and fries are crispy. 4

SEASON with salt and pepper to

taste. 5

TOP with shredded cheddar.

5

SERVE French toast with maple syrup, if desired.

SPAGHETTI SKILLET PIE MEDIUM

15 MINUTES SERVES

WHAT ½ cup milk or cream ¼ cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes

4 eggs 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced ½ pound leftover cooked spaghetti (with tomato sauce)

HOW 1

WHISK together the milk, cheese, salt, pepper, parsley and eggs in a small bowl. 2

HEAT oil over medium heat in a medium skillet. Sauté garlic, stirring constantly, until lightly browned. 3

POUR leftover spaghetti into skillet,

arranging to form a neat, slightly raised circle. Pour egg mixture evenly over spaghetti and cook, without stirring, until bottom is crispy, or about 5 minutes.

4

FLIP pie to cook other side by setting a plate the same size as the skillet on top of the pan and inverting the pan. Add more oil to pan if necessary.

SPRINKLE TOP WITH MOZZARELLA AND PARMESAN

5

SLIDE inverted pie, crispy side up, back into skillet and finish cooking over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes, or until browned. 6

SLIDE pie onto a plate, cut into wedges and serve with Parmesan.

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |17


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A last-minute party appetizer By Kai Huang Forgot to put together some killer appetizers? Friends already on the way? Think twice before you default to that plastic-wrapped cheese and cold cuts platter. This ooey, gooey baked Brie is versatile enough to top anything from crackers to crostini. Your guests will thank you.

PESTO BRIE PLATTER EASY 12 MINUTES SERVES WHAT 1 whole wheel Brie (10-14 ounces) 3-4 generous spoonfuls pesto 20 slices crostini

HOW 1

PREHEAT oven to 350째F.

2

PLACE Brie on baking sheet lined with foil. 3 SPREAD pesto generously over Brie. 4 BAKE for 10 minutes until Brie is very soft. 5 TRANSFER to serving plate, cut and serve with crostini or crackers.

ALTERNATIVE BRIE TOPPINGS by Sophie Jacob 1

SUN-DRIED TOMATOES AND THYME

18 |

2

MAPLE SYRUP AND PECANS

SE

R PHOTO BY KAI HUANG

WOULD U BRIE MINE?

3

ROASTED STRAWBERRIES

4

WRAPPED IN LAYER OF PROSCIUTTO

5

BACON, CHOPPED PEPPERS AND THYME


SOLUTION

THE TRIPLE THREAT Too much is never enough. By Stephanie Marshall Sometimes you need to satisfy that sweet tooth at a minute’s notice. This ice cream sandwich is a quick, no-bake dessert that’s ideal for people who spend more time on math homework than baking formulas. Maybe you’ll even get an extra kick of caffeine to finish that problem set.

CHOCOLATE DONUT, NUTELLA AND COFFEE ICE CREAM SANDWICH EASY

ASS

EMB

LY O N LY

5 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

1 chocolate donut 2 tablespoons Nutella 2-3 scoops coffee ice cream

HOW 1

PHOTO BY BERNARD WEN

CUT donut in half lengthwise, as if you were cutting a bagel. 2 SPREAD Nutella inside each donut half. 3 SCOOP ice cream onto one side and top with the other donut half.

NU-SPOON.COM |19 NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM


DMK M” BEHIND “D E H T T E E M EWEST FISH, THE N & R E G R U B . BY ES STREET Y O N O T N ADDITIO RKOULAKIS GEORGE MA

DAVID MORTON HOMETOWN HIGHLAND PARK, IL

AGE 40

ALMA MATER UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN FAVORITE PLACES TO DINE FOUND KITCHEN & SOCIAL HOUSE, UNION PIZZERIA, AVEC, BIG STAR

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

FUN FACT MORTON’S SISTER IS AMY MORTON, OWNER OF FOUND


S

PHOTO COURTESY OF DMK RESTAURANTS

erial restaurateurs have a reputation. We picture them as brash and cutthroat, working around the clock to stay ahead of the fickle game of serving trendy food. But family men residing in the Evanston community? Not so much. Yet both seasoned restaurateur David Morton and five-time James Beard nominee Chef Michael Kornick live with their families in Evanston — and we’re thankful they do. The two partners just raised the bar for the Evanston dining community with their new restaurant, DMK Burger & Fish, where they will serve fare similar to Chicago mainstays DMK Burger Bar and Fish Bar. Our favorite menu items include the turkey burger with refreshing dijonnaise, and the Satchmo, a fried shrimp and crawfish sandwich served on a perfectly toasted top-split roll lathered with a savory roasted garlic aioli. Pair those with any of the to-die-for fries or shakes, and you’ve got yourself a meal. The small size and communal tables make for an intimate atmosphere, but the modern design and music keep the space youthful and fun. Beyond this new venture, the powerhouse team also owns six more restaurants that have built the DMK empire into what it is today: three DMK Burger Bar locations, Fish Bar, Ada Street and County BBQ, the latter two sporting Michelin Bib Gourmand titles. Back in December, I had the pleasure of speaking to Morton, who spoke about his past, his longtime desire to open an Evanston restaurant and his plans for the future. Read on to learn about the Evanstonian who’s helping usher in a new era in our suburb’s dining scene. So how long have you lived in Evanston? I’ve been here 10 years. I love Evanston. I love the proximity to the city. I sometimes go back and forth, more than once a day. I’ll go downtown and work, then come back and pick up my wife and go back downtown for dinner. I also love the proximity to nature. We’re basically steps from the beach. My wife and I have a daily ritual where we wake up early in the morning and do a four-mile walk by the lake. It’s just a way to spend some time together before the kids are up and running. So Evanston allows for a lot of that. And I love having the proximity to the university because it does make the city dynamic, cool and interesting. No drawbacks of living here, as far as I’m concerned.

Can you tell us a little history behind Burger Bar and Fish Bar? Part of what we are interested in doing is having one of the most expensive inexpensive restaurants in the industry. We’re super into value, but also super into really high quality for everything from design to the food. So when Michael and I started this little voyage together, it was around DMK Burger Bar. When we started out we spent the better part of a year traveling the country. At the time, before the big burger boom, burgers were still relegated to fast food. We went from L.A. to New York to Milwaukee to Dallas to Vegas, and Philadelphia — wherever possible to see what our contribution to the world of burgers was going to look like. We saw a place called Father’s Office in L.A. that was very inspiring. They had one store, and did a couple things very, very well. Today, DMK Burger Bar has been a huge success for us. At the end of the day, I think DMK’s competitive advantages include hospitality. It’s a lost art. We have an amazing training program on it, and we spend a tremendous amount of time and energy training people on what we think are the principles of creating amazing moments for guests. DMK is the largest buyer of grass-fed beef in the Midwest outside of grocery. So we arrived to the grass-fed beef party very early. We’ve had a meaningful impact on the market in general. Our locations include the original

Why open up in Evanston now? This will be our seventh restaurant. One of the focuses of our company is using restaurants to slowly transform the industry. We are interested in the intersection between really hardcore culinary and casual. And as we move through our projects, I’ve come to think

the DMK chicagoland empire

ONE OF THE FOCUSES OF OUR COMPANY IS USING RESTAURANTS TO SLOWLY TRANSFORM THE INDUSTRY. WE ARE INTERESTED IN THE INTERSECTION BETWEEN REALLY HARDCORE CULINARY AND CASUAL.

of us both as an HR company and as a restaurant company. Part of the journey of opening different concepts for us has been mostly inspired by a motivation to draw the best possible talent we can find. A lot of our projects are opportunistic. This space and this time was opportunistic. The deal was actually made on a handshake while I was jogging along a path by the water. I ran into someone who had some involvement with the space, and knew there was some potential in Evanston so, at that particular time, I said, “Great. We’ll move forward based on the opportunity.”

in Lakeview, one out in Lombard, and we’re working on one for Soldier Field. So DMK is, to this day, one of the only burger restaurants that is truly chef-inspired. Fish Bar was just like Burger & Fish in that it was an interesting opportunity. The space became available right next door to the original DMK, so I kind of felt that it was an opportunity to play 75% defense and 25% offense in an effort to control the corner. In preparation, Michael and I traveled quite a bit to think about what we’d do with that tiny space. We really fell in love with a couple of concepts, one in New York and one in L.A., that were really passionate about delicious fish. And at the time there was very little innovation in the Chicago restaurant scene that revolved around fish. We liked the idea of the counter-service element that we were inspired with at a place called Mary’s Fish Camp in New York. How did the Burger & Fish concept come about? For a long time we’ve been talking about doing another iteration of DMK Burger Bar and Fish Bar next door. And then this opportunity in Evanston came up. The conversation has evolved, as it always does, but we think that Burger & Fish will resonate with the Northwestern audience. This establishment is unique because of its service model. It’s more of a quick-serve model. We’ve been spending a ton of time (we’re still working on it) thinking about how we can add as much hospitality as possible to an area of the industry to which people don’t typically associate value. It’s a shrunken version of DMK Burger Bar’s menu with a lot of opportunity for evolution. So you’ll see some selection of burgers that are always there, but the menu will continually change as well. For Fish Bar, we have a section called “On a Bun,” which is our sandwich section, and it’ll feature three or four of Fish Bar’s sandwiches.

FISH BAR

ADA STREET

COUNTY BBQ

2956 N SHEFFIELD AVE

1664 N ADA ST

1352 W TAYLOR ST

CHICAGO, IL

CHICAGO, IL

CHICAGO, IL

DMK BURGER BAR

DMK BURGER & FISH

2954 N SHEFFIELD AVE

815 NOYES ST

CHICAGO, IL

EVANSTON, IL

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |21


Eat

Drink And Be Merry Get party-ready in two minutes with two-ingredient drinks. Less work, more play. By Isadora Baum and Michelle Laszlo Photos by Daniel Schuleman

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tequila

& grapefruit soda


POM juice

& sparkling wine

Dr Pepper

& Midnight Moon cherry moonshine

Coca-Cola

& red wine

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |23


bourbon

& Mountain Dew

beer

& hard cider

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Get Cookin’ with Mini Workshops!

Join us at Norris to cook up something good! Workshops cost just $12 Visit www.minicourses.org for a complete list of cuisine workshops


KE A T A M , ONE THEN GE D L O A C FEAST, NNING B A R G ED -WI TIME M D E R H A -T W E BEER OW AN A WERY. TH BEER TO KN GAN BRE VE YOUR A I MICH OME TO H IT TOO. C EAT HAS EMAN AND CHUL IEL S

PHO

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CHOCOLATE STOUT CUPCAKES By Amanda Gajdosik 1 box chocolate cake mix 1 ¼ cups stout beer ½ cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled for five minutes 3 eggs Cream cheese frosting PREHEAT oven to 325˚F. Line 24 muffin tins with cupcake liners. POUR cake mix into large bowl. In separate medium bowl, mix together beer, butter and eggs. Pour egg mixture over cake mix and combine. POUR batter into cupcake tins and bake for about 20 minutes, or until tops have risen and spring back when lightly touched. ALLOW to cool completely before topping with cream cheese frosting.

GUINNESS FLOAT By Annie Trimber Coffee or vanilla ice cream 1 can Guinness beer POUR Guinness into tall glass. Tilt glass to minimize foaming. SCOOP ice cream into Guinness.

BEER FRIES By Annie Trimber 1 bottle amber wheat ale (we used 5 Rabbits) 1 large Russet potato, peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon chili powder ¼ teaspoon garlic powder Salt and pepper SLICE peeled potato into 1-inch thick wedges. SOAK fries in medium bowl with beer for 15 minutes. DRAIN the bowl, and pat fries dry with paper towel. TOSS fries with spices and olive oil. PLACE fries on parchment-lined baking sheet in even layer. BAKE for 40 minutes, or until tender and golden brown.

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |27


PHOTO BY AMANDA GAJDOSIK

BEER-BRAISED BEEF By Amanda Gajdosik Canola oil 1 2-3 lb beef roast 1 medium sweet onion, sliced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 12-ounce bottles beer, a red ale or kolch style works well Salt and pepper PREHEAT oven to 300˚F. ALLOW the roast to come to room temperature for about 30 minutes. Salt and pepper all sides. HEAT 2 tablespoons oil in large roasting pan or dutch oven over medium-high heat. Sear roast on all sides, about 2 minutes per side. REMOVE beef from pot. Add 1 tablespoon oil and sauté onions and garlic until fragrant, about 1 minute. RETURN roast to pot, pour in beer and cover with lid or foil. BAKE in oven for 3-4 hours, until meat is fork-tender and liquid has reduced by half. REMOVE roast from pot and allow to rest on cutting board.

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BEER GRAVY Remaining pan juices ½ cup milk 1 tablespoon cornstarch PLACE pot with remaining pan juices over medium heat. WHISK together milk and cornstarch in small bowl, and pour into pot. STIR to combine and let simmer until desired consistency is reached. Spoon over roast when served.


, , E. DAY, L TOLERANC LAY. Y R E V E P O S BEERY LOW ALCOHR WORK, NOT K N I R D L NEW HOLLAND BREWERY, N WHO N INCREDIB ASTING IS FO A M A PRODUCTION CAMPUS FOR ITH HAS A IS BEER T A H (TOURS EVERY SATURDAY) ik F s E o S ajd TIM ECAU anda G 684 COMMERCE COURT B m A S ’ y T B THA HOLLAND, MI 49424 Faith is a microbiologist turned beer-maker at New Holland Brewing in Holland, MI, whose day-today work includes tasting hundreds of barrels of beer. Faith, 25, started working at New Holland in 2012 as a brewer. Today he’s the woodmaster, the man in charge of all the brewery’s barrel-aged beers. His desk is littered with bottles, labels, jars of honey cultivated from their own hives, and binders filled with spreadsheets. The pages are crowded with slanted, squished script devoted to different beers, different barrels, different taste tests. Smiley or frowny faces offer his opinions about a drink at a glance. With dozens of beers and artisanal spirits to choose from, there’s something for everyone at New Holland. A tour of the brewery’s facilities offers beer buffs and beginners alike a rundown of what exactly it takes to make art in fermented form — NH’s tagline. “You want a beer?” are his first words to me as I walk into the massive production facility. Yes, yes I do want a beer. With taps and kegerators littered around the building, there’s plenty of options. Selection made (I chose the Poet, an oatmeal stout), he walks me to the back of the warehouse where the grains are stored. “Here, taste this!” He opens the lid of a storage bin. Grabbing a handful of grains, he shoves them into his mouth and starts crunching. I follow suit and the grains start popping and fizzing, like gluten-filled Pop Rocks. They leave the taste of lemon on my tongue.

Next, Faith shows me the brew house, where the malts (grains that have been dried) are mixed and milled. The malts are mashed with specific mixtures at different temperatures, according to each beer. Then the mash goes into the kettle where it is boiled and hops are added. At this point, the mash is known as wort: beer that hasn’t fermented. After a trip through the whirlpool, the wort is cooled and put into fermentation tanks where different strains are added to get the beer bubbling and producing alcohol. The beer (because yes, now it’s beer; there’s alcohol in there!) is then filtered and moved to bright tanks, where the beer matures, clarifies and is naturally carbonated through secondary fermentation. Now the freshly-made booze either goes into barrels to be aged, or bottled and packaged for sale, depending on the beer. The barrelaged beer concept is growing at New Holland, with different varieties being blended and made on the regular, or aging for months or years at a time before being mixed to create a unique new brew. “It’s definitely a labor of love,” Faith says. “I’m putting stuff to wood that, while it was produced this year, won’t be ready for another three.” We sample four

coffee and chocolate variations of NH’s Dragon’s Milk stout, discussing the positives and negatives of each incarnation. From the Dragon’s Milk Cellar we move onto the House of Funk, the brewery’s sour cellar. The room is chilly (better for the beer) and lined with barrels on three sides. Six gigantic fouters (think wine barrels on steroids) stand at attention along the right wall, each named after great funk musicians. I think I just sampled beer from James Brown. Tasting and testing the whole way (he even let me try his Root Bootch, a root beer-inspired Kombucha), I’ve been shown the works of New Holland. Bottling and packaging equipment with more levers, handles and knobs than the USS Enterprise, bottles and kegs stacked up to the ceiling, Faith has shown me the entire facility. “There are plenty of people sitting behind a desk wearing Chuck Taylor’s and black-rimmed glasses who can push a button to brew beer, but that’s not what we do here,” Faith says. “We’re very hands-on; we’re far from automated.” And it shows. New Holland is continually improving and innovating in every area of beer and brewing. From sustainable reuse of bourbon barrels, the garden at their brewpub and the celebration of local and seasonal flavors in all their products, New Holland is going above and beyond.

(616) 355-6422

CHECK OUT THESE OTHER BREWERY TOURS IN THE CHICAGOLAND AREA.

GOOSE ISLAND BREWERY 1800 WEST FULTON CHICAGO, IL 60612 (312) 91VV5-0071 FINCH’S BEER 4564 NORTH ELSTON CHICAGO, IL 60630 (773) 283-4839 METROPOLITAN BREWING (TOURS ARE RARE, BUT WORTH IT) 5121 NORTH RAVENSWOOD CHICAGO, IL 60660 HALF ACRE BEER COMPANY 4257 N LINCOLN AVE CHICAGO, IL 60618 REVOLUTION BREWING 2323 N MILWAUKEE AVE CHICAGO, IL 60647 ATLAS BREWING COMPANY 2747 N LINCOLN AVE CHICAGO, IL 60614 TEMPERANCE BEER COMPANY 2000 DEMPSTER ST EVANSTON, IL 60202

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |29


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t a myeo u r h c t a m

r ur kitchen fo o y to in r e n ncy steak din n't eat well? a c e k Bring that fa ro b e ho says th endall Siewer t, $10 or less. W uerrieri and K ncesco G Recipes by Fra l Schuleman ie Photos by Dan

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1 Ribeye Steak Medium / 15-20 minutes / Serves 1 1 large ribeye steak ¼ cup vegetable or canola oil 3 tablespoons butter 3-4 sprigs thyme or rosemary Salt Garlic powder Cayenne 1. Pat steak dry on both sides with paper towel. 2. Season both sides generously with salt, garlic powder and pinch of cayenne. 3. Heat oil in pan over medium-high heat until it begins to smoke. 4. Place steak carefully in pan and cook, flipping frequently, for about 4 minutes, until a pale golden brown crust starts to form. 5. Toss in butter and rosemary. Tilt pan slightly so melted butter pools at bottom. Use spoon to pour butter over steak, aiming at light spots. (TIP: that’s called basting) Continue flipping and basting for 2-3 minutes, or until instant read thermometer inserted into thickest part of steak registers 120 to 125˚F for medium rare. 6. Transfer steak to large plate and pour pan juices on top. Let rest for about 5-10 minutes, loosely covered in tin foil. 7. Slice against the grain and serve.

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Arugula Salad

Roasted Cauliflower

Easy / 5 minutes / Serves 2

Easy / 25 minutes / Serves 2

4 cups arugula, washed 1 lemon, juiced and zested ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 cup cherry tomatoes 5 tablespoons olive oil 1. Whisk together lemon zest, lemon juice, mustard and olive oil in a small bowl. 2. Cut cherry tomatoes in half and add to large bowl with arugula. 3. Pour in half the dressing and toss together. Add more dressing as needed.

2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon cayenne 2 cups cauliflower Salt, to taste 1. Preheat oven to 425ºF. 2. Toss cauliflower with olive oil, garlic, salt and cayenne in large bowl. 3. Place seasoned broccoli onto baking sheet and roast for 20 minutes, tossing halfway through, until ends are brown and the stalks are crisp.

IF IT DOESN’T HAVE MEAT... IT’S A SNACK — RON SWANSON, PARKS AND RECREATION NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |31


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CHUCK

steak

Medium / 15-20 minutes / Serves 1 1 large chuck steak Âź cup vegetable or canola oil Salt Garlic powder Cayenne 1. Pat steak dry on both sides with paper towel. 2. Season generously with salt, garlic powder and pinch of cayenne.

1

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3. Heat oil in pan under medium-high heat until it begins to smoke. 4. Place steak carefully in pan and cook, flipping frequently, for about 7 minutes total. 5. Remove steak from pan and let rest on separate plate for 7 minutes, loosely covered in tin foil. 6. Slice against the grain and serve.

skirt steak Medium / 15-20 minutes / Serves 2 1 large skirt steak Âź cup vegetable or canola oil Salt Garlic powder Cayenne Chimichurri (see recipe below) 1. Season skirt steak generously with salt and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Pat dry with paper towel and season again with salt, garlic powder and pinch of cayenne.

2. Heat oil in pan under high heat until it begins to smoke. 3. Place steak carefully in pan and cook until nicely charred, about 3-4 minutes on each side. Flip frequently for even cooking. 4. Remove steak from pan and let rest on large plate for 5-10 minutes, loosely covered in tin foil. 5. Slice against the grain and serve with chimichurri.


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1 Dry Rub Marinade Pinch of sugar Salt Paprika, to coat steak Garlic powder, to coat steak Black pepper, to coat steak Cooking oil, to coat steak 2 Chimichurri Sauce and Marinade ½ cup red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon salt

3-4 cloves garlic, minced 1 shallot chopped 1 jalapeño, finely chopped 2 cups cilantro, minced 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, minced cup fresh oregano, finely chopped ¾ cups extra virgin olive oil 3 Ginger-Soy Marinade 1 teaspoon ginger, thinly sliced

1 clove garlic, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon sesame oil ¼ cup soy sauce 1 teaspoon honey 4 Rosemary-Dijon Marinade 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 sprig rosemary, finely chopped Pinch of crushed red pepper Juice and zest of ½ lemon NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |33


TOP 5 CHICAGO-AREA STEAK RESTAURANTS By Eilis Lombard

PHOTO COURTESY OF PETE MILER’S

David Burke’s Primehouse 616 N Rush St, Chicago, IL 60611 Here, diners can experience the highestquality ribeye dry-aged in a cellar lined with Himalayan salt. The aging process imbues this beef with an almost unbelievably rich, slightly gamey flavor characteristic only to this James Hotel restaurant.

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LEARN THE LINGO By Katherine Dempsey MARBLING Fat that creates white spots and streaks in lean meat. Evenly spread, prominent marbling is a good thing.

SEARING

Bar & Boeuf 2 Bavette’s 218 W Kinzie St, Chicago, IL 60654 Art deco-style chandeliers, maroon leather booths and mahogany tones create a hip speakeasy vibe at Brendan Sodikoff’s Bavette’s Bar & Boeuf. Although this date night hotspot is a newcomer, its prime bone-in dry-aged ribeye with béarnaise sauce and steak salt is a serious contender among the best Chicago-style steaks.

To cook meat on a very hot surface so that it browns quickly and creates a “sear” or “crust.”

Las Tablas 2942 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, IL 60657 If you’re not looking to shell out $50 on a piece of red meat, try a steak dinner with Latin American flair at this Colombian steakhouse. Their entrana (skirt steak) is famously tender, packed with flavor from a top-secret rub that’s been in the owner’s family for generations, and is accompanied by a fresh chimichurri sauce.

PRIME

Pete Miller’s 1557 Sherman Ave, Evanston, IL 60201 Pete Miller’s is famous among Northwestern students as the place you make your parents take you the second they arrive on campus, and for good reason. This steakhouse and live jazz joint is pricey, but its juicy filets are some of the best you’ll find without having to venture downtown.

SELECT

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The Golden Steer 5 7635 Roosevelt Rd, Forest Park, IL 60130 The Golden Steer doesn’t have the same swank and finesse of most of the favorite downtown steakhouses, but don’t let the ‘70s style décor fool you — this Forest Park hidden gem knows how to cook steak. The prime top sirloin and the filet mignon are both charbroiled to perfection and under $30.

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GRADE USDA evaluation of beef’s tenderness, juiciness and flavor (quality grades) and quantity of usable lean meat on the carcass (yield grades). USDA quality grade indicating beef that comes from young and well-fed beef cattle. It has rich marbling and is the most tender, juicy and flavorful beef.

CHOICE USDA quality grade indicating beef with less marbling than that of Prime. USDA quality grade indicating beef that is usually leaner than Prime or Choice. It may be less juicy and flavorful.

GRAIN Direction of muscle fibers in meat. One should cut against the grain when slicing steak (see below).

“CUT AGAINST THE GRAIN” Slicing meat in the direction opposite to the grain. This cuts across the muscle fibers, allowing for more tender meat.

DRY-AGED BEEF Beef that is kept in a controlled,

refrigerated space for as long as six weeks, allowing for water evaporation to take place and therefore, concentrating the flavor.

ORGANIC Beef taken from cattle that are raised on certified organic pastures and receive certified organic feed. The cows must be able to access open pasture and may not be given antibiotics or hormones.

GRASS-FED Beef taken from cows that graze on pasture without switching to grains and supplements. Contains more healthful fats and less fat in general.

GRAIN-FED Beef taken from cows that begin by grazing on pasture but switch to a blend of grains, corn, soy and other supplements, as well as hormones and antibiotics. Feedlot cows gain weight more quickly than grass-fed cows.

RIB EYE Steak that comes from the beef rib. It is very marbled and flavorful.

FILET MIGNON Very tender meat that is taken from the beef tenderloin.

STRIP STEAK Steak portion taken from the strip loin, or non-tenderloin, part of the cow’s short loin.

T-BONE Steak that contains a T-shaped bone. Meat on the larger side of the bone comes from the strip loin. Meat on the smaller side of the bone comes from the tenderloin.


STAKE YOUR CLAIM IN STEAKS

SKIRT STEAK $6.99/lb This potentially tough but flavorful cut of meat is popular in fajitas, where it is often served with onions, peppers and rice. Skirt steak also goes well with a vibrant, herbaceous chimichurri sauce. Grill and slice against the grain to get a tender steak, or let it cook slow and low.

We all love steak but high prices and confusing cuts can scare off even the most dedicated meat-lover in college. This handy guide breaks it down, so you can choose a cut you know you will love at a price you love even more. By Arielle Cooper

BRISKET $1.99/lb Slow-cooked brisket paired with hearty vegetables like roasted potatoes and carrots comprise the ultimate comfort meal. Brisket can also be made into corned beef or pastrami, which goes nicely with cole slaw or Russian dressing.

CHUCK EYE STEAK $4.99/lb Chuck eye steak, known as “the poor man’s ribeye,” is a great substitute for the real deal when you can find it. All it needs is some sautéed onions and mushrooms to complete the meal.

(NEW YORK) STRIP STEAK

HANGER STEAK

SIRLOIN STEAK

$7.99/lb This classic cut is usually preferred for its relative tenderness and good marbling. Its flavor is not as intense as that of a ribeye but on the other hand, the strip is much easier to cook and eat.

$7.99/lb Hanger steak is a nicer version of skirt steak; it’s the cut that butchers will often keep for themselves. This prized cut of meat is best kept simple and classic; serve it grilled with a side of fries or mushrooms and red wine sauce.

$7.99/lb Sirloin steak, not to be confused with top sirloin, lends itself to a variety of preparations. This cut should be simply marinated and grilled. Serve with a side salad or use like you would skirt steak.

RIBEYE

T-BONE

FILET OR TENDERLOIN

$9.99/lb Ribeye is the king of steaks: rich, juicy with robust flavors and great marbling. It offers everything you want in a model steak. Serve it with something bright and light, like tomatoes or crispy green beans to balance the steak’s fatty richness. If you want to really indulge when dining out, order a dry-aged ribeye.

$8.99/lb T-bone steak is one part strip and one part filet, each section separated by a T-shaped bone. While the strip has a strong beef flavor and moderate chew, the filet is tender and has a more subtle beefiness. The two-part structure makes this steak a little trickier to cook correctly.

$13.99/lb Filet (mignon) is certainly worth the money if done right. Filet is the most tender cut of steak with an almost buttery texture. But it is also very low in fat, and proportionately low in flavor. Unless you cherish tenderness above everything else, go with a less-pricey, more flavorful cut. Otherwise, take care not to overcook the filet or overpower it with other flavors. NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |35


CARRYOUT OR DELIVERY

847.905.0194

914 1/2 Noyes Street Evanston IL 60201 Order online:

TomateFreshKitchen.com Contemporary Latin flavors using the freshest local ingredients!

TOMATE CATERS! Let us make your next event delicious! Call today to pre-order our famous empanadas, tacos, burritos, gorditas,‌ and nachos! y ealth our h en-free t u o b ut Ask a rian & gl s a n t e o i g t ve op

And don’t forget dessert! ~ Chef Tania Ruiz


KEEP YOURSELF ALIVE.

OOH MAMI, UMAMI

PHOTO BY NAIB MIAN, ILLUSTRATIONS BY KYLE HANCHER

The distinct yet mysterious “fifth taste” By Hannah Kliot WHAT IS UMAMI? According to Merriam-Webster, umami is defined as “a taste sensation that is meaty or savory and is produced by several amino acids and nucleotides.” You may recognize the fifth taste from the savoriness found in meats, mushrooms, soups, cheeses and green tea. Umami is paradoxically considered to be the most subtle yet intense of the tastes. While not as pronounced as, say, the tartness of a lemon, umami is responsible for making most of our meals delicious. HOW WAS THIS FLAVOR IDENTIFIED? In the late 19th century, French chef Auguste Escoffier was cooking with veal stock and realized that the dish contained a taste that didn’t fit the traditional categories of sweet, sour, salty and bitter. There wasn’t scientific proof to support this claim until 1907 when Japanese chemist Dr. Kikunae

Ikeda discovered glutamate, the amino acid responsible for the taste of umami. He called it “umami,” which means “yummy” or “pleasant savory taste” in Japanese. HOW DOES UMAMI WORK? Glutamate is found in most living things. When they die and their organic matter breaks down, the glutamate molecule breaks apart into L-glutamate. This process can happen when meat is cooked, during the fermentation process of soy sauce, when a tomato ripens in the sun, or when Parmesan cheese is aged. The human tongue has receptors for L-glutamate, so when you bite into steak or a hunk of Parmesan, L-gluta-

FOODS RICH IN UMAMI

UNROASTED GREEN TEA

CLAMS

mate is what you taste. Scientists adopted Ikeda’s term, “umami,” to describe this new taste. DOES UMAMI HAVE ANY BENEFITS? While umami is responsible for the “yum” factor in most of our foods, it has other benefits. When we taste glutamate, we release endocrine hormones that make us feel full and satisfied with our meal. We are exposed to umami at a very young age — there is about as much umami in breast milk as there is in soup broth. This helps babies understand the sensation of being fed and how to recognize satiety. Since umami is found in many high-nutrient foods, it is also important in the diet of

TOMATOES

CHEDDAR

SOY SAUCE

elderly people whose taste receptors have weakened with age, which commonly leads to a smaller appetite and generally worse nutrition. WHAT ABOUT MSG: FRIEND OR FOE? MSG, or monosodium glutamate, became famous for its ability to imbue the umami flavor into dishes, or enhance flavor. MSG is the sodium salt form of glutamatic acid. The taste of MSG by itself is often described as unpleasant. However, when MSG is added in low concentrations to appropriate foods, the flavor, pleasantness and acceptability of the food increases. That’s because MSG is a tastant: a substance that stimulates the sense of taste. While much controversy still lies around the issue, the Food and Drug Administration has classified MSG as a food ingredient that’s “generally recognized as safe.”

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |37


Twice the Price, Twice the Value? Find out what’s really behind that organic label. By Megan Suckut

rowsing through the produce section at Jewel-Osco, you’re repeatedly confronted with the same question — should you buy the regular pears or the organic pears? Regular spring mix or the organic arugula? Eyeing the price difference, you consider buying the conventional produce, but the thought of pesticides nags in the back of your mind. Should you fork over the extra couple of dollars? As reports citing the health dangers of chemicals and pesticides circulate in the news, more Americans are reaching for the organic option despite its often heftier price tag. Sales of organic foods in the U.S. grew from $3.6 billion to $24.4 billion between 1997 and 2011. The numbers seem to indicate an increasing trust in what is believed to be “good for you,” but it begs the question of whether organic products are comparatively beneficial enough to warrant this popularity.

B

What does the label ‘organic’ mean? According to the USDA, the organic label denotes produce and other ingredients grown without the use of most synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, sewage sludge, genetically modified organisms or ionizing radiation. Animals that produce meat or diary products with the organic label do not take antibiotics or growth hormones, are fed certified organic feed for 38 |

their entire lives, are raised on certified organic pastures and have year-round outdoor access. So, is organic food more nutritious? In 2012, researchers at Stanford University found the only compelling nutritional difference between conventional and organic foods was a slightly higher level of phosphorus in organic produce. There were no consistent differences in vitamin, protein or fat content. However, the case may be different from product to product: A 2013 study found that organically grown tomatoes from a northeastern state of Brazil were smaller but had a higher nutritional value than conventionally grown tomatoes. The organic tomatoes had more vitamin C, sugar and lycopene. Is organic farming really better for the environment? Organic farming is often considered less damaging to the environment because it does not use chemically-based fertilizer or insecticides. Instead it employs alternatives like manure or compost, which may not be organic themselves. However, organic farming still uses pesticides and fungicides to prevent pests from destroying their crops. Turns out the US Organic Standards approve pesticides derived from natural sources for use in producing organic food. Moreover, the government does not record or regulate the actual volume usage

of pesticides on organic farms, meaning it is unclear what the actual long-term impact of natural pesticides is on the environment or on our health. Does organic taste better? There is no substantial evidence that organic food tastes better. Genetically speaking, if the plants are the same and receive the same nutrition and care, they should taste the same. However, if crops are not well-nourished, there could be taste discrepancies. The season, location of growth and many other factors can also contribute to the end result. Are some organic foods more worth it than others? Buying organic foods does not have to be all or nothing — there are foods that might be better bought in their organic incarnation. Among the most commonly pesticide-contaminated produce are fruits and vegetables whose skin or leaves you typically consume. These include apples, spinach, peaches and grapes. Some of the least commonly contaminated foods, and therefore not worth spending extra for, are onions, pineapples, cantaloupe, cabbage and mushrooms. All in all, there is no substantial proof as to whether or not organic food is the better option, but when it comes to dollar value, going organic may not be entirely justifiable. In the end, it’s a personal choice.


NOURISH

WHY THE BAD RAP?

Get the facts straight on fats and carbohydrates. By Emily Wickwire and Chelsea Renter Greasy cheeseburgers. Ice cream. Pizza. We all know carbs and fats have a bad reputation. But the truth is both nutrients are essential to proper health. Before you nix the toast with your eggs, make sure you are aware of the difference between nutrient-dense, healthy fats and carbohydrates and those that really do sabotage your diet.

THE BAD FATS SATURATED FATS Mostly found in animal and dairy products, these fats do not provide significant health benefits. In fact, eating a lot of saturated fat over time causes cholesterol levels to rise, leading to heart attack or stroke. It’s best to limit your intake of fatty cuts of meat like beef and lamb, cheese, whole milk, as well as most junk food — think ice cream, baked goods and anything fried.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY LIV MARCUS

TRANS FATS Much like saturated fats, trans fats are unhealthy and raise your body’s levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein), or “bad” cholesterol. But even worse, they also diminish your supply of healthy cholesterol, or HDL (high-density lipoprotein). Try to keep trans fats to less than one percent of your daily calorie consumption. Shy away from fried foods, baked goods, frozen dinners and foods that contain hydrogenated oils.

THE BAD CARBS SIMPLE CARBOHYDRATES

Simple carbohydrates (think: candy and table sugar) are fast-digesting, causing glucose and insulin levels to spike rapidly. Because these simple carbs can be broken down so fast, they quickly fill our muscles’ energy stores, and any remaining glucose is stored as fat. Ditch the processed, refined carbohydrates found in white bread and sugary beverages. IS BUTTER A CARB? – REGINA GEORGE, MEAN GIRLS

THE GOOD FATS MONOUNSATURATED FATS When eaten in moderation, these fats can be a beneficial part of your diet. Besides providing important nutrients like vitamin E, they can lower cholesterol levels and reduce health risks such as heart attack and stroke. Foods like avocados, nuts and peanut butter boast these healthy fats, as do a number of vegetable oils — among them olive oil, peanut oil and canola oil.

POLYUNSATURATED FATS Besides having the same cholesterol-lowering qualities as monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats provide omega-6 and omega-3 fats, which are important for brain function and bodily growth. However, foods containing these good fats are caloric and shouldn’t be eaten in excess. For sources of this type of fat, try fish like salmon and trout, and seeds and nuts like flax and almonds.

THE GOOD CARBS COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATES

Unlike simple carbs, the body digests complex carbohydrates slowly, keeping you fuller longer and maintaining optimal energy levels. To reap these health benefits, embrace the complex, nutrientrich carbohydrates found in barley, whole grains, fruits, beans and vegetables.

NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |39


GO GREEK

Navigating the salad bar can be a rush of its own. By Leanna Smith

5 MINUTES SERVES WHAT

3 slices tomato, quartered 3 slices cucumber 3 slices bell pepper 3-4 slices red onion Feta Black olives 1 grilled chicken breast, sliced Red wine vinegar Olive oil

HOW 1

WHISK red wine vinegar and olive oil together in a bowl with a fork to make dressing. 2 TOSS vegetables and feta with dressing. 3 TOP with sliced grilled chicken.

DINING HALL CHEAT SHEET Salad Bars Aren’t Just for Greens By Kendall Siewert

Mix feta in with scrambled eggs.

40 |

Top Sargent’s quinoa and tomato salad with grilled chicken.

Cucumbers and salt make a perfect snack (just trust us).

Add fresh slices of tomato to a grilled cheese.

Top fries with shredded cheese and microwave for 3 minutes. Add bacon bits and pickled jalapeños for dining hall cheese fries.

THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF PEOPLE - GREEKS, AND EVERYONE ELSE WHO WISH THEY WAS GREEK. — GUS PORTOKALOS, MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING

PHOTO BY PIRIL DOBRUCALI, ILLUSTRATIONS BY KYLE HANCHER

EASY

With the limited variety of salad bar toppings, it’s easy to rely on the same few ingredients for a quick side salad. Salty feta, fresh vegetables and a simple dressing, however, make Greek salad a refreshing alternative to the typical heavy winter meal.


NOURISH

Small Town, Big Plate Senior Will Worden proves you don’t need top training to be a top chef. By Aurelie Corinthios Hometown Green Mountain, Iowa (Population: 100. No joke.) Age 21 Class Senior Major Manufacturing and design engineering Grocery shops at D&D Always has in the kitchen Cottage cheese and jalapeño chips

How did you learn to cook? My mom mostly taught me. I was in 4-H* when I was in junior high with a lot of my friends — 4-H is pretty big in Iowa. A lot of people raise livestock, but since I don’t live on a farm I did a lot of baking projects. I also did some woodworking. So that’s pretty much how I learned the basics, and then last year when I moved into my own apartment, I ended up cooking a lot for my roommate and myself, which also gave me a lot of practice. *What’s 4-H? A youth organization administered by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture of the USDA that works to engage youth in hands-on learning activities in the areas of science, healthy living and food security.

PHOTO BY DANIEL SCHULEMAN

How often do you cook? Probably two or three times a week. I used to cook every night, but now I make stuff in bigger batches and save it. What’s your favorite thing about cooking? I just like knowing everything that you’re putting into your dish. Also, when you make something and it actually tastes good, just being able to say that you made it is really satisfying. What’s your favorite dish to cook? Probably chili. I cut up a couple of peppers and an onion, cook some meat and then throw it all in a big pot with beans. Where do you get your recipes? A lot of times when I make stuff, I kind of look at a couple of recipes online and then sort of mash them all together. I never really look at physical cookbooks, and I don’t really use any website or blog specifically other than “Cooking Comically,” which is pretty cool — they write up comic strips of recipes. Also, sometimes I get recipes from my mom. Like there’s this pie she makes that I really like — apple custard pie. What do you do if a recipe looks too hard? Usually if it looks too complicated or if I know I won’t be able to get the ingredients, I’ll just do it anyway without some of those ingredients. It’s fun to try new stuff, even if it seems scary, and see what you can make of it. Best dessert you’ve made? Last year we found this recipe for Oreo ice cream cake. It’s just ice cream, whipped cream and crushed up Oreos, and then you just throw it in the freezer. My roommate and I ate a lot of that last year. Any advice for our readers? I think a lot of people in general are afraid to cook, just because they don’t think they’ll be that good at it or it won’t taste good. Obviously when you start cooking it won’t always taste great, but you just made that food so you’ll probably eat it anyways. It’s all a matter of practice, really. If you are willing to try out different recipes and maybe fail sometimes, you’re more likely to find out what you like to cook, something that’s easy for you to make and that you also enjoy eating.

WILL’S CHILI RECIPE MEDIUM

60 MINUTES SERVES

2 lbs ground beef ½ onion, chopped 1 bell pepper, chopped 1-2 jalapeño peppers, chopped 1 15-ounce can black beans, drained 1 15-ounce can kidney beans, drained 2 15-ounce cans diced tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil Cholula hot sauce, to taste Chili powder, to taste Salt and pepper, to taste

1

BROWN beef with 1 tablespoon of oil in pan over medium-high heat. Break up meat into small pieces. Salt and pepper to taste. 2 SAUTÉ peppers and onions in remaining tablespoon of oil in large pot over medium heat, about 3 minutes. 3 ADD tomatoes, beans and browned meat to pot. 4 ADD hot sauce, chili powder, salt and pepper to taste. 5 SIMMER for about half an hour with lid ajar, stirring occasionally. 6 SERVE in large bowl with shredded cheese on top and saltines. (I like to scoop it with jalapeño kettle chips.) NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |41


INSTAGRAM YOUR MEAL LIKE A PRO The #nofilter guide to the elusive art of foodstagramming By Kendra Valkema

a smartphone and upload said photo to instagram with carefully selected filter for maximum likes

VALENCIA

USE YOUR TABLE MANNERS

2

SIT NEXT TO A WINDOW

3

PLAY WITH YOUR FOOD

4

STAND UP

Before you reach for your phone, practice your manners. Are you with someone who may be offended if you take a picture? Pause before ‘gramming, especially when you don’t know your fellow diners. Don’t risk your reputation at a networking lunch for a photo of your fruit skewer.

The worst thing about food photography is also the easiest thing to fix. Avoid dark or yellow photos by drenching your dish in natural light. Also, turn off your flash — it will ruin your photo and attract the glares of other diners.

Food needs friends. Instead of zooming in on your food, try including the elements that make your experience different and photo-worthy. Leave measuring cups, condiment holders and other dishes on the table. People can be props, too! If you’re with others, try a shot that captures hands reaching for the breadbasket or wine glass.

NASHVILLE HUDSON

An overhead photo is a the best way to include the entire table. It can also help you avoid the noisy background that can result from taking table-level photos. Just be wary of your phone’s shadow if you’re standing beneath an overhead light.

LO-FI

QUESTION: HOW MUCH DOES A HIPSTER WEIGH? ANSWER: AN INSTAGRAM 42 |

PHOTOS BY KENDRA VALKEMA

FOODSTAGRAM (v.) to photograph food with

1


PHOTO BY MAGGIE GORMAN

SALTED CARAMEL APPLE CRISP*

*Want the recipe? Scan away. NU.SPOONUNIVERSITY.COM |43


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Spoon — Winter 2014  

College students can cook fancy meals too. Try our recipes!

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