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Contents... 18 16 4 30 26 22 14 8 32 Editor in Chief: Jim Cornelius Community Marketing Partner: Vicki Curlett Graphic Design: Jess Draper & Leith Easterling

The Nugget N E W S PA P E R

E Main Ave | P O Box | Sisters OR - - | www NuggetNews com

©2021 The Nugget Newspaper, LLC, for Spirit of Central Oregon. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. All advertising which appears in Spirit of Central Oregon is the property of The Nugget Newspaper, LLC, and may not be used without explicit permission. The Nugget Newspaper, LLC/Spirit of Central Oregon assumes no liability or responsibility for information contained in advertisements, stories, etc. within this publication. All submissions to Spirit of Central Oregon will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyrighting purposes and that all rights are currently available.

2 • Spirit of Central Oregon


Tradition & innovation find a home in Central Oregon

Central Oregon has been discovered by a nation full of people looking for a deeper, more connected way of life. This beautiful spot in the center of the state has always attracted pioneers — from the early ranchers and farmers to the people who worked the forests for the timber that built America. Nowadays, pioneers are entrepreneurs who find inspiration in the landscape for outdoor recreation, art, and craft food and drink. The challenge that faces Central Oregon is one that Americans have faced in many times and many regions: How do we embrace the best of the new while preserving the most valuable aspects of traditional practices and ways of life? In this region, we are uniquely capable of walking that narrow, winding path. Right here we have craftspeople bring ancient crafts like cider making and glass arts into the 21st century, while a local man with a passion for fishing

and custom craft has piloted the oldest fly rod maker in the country into a new millennium. There are still cowboys, ranchers, and farmers working this land — but they’re not relics of a bygone time. They’re working in a 21st-century market, embracing best practices that have evolved over decades and developing local markets, even as the region faces challenges from climate change, drought, and fire. While the beauty and opportunity drawing people here in ever-growing numbers are self-evident, life in Central Oregon has its challenges — which are best met with a pioneer spirit of resilience and hope for the future. The stories you will read in these pages reflect that spirit — that connectedness with the land, the belief that we can honor tradition as we move into the future creating a lasting legacy of our own. Jim Cornelius, Editor in Chief

www.NuggetNews.com • 3


WORKING THE LAND WITH

Cate Havstad By Ceili Cornelius | Photo by Amanda Leigh Smith

Cate Havstad is a woman of many talents and many passions. Havstad grew up in the outdoors in Northern California riding horses and running through rangeland, and falling in love with that landscape at a young age. Now residing in Central Oregon, in the Madras area, her love and passion for the rangeland shines through her everyday life. Havstad took a lot of time throughout college to travel and work in the outdoors. In her early 20s, she went to South America to work on farms in Argentina, Chile, and Peru, sparking a passion for working with the land. She worked with the international organization Outstanding in the Field, which endeavors to bring restaurants to the source of the ingredients that go into their food, and connect diners with the source of their meals in a farm-totable dining experience. “That exposure, working with them at that age and seeing the farming process, really sparked that interest in me,” Havstad said. 4 • Spirit of Central Oregon

She knew working the land would be a part of her life. In 2014, a family friend took Havstad out to a local Oregon farm, Juniper Jungle, where she met Chris Casad and started volunteering. Flash forward a few years: Chris Casad and Havstad coupled up, moved to Casad’s own property, and began farming their land. “We quickly realized we need more land to work with for our own farm,” Havstad said. They ended up moving to the Madras area and starting their own family farm business, Casad Family Farms. In 2017, they became a certified organic farm and have been growing ever since. According to their website: “[Casad Family Farms] grow mixed vegetables and root crops for wholesale distribution to local restaurants and grocery stores. In addition to diversified veggies, we raise hays, grains, and specialty seed crops…We raise homestead cattle and hogs, pastured chickens and turkeys.”

Continues on page 6


www.NuggetNews.com • 5


Over the next several years, they plan to make available to the public the scientific data tracking the ecological outcomes of their management practices. “Out beyond the use of the words ‘organic,’ ‘regenerative,’ and ‘natural,’ there is a place where science and data live,” Havstad said. Casad Family Farms strives to make that science and data on farming accessible to the public, to understand the ecological benefits of local farming practices. Not only does Havstad spend her days out on the farm working with the land, she also runs her own traditional hatmaking business — Havstad Hat Company — out of her homestead. Havstad spent part of her early 20s traveling around with musician Willy Tea Taylor shooting footage for the documentary “Searching for Guy Clark’s Kitchen.” He presented her a custom, Western-style hat, telling her it was her “moviemaking” hat, encouraging Havstad to pursue whatever passion she found. One day, she returned home to find that her beloved moviemaking hat had been chewed up. Devastated, she started researching ways she could repair it. Her own interest in hatmaking grew, and her own company was born in 2014 after moving up to Central Oregon full time. Havstad’s approach as a hatter uses the traditional methods from the 1800s, while also bringing in her love for sustainable material sourcing and creative design. Every Havstad Hat Co. hat is custom designed, and handmade start to finish by Havstad. Recently, Havstad and Casad have felt the effects of the water shortage and drought plaguing the Central Oregon area. During a normal seasonal year, Central Oregon receives enough rainwater for all farmers and consumers to use. This year, however, rainwater has been in direly short supply. The water system in Central Oregon was built in the Deschutes River Basin in 1907 and is based on seniority. “After five years of sustained drought, we are seeing the worst conditions in our lifetime. The inefficiencies of a 100-year-old system are being highlighted,” said Havstad. In a booming housing market, land is being developed, pulling more of a need for water, taking away from the agricultural lands due to the extreme water shortage in the area. Usually, farmers receive 2.5 acre-feet of water per year; this year that has been cut down to 0.8 acrefeet of water, which is not enough to sustain crops for 6 • Spirit of Central Oregon

PHOTO BY STEPHEN SMITH

Continued from page 4

“The hatmaking business fulfills my meditative, creative side.” — Cate Havstad the entire season. An acre-foot of water equals about 326,000 gallons, or enough water to cover an acre of land one foot deep. “We are all trying to, as farmers, navigate the laws to move within a region, and it makes it difficult to move water in an unmodernized irrigation system. There is a culmination of issues occurring all at the same time,” Havstad said. Havstad has become an advocate for public understanding of what is happening to farmers in their backyard. “The State overall needs to reassess how we prioritize resources because we are in this new phase of climate change; the paradigm has to be re-evaluated,” she said. Casad Family Farms, due to the limited access to water this year, will most likely suffer a smaller harvest, smaller fruits, and fewer cuts of hay due to the extreme dryness of the land and having to decide where to put water. For Casad Family Farms, 2020 was a year of pivoting to a new reality of a shortage of water — and also switching models due to the pandemic. “Our restaurant partners took a huge hit, so we pivoted to doing more grocery store sales due to COVID,” said Havstad. One of the biggest things Havstad wants the public to understand is that, due to this perfect storm of severe drought and water shortages, the price of food is going to go up. “The market trickle-down will reflect the drought and the food costs will reflect that as well,” she said.


Despite the dreary future of farming on Central Oregon lands, Havstad likes to see a silver lining. “I am a stubborn optimist and I love getting the chance to work hard for the things I believe in. I think this time is an opportunity for a societal wake-up and a time to reflect on what really matters with our basic needs of food and water, and I hope that we learn to better allocate our resources to grow our food,” she said. Havstad’s passion for farming, sustainable land management, and hatmaking drive her to get up and work every day. “I don’t love every aspect of it, but I wake up feeling a drive and purpose and the hope I get to better the lives of the people we work with,” she said. Havstad splits her year, taking a pause from hatmaking for the farming season from May to September, and making hats in the fall. Havstad, her husband, Chris, and their newborn son live on their homestead in Madras. She says they feel a sense of “hyper-locality,” due to the nature of their work with the farm, as well as with the community that Havstad has built as a hatter. “I hope that I can help build a solid ecological future,” she said. To learn more, visit www.casadfamilyfarms.com or www.havstadhatco.com.

PHOTO BY STEPHEN SMITH

Chris Casad and Cate Havstad operate Casad Family Farms in Madras, growing organic vegetables, hays, grains, cattle, hogs, chickens, and turkeys.

www.NuggetNews.com • 7


CENTRAL OREGON VETERANS RANCH

compassion, commitment, community By Greg Walker (Ret.) | Photos by Cody Rheault

Central Oregon Veterans Ranch (COVR) is “A working ranch that restores purpose and spirit to veterans of all ages,” according to founder Alison Perry. At 19 acres, COVR can be likened to a forward-operating base of awareness, compassion, and renewal for the multigenerational veteran population in Central Oregon. “It is their place,” Perry said. “They immediately feel a sense of belonging. And many of our veterans say they have not felt that level of camaraderie since they got out of the military.” In Deschutes County the veteran population as updated in March 2021 stands at 9.9 percent. Crook County’s VET metric is 13.9 percent, with Jefferson County mirroring Deschutes at 9.9 percent. Age-wise, Deschutes is home to the greatest number of veterans 75 years old and 8 • Spirit of Central Oregon

greater. The average age for veterans county-wide is 62. What this translates to is a generational wartime campaign span that includes WW2, Korean, Vietnam, Cold War, El Salvador, and Operations Desert

Shield, Storm, Desert Spring, Iraqi Freedom (OIF), Enduring Freedom (OEF), and the now 20-year-plus global war on terrorism (GWOT).

Continues on page 10

“It is their place,” Perry said. “They immediately feel a sense of belonging. And many of our veterans say they have not felt that level of camaraderie since they got out of the military.” — Alison Perry


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Continued from page 8 A forward-operating base in Central Oregon “The Ranch is a safe place for our veterans to visit, work, and attend classes and group sessions together,” said Michelle Abbey, the spouse of a now-retired Marine Corps officer. Abbey is the Ranch’s director of community and donor relationships. The Ranch offers opportunities for veterans to build peer relationships and engage in meaningful volunteerism through individual and group work projects. “We have 12 acres of irrigated pasture that we are rehabilitating using regenerative farming principles,” Abbey said. “This is another way local veterans are contributing to the future of our greater community. “We are doing our best to be good stewards of the land and grow healthy forage for our animals. Currently we are engaging veterans and the community in upgrading our irrigation system, which will include increasing electrical output to our pond and installing an irrigation pump. This project is important for

Michelle Abbey does community outreach work for the Ranch — and she also moves irrigation pipe on its pasture. 10 • Spirit of Central Oregon

not only the land and our animals, but part of the Beginner Farmer Rancher program COVR offers veterans in partnership with local nonprofit High Desert Food & Farm Alliance.” The overarching purpose is to help veterans come out of an often self-imposed isolation and regain a sense of purpose. “That’s about growth and transformation,” Perry said. “It’s not just about managing PTSD.” The cost of war More than 3 million U.S. service members have been deployed since September 11, 2001, and one in five suffers from “invisible wounds” like

post-traumatic stress (PTS), chronic depression, anxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and drug and alcohol challenges. Physical wounds and injuries include traumatic amputation, severe burns, sexual abuse and assault trauma, and traumatic brain injury. According to the Watson Institute at Brown University in August 2021: “Since 2001, between 1.9 and 3 million service members have served in post-9/11 war operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and over half of them have deployed more than once.” This number excludes those who have borne the costs of war as spouses, parents, children, and friends. According to Perry, COVR “facilitates opportunities for veterans of war to find support and camaraderie with peers who have endured similar experiences. The Ranch’s mission is strengths-based and facilitates opportunities for post-traumatic growth; redemption and growth from traumatic experiences, for veterans across the lifespan.” Central Oregon Veterans Ranch is addressing the unique needs of veterans and capitalizing on the

Continues on page 12


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Continued from page 10 reciprocal healing possible by bringing different generations together in a productive, pastoral ranch setting. One example of how the COVR team provides real time/real world assistance recently took place. On August 26, COVR hosted a forum for Operation Enduring Freedom veterans to participate in, to share their voices in response to the abandonment of Afghanistan. Members of the COVR OEF/OIF Combat Veteran Peer Support group, COVR staff, and other OEF veterans facilitated the conversation. The event was closed to respect the privacy and safety of those who served in Afghanistan. The forum provided a positive and constructive environment for all those OEF veterans in the Central Oregon community who attended. Outreach and support “We have wonderful partners in the small and large business community as well as the local fraternal organizations and private citizens.” says Michelle Abbey. “It’s the support of these partners that allows us to continue growing our services and programs for veterans in Central Oregon.” This year COVR is focused on improving agricultural operations, including the pasture rehab project, and expansion of its peer support services. The organization is in a significant growth phase with an eye toward national expansion. “We’ve had interest in the COVR model from other communities around the state and even nation,” Perry said. Perry also stated that the longterm vision of COVR still includes 12 • Spirit of Central Oregon

Veteran Logan Wheeler operates a hydroponic greenhouse at Central Oregon Veterans Ranch.

See related story, page 14.

launching its end-of-life care program for combat veterans when the timing is right. Roughly 75 veterans are either working or participating in programs at the Ranch on a weekly basis. These include BIPOC veterans and their families. Last July was BIPOC Mental Health Month. According to cohenveterans network.org, “An IVMF (Institute for Veterans and Military Families) and Military Times COVID-19 poll revealed that during the pandemic, BIPOC veterans report a higher percentage of resource needs — including mental health resources. With an increasingly racially and ethnically diverse military population recent reports show as much as 31 percent of the United States Military is nonwhite, with about 17.1 percent identifying as Black or African American, it’s more important than ever that we understand how to effectively reach and serve these BIPOC veterans.” Melinda Johnson, an African American therapist employed by the VET Center in Bend, along with John Parsons, veteran peer support specialist for Deschutes County, offers weekly groups at COVR. Native

American veterans from Warm Springs and the surrounding area likewise participate and contribute to the Ranch’s broad military family. While COVR maximizes service delivery to Central Oregon through partnerships with organizations like the VET Center, Deschutes County, and Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, it relies upon the fiscal support of individual donors, corporate sponsors, and foundation grants to continue growing. The life-changing impact of the unique Ranch environment would not be possible without this support. The Ranch welcomes inquiries about its current services and future plans. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CENTRAL OREGON VETERANS RANCH AND WAYS TO SUPPORT ITS MISSION, CONTACT: Michelle Abbey Central Oregon Veterans Ranch Director of Community and Donor Relationships 541-706-9062, ext. 2 Monthly donations to sustain veteran support may be made at http://weblink.donorperfect.com/ COVR.


www.NuggetNews.com • 13


LOGAN WHEELER

warrior-healer By Greg Walker (Ret.) | Photo by Cody Rheault

“The enemy doesn’t care if you are tired. Soldiers must prepare themselves physically and mentally to fight in the most undesirable conditions.” — 1/25 SBCT “Arctic Wolves,” Fort Wainwright, Alaska In February 2010, Logan Wheeler enlisted in the U.S. Army as a cavalry scout (MOS 91D). His job was to be the commander’s eyes and ears on the battlefield. When information about the enemy is needed, they call on the scouts. During his combat tour he engaged the enemy with anti-armor weapons, tracked and reported enemy movement and activities, and directed the employment of various weapon systems onto the enemy. “My STRYKER armored vehicle was hit three times with improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and once by a Soviet rocket-propelled grenade (RPG),” he said. “Our unit was deployed to the Horn of Panjwai in Afghanistan. We were operating in the birthplace of the Taliban, and they did not want us there.” Wheeler served during Operation 14 • Spirit of Central Oregon

Enduring Freedom. In April 2011, he deployed with the 1/25th Brigade Combat Team (STRYKER), 5/1 Cavalry, known at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, as the “Arctic Wolves.” When he says he saw a lot of combat, he’s understating the reality of his service as a scout. “On July 4,” he said, “I was shot at for the first time in my life.” Wheeler would be awarded the coveted Combat Action Badge, or CAB. “The CAB means you did your job under enemy fire,” he said. “I’m very proud of that award.” As with so many who have served in the global war on terrorism, Wheeler returned home and left the Army, but his invisible wounds did not leave him. Today he receives VA disability compensation and services, thanks to his veteran service

officer’s efforts on his behalf. With a full-time job in Bend, the former cavalry scout is also the hydroponic intern at the Central Oregon Veterans Ranch, working 15 hours a week overseeing the agricultural aspects of the Ranch. In addition to maintaining the greenhouse and pastures he is deeply involved in veteran outreach efforts sponsored by the COVR staff. “I was in a very dark place after I returned home,” he recalls. “Because of that experience I connect quickly with vets here at the Ranch and during our outreach efforts.” Logan sees the Ranch and its programs fulfilling three key needs for its multigenerational veteran population. “First,” he says, “is showing a vet how she or he can grow past their PTS wounds. Second, how


our peer-to-peer support groups help reintegrate the veteran into the larger local community here in Central Oregon. Finally, how we use agriculture and nature to reattach the veteran to himself and his family and friends. “The Ranch is a lifesaver,” Wheeler emphasizes. How does he feel about the war’s ending for the United States in Afghanistan? “We did many things for the Afghans that we can be proud of. Especially for the women and children of Afghanistan. We’ll just have to see how it all goes from here.” In the meantime, Logan Wheeler welcomes his fellow veterans and their families to the Central Oregon Veterans Ranch, where they can invest themselves in the work of peacemaking and healing both within themselves and on behalf of those others who answered their nation’s call to serve in uniform in time of war.

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www.NuggetNews.com • 15


Central Oregon man is

‘Captain of Adventure’ By Ceili Cornelius | Photos provided

Ross Robinson turned a lifelong zest for adventure into a career, and this year was named Captain of Adventure for Uncharted Society.

Robinson, who grew up adventuring in Central Oregon and graduated from Sisters High School in 2013, was selected by Uncharted Society after working with their parent company, Bombardier Recreational Products (BRP). A manufacturer of snowmobiles and other all-terrain vehicles, BRP recently launched Uncharted Society. According to their website, “Uncharted Society is creating and curating adventures enabled by power-sports, pushing the boundaries of what you can see, feel, and sense out there.” Uncharted has locations across the United States hosting adventure sports for anyone and everyone. 16 • Spirit of Central Oregon

This year, they launched the Captain of Adventure program. In this role, Robinson is going across the country on a six-month road trip, visiting Uncharted locations and creating content around adventures and experiences that use BRP powersports vehicles. Robinson engages with Uncharted Society’s local outfitters, guests, media, and the BRP team to document and share the experiences and celebrate outdoor adventure. “The focus isn’t on selling units,

it is more about selling experiences and making sure everyone knows that no matter what, they can have adventures too,” Robinson said. Robinson had been working with BRP as a professional snowmobile athlete and decided to put himself up for the opportunity to be the Captain of Adventure. “There were over 2,000 applicants and the timing just worked out that I was selected. I am not only

Continues on page 34

“The focus isn’t on selling units, it is more about selling experiences and making sure everyone knows that no matter what, they can have adventures too” — Ross Robinson


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27 years

ON THE LOOKOUT

for fire

By Jim Cornelius | Photos by Cody Rheault

For most of the past three decades, Tony Lompa has manned the fire lookout at Henkle Butte three miles northeast of Sisters. Though it’s not a towering eminence — standing at only 3,412 feet in elevation — the cinder cone is located in a strategic spot that overlooks a vast and varied landscape. “On a clear day we can see from Lake Billy Chinook all the way to Lava Butte,” Lompa said. Over these many years, Lompa has spotted countless fires, including smoke that signaled major blazes that roared to dangerous life, threatening rural subdivisions and valuable timberlands across Sisters Country. In 2003, he spotted the Booth Fire, which would merge with the Bear Fire and explode into the massive B&B Complex Fire that burned over 90,000 acres to the west of Sisters 18 • Spirit of Central Oregon

and twice forced the evacuation of Camp Sherman. In 2004, he told writer Jim Fisher, “I was watching the Bear Butte Fire with Dave Snow, a retired Forest Service employee from Sisters and the relief lookout on Henkle Butte. As that fire spread, I looked to the west and saw a dark smoke column suddenly appear near the Santiam Pass. It happened so fast and the smoke was so dark that I thought it was a car fire.” He spotted the Rooster Rock Fire and the George Fire. In July of 2021, he got the first spot on the Grandview Fire and watched it double in size within minutes of reporting it. That fire led to the evacuation

of hundreds of rural residents before wildland firefighters were able to contain the blaze at 6,032 acres. Henkle Butte is one of a mere handful of manned lookouts left in the area, including one on Black Butte. With everyone carrying a cell phone in the woods, fires are often called in by citizens or people working in the woods, or spotted by aircraft. Lompa, though, is “still doing the old-fashioned spot ’em and call ’em in thing.” Not for much longer though. He plans to stay on the job until October, depending on how long fire season lasts. Then he’ll retire. His last trip

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Continued from page 18 down the steep stairs at Henkle Butte will mark the end of an era that began 40 years ago when he started working for the Oregon Department of Forestry in Sisters. He’d arrived in Sisters in 1975, moving north from his home in Santa Cruz, California. “When I came to Sisters, it was a whole different world,” he recalls. “You either washed dishes or you worked in a business that your parents had. There wasn’t a lot going on.” He worked for Leithauser Grocery in Sisters for a time, then Papandrea’s Pizza. Then he got work planting trees in the forest, and in 1981 signed on with an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) wildland firefighting hand crew. In 1985 he became a forest officer, operating a 200-gallon engine and a five-person “chase crew” for ODF. In 1994, he switched jobs to the Henkle Butte Lookout. “I’ve been up here since ’94,” he said. “It keeps me relevant in the fire game.” Unlike many ODF employees, he never changed forest locations to further his career. “I’m just a total freak,” he said with a chuckle. “I wanted a job in Sisters, 20 • Spirit of Central Oregon

because that’s where I live.” The work has given him a sense of purpose and of being part of an organization doing critical work. “It was good for me to be part of something and to have a steady job,” he said. “I haven’t had a summer off since I was 24 years old.” He loves ODF and the people he has worked with over the decades. “I really can’t say enough positive about the organization,” he said. On a typical day, he arrives at 9:30 a.m. “The first thing you do is walk the catwalk,” he said. That initial walkaround reorients him to a landscape he knows as intimately as anyone in Central Oregon. His shift usually ends at 6 p.m.

The centerpiece of the lookout is an Osborne Fire Finder. A circular, spinning table with a topographic map and sighting apertures, the Osborne has served for more than a century as an accurate way of pinpointing a fire’s location. The Henkle Butte Lookout is comfortable, with power that allows for a microwave oven. Even so, it’s not a gig for everyone. It requires a certain kind of temperament to find contentment looking out over a landscape where nothing is

happening most of the time — and when something is happening you have to be on it.

“It’s a great gig, but you’ve got to have music or be a writer,” he said. He noted that Glen Corbett, who also serves on the lookout, is a painter. Music has always been a passion for Lompa. He brings his Breedlove guitar and/or a ukulele to work and sings out into the landscape. He’s always had evening and weekend gigs in town — currently playing regularly at Chops Bistro. “My mom taught me to sing before I could walk,” Lompa said. He recalled his first gig in Sisters, at the town’s main watering hole, which was a 21-and-over establishment. “I was 20 years old, and it was at the B-Bar-B,” he said. “You could play, and then you had to sit outside on your breaks in the cold.” Lompa says he doesn’t have major plans for retirement. He wants to spend more time with his wife, Katie, who is an urban forester with ODF. She plans to retire next year. They’ll probably do some traveling, but mostly they plan to enjoy Central Oregon — the landscape Tony Lompa has been looking out over for decades.

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Continued from page 18 down the steep stairs at Henkle Butte will mark the end of an era that began 40 years ago when he started working for the Oregon Department of Forestry in Sisters. He’d arrived in Sisters in 1975, moving north from his home in Santa Cruz, California. “When I came to Sisters, it was a whole different world,” he recalls. “You either washed dishes or you worked in a business that your parents had. There wasn’t a lot going on.” He worked for Leithauser Grocery in Sisters for a time, then Papandrea’s Pizza. Then he got work planting trees in the forest, and in 1981 signed on with an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) wildland firefighting hand crew. In 1985 he became a forest officer, operating a 200-gallon engine and a five-person “chase crew” for ODF. In 1994, he switched jobs to the Henkle Butte Lookout. “I’ve been up here since ’94,” he said. “It keeps me relevant in the fire game.” Unlike many ODF employees, he never changed forest locations to further his career. “I’m just a total freak,” he said with a chuckle. “I wanted a job in Sisters, 20 • Spirit of Central Oregon

because that’s where I live.” The work has given him a sense of purpose and of being part of an organization doing critical work. “It was good for me to be part of something and to have a steady job,” he said. “I haven’t had a summer off since I was 24 years old.” He loves ODF and the people he has worked with over the decades. “I really can’t say enough positive about the organization,” he said. On a typical day, he arrives at 9:30 a.m. “The first thing you do is walk the catwalk,” he said. That initial walkaround reorients him to a landscape he knows as intimately as anyone in Central Oregon. His shift usually ends at 6 p.m.

The centerpiece of the lookout is an Osborne Fire Finder. A circular, spinning table with a topographic map and sighting apertures, the Osborne has served for more than a century as an accurate way of pinpointing a fire’s location. The Henkle Butte Lookout is comfortable, with power that allows for a microwave oven. Even so, it’s not a gig for everyone. It requires a certain kind of temperament to find contentment looking out over a landscape where nothing is

happening most of the time — and when something is happening you have to be on it.

“It’s a great gig, but you’ve got to have music or be a writer,” he said. He noted that Glen Corbett, who also serves on the lookout, is a painter. Music has always been a passion for Lompa. He brings his Breedlove guitar and/or a ukulele to work and sings out into the landscape. He’s always had evening and weekend gigs in town — currently playing regularly at Chops Bistro. “My mom taught me to sing before I could walk,” Lompa said. He recalled his first gig in Sisters, at the town’s main watering hole, which was a 21-and-over establishment. “I was 20 years old, and it was at the B-Bar-B,” he said. “You could play, and then you had to sit outside on your breaks in the cold.” Lompa says he doesn’t have major plans for retirement. He wants to spend more time with his wife, Katie, who is an urban forester with ODF. She plans to retire next year. They’ll probably do some traveling, but mostly they plan to enjoy Central Oregon — the landscape Tony Lompa has been looking out over for decades.

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CARRYING ON ONE OF FLY-FISHING’S

greatest legacies By Jim Cornelius | Photo by Vicki Curlett

Fly-fishing is steeped in tradition. The whole point of stepping into a stream with a fly rod is to strip away the noise and gadgetry of modern living, quietly casting a line without mechanical assistance, with a rod that feels like a living extension of the angler’s arm. Nothing speaks to the elegance and tradition of the sport more than a custom-built, split bamboo fly rod — and no name looms larger than E.F. Payne Rod Co. From his shop in Bend, Payne Fly Shop, David Holloman carries on the tradition of America’s oldest and most esteemed maker of split bamboo fly rods, crafted in the same exact manner and using the same exact equipment that was used over a century ago when E.F. Payne operated his shop at Highland Mills, New York. Holloman revels in the history of the company he has owned since 22 • Spirit of Central Oregon

the 1990s. He notes that a gunsmith named Hiram Leonard invented the modern-day fly rod. Leonard’s fellow gunsmith and fishing buddy in Bangor, Maine, was Ed Payne, and Payne ended up becoming something of a business rival to Leonard. “He started making bamboo fly rods officially in 1876,” Holloman recalled. “Ed Payne and his partner made the first fly reel, also at that time.”

E.F. Payne Rod Co. was established in New York in 1898, and since then it has been regarded as the premier American maker of bamboo fly rods. After World War II, the Payne family sold its interest in the company. “It had multiple different corporations and people that have owned it,” Holloman said. “And in 1992, I

Continues on page 24

“We’re the most-copied taper designer in the world, and have always been for 100 years. That is really the claim to fame of the E.F. Payne Company.” — David Holloman


www.NuggetNews.com • 23


Continued from page 22 bought the company.” That was the fulfillment of Holloman’s longtime personal fascination with the making of bamboo rods. “I had an interest in Payne,” he said. “When I was in college, I almost took a summer job with them, because I had been making bamboo rods on my own since I was a teenager.” The summer job didn’t happen because Holloman wasn’t prepared to leave Oregon for New York — at least not for the money that was on offer. But years down the line, he approached the owner of the company that then owned Payne and expressed an interest. And he became the owner and senior rod maker for the venerable company. Payne’s bamboo is sourced from a single area in China; the rods are made of split Tonkin (or, more properly, Tsinglee) cane. “Our bamboo is the finest in existence,” Holloman said. “We haven’t bought bamboo since 1933. Our warehouse is full of high-end combs of bamboo.” Aficionados of the bamboo fly

Payne Fly Rods are produced by hand using workbenches and tools that date back to the original New York shop.

PHOTO BY JIM CORNELIUS

24 • Spirit of Central Oregon

rod liken a finely made rod to a fine violin — with Payne rods being the “Stradivarius” of the field. “Bamboo gives you a feel and response that can’t be matched by graphite or fiberglass materials,” Holloman said. But the material alone does not in and of itself make for a premium fly rod. “A cheap bamboo fly rod is nothing necessarily special,” Holloman said. Design matters. One of E.F. Payne Rod Company’s great claims to fame is the taper design created for each weight of fly line. “We’re the most-copied taper designer in the world, and have always been for 100 years,” Holloman said. “That is really the claim to fame of the E.F. Payne Company.” Execution is, of course, critical to making the rods come alive, and the work is extraordinarily painstaking. The bamboo must be cut to lengths, split into strips, and the interior nodes and dams worked down. “It’s just all hand-labor, and really intensive,” Holloman said. “We work it down into perfect little boards.” Six of those perfect little boards must then be perfectly glued together to make a section of the rod. Grips are made of hand-cut cork, and all metal fittings are made in the shop. One of the aspects of the work that produces real historical magic is that the work is done using workbenches and tools that date back to the original E.F. Payne Rod Co. shop in New York. The lathe on which parts are turned dates back to the 1890s and runs on a belt of buffalo leather.

All metal fittings are made in-house with original materials to original specifications. PHOTO BY JIM CORNELIUS

With the original equipment, original materials, and original specifications all at hand, Holloman often will reproduce an exact copy of an angler’s heirloom. “We will make them an identical clone of their great-grandfather’s fly rod,” Holloman said. With 80 to 100 hours of work invested in each rod, production is necessarily limited, especially since Holloman is currently, due to COVID conditions, the only full-timer, backed by four or five part-timers. In keeping with tradition, he won’t say how many rods the company makes in a year. “The company, throughout its history, has never disclosed our yearly production of rods,” he said. Any angler who picks up a fly rod made by E.F. Payne Rod Co. — whether it’s from 1898 or 2021 — can feel the magic with which it is imbued. They know instinctively that they are holding the Stradivarius of the fly-rod world. And those lucky enough to cast a line with one will find themselves harmonizing in the deepest way with the music of the trout streams of the world. Payne Fly Rods are handcrafted at Payne Fly Shop, 490 NE Butler Market Rd., Bend; 541-549-1544.


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CENTRAL OREGON GLASS ARTISTS

capture light and color By Katy Yoder

PHOTO BY BILL BARTLETT

Glass artists are a strong, determined lot. Some work with soft, moldable glass heated between 1,600 and 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The art objects they create can weigh hundreds of pounds and can shatter into countless shards of lost possibilities.

The hands of a glass artist are calloused, creased from handling heavy materials, and often scarred from cuts and burns. The glass artists we spoke with are male and female, young and not-so-young — all passionate about creating their vision through glass. 26 • Spirit of Central Oregon

Nancy Becker appreciates beauty wherever she finds it. A longtime Central Oregonian, she left the area for five years after she was hired to produce her glass memorials in the southern U.S. for a private studio. She returned two years ago, and couldn’t wait to get back in touch with the colors and spirit of Central Oregon. Tumalo Art Company in the Old Mill District has featured Becker’s work for many years. S i n c e h e r re t u r n Becker has continued creating memorial glass, and pieces for her “Dance of the Flower Fairies” series. The idea for creating memorial pieces came to her after she lost a beloved dog. “I was literally laying on the earth being sad about losing this dog unexpectedly,” she said.

“I went into my shop in Sisters and made a memorial piece and a couple came in and asked me what I was doing. As I told them, they teared up, and after I was finished, they asked me to produce a piece for them, and that’s how the memorial pieces started. “I’m still astonished by the beauty that we’re given. My glass captures a moment of that beauty. The forms and color are looser and fluid. I feel privileged to have access and the ability to create with that medium. It’s limitless. I just think about where I am at the time. Dillon Falls has a complete palette being expressed depending on the day. I don’t take photographs; it’s what I feel when I’m in a place. The purpose of a

Above Susie Zeitner at work at Z Glass Act in Sisters. Right A fusible glass painting by Susie Zeitner.


piece of artwork is to help whoever purchases or sees it to connect to who they are inside and feel what that piece is offering. That connects them to themselves. It’s an honoring of everybody.” Becker invites people to text her at 541-788-7899 to see her work in her studio. Susie Zeitner of Z Glass Act mastered her glass skills over 22 years of hard work, creativity, and experimentation. She’s widely known for her work in the commercial lighting genre. Her work can be seen in homes, hotels, and other commercial high-end buildings. Collectors are also enjoying her work in mosaic tileglass totems, and fusible glass paintings. The fusing technique requires a kiln. “You fire glass powder paint made out of an emulsion of glass powder. I create an image like a watercolor technique and paintable glass technique,” she said. Zeitner is focusing on wildlife and Native American imagery for her glass paintings. The totems are made from fusible kiln glass. She assembles materials made in her studio then fractures and refires them to become tiles on the totems. She rotates between the totems, paintings, and commercial lighting and is really enjoying the fine art realm. The totems are sold at Hood Avenue Art, in her studio, Z Glass Act in Sisters, and at Pottery House in Tumalo. To make an appointment, contact her via phone at 541-556-9068 or email her at susiezeitner@gmail.com.

Continues on page 28

Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show, always held the second Saturday in July, is renowned as the largest outdoor quilt show in the world. Over 1,200 quilts on display from quilters of all ages and skill levels. Amidst a festival atmosphere, 10,000+ visitors from all over the U.S. and multiple countries come to celebrate the creativity, skill, and heritage of quilting arts.

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www.NuggetNews.com • 27


Continued from page 27 Brad and Sherry Logan own High Desert Stained Glass in Bend. Their home studio contains commissioned projects in various stages of completion. Their latest and largest commission required them to invest in 20-foot-high scaffolding to create stained glass panels for St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Eastern Oregon. Each window will be 100 inches high and will be a part of a design that migrates through all of them. The scaffolding will be used to create a huge drawing board replicating the window spaces in the church. Brad expects the project to take about a year to complete. He laughs when he looks up at the yellow scaffolding, wondering how he’ll be scaling the heights required to get the job done. At the other end of the spectrum, the Logans work on small repairs, and all kinds of home projects that transform a plain window into something beautiful and ever-changing in the light. Brad does all the rendering, manufacturing, and installation for their projects. His favorite projects allow him to take his client’s

vision and manifest it through his creativity and experience. “We prefer projects that allow us to form strong relationships with our clients. They usually take between 12 to 16 weeks to complete,” he said. Brad’s specialty is beveled glass. It’s a four-step, handcrafted process where you have to grind from one wheel to another to come up with a finished project. He says anything customers can imagine as an image can be translated to a stained glass window. Michelle Kaptur of Soulbursts Cremation Ash Glass Art focuses on cremation keepsakes. She began working with ash after Mount St. Helens’ eruption and later helped a friend incorporate her father’s ashes into a glass piece. “After making some pieces for my family, I realized what a benefit it was for people,” she said. “You can touch it and it’s beautiful and a more positive way to engage with the ashes. I enjoy the work. I could still be making art glass, but this is very rewarding to me,” she said. You can view her work at soulbursts.com.

Michelle Kaptur of Soulbursts Cremation Ash Glass Art creates unique cremation keepsakes. AD Glass & Design is run by self-described gaffer Aaron Duccini. The shop and showroom is at 30 SW Century Dr., #120 on Bend’s west side. Duccini fired up the furnace in his new studio in 2017. He explained that a gaffer is the lead designer in the glass-blowing team and the one that’s on the bench and most hands-on. Duccini says he enjoys doing a lot of old-school techniques with a modern twist. For his fancy pieces he uses a Swedish technique known

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as graal. “I take a blank I created earlier, and carve that out and pick it back up and reshape it and make it larger and a different shape,” he said. “I do a lot of fun seasonal items and personal experiences for someone who’d like to come in. We can make a paperweight, blown ornament, or small cups in about 45 minutes. I offer beginning to advanced classes and teach all kinds of techniques. I make sure everyone has a good time. Depending on the project, people can come back the next day to pick up their glass, or we can ship it to them. I do custom work and repair projects too. Anything I can draw, I can put on glass.” Whether you’re looking to collect, browse, or try glass-blowing yourself, you’ll want to visit these Central Oregon artists who create art in a myriad of ways. As Nancy Becker says, “Art is a language, a communication everyone knows at a deep level, and I love to speak that language. My main art vocabulary exists in hand-blown and shaped glass — a complex and mesmerizing material.”

Aaron Duccini of AD Glass & Design at work in his Bend studio.

www.NuggetNews.com • 29


Celebrating

traditional cultures through film

By Jim Cornelius | Film stills courtesy Figure 8 Films

There is nothing more traditionally “Central Oregon” than buckaroos and wild horses. An event set for November 5-6 at the DD Ranch in Terrebonne will celebrate — and support — both. A work-in-progress screening of “The Outside Circle: A Movie of the Modern West” is set for both days, and in collaboration with the Warm Springs Horse Network and Safe Acres Sanctuary. The screening will help raise funds. The Warm Springs Horse Network (WSHN) has been working with the Warm Springs Tribe in Central Oregon, placing orphan foals since 2014. As of January 2015 WSHN officially became its own nonprofit, under the name Warm Springs Horse Network. “The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs is working very hard at managing the number of 30 • Spirit of Central Oregon

horses [on its range], through gelding, adoptions, selling, and the like,” Beth Matanane of WSHN explained. “However, due to land degradation, fires, and drought, the need necessitates the immediate removal of some horses from the range. This removal leaves some foals available and, occasionally for the right person with the right facility, a mare/foal pair can be obtained, as well as older horses.” Matanane says that, once gentled, WSHN horses prove to be

exceptional partners. “Generally speaking they are hardier than domestic horses having excellent bone, feet, intelligence, endurance, and are easy keepers ranging in every color under the sun, some very unique eye candy!” she said. In the past, WSHN has presented screenings such as “unBranded,” and “Harry and Snowman,” as

Continues on page 32

“Generally speaking they [Warm Springs Horse Network horses] are hardier than domestic horses having excellent bone, feet, intelligence, endurance, and are easy keepers...” — Beth Matanane


” www.NuggetNews.com • 31


Continued from page 30 fundraisers for the cause — along with a film festival, hosted by Equis Films International. This November they’re partnering up with the Central Oregon-based filmmakers of “The Outside Circle.” “The Outside Circle: A Movie of the Modern West” is a documentary film about the life and legacy of Great Basin cowboys and ranchers as they work to preserve their culture and traditions in a rapidly changing world. Filmed on locations throughout Oregon, Nevada, Texas, Wyoming, and Idaho, this movie focuses on the traditional values of the rural west: faith, family, friends, and community, as seen through the eyes of those who make their lives and homes across the American outback. Writer and documentary filmmaker Craig Rullman originally conceived of the film as a portrait of artist and Paisley–area buckaroo Len Babb. “It started with Len, for me, because he works in that legacy of [legendary Western artist] Charlie Russell, and has been a working cowboy all his life,” Rullman said. However, he noted, “the movie evolved over time.” There were interrelated stories that evolved out of tracing Babb’s life in the saddle, working for a variety of ranches in the Great Basin. Those stories evolved into a portrait of a community and the lifeways and culture of the Great Basin buckaroos — which is reflected in the title. Being on “the outside circle” means, in a literal sense, riding big circles through wide-open country, checking on cattle, finding lost cattle, rounding up cattle — the fundamental 32 • Spirit of Central Oregon

job of the buckaroo. It’s also a metaphor for a life lived on the outskirts of mainstream, modern-American society. “We can’t tell Len’s story without telling the story of the Murphy family and their five generations in Paisley, trying to build a ranch and a business and a healthy family,” Rullman said. And, from the beginning, Rullman knew that he wanted to document the life and work of Paiute buckaroos, which is found in the lives of the Crutcher and Jackson families in northwestern Nevada. “In the Great Basin,” Rullman explained, “native cowboys have a tremendous reputation for just being great hands.” Rullman was drawn to the diversity reflected in the many lives of the Great Basin buckaroos, and also the sense of community built around that way of life. And there is something about buckarooing that brings out the artist in the people who live the life, and appeals to those of an artistic bent in other walks of life. “Some of what drew me in this direction was doing a little work for the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association, and seeing their

commitment to creating functional art,” Rullman said. Many buckaroos braid exquisite horsehair tack; others excel in engraving spurs or in leatherwork and saddle making (Babb and his son are also noted saddle makers). Exceptional artistry is an unexceptional aspect of the buckaroo way of life. “That line between art and life is blurred,” Rullman said. Through “The Outside Circle: A Movie of the Modern West,” Rullman hopes to remind audiences that the cowboy life is not a relic of a distant American past, but an ongoing, vital, contemporary American way of life. “They’re here today — and they’re doing interesting things,” he said. And if screening the film touches folks in Central Oregon and helps find a home for some Warm Springs foals, well that seems like a pretty good deal for all concerned. View a teaser trailer for the film at https://bit.ly/outsidecircle The Warm Springs Horse Network can be found on Facebook. Visit Traditional Cowboy Arts Association at www.tcowboyarts.org.


WORK-IN-PROGRESS SCREENING:

The Outside Circle: A Movie of the Modern West

DD Ranch, 3836 NE Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne This is an outdoor venue under the Central Oregon stars. Bring a comfy chair and a blanket. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. each day. Movie starts at 7 p.m. Tickets available via TicketTailor for $15 (https://www.tickettailor. com/events/ddranch/585478); or $18 at the gate. Event features: • Len Babb Western Art Show. • Live music featuring Jim Cornelius, Mike Biggers, and Jody Cooper. • Silent auction on Friday night. • Food trucks and adult beverages available on site. This film is suitable for all ages.

We’ve Moved! Come by and let us show you around!

151 N. Spruce Street 541-549-1403 Open Friday & Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. www.NuggetNews.com • 33


Continued from page 16 creating content for their brand, but also expanding my own brand,” he said. Robinson is taking a van across the country, going to 45 different locations, starting in Florida, and will end up in Colorado for some winter snowmobile content. “I am really just going from point A to point B, sometimes spending a couple hours in a location to spending a couple days, it just depends on the type of location and the type of experience they offer,” he said. The trajectory of the trip includes going through Texas, Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Colorado, California, and more. Most of the locations have different types of adventure experiences connected to BRP and their brands and companies. “Every location is an Uncharted Society outfitter, and my job is to provide content for Uncharted as well as for those outfitters at each spot,” he said. Robinson shoots photos and creates video content of the location’s

34 • Spirit of Central Oregon

offerings and products. “The goal is to really connect people with experiences no matter where they come from. Even if you aren’t a power-sports fan, Uncharted strives to create experiences for anyone and everyone,” he said. During his years at Sisters High School and even after graduation, Robinson was heavily involved in the Interdisciplinary Environmental Expedition (IEE) program. The IEE program offers high school juniors the opportunity to experience outdoor recreation in Central Oregon, combined with science and English classroom subjects. Seniors can serve as program interns. Every year, the program does a three-day mountain trip in the Three Sisters Wilderness and a rafting trip down the Deschutes River. Robinson was a student, an intern, and then eventually an adult leader in the program, and has only missed three trips. He’ll miss this year, as he will be out on the road. “I wouldn’t be doing what I am

doing now without the program and my involvement,” said Robinson. “I think this program is really special; it comes at the right time in kids’ lives and gives them a taste as to what’s possible in the outdoor industry.” The program allows high schoolers to be way ahead in outdoor leadership training based on the type of


activity and the way the program is set up. “Sisters has the most unique outdoor programs for young people. My favorite aspect is being able to spend time and share the experience with the kids. I don’t think kids realize how special it is until they’re out of it,” Robinson said. After high school, he went into the guiding profession and ended up working for many months in South America, as well as winter mountain guiding in Colorado. During his time as a guide, Robinson began developing his own media and content-creation skills. He was striving to become a professional snowmobiler and needed to create his own videos and content to get his name out in front of sponsors. “I found a passion for creating

videos, trying to become a professional pro snowmobiler,” he said. Now that’s the centerpiece of his career. “The main driver is the content and storytelling aspect of this experience,” he said. Robinson is along for the ride in this journey with Uncharted Society. “Every opportunity is what you make of it,” he said. “I plan to

reevaluate what exactly I want to do in my future career as long as it still includes big, bold crazy-cool adventures.” View Robinson’s content on his YouTube channel, www.youtube. com/c/RossRobinsonX, and Uncharted Society’s Instagram at www.instagram.com/ unchartedsociety.

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Central Oregon cideries

build community By Katy Yoder

When AVID Cider Company co-owner Sam Roberts was a young woman, she studied abroad and fell in love with cider pubs. It wasn’t just the delicious taste of the ciders. “I went to school in England,” said Roberts. “My mom’s from there and I worked in a pub. They made them like community living rooms. People of all ages came in to hang out. We had regulars who came every day. That’s what my partner, Dan McCoy, and I wanted to create here. It really started with me living in England and getting hooked on ciders.” That community vibe is strong at AVID. The Bend tasting room welcomes everyone, including their customers’ dogs, who can be found lounging on couches and overstuffed chairs. Roberts is proud of the inclusive community they’ve created and loves seeing regulars and families bringing in food from the hot dog food truck out front or any other takeout from Bend restaurants. 36 • Spirit of Central Oregon

One of the things that sets AVID apart from other cideries is their use of fresh-pressed juices and high-quality fruits. “Most come from the Hood River area, so it’s as local as possible,” said Roberts. Having been in business since 2013, AVID has a wide distribution of their products. “We’re in nine states including California, Montana, and Washington and are about to launch a variety pack with apricot-peach and pear-apple and a Northwest berry with classic blackberry, apple, blueberry, and pomegranate.” AVID is located at 550 SW Industrial Way, Suite 190, in the Box Factory; open from noon to 11 p.m. Tumalo straddles Highway 20 between Sisters and Bend. It’s home to two cider companies. Tumalo Cider Company opened in 2014 after owner Jeff Bennett decided he wasn’t finding the kind of ciders he liked to drink.

He’s made a point of steering clear of the cloying ciders that can give the drink a bad name. “There’s a big misconception that cider’s really sweet,” said Bennett from the tasting room located at 64654 Cook Ave. “We’re here to dispel that myth. We focus on less-sweet flavors. We don’t over flavor, and use apples higher in acidity so you get that perception of dryness balanced out with a little bit of sweetness from extra fruit. The primary goal is not too sweet but well balanced.” Cider is popular for a variety of reasons. The alcohol content is low by volume, it’s gluten-free, and lends itself to fruity combinations that reflect growing seasons. “In my book, it’s about balance — sweetness, acidity, flavor,” Bennett said. “That’s really the main goal.” Bend Cider Company (BCC) is just around the corner in Tumalo off Cook Avenue at 64649 Wharton Ave.

Continues on page 38


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www.NuggetNews.com • 37


Continued from page 36 Co-owners Tammy and Kelly Roark wanted their cidery to reflect everything they love about Bend. Kelly’s deep Oregon roots are represented through the integration of music, art, and culture into their company. “We give back through featuring artists, supporting local music festivals, and offering live music on our stage. We also give to environmental education programs. We want that for our kids also,” Tammy said. Each BCC can features a threatened or endangered species to spotlight Pacific Northwest animals. “One can has a bison, which no longer roams free in Oregon. Then we did the monarch butterfly, spotted owl, and sockeye salmon,” said Tammy. The Roarks have three young children and run their business with Tammy’s brother, David Ward. “We’re totally family run, and we built the production room ourselves using locally sourced pumice-crete, which is a lava rock mined in Tumalo. It’s a good material for temperature regulation which is key to fermentation,” Tammy explained. Bend Cider Co. is a botanically focused cider company, meaning each flavor complements the apple profiles with a botanical element. “It’s similar to when you eat food and there’s rosemary sprinkled on some bread, or thyme or dill,” Tammy explained. “It’s there, but isn’t overtaking the meal.” The couple has two cider-specific orchards, one in the Willamette Valley and another just up the hill in Tumalo. They’re starting out with 100 trees 38 • Spirit of Central Oregon

and have already had to overcome a damaging hailstorm that stripped the trees and halted production that year. But they’re not the kind of people who give up easily. The trees are looking good and the business is thriving. They invite everyone to join them in their tasting room and to hang out on the lawn where there will be live music in October. Heading south out of Bend, Legend NW Cider Company is right off the highway at 52670 Hwy. 97. Don’t trust your GPS to take you there. The building used to be a tire factory, and many customers have been guided to the tire company’s new location in La Pine. Owners Adrianne and Tyler Baumann transformed the building into a fun, welcoming meeting place for locals and travelers alike. During an interview with Adrianne, two women who’d heard about Legend dropped in to fill up their growlers before heading off to a campsite for the weekend. Legend is gaining traction as a fun place to try some cider or grab a bite to eat. Choosing La Pine wasn’t by chance, but a part of the Baumanns’ efforts to bring economic vitality to the town. The Baumanns were approached by the City of La Pine and invited to open their business

in an area ripe for development and a fresh start. “When choosing a location, La Pine city planners and EDCO reached out and said this is a part of our county that needs commerce, more jobs, and something to feel proud about,” said Adrianne in-between pouring pints for customers. “Besides our actual product, our Legend family is a huge part of who we are. We’re both Oregon natives, and own a house south of Bend. We support local sports teams, artists, musicians, and we have items for sale made locally. That’s core to our ideals. To support a community that needs us. Since we’ve opened, a few food carts have popped up, and a distillery came in. We hope we were a part of getting that ball rolling to make La Pine a destination for tourists too.” Adrianne says one of the things that sets them apart from other cideries is their use of beer yeast as opposed to cider yeast. They made that decision because they prefer the flavor profile. “We came from a beer background and still enjoy local craft beers in Bend,” she said. “We are producing more of a beer drinker’s cider, but it’s still gluten-free.” Another difference is their choice to make unfiltered cider. Think of the difference between a rich, old-fashioned cider and a kid’s juice box. All of these Central Oregon cideries have one thing in common… they’re all about elevating and celebrating ciders and they’re all about the communities they call home. As Tammy Roark said, “Our flavor profiles reflect more than just our personal tastes; they create a connection to the region.”


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