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The Nugget Vol. XLIV No. 1

POSTAL CUSTOMER

News and Opinion from Sisters, Oregon

www.NuggetNews.com

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Sisters rider shines in rodeo competition By Jim Cornelius Editor in Chief

Adriene Steffen has added to her collection of rodeo trophies with a Reserve Champion finish in pole bending at the Junior Wo r l d C h a m p i o n s h i p s Rodeo held December 7-12 in Fort Worth, Texas. The 15-year-old rodeo competitor from Sisters has racked up considerable success in the arena, competing nationally since 2017. Steffen turned in blazingfast times of 20.7 seconds and 20.1 seconds on her 19-year-old horse named Bully, whom she started working with a year ago. “I was really proud of my horse,” Steffen told The Nugget. “Those were the fastest times we’ve run. He’s a super-good, easygoing horse that you just have to be there for the ride and help him out.” Top honors went to Macie Kulikov of Sanger, California, whose runs included extraordinary sub20-second times. Pole bending is a timed

PRE-SORTED STANDARD ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID Sisters, OR Permit No. 15

Sisters will grow through 2021 By Sue Stafford Correspondent

an indoor arena. Steffen explained that horses often

Growth in Sisters is keeping up a steady pace in early 2021. Numerous commercial and residential projects are in various stages of approval and implementation. • Approved: Three Winds Apartments (West Hood Avenue behind Bi-Mart). Partition to divide the property into three parcels. Site Plan Review to allow for three, 10-unit multifamily residential buildings on new Parcel 2 and two 10-unit multi-family residential buildings on new Parcel 1, for a total of 50 units. • Approved: 201 E. Sun Ranch Dr., map and tax lot 151004CA01900. Request:

See RODEO CHAMP on page 23

See GROWTH on page 14

PHOTO BY BOAZ DOV ELKES

Sisters youth rodeo competitor Adriene Steffen earned Reserve Champion honors in pole bending at the Junior World Championships in Fort Worth, Texas. event that features a horse and rider, running a weaving or serpentine path around six poles arranged in a line,

similar to a skiing slalom. Achieving times in the low 20-second range is tough, especially in

Staying safe this winter Restaurant to open despite ban on national forests By Jim Cornelius Editor in Chief

People are flocking to the mountains this winter, filling up sno-parks, ski areas, and other recreation sites on national forest lands. While winter is a great time to explore public lands, forest officials caution that there are additional precautions and steps to take before heading out. Recreation staff and emergency responders ask everyone to follow these tips and stay safe this winter: • Always check weather and road conditions before leaving home. • Prepare your vehicle for conditions at high elevations, carry tire chains and keep a winter weather kit in your vehicle. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue team rescued a man and his 13-year-old daughter who got stuck in snow in a four-wheel-drive truck on a

Inside...

forest road north of Paulina Lake. DCSO reminds the public to use caution when traveling on forest roads this time of year due to snowpack. Road conditions vary significantly and roads can quickly become impassable. If you are traversing in these conditions be sure to bring appropriate vehicles, equipment, lighting, clothing, food, water, navigation and communication devices. Traffic may be heavy around popular winter recreation sites so have a back-up plan if the site you wanted to visit is full. Consider weekday visits or local transit options rather than driving to areas and always carpool if possible. If a parking lot is full, do not park along the highway, in no-parking zones, or block See SAFETY on page 14

For Tom and Jeannie Gilgenberg Buck, keeping their wine bar and bistro closed indefinitely isn’t an option. The couple opened Cork Cellars for in-restaurant dining on January 1 — in spite of state mandates prohibiting indoor dining in counties deemed at “extreme risk” in the current surge of COVID-19 cases. “Tom and I seriously considered closing,” Jeannie told The Nugget on December 31. “If we don’t do this, there will not be a Cork Cellars.” The restaurant opened with the same safety and sanitation protocols that were in place before Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) imposed tighter restrictions in November. Those restrictions prohibit all indoor dining, gym openings, and indoor entertainment in “extreme

PHOTO BY JIM CORNELIUS

Tom Buck and his wife, Jeannie, opened Cork Cellars on January 1 with the protocols that were in place before the shutdown of indoor dining. risk” counties — including Deschutes — in an effort to blunt a surge in COVID19 cases that has seen more

hospitalizations and fatalities in Oregon than at any time See RESTAURANT on page 8

Letters/Weather ............... 2 Announcements...............10 Property Guy.................... 11 Sisters Naturalist.............19 Classifieds................. 20-21 Meetings .......................... 3 Entertainment ................. 11 Fun & Games ............... 12-13 Crossword .......................19 Real Estate ................ 22-24


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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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A crisis of legitimacy By Jim Cornelius Editor in Chief

Letters to the Editor… The Nugget welcomes contributions from its readers, which must include the writer’s name, address and phone number. Letters to the Editor is an open forum for the community and contains unsolicited opinions not necessarily shared by the Editor. The Nugget reserves the right to edit, omit, respond or ask for a response to letters submitted to the Editor. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. Unpublished items are not acknowledged or returned. The deadline for all letters is 10 a.m. Monday.

To the Editor: My father served in both World War II and in the Korean War as a Japanese linguist/ Naval intelligence officer. My father-in-law served as a soldier in combat in the Korean War. My brother served two tours as a Seabee in combat zones during the Vietnam War. My husband and I spent eight months in the former Soviet Union as Foreign Service Staff Officers countering Soviet anti-American propaganda on a U.S. Government exhibit. After the Soviet Union fell, and while I was working as corporate counsel at U.S. Bank, I spent many hours volunteering for

the American Bar Association’s Central and East European Law Initiative, assisting the newly independent countries of the former Soviet bloc adapt their legal systems to the norms of democracy and the rule of law. My older son is a licensed EMT. My younger son was awarded several medals for his service as a civilian in the Pentagon during both the Obama and Trump Administrations. We have all served our country in different ways. As should be apparent from the foregoing, for letter writer Chet Davis to accuse See LETTERS on page 6

Sisters Weather Forecast

Courtesy of the National Weather Service, Pendleton, Oregon

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

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Showers

Mostly Cloudy

Rain/Snow Showers

Partly Cloudy

48/29

44/31

41/26

40/28

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Over the holidays, the House of Cornelius rode down a side trail into the Wars of the Roses. The Wars of the Roses were a series of civil wars that ripped England apart for 30 years from 1455 to 1485. The complexity of threedecades of instability, turmoil and extreme violence has been over-simplified into a dynastic struggle between the Houses of Lancaster and York, the Red Rose vs. the White. The struggle has been fodder for dramatists from Shakespeare to Philippa Gregory’s “The White Queen,” and George R.R. Martin plundered its rich, bloodshot vein in the fantasy epic that became HBO’s wildly popular “Game of Thrones.” For all its inherent drama, perhaps the most compelling aspect of the period is its resonance. Historian Dan Jones, who wrote an excellent single-volume history titled “The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors,” prefers the term “resonance” to the often-glib assertion of historical “relevance.” Seeking on-the-nose, oneto-one correlations between past and present events can easily mislead. But resonance is a different matter — it gets at the continuity of human behavior, the noble and the sordid. It allows us to see ourselves in the people of the past — and to see them in us. What tore England asunder in a welter of blood was a crisis of legitimacy. King Henry VI — who inherited the Crown as a young child — fell very far indeed from the mighty tree that was his father, Henry V. He was weak, vacillating, and probably seriously mentally ill. He was the legitimate king, but he wasn’t up to the job. A sincere effort to do right by the realm on the part of his Queen, the remarkable Margaret of Anjou, was contested by the most powerful noble in England, Richard, Duke of York — who considered himself, not without reason, to be a superior candidate for Lord Protector. The question of who would guide England through crisis dissolved into a brutal and intractable conflict. For decades, no one could establish full, uncontested legitimacy as King of England – and the realm bled. The American Constitution was designed to make national institutions much more important than the people who hold office. American presidents are not supposed to be monarchs. American citizens are not

supposed to rally to the personal banners of overlords. But over the 232-year history of the presidency, the chief executive has been allowed to grow more and more powerful, to the point at which recent presidents (of both parties) brag about their ability to rule by decree, through what they benignly call “executive orders.” And when you have a monarchical presidency, a crisis of legitimacy has explosive potential. For the past two decades, since the excruciatingly close 2000 Bush vs. Gore election, it has become common practice to challenge the legitimacy of the person who sits behind the Resolute Desk. Even when he won by wide margins in 2008 and 2012, some of President Barack Obama’s opponents falsely claimed that his presidency was illegitimate because he wasn’t born in the U.S. In fact, “birtherism” was Donald Trump’s entre into the national political limelight. In 2016, many Democrats, appalled by Trump’s unexpected victory, loudly cried that he was “not their president” — though he clearly won the election — and, proclaiming “The Resistance,” assiduously sought his removal from office through investigation and impeachment. Now we are witnessing the unprecedented spectacle of a sitting president undermining the legitimacy of the very institutions he is supposed to represent, claiming against all evidence that he remains the rightful leader of the nation, and sowing what, for millions of Americans, will be an ardent belief that the new president is not legitimate. A president urging a state official to “find” votes and to “recalculate” an election outcome should alarm any citizen, whatever their political persuasion. Republican Senator Ben Sasse has rightly called President Trump’s post-election behavior “(pointing) a loaded gun at the heart of legitimate self-government.” Events of recent weeks have expanded the Overton Window of what can be accepted in American politics. In his history of the Wars of the Roses, Jones notes that, “Richard III’s usurpation of the Crown had broken every rule of political propriety, and with it, opened new and previously unthinkable possibilities.” The resonance of history whispers that, when the unthinkable becomes possible, the land is in grave danger.


Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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Sisters Dance Academy

HOSTS VIRTUAL SHOW

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Deceased homeless honored in walk By T. Lee Brown Correspondent

PHOTO BY JERRY BALDOCK

Dancers performed without an audience, during a two-day video recording session at Wellhouse Church. The Sisters Dance Academy (SDA) has had its fair share of difficulties while coping with statemandated shutdowns during COVID-19. The first shutdown the dance academy faced was in March when the concerns over the spread of COVID-19 were growing rapidly. The studio quickly made adjustments to be able to host their classes online to try to preserve their students and program. “Since so many of our students were doing school online,” said Lonnie Liddell, the studio’s owner and director, “it was really difficult for many of our students to have to do dance that way, too. We lost many students who really struggle with that learning format.” The studio was allowed to reopen to in-person classes in June and continue with having students attend onsite through mid-November.

Even though the studio faced a significant drop in enrollments during the summer and fall sessions, both students and instructors alike were grateful to be attending classes in person again. With many new protocols in place, like smaller class sizes, daily disinfecting procedures, requiring face coverings, hand-washing and limiting only dance students to be in the building, the studio was able to maintain a very safe environment and had no COVID-19 exposures. In mid-November, as COVID-19 cases were rising in the state, the governor issued another closure for businesses like the dance academy. “We again had to shift to all of our classes being online and our students were so heartbroken to not be able to attend their classes in person,” said Liddell.

“However, we all remained grateful we could still finish out the season virtually and give some closure to one of the most difficult years in our history.” The dance academy was able to record their dancers and all they had prepared for the dance academy’s winter performance that was initially scheduled to be held on December 12. Due to the COVID-19 restrictions, the Sisters High School auditorium was not an option as a usable space for the dancers, so Liddell went looking for other possibilities. She was able to find a local church willing to open their doors to the dancers to be able to record their performance and give them the opportunity to present a virtual performance. “The Wellhouse Church was amazing to work with See PERFORMANCE on page 23

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Living unsheltered in Sisters Country can be difficult, cold, and even deadly. On December 21, Mandee Seeley honored those who have died. Seeley was inspired by an event held in Bend. According to organizers of The Longest Night, twice as many people in Central Oregon are homeless today as there were in 2013. “Even though we haven’t lost anyone here in Sisters this year, we have in the past, so I wanted to honor them in their own community,” said Seeley.

While walking Sisters Community Labyrinth, Seeley thought about “the two folks we’ve lost since I moved here in 2016… even one life is too many.” They might still be alive, she noted, “if they’d had a safe, warm place to call home.” The walk was unofficial, with the annual labyrinth Solstice gathering canceled due to COVID-19. Last year’s winter solstice walk featured ceremonial elements, a toasty fire, and nearly 50 celebrants. This year, Seeley and her family simply walked the labyrinth with just a few masked friends and supporters. See WALK on page 18

Folk festival expanding online programming Sisters Folk Festival (SFF) has announced a new session of winter programming to expand virtual education outreach programs for adults and youth during COVID-19. Registration is now open for educational offerings planned for this winter and spring, including multi-week songwriting and performance classes, instrumental music and engineering workshops, and three separate Sisters Songworks offerings taught by both regional and nationally-recognized instructors and musicians.

In response to the global pandemic, SFF redesigned many of their traditional offerings in 2020. The cultural nonprofit is now looking to build on the success of those reimagined programs with a slate of online music education courses and workshops rolling out this winter. “Dynamics in Performance” is a four-week course taught by Beth Wood taking place Thursday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m., January 28 through February 18. The See SFF PROGRAMS on page 22

As the COVID-19 crisis continues to affect gatherings, please contact individual organizations for current meeting status

SISTERS AREA MEETING CALENDAR Council on Aging of Central Oregon Senior Lunch Tuesdays, noon, Sisters Al-Anon Mon., noon, by Zoom. / Thurs., Community Church. 541-480-1843. 10 a.m., Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran East of the Cascades Quilt Guild 4th Wednesday (September-June), Stitchin’ Church. 541-610-7383. Post. All are welcome. 541-549-6061. Alcoholics Anonymous Thurs. & Friends of the Sisters Library Board Sun., 7 p.m., Episcopal Church of the of Directors 2nd Tuesday, 9 to 11 a.m., Transfiguration / Sat., 8 a.m., Episcopal Sisters Library.www.sistersfol.com. Church of the Transfiguration / Mon., Go Fish Fishing Group 3rd Monday, 5 p.m., Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran 7 p.m. Sisters Community Church. All Church / Big Book study, Tues., noon, ages welcome. 541-771-2211. Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church / Heartwarmers (fleece blanketmakers) Gentlemen’s meeting, Wed., 7 a.m., 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 1 p.m., Sisters City Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church / Hall. Materials provided. 541-408-8505. Sober Sisters Women’s meeting, Thurs., Hero Quilters of Sisters Thursday, 1 to noon, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran 4 p.m. 541-549-1028 or 541-719-1230. Church / Step & Tradition meeting, Fri., Citizens4Community, Let’s Talk noon, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran 3rd Monday, 5:30 to 8 p.m. RSVP at Church. 541-548-0440. citizens4community.com Alzheimer’s & Dementia Caregiver Military Parents of Sisters Meetings Support Group 1st Tuesday, noon, are held quarterly; please call for details. SPRD bldg. 800-272-3900. 541-388-9013. Black Butte Ranch Bridge Club Oregon Band of Brothers – Sisters Tuesdays, 12:30 p.m., BBR community Chapter Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m., room. Partner required. 541-595-6236. Takoda’s Restaurant. 541-549-6469. SAGE (Senior Activities, Gatherings Central Oregon Fly Tyers Guild & Enrichment) Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. For Saturday meeting dates and to 4 p.m. at Sisters Park & Recreation location, email: steelefly@msn.com. District. 541-549-2091. Central OR Spinners and Weavers Sisters Aglow Lighthouse Guild One Saturday per month, Jan. 4th Saturday, 10 a.m., Ponderosa Lodge thru Oct. For schedule: 541-639-3217. Meeting Room. 503-930-6158.

BOARDS, GROUPS, CLUBS

Sisters Area Photography Club 2nd Wednesday, 4 p.m., meeting by Zoom. 541-549-6157.

Sisters Speak Life Cancer Support Group 2nd & 4th Wednesday, 1 p.m. Suttle Tea. 503-819-1723.

Sisters Area Woodworkers 1st Tuesday, 7 to 9 p.m. 541-639-6216.

Sisters Trails Alliance Board 1st Monday, 5 p.m. Sisters Library. Public welcome. 808-281-2681.

Sisters Astronomy Club 3rd Tuesday, 7 p.m., SPRD. 541-549-8846.

Sisters Veterans Thursdays, noon, Takoda’s Restaurant. 541-903-1123. Sisters Bridge Club In-person gathering suspended until further notice. Three Sisters Irrigation District For free online bridge info, Board of Directors 1st Tuesday, call Barbara 541-914-6322. 4 p.m., TSID Office. 541-549-8815. Sisters Caregiver Support Group 3rd Tues., 10:30 a.m., The Lodge in Sisters. 541-771-3258.

Three Sisters Lions Club 2nd Tuesday, noon, Ray’s Food Place community room. 541-419-1279.

Sisters Cribbage Club Please call for details. 541-923-1632.

VFW Post 8138 and American Legion Post 86 1st Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., Sisters City Hall. 541-903-1123.

Sisters Habitat for Humanity Board of Directors 4th Tuesday, 6 p.m. Location information: 541-549-1193. Sisters Kiwanis Thursdays, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Brand 33 Restaurant at Aspen Lakes. 541-410-2870.

Weight Watchers Thursdays, 8:30 a.m. weigh-in, Sisters Community Church. 541-602-2654.

SCHOOLS

Sisters Parent Teacher Community 2nd Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. at Sisters Saloon. 541-480-5994.

Black Butte School Board of Directors 2nd Tuesday, 3:45 p.m., Black Butte School. 541-595-6203.

Sisters Parkinson’s Support Group Meeting by Zoom. 541-668-6599.

Sisters School District Board of Directors One Wed. monthly, SSD Admin Bldg. See schedule online at www.ssd6.org. 541-549-8521 x5002.

Sisters Red Hats 1st Friday. Location information: 541-279-1977. Sisters Rotary 1st and 3rd Thursdays, Noon, Aspen Lakes. 541-760-5645.

Sisters Middle School Parent Collaboration Team 1st Tuesday, 2 p.m., SMS. 541-610-9513.

CITY & PARKS Sisters City Council 2nd & 4th Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., Sisters City Hall. 541-549-6022. Sisters Park & Recreation District Board of Directors 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 4:30 p.m., SPRD bldg. 541-549-2091. Sisters Planning Commission 3rd Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Sisters City Hall. 541-549-6022.

FIRE & POLICE Black Butte Ranch Police Dept. Board of Directors Meets monthly. 541-595-2191 for time & date. Black Butte Ranch RFPD Board of Directors 4th Thursday, 9 a.m., Black Butte Ranch Fire Station. 541-595-2288. Cloverdale RFPD Board of Directors 3rd Wed., 7 p.m., 67433 Cloverdale Rd. 541-548-4815. cloverdalefire.com. Sisters-Camp Sherman RFPD Board of Directors 3rd Tuesday, 5 p.m., Sisters Fire Hall, 541-549-0771. Sisters-Camp Sherman RFPD Drills Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Sisters Fire Hall, 301 S. Elm St. 541-549-0771. This listing is for regular Sisters Country meetings; email information to lisa@nuggetnews.com


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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

St. Charles’ visitor policy changes

Breaking the cycle of incarceration Editor in Chief

Some 45 percent of people in our jails and prisons struggle with mental health challenges, and as many as 75 percent have substance abuse and addiction problems. Lezlie Neusteter of Sisters, a licensed clinical social worker, sees a grim pattern: “Far too often, clients are released from jail homeless, depressed, anxious, feeling hopeless and overwhelmed. Lacking basic support, they return to the same toxic environments with little chance of engaging in treatment. Direct placement into treatment provides a seamless transition giving the client the stability and support they need to successfully comply with probation, court mandates and to engage fully in treatment. Treatment saves lives. It benefits the client, their family, and our community.” Neusteter ’s practice, Central Oregon Forensic Social Work, seeks to break the cycle of incarceration by connecting inmates direct from jail to intensive inpatient treatment. Forensic social work occurs within the criminal justice system. Neusteter is engaged directly by public defenders to go into the jail and perform an assessment on a client, including treatment history and needs. “The vast amount of clients I work with have been cycling in and out of homelessness and incarceration for years,” she told The Nugget. “For many years.” She makes treatment recommendations and if

The vast amount of clients I work with have been cycling in and out of homelessness and incarceration for years. — Lezlie Neusteter

those recommendations are accepted through the courts, she coordinates treatment — ideally long-term residential treatment. Such coordination is critical to people who need treatment but lack the capability to access it on their own. “So many clients I work with are desperate for treatment, but they haven’t had the resources or support to get into treatment,” Neusteter said. “They’re often homeless, often without a phone. They’re focused on food and shelter.” The effort is impeded by a basic lack of treatment slots available. “We have a dire shortage of long-term mental-health and substance-abuse facilities in this state,” Neusteter said. It can take four to six weeks to secure a spot — and if a client has left incarceration in the meantime, they may have reverted to their previous patterns of behavior. “Sometimes I lose them because their sentence isn’t long enough,” Neusteter said. Neusteter and many other advocates in the field emphasize that investing in treatment is a cost-savings in the long run, both in terms of dollars and in social capital. Getting eligible people “to go from the criminal justice

system to the healthcare system where they belong,” Neusteter asserts, gets at the root cause of incarceration and is “far cheaper” than continually cycling people in and out of jail. “We could significantly reduce recidivism, reduce the crime rate, reduce homelessness,” she said. “We’re missing a really big opportunity to interrupt the cycle of incarceration with these people.” Neusteter has a deep background in the field. She worked with the City of Long Beach Homeless Bureau and was instrumental in creating a veterans justice outreach program in San Diego County to divert veterans with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress out of the criminal justice system. She says that the “system” in Central Oregon recognizes the value of her current work. “I’m receiving a lot of

We’re missing a really big opportunity to interrupt the cycle of incarceration with these people. — Lezlie Neusteter

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support,” she said. “I’m genuinely encouraged by the support I’ve been receiving from the DA and judges in Deschutes County.” Neusteter is accepting donations to assist clients going from jail to residential treatment programs who are in need of used clothing and other basic necessities. If you are interested in donating, send a check or money order to: Central Oregon Forensic Social Work, PO Box 1716, Sisters, OR 97759, or call to arrange donations of clothing and new hygiene items at 541-728-3036.

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Lezlie Neusteter of Sisters practices forensic social work, endeavoring to connect people with addiction and/or mental health challenges with services that can help keep them out of jail and prison.

Because the number of COVID-19 cases in the community continues to be high, St. Charles Health System will no longer allow hospitalized COVID-19-positive patients to receive visitors under most circumstances. To protect St. Charles’ patients and caregivers, door screeners and guest services teams will notify any visitors who intend to visit COVID-19-positive patients that they will not be allowed to visit. St. Charles will once again encourage COVID19-positive patients to use iPads for communication with their family members. “This was a tough decision, but a necessary one to ensure the safety of our patients and caregivers,” said Dr. Jeff Absalon, the health system’s chief physician executive. “The risk of exposure continues to be high, so we must do everything we can to prevent further spread of the virus.”

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Sheriff’s Office class prepares mentors for youth Central Oregon Partnerships for Youth (COPY), a program of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, is offering a virtual class to prepare volunteers to become mentors for children with an incarcerated parent. After initial training and comprehensive background checks, volunteers are matched with a child in Sisters, Bend, Redmond, or La Pine that share similar interests and activities and commit to spending a few hours a week together for a minimum of one year. This time is often spent on outside activities, exploring the community, doing art or craft projects, or simply hanging out and talking. On Saturday, January 16, COPY will offer a virtual orientation/training class. This 3-1/2-hour class covers program policies, how to establish a mentor relationship, the impact incarceration has on families, communication skills, and safety and best practices for mentoring in a COVID-19 world. There is no cost to attend, but advanced registration is required. For additional details call 541-388-6651 or email COPY@deschutes.org Additional program information is available at the Sheriff’s Office website at www.sheriff.deschutes.org/ copy.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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Commentary...

A growth mindset — hope and believe

By Edie Jones Correspondent

As we move into 2021 it’s hard not to approach it with fear and worry, considering the year we’re putting behind us. When this is the mindset we adults carry forth, it is sure to be picked up by the children in our lives, whether we verbalize it or not. An important question is how can we avoid passing on these negative vibes to our kids? Probably the most important thing we can do is to find a way to change our perspective. Even if it happens in small increments, it can make a difference. Finding a way to start each day remembering the good things in our lives helps balance our outlook as we face the challenges of the day. Carol Dweck, a researcher at Stanford, has coined the terms now becoming familiar in education circles of “fixed” and “growth” mindsets. When people believe their qualities are fixed traits and therefore cannot change, they often stop working to develop and improve them. It is the belief that talent alone leads to success, and effort is not required. It is the belief that “I’m less intelligent than others so why try.” Or, “I’m so smart I better be careful because I don’t want to make a mistake. So, I’m not going to try to avoid messing up.” Contrast this with a growth mindset, where people believe that with effort, time, and experience their situation can change. Even though these terms usually refer to learning I think they also apply directly to how we see the pandemic affecting us.

When we have a growth mindset we believe in our ability to cope, push forward and have hope that things will get better. With the pandemic circling around us, it is often hard to perceive things this way. However, the more we work at it, the easier it becomes. The more we adapt the mindset of trying harder at social distancing the more comfortable it becomes. When adults have a growth mindset, kids develop one also. When you consider how difficult comprehensive distance learning is for many of our students, a growth mindset is essential to their succeeding. Helping kids recognize that just because studying and learning right now is hard, it doesn’t mean it will always be. Encouraging growth in even small areas, such as staying with a project five minutes longer each day, will help them develop the perspective of having some control over a situation that seems out of control. When a parent loses a job and life gets tough, it’s extremely difficult to maintain a positive attitude and believe things will change.

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However, looking for the smallest silver lining, such as the extra time available to help a child learn to read or do math, can be rewarding. When you get excited about small accomplishments, your child will too. And, when one or two happen, more are sure to follow. Training ourselves to have a growth mindset takes time and often is not easy. When we’ve lived with the concept that things are the way they are because they just are, it’s hard to make a transition to thinking differently. If there was any time it was important to take on the perspective that things can change and are going to get better, it’s now — if not for our own peace of mind, for the growth of our kids. It’s hard to recognize the good in our current situation. One concept that may be overlooked is that the kids living through all the school changes are learning to be adaptable and flexible. Both of these are qualities needed as a person matures. The more someone can adapt and move with the flow, the more responsible they become, and the more responsible they are,

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the better they are at coping with new situations. We all know there will be many other situations where are kids will be called upon to change and grow. The more we can plant the beginning of a growth mindset today, the better prepared they will be for the next time. Let’s all hope they will never have to cope with another pandemic. Jane Kirkpatrick, a wellknown local author, uses the metaphor of a coping saw to describe something that has strength while still being flexible. I use it often in describing an adaptable, resilient parent. A growth mindset in our kids helps them to approach difficulties with that same attitude, having hope and believing in their abilities to handle whatever comes their way. When I get down, feeling I’m going to be isolated and alone forever, my kids remind me that it’s not forever, and it will change and get better. That gives me hope and a belief in my ability to handle whatever is happening right now, empowering me to be ready when the pandemic is gone and change comes.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

LETTERS

Continued from page 2

me of being a socialist is wrong and offensive. “Marxism” and “socialism” are labels that are used in wildly inappropriate ways to smear and discredit people with whom the right disagrees. Name-calling is precisely the kind of conduct that doesn’t advance the civil discourse and fact-based dialogue that have been absent for too long. The facts I cited in my op-ed (“Let’s start with the truth,” The Nugget, December 16, page 2) are supported by citations to reports by the Inspector General of the Department of Justice, the bi-partisan Senate Intelligence Committee, and the non-partisan Government Accountability Office, plus well-researched media accounts. They refuted the false statements in Jeff Mackey’s Letter to the Editor. Mr. Mackey was probably acting very sincerely when he repeated these false statements, which have been widely propagated by right-wing media outlets. But they are not true, and they cause people to form viewpoints that are not consistent with reality. When false statements go unrebutted by the truth, we, as a society, are all harmed. I’m trying to do my small part to repair that harm. I hope I can partner with others in Sisters Country to do the same. Mary Chaffin

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To the Editor: I loved Lisa May’s article on the true joy of Christmas. Some will suffer greatly in this life while others suffer less, but we will all encounter suffering in this world. Empathetically, I would not consider myself to have an easy solution. Suffering can be extremely intense and I could not say to this point in my life I have experienced torment. I have deep compassion for Lisa and her bottomless sorrow as well as others who live in agony. I can say along with Lisa that there is no hope for our sufferings, none whatsoever, unless there is a door to eternity such as through Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection. When we consider that God did not leave us alone to suffer unbearably, as some might think, but rather He entered into our suffering by choice, through the cross. What a host of possibilities exist for our sufferings when we consider the resurrection to eternal life. We may determine to contemplate our perseverance and endurance in this realm to be exchanged for something greater in the next. Janie Martin

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To the Editor: With the “year of COVID” barely behind

us, we look forward to the New Year and the customary resolutions: reduce personal weight, reduce time on social media, and reduce consumption of animal foods. Yes, that. Nearly 40 percent of Americans are already eating more plant-based foods. Hundreds of school, college, and corporate cafeterias have embraced Meatless Monday. Even fast-food chains like McDonald’s, Burger King, Carl’s Jr, Chipotle, Denny’s, Dunkin’, Starbucks, Subway, Taco Bell, and White Castle offer plant-based options. Dozens of start-ups, led by Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, are producing plantbased meats, milks, cheeses, and ice creams. Every ice cream manufacturer boasts nutbased flavors. Even meat industry giants Tyson Foods, Perdue, Hormel, and Canada’s Maple Leaf Foods have rolled out their own plant-based meat products. The reasons for the skyrocketing popularity of plant-based meat and milk products are compelling: they are more convenient, healthier, more eco-friendly, and more compassionate than their animal-based counterparts. The resolution to explore plant-based foods requires no sweat or deprivation — just some fun visits to our favorite supermarket and food websites. Siegfried Neufhaus

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To The Editor: In response to Ms. Baldessari’s Letter to the Editor, I am really against folks breaking the law. Specifically, crimes against others. Allowing vagrants/homeless to occupy the same spot on public land more than 14 days is a crime — against all of us. But if your problem is really within one or two miles radius of Sisters, I believe the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office (Sisters Outpost) would be your best avenue of solution. The local Sisters Ranger District Forest Service Office/kiosk has not even found a way to reopen since March, thus disbanding services such as map distribution, various permits including tree cutting, and other services. I do believe lawlessness spirals out into the community if it is not enforced. Have you had your place of business robbed this year? I have. Did you and 20 of your neighbors, get your locked mailboxes jacked open on Christmas Eve this year? I did. Here’s the reason I write: It’s cause “you don’t S.C.U.B.A. dive alone.” “You shouldn’t ski powder on your own.” And if you are scared or paranoid to encounter a male on a trail, better to hike with a pike, in your chainmail. Derek Damerell

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Seed to Table seeking board members By Audrey Tehan Columnist

Seed to Table (S2T) is searching for three new board members going into the new year. Seed to Table envisions a healthy and resilient community where all people, regardless of race, gender, geography, or socioeconomic status, have access to fresh produce that is nourishing, locally grown, and in keeping with their culture and preferences. From our two-acre farm plot we strive to model a sustainable food system while providing equitable access to fresh foods and opportunities for all to engage positively with nutritious foods. Currently, S2T is looking for three dedicated individuals who have time to serve. Our organization’s foundation is built on having a dedicated and enthusiastic Board of Directors to support the executive director. Initiated by the Sisters Science Club in 2013, S2T has doubled its capacity to grow food and educate the community each year. During the 2019 growing season, our small staff and board was able to educate 1,500 students on the S2T’s two-acre farm plot. In 2020 we were able to creatively adapt our programming to continue providing the same

essential services in the face of ever-changing guidelines. Education programs strive to connect students with positive food relations so they may live more healthy and vibrant lives. Nearly 60 Next Generation Science Standards are connected throughout the student field trips on the farm, which assists teachers in providing some of the best education in the state. In addition, we took over management of the Sisters Farmers Market to provide even more opportunities for our community to access fresh local foods. S2T also grew and distributed 40,000 pounds of produce to the community, feeding nearly 150 families each week through the food bank, community produce shares, school districts, and wholesale distribution. Serving on the board will allow you to have a voice towards serving our community in an impactful way. There’s much work to be done; food and nutrition insecurity in our area, especially for low-income individuals, is only growing. We would love for you to be part of our mission to do what we can to address these issues. For information, contact Board Vice Chair Barb Schulz at bschulz@ bendbroadband.com.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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8

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

RESTAURANT: Cork Cellars

is part of resistance to ban on indoor dining Continued from page 1

during the pandemic. The bistro will require patrons wear masks when not at the table eating, will separate diners, and will not offer wine tasting or music events. The couple argues that restaurants with safety protocols including heavy sanitation efforts in place have not been shown to be a significant factor in COVID-19 spread. “Restaurants have never been this clean ever,” Jeannie said. “I’ve worked in many, and they’ve never been this clean, ever.” While comprehensive data is not available from OHA, Tom Buck cites numbers from New York and California that indicate that restaurants account for 1.4 percent of cases. In all areas, the vast majority of cases in the current surge can be traced to small social gatherings in homes. “You’re pushing people out of restaurants where it’s monitored and controlled into a free-for-all in people’s living rooms,” Buck said. The couple also notes that there are inconsistencies in the way restrictions are imposed on different business sectors. “Airlines are still functioning and you can sit two inches away from somebody and eat on an airplane without a mask,” Jeannie said. She noted that one of the observations that pushed her and Tom into their decision to open was “going to Costco and seeing a lunchroom full of people who were not social distancing or wearing masks while they were eating.” Cork Cellars is part of a groundswell of resistance to mandates to fully close indoor dining. Emily Cureton of Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) reported on December 30 on a restaurant in Redmond that has defied closure mandates, noting that, “…defiance is growing, with businesses, activists, and a budding coalition of mayors allying to promote a coordinated rebellion that begins New Year’s Day.” “The only way for my family and my staff to survive is to not comply with the executive order,’’ Westside Local restaurant owner Amber Amos in Redmond

told OPB. The story further noted that, “Meetings … have been happening around Central Oregon in recent weeks, drawing business owners and public officials in Redmond, Madras, Bend and Prineville, while being promoted and guarded by local activists, some of whom are armed.” The owners of Cork Cellars face potential sanctions from state authorities, including fines administered through Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the withdrawal of their liquor license by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC). In response to the movement to open restaurants in spite of restrictions, Governor Kate Brown issued a statement and a warning last week: “I have directed Oregon OSHA and the OLCC to deploy all available resources to ensure businesses are in compliance. I expect enforcement agencies to continue to use an education first approach, but Oregonians need to understand that these rules are enforceable under law. For businesses that refuse to comply, OSHA and OLCC staff are empowered to take administrative action including issuing citations, fines, and Red Warning Notices if necessary.” Brown asserted that, “Help is on the way for struggling businesses. I proposed new resources for rent relief for businesses in the third special session, and I expect a new round of federal aid to be delivered soon. We can’t waiver in our response to the virus now, when the end is finally in sight and resources are on the way.” (See sidebar at right for full statement.) The owners of Cork Cellars say they feel that they’re out of options. Jeannie noted that they have paid staff and bills out of their pockets throughout the closure, which can’t be sustained indefinitely. Operating on a takeout-only basis doesn’t cover costs. “We can’t keep living like this,” Jeannie said. While they appreciate the community support they received through a GoFundMe campaign in July, they don’t feel that they can continue to ask the community to subsidize them. “We just want the opportunity to serve the community and make a living,” Tom said.

Brown warns businesses defying restrictions In response to widespread movements for businesses to reopen in the face of state-mandated restrictions, Governor Kate Brown issued a statement on December 31: “Oregon’s health and safety measures are in place to protect Oregonians, save lives, and keep our hospitals and healthcare workers from becoming overwhelmed by COVID-19. Oregonians have made incredible sacrifices throughout this pandemic, and now, many communities across Oregon are reducing the spread of COVID-19 and moving into risk levels that allow restaurants and businesses to reopen to at least some indoor service. “If businesses reopen too early and instead create new spikes in COVID-19 cases, the actions of a few business owners could set entire communities back and keep them in the Extreme Risk category for even longer. “It’s unfortunate and irresponsible that some local politicians are choosing to willfully mislead business owners into jeopardizing public health and risking fines, instead of working with their communities to help stop the spread of COVID-19 so that we can reopen businesses, schools, and more quickly return to normal life. “Let me be clear: Local elected officials do not have the authority under Oregon law to disregard my emergency orders or to authorize anyone else to do so. Any businesses that

reopen in violation of state risk-level requirements for their county will be subject to fines and enforcement. Undoubtedly, those same local elected officials who are encouraging businesses to fully reopen and flagrantly disregard public health are unlikely to have the backs of businesses when faced with fines and penalties, nor are they likely to be willing to be held responsible for the publichealth impacts their actions create. “I am urging all Oregon businesses to put the health of their communities first by following the guidance we have in place for their counties. A large majority of businesses continue to do the right thing to protect their communities. However, when Oregonians don’t take COVID-19 seriously, and don’t take steps to reduce the spread of the disease, they put all of us at risk. “I have directed Oregon OSHA and the OLCC to deploy all available resources to ensure

businesses are in compliance. I expect enforcement agencies to continue to use an education-first approach, but Oregonians need to understand that these rules are enforceable under law. For businesses that refuse to comply, OSHA and OLCC staff are empowered to take administrative action including issuing citations, fines, and Red Warning Notices if necessary. “Oregon has led in our response to COVID-19, and help is on the way for struggling businesses. I proposed new resources for rent relief for businesses in the third special session, and I expect a new round of federal aid to be delivered soon. We can’t waiver in our response to the virus now, when the end is finally in sight and resources are on the way. We are better than this. As we head into the new year, I am asking all Oregonians, yet again, to commit to making smart choices and to take seriously their individual responsibilities during a public-health emergency.”

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

9

Politicians, activists push back on restrictions By Jim Cornelius Editor in Chief

Since the reimposition of business closures and restrictions due to a surge in COVID-19 cases in November, a groundswell of resistance has developed among business owners, local politicians and activists. A dozen mayors and mayors-elect across Oregon created a “Main Street Mayors” coalition that urged small businesses to reopen January 1, despite the state COVID19 restrictions. In a press release, the coalition stated that, “Main Street Mayors is supporting members of the coalition operating in counties labeled ‘Extreme Risk’ who will voluntarily comply with state requirements for ‘High Risk’ counties starting on January 1, 2021. This will allow restaurants and gyms to open at significantly reduced capacity.” Mayor Stan Pulliam of Sandy has been the point man for the coalition. “People are packing into malls and grocery chains supporting corporate America, and yet we can’t sit down at a locally owned restaurant to support a local business owner and their employees while enjoying a meal with our families in a safe and responsible way,” he stated. “The double standards must end.” Cork Cellars Wine Bar & Bistro in Sisters opened on January 1, employing the COVID-19 safety protocols that they had in place before the renewed restrictions were imposed (see related story, page 1). The effort has been promoted and supported by a community organizing activist network titled People’s Rights, Oregon 5. The group has been meeting at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. Matt Cyrus, whose family owns Aspen Lakes, confirmed that the golf course rents its facilities to the group and told The Nugget on December 30 that they had met at Aspen Lakes the previous evening. The organization’s pointman, BJ Soper of Redmond, did not respond to The Nugget’s phone calls as of press time. Soper has been involved in constitutional rights activism for several years, including taking a group to Burns during the Malheur Wildlife Refuge takeover in 2016. He said at the time that he did not support the takeover led by antigovernment activist Ammon Bundy, but he sympathized with the group’s frustrations and was outraged by the death of occupier LaVoy Finicum in a shooting by

police along a highway in Eastern Oregon. Bundy was an originator of the People’s Rights network, but Soper recently told Oregon Public Broadcasting that the network’s leadership is not centralized and told reporter Emily Cureton in a text that “Ammon has nothing to do with Oregon.” People’s Rights describes itself on its website (www. peoplesrightsoregon5.com) as “People and citizens of the USA that recognize that we have rights, and are willing to unite to defend those rights and each other. We are an inclusive and welcoming group to all people regardless of race, age, nationality, religion, or political beliefs.” The group, which has promoted anti-lockdown “We Will Not Comply” rallies in Central Oregon, is opposed to mask mandates and supports and promotes businesses that have defied state-mandated restrictions. On its website is an “Oregon Business Owners Guide”

(available on this page: www.peoplesrightsoregon5. com/local-news) that argues that: “There is no statutory law that requires you, your employees, or your customers to wear a mask, get their temperature taken or stay six feet apart. There is no law that requires you to serve your customers outside or reduce the number of people in your business establishment. In fact, if you require your customers to wear a mask or restrict their movement or entry if they are not wearing a mask, you are at risk for violating several federal and state laws.” The growing pushback against restrictions, particularly on the part of local politicians, drew a strong rebuke from Governor Kate Brown, who issued a statement on December 31: “It’s unfortunate and irresponsible that some local politicians are choosing to willfully mislead business

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owners into jeopardizing public health and risking fines, instead of working with their communities to help stop the spread of COVID-19 so that we can reopen businesses, schools, and more quickly return to normal life. “Let me be clear: Local elected officials do not have the authority under Oregon law to disregard my emergency orders or to authorize anyone else to do so. Any businesses that reopen in violation of state risk level requirements for their county will be subject to fines and enforcement.

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“Undoubtedly, those same local elected officials who are encouraging businesses to fully reopen and flagrantly disregard public health are unlikely to have the backs of businesses when faced with fines and penalties, nor are they likely to be willing to be held responsible for the public health impacts their actions create.” (See full text of Governor B ro w n ’s s t a t e m e n t o n page 8.) Businesses that violate emergency orders are subject to fines, revocation of licenses and potential closure.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Commentary...

Loving Jim A. By Karen Kassy Guest Columnist

Two decades ago, I moved to Central Oregon with the calling in my heart to have a farm. Coming from farmers on my mom’s side, I didn’t want to be a crop-and-livestock-raising farmer — that is some of the hardest work I know. I wanted something manageable, where I could rescue one of the other loves of my life, Newfoundland dogs, and help them find a forever home. I wanted to live in harmony with the land and its animals, leaving a place better than I found it. Jim Anderson helped me with that. A few years in, with Bend experiencing a housing construction boom all around my small acreage, nicknamed “Farmony,” the harmony was disrupted. All of a sudden, there was a huge amount of holes from a growing population of sage rats. I wanted to rebalance the population naturally, and read an interesting article in The Bend Bulletin stating that if I built a barn owl nesting box, things might be restored. The author gave an address to write for plans. I emailed right away, “Dear Jim Witty” (the name

of the other “Jim” writer at the newspaper). Within a few hours, I was rewarded with a reply. Never chastising me for accidentally addressing him as the wrong Jim, instead “Jim A.” offered to come out to my place to make sure barn owls were the right solution for me. He had Googled me and found out I was an author. He told me he had written a book “Tales from a Northwest Naturalist.” I love to read and learn, and offered to buy a book. “Let’s trade!” he wrote, grandly. I mentioned I’d be up at Sisters at Angeline’s for Friday night music – might he be there? We could meet and trade books. Although he had lived in Sisters for years, he had never gone to Friday music. By this time, we were talking on the phone, “What do you look like?” I queried. Drawing out the words slowly, “I’m an ooolllddd man.” He made me laugh. Somehow we missed each other during that evening, although he was there and I was there, looking for each other. He chalked it up to fate. Jim came over to the house the next day. In less than 15 minutes he surveyed the land. “Barn owls would starve

out here; your place is too small. What you need is a red-tailed hawk’s nest. I’ll make you one.” We then spent the great majority of three hours talking about a wide range of topics. I didn’t realize it was the beginning of a platonic love affair. At 73 years of age, Jim knew so much about history, having moved here in the 1950s, and more about animals and plants than I have read in dozens of books. He talked about his spirituality. With tears in his eyes, he told of a healing experience from a health issue when some spiritual friends laid hands on him. He was smart, funny and mystical. Fast forward nearly two decades, I realize I never got three hours uninterrupted with Jim again (he is busy) — but we crossed paths again many times. At 74, he installed the promised red-tail hawk’s nest when he climbed my 150-year-old “grandfather juniper” in the back pasture. I thought to myself, “I hope he doesn’t fall down — I really like his wife Sue and don’t want to tell her she lost him on my watch.” Returning safely to earth, “Now Karen, you climb up and put some hay or straw to attract those

PHOTO COURTESY KAREN KASSY

Jim Anderson and Karen Kassy. hawks…” “Wait a minute, Jim, I may be decades younger than you, but I cannot climb that tree. Why didn’t you tell me? I would have given you some hay before you went up!” We laughed so hard. His experience was that hawks probably wouldn’t come the first year. I was lucky: his nest invited them. They came right away and I had sage rat balance in my ecosystem from then on. Over the years, we’d get snatches of moments together. I moved to Sisters and I would see him around town. He told me stories. Once he saw some guy driving with a bunch of feathers hanging from his rear view mirror. Jim said his intuition let him know that something wasn’t quite right. He followed the guy and saw his

house was decorated with lots of illegal feathers. Jim called the authorities. With a search warrant, inside the home, officials found dozens of dead, poached, protected birds — including the bald eagle. Jim is brave — he stands up for people and animals. Jim is a community resource —for everyone. He mentioned he gets about three hours of emails a day (in addition to phone calls) from people who need help. Jim inspires me with his consistently positive attitude and love of learning and wonder. One day I called him and said, “Jim my love seat is buzzing.” Before I could explain I thought I had bees in the porch furniture, he teasingly laughed and let me See JIM A. on page 16

A N N O U N C E M E N T S Weekly Food Pantry

Wellhouse Church has a weekly food pantry on Thursdays. Food is currently being distributed drive-through style from 12:30 until all food is distributed at the Wellhouse Market building, 222 N. Trinity Way. People in need of food may drive through the parking lot and pick up a bag of food for their household. Other Sisters-area churches are joining with Wellhouse Church to contribute both financially and with volunteers to help sustain the program. Info: 541-549-4184.

Free Weekly Grab-N-Go Lunches For Seniors

The Council on Aging of Central Oregon is serving seniors (60+) free Grab-N-Go lunches on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays each week. The lunches are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis drivethrough style from 12 to 12:30 p.m. at the Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. Mckenzie Hwy. Seniors may drive through the parking lot and pick up a meal each day of service. Come on by, no need to make a reservation. Info: 541-678-5483.

Antiques & Jewelry Donations Needed

Sisters Kiwanis takes donations of antiques, collectibles and jewelry throughout the year for its annual Antiques, Collections & Jewelry Sale, held on Saturday every Memorial Day weekend. Your donation is tax-deductible! For more information and to arrange for pickup of large or small items, please call Pam at 541-719-1049.

SMS Selling Sisters Strong Shirts/Decals

The student leadership group at Sisters Middle School is hoping to make a difference in our community. They are selling shirts and decals featuring a newly designed Sisters Strong logo. The proceeds of the sales will go to Kiwanis Food Bank, Family Advocate Network, and the school’s leadership program. Shirts and decals can be purchased online and picked up downtown at either Paulina Springs Bookstore or Canyon Creek Pottery. Please go to www. sistersstrong.org to purchase your items. Shirts are $15 and car decals are $4. For more information email jeff.schiedler@ ssd6.org.

wedding announcement Mark and Sheila Reifschneiderr proudly announce the marriage ge of their daughter, Sabrina Reifschneider, to Luke Allen, son of Scott and Kim Allen of Arizona. The couple were married on December 13, 2020 in Sisters. The couple met et at Corban University where Sabrina and Luke finished their ir last semester this fall, Sabrina graduating with a Bachelors of Science/Biology degree and Luke in Business and Marketing. They will be residing ng in Arizona, where Sabrina willl begin an accelerated Nursing program at Creighton University ity and Luke will be working for Disciple Nations Alliance.

Please call the church before attending to verify current status of services as restrictions are adjusted.

SISTERS-AREA CHURCHES Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church (ELCA) 386 N. Fir Street • 541-549-5831 10 a.m. Sunday Worship shepherdofthehillslutheranchurch.com Sisters Community Church (Nondenominational) 1300 W. McKenzie Hwy. • 541-549-1201 10 a.m. Sunday Worship (with signing) sisterschurch.com | info@sisterschurch.com St. Edward the Martyr Roman Catholic Church 123 Trinity Way • 541-549-9391 5:30 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass 9 a.m. Sunday Mass 8 a.m. Monday-Friday Mass Calvary Church (NW Baptist Convention) 484 W. Washington St., Ste. C & D • 541-588-6288 10 a.m. Sunday Worship | ccsisters.org The Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration 68825 Brooks Camp Rd. • 541-549-7087 8:30 a.m. Ecumenical Sunday Worship (Sunday school, childcare) 10:15 a.m. Episcopal Sunday Worship (Sunday school, childcare)

Chapel in the Pines Camp Sherman • 541-549-9971 10 a.m. Sunday Worship Sisters Church of the Nazarene 67130 Harrington Loop Rd. • 541-389-8960 | sistersnaz.org 10:45 a.m. Sunday Worship | 2sistersnaz@gmail.com Wellhouse Church 442 Trinity Way • 541-549-4184 | wellhousechurch.churchcenter.com 10 a.m. Sunday Worship (Indoor & Outdoor Venues available) Vast Church (Nondenominational) 541-719-0587 • 5 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Worship at 442 Trinity Way (Wellhouse building). See vastchurch.com for details. Seventh-Day Adventist Church 386 N. Fir St. • 541-595-6770, 541-306-8303 11 a.m. Saturday Worship The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 452 Trinity Way • Branch President, 541-420-5670; 10 a.m. Sunday Sacrament Meeting Baha’i Faith Meetings Devotional Gatherings, Study Classes and Discussion Groups. Call for location and times • 541-647-9826

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The Property Guy By Mike Zoormajian

2021 Central Oregon real estate in three short conversations

Well, 2020 has been a crazy year for everybody. Definitely not what we expected. Despite the state-inflicted suffering among local businesses, the Central Oregon real-estate market continued its upward climb. Please allow me to share with you three conversations that are going to characterize 2021. The conversations are real, but the names have been changed to protect the innocent. Words are my side of the conversation only: No. 1 Material Shortages and Higher Prices Bruce! It’s me. Got a couple home builds going on and I need a couple garage doors… Yeah, it has been too long. But I’m glad to talk to you too… What? Skiing? Yeah man. Come on out. Snow is decent and you can crash with us… Oh, no worries. I mean we’ve been friends for twenty years. Now about those doors… You’re going to give me

the friends and family deal? And get me to the front of the line? I appreciate that… Wait. They’ll be ready when? March you said… From refrigerators and stoves to garage doors and lumber, there is a nationwide shortage of construction material. And what’s left is expensive. Lumber alone is up 25 percent this year. Global supply chains are a reality, and they are broken. That combined with high demand is raising both prices and lead times. Demand for housing will continue to far outstrip supply through 2021. Houses just can’t be built fast enough. No. 2 Demographic Shifts Brian! Super glad you called. What’s going on?… You want me to look at some property?… In Sandpoint, Idaho?… I love that town. Super cute and clean. And skiing at Schweitzer is off-the-hook. You looking at investment property?… You’re moving?… Can’t afford a place in Sisters? But you and Mrs. Brian are both healthcare professionals… Much of Central Oregon has already priced itself out of the market for young families. These are the same families that make a town vibrant, its economy diverse and healthy, and the schools run. Throwing a few “affordable” units into new developments isn’t going to help in any meaningful way. The median housing price in Bend is just touching $550,000. So theoretically, a young couple would need to come up with more like a $100,000 down payment.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon But the reality is that this a seller’s market with average time on market being about a week. So nice young couples are getting beat out by full-price cash offers. Which brings us to… No. 3 Out-of-Town Money Hey it’s Mike. WetDog Properties… Who? Janice? Yes. Nice to meet you too… You say Bob and Nancy referred you … Yes, I remember them. They traded in a 1,000 sq. ft. shack in San Fransisco. We got them into 5 acres in Tumalo and a couple of rental houses… You sold your house and now want to move to Bend as well? Look, ah, Janice, we’re kinda full here in Central Oregon right now. But I’m hearing nice things about The Dakotas. Why don’t I call… Well no, I really wouldn’t want to live there either… Despite COVID’s best attempt to wreck the economy, there is still a lot of money rattling around out there. And it’s coming right for us. Combine the trends of working from home and an exodus from cities, and you have demand (and prices) in Central Oregon hitting new highs. The consensus among economists is to expect housing prices to rise more like 10 percent through 2021. Much of this demand is coming from out-of-town money, for whom Central Oregon is still a bargain. There you have it. 2021 trends in three conversations. We’ll get back to our usual Dear Property Guy next time. In the meantime, have a safe and peaceful New Year.

Sisters Middle School Honor Roll Fifth Grade 4.0: Anderson, Quinn; Berry, Maxwell; Bolam, Logan; Chase, Mckenzie; Cohen, William; Davis, Kennedy; Durham, Madison; Hayes, Bennitt; Irlam, Connor; Jarvis, Leila; Jensen, Jasper; Jordan, Addison; Kennedy, Teague; King Siena; Kirkpatrick, Makayla; Luhning, Camas; Magner, Lola; Maloney, Mcginnis; McCabe, Jackson; Moen, Stella; Nieto, Alexander; Riemer, Brecken; Stelle, Ryan; Sybesma, Corbin; Talus, Henri; Vanhandel, Mason; Willard, Christopher. 3.5 And Above: Chapen, Amelia; Clark, Sofia; Harry, Isabella; Harry, Tristan; Johnson, Bjorn; Marsh, Dillon. Sixth Grade 4.0: Corcoran, Audrey; Davis, Spencer; Ellis, Bauer; Goe-Alayon, Kainoa; Hamerly, Thomas; Jones, Piedra; McDonnell, William; Quistgard, Hunter; Ryan, Josie; Velikonia, Juliette. 3.5 And Above: Backus, Juliette; Brang, Mason; Few, Shanitah; Lockwood, Sophia; Morris, Luxen; Sartelle, Gisele; Talerico, Ryder; Brown, Ava; Grummer, Pia; Hubbell, Liam; Lindsay, Brooke. Seventh Grade 4.0: Beutler, Josh; Bowen, Taylin; Burks, Jonathan; Duey, Brooke; Fendall, Gracie; Freeman, Chloe; Gerke, Sophia; Hayes, Hudson; Heuberger, Haven; Miller, Daniel; Miller, Georgia;

JAN

BRANSON, MO IN THE SPRINGTIME!

WED

6

APRIL 13-20, 2021 | $2,424 PPDO Includes air, taxes, transfers, 7 nights, 14 meals. During the Country Music Fest weekend! It’s a HUGE weekend for entertainers with 10-12 shows each day!

ALASKA CRUISE

MAY 23-JUNE 2, 2021 STARTING AT $2,899 PPDO Includes air, taxes, transfers, 3 pre-nights, free gratuities, free premium beverage package, free on-board credit!

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU! Trevor Frideres, D.M.D. Greg Everson, D.M.D. 541-549-2011

491 E. Main Ave. • Sisters www.sistersdental.com Hours: Mon., 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Tues.-Thurs., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fri., 7 a.m.-3 p.m.

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Things to participate in online while staying safely at home.

RIVER CRUISE

Sisters Dental

Moen, Charles; Nieto, Olivia; O’Neill, Ava; Owens, Bradley; Pokorny, Luke; Roberts, Colby; Russell, Addison; Singleton, Kate; Skeels-Sutton, Bailey; Stotts, Ava; Thorsett, Norah; Yoakum, Brendan. 3.5 And Above: Adelt, Payten; Bafford, Zoee; Derksen, Joseph; Quitoriano, Colby; Schwartz, Teegan; Smith, Serafina; Bronson, Hunter; Kiefer, Bayla; Riemer, Reagan; Welsh, Teagen. Eighth Grade 4.0: Backus, Emerson; Berg, John; Bolam, Chloe; Davis, Ella; Davis, Holly; Jeffrey, Lex; Keeton, Faith; Liddell, Samantha; Martin, Kiara; Merrill, Cooper; Myagkov, Stepan; Riehle, Ava; Sahlberg, Emma; Schar, Bodie; Scholl, Kathryn; Scott, Landen; Thies, Zach; Tisdel, Spencer; Turpen, Jack; Velikonia, Jordan; Werts, Kellen; Wyland, Shae. 3.5 And Above: Hicks, Layla; Sager, Garrett; Silva, Dieto; Skidmore, Benjamin; Atkinson, Garrett; Planty, Solei; Sartelle, Etienne.

Calendar

MARCH 21-29, 2021 STARTING AT $3,298 PPDO Includes air, taxes, transfer, one pre-night, shore excursions!

Deschutes Public Library: Oregon Battle of the Books 3 p.m. “The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street” will be read live and there will be a DIY craft and discussion of the book for grades 2-5. Three-part program continuing on Wednesdays, January 13 and 20. Go to www.deschuteslibrary.org/kids/programs. Deschutes Public Library: Preserving Central Oregon’s Dark Skies 6 p.m. Learn the importance of dark skies and how to decrease light pollution in this live Zoom presentation. Go to www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/ to register. Deschutes Public Library: First-Time Homebuyers Webinar 6:30 p.m. Hear from a licensed real estate agent covering the ins-and-outs of home buying in this live Zoom event. Go to www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/.

VICTORIA, B.C.

SEPT. 18-22, 2021 | $1,649 PPDO* Includes air, taxes, transfers, 4 nights at Embassy Inn, 4 breakfasts, Victoria City/ Butchart Gardens/Craidarroch Castle tours, High Tea at The Empress.

GRAND CANYON

OCT. 2-6, 2021 STARTING AT $1,999 PPDO* Includes air, taxes, transfers, 2 nights Amtrak, 2 nights land, Hollywood-area tours, 2 breakfasts, 2 dinners.

PEARL HARBOR

DEC 3-9, 2021 l $3,249 PPDO Commemorating the 80th anniversary, includes air, taxes, transfers, 7 days/6 nts., admission to Pearl Harbor, USS Missouri, USS Arizona, & much more! $20 meal/ beverage credit per person per day.

Connie Boyle 541-508-1500 Box 615 Sisters, OR 97759

11

JAN

9

SAT

JAN

12 TUE JAN

14

THUR

Deschutes Public Library: Feng Shui Placement and Balance 4 p.m. Join Vibrant Spaces designers to create your perfect place with feng shui principles in this live Zoom presentation. Registration is required at www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/. Deschutes Public Library: Geology of Central Oregon – The Crooked River Caldera 6 p.m. Explore the rich geologic history of our landscape with retired Forest Geologist Carrie Gordon. Registration is required at www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/. Deschutes Public Library: Botany Meets Biology – The Plight of the Sage Grouse 6 p.m. Dr. Stu Garrett discusses the decreasing grouse population. Registration is required at www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/.


Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

FUN & GAMES

MEGA MAZE Help the snowman get through the maze to find his puppy.

SPOT 10 DIFFERENCES & COLOR

CAOT

FACSR 6

IRGETA 15

3

4

5

6

19

2

10

20

11

3

24

SOELVG

8

9

10

D

16

7

OWNPTANSS 8

7

14 23

5

18

12

4

SOOBT

11

12

J

13

Y

14

13

15

16

17

1

2

18

19

20

22

U

21

D

22

23

7

24

Hi, I‛m Isla! Today I‛ll be teaching you how gravity works.

GRAVITY Don‛t let it get you down!

Find the words forwards or backwards, horizontally or diagonally. From remaining letters, discover a hidden message.

STAY ACTIVE HIDDEN MESSAGE WORDFIND BIKING DANCING FOOTBALL FRISBEE GOLF HIKING ICE SKATING JAZZERCISE JUMPING JACKS JUMPROPE KICKBOXING LIFT WEIGHTS SKIING SLEDDING SNOWSHOEING TRAINING VIRTUAL COACH WALL BALL YOGA ZOOM ZUMBA

S K G E B H E E P Z

I H S F

M K O N I

C N T L

G A C K W S

I

I

P V O I

I O K O L A E L H O

A R N M I O I

W N N P J Z

I

S F G G

C N G K O I

E

G A M O U G L A N G A O E E G U L M W A N I

R N T T W B

J N B L U S D I

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A A

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R G R

I

B T S

T B D H A P E N A F

I

I

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E A L O N M G L

I

O I O L K N L G E C U L L F V M S Y U S Y L W I E S

I

K

C K B O X

I

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J R G

SUDOKU Easy Peasy! Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down, and each small nine-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.

!

WHOA

I guess I shouldn‛t have been on the roof.

I have a pumpkin and a leaf. I‛m going to see which falls faster.

FAST FACT

Gravity affects objects’ acceleration regardless of mass, but... Galileo (Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer) discovered that objects that are more dense, or have more mass, fall at a faster rate than less dense objects, due to air resistance. Air resistance would cause the leaf to fall more slowly than the pumpkin.

Sudoku puzzle solved:

2

17

9

TTSENMI

Copy the letters in the numbered cells to other cells with the same number.

1

1

TAH

Unscramble each of the clue words.

D

21

Word Scramble answer: DRESS WARM AND ENJOY THE GREAT OUTDOORS

WINTER WEAR WORD SCRAMBLE

Wordfind hidden message: KEEP MOVING ALL WINTER LONG

12

C R E Z Z A J N N S G I N G L G G L

Questions, comments, submissions... kidsinprint@nuggetnews.com

13


Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

FUN & GAMES

MEGA MAZE Help the snowman get through the maze to find his puppy.

SPOT 10 DIFFERENCES & COLOR

CAOT

FACSR 6

IRGETA 15

3

4

5

6

19

2

10

20

11

3

24

SOELVG

8

9

10

D

16

7

OWNPTANSS 8

7

14 23

5

18

12

4

SOOBT

11

12

J

13

Y

14

13

15

16

17

1

2

18

19

20

22

U

21

D

22

23

7

24

Hi, I‛m Isla! Today I‛ll be teaching you how gravity works.

GRAVITY Don‛t let it get you down!

Find the words forwards or backwards, horizontally or diagonally. From remaining letters, discover a hidden message.

STAY ACTIVE HIDDEN MESSAGE WORDFIND BIKING DANCING FOOTBALL FRISBEE GOLF HIKING ICE SKATING JAZZERCISE JUMPING JACKS JUMPROPE KICKBOXING LIFT WEIGHTS SKIING SLEDDING SNOWSHOEING TRAINING VIRTUAL COACH WALL BALL YOGA ZOOM ZUMBA

S K G E B H E E P Z

I H S F

M K O N I

C N T L

G A C K W S

I

I

P V O I

I O K O L A E L H O

A R N M I O I

W N N P J Z

I

S F G G

C N G K O I

E

G A M O U G L A N G A O E E G U L M W A N I

R N T T W B

J N B L U S D I

T T

A A

I

R G R

I

B T S

T B D H A P E N A F

I

I

R

E A L O N M G L

I

O I O L K N L G E C U L L F V M S Y U S Y L W I E S

I

K

C K B O X

I

I

J R G

SUDOKU Easy Peasy! Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down, and each small nine-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.

!

WHOA

I guess I shouldn‛t have been on the roof.

I have a pumpkin and a leaf. I‛m going to see which falls faster.

FAST FACT

Gravity affects objects’ acceleration regardless of mass, but... Galileo (Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer) discovered that objects that are more dense, or have more mass, fall at a faster rate than less dense objects, due to air resistance. Air resistance would cause the leaf to fall more slowly than the pumpkin.

Sudoku puzzle solved:

2

17

9

TTSENMI

Copy the letters in the numbered cells to other cells with the same number.

1

1

TAH

Unscramble each of the clue words.

D

21

Word Scramble answer: DRESS WARM AND ENJOY THE GREAT OUTDOORS

WINTER WEAR WORD SCRAMBLE

Wordfind hidden message: KEEP MOVING ALL WINTER LONG

12

C R E Z Z A J N N S G I N G L G G L

Questions, comments, submissions... kidsinprint@nuggetnews.com

13


14

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

SAFETY: Winter safety includes not parking on side of highway

GROWTH: Sisters will continue to see growth in 2021

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 1

other vehicles. Ambulances and other emergency vehicles need unhindered access to operate safely and save lives. Highway snowplows need extra-wide road space as they have “wing” plows that stick out more than eight feet from the right front edge of the truck to remove snow. Vehicles blocking traffic or parked illegally are subject to ticketing and towing. This winter ski areas are operating with reduced capacity, modified hours, or special COVID-19 protocols. Some ski area parking lots are filling up before 8 a.m. Check the ski area’s website in advance to know about any restrictions and take advantage of advance reservations, if available. Do not endanger others or yourself by parking or idling on highways waiting for parking spaces to open. For more information about winter recreation visit: • Deschutes National F o r e s t , w w w. f s . u s d a . gov/detail/deschutes/ home/?cid=FSEPRD863232 • ODOT Winter Driving Guide: www.oregon.gov/ odot/documents/winterdriving-guide.pdf

The applicant requests Site Plan (Type II) approval for a 6,912 sq. ft. warehouse building including storage and a 960 sq. ft. office space on the second floor. • Approved, but construction not yet started: 141, 151, and 171 E. Main Ave. (behind Sisters Saloon and Ranch Grill and Rancho Viejo). Site Plan Review of an eating/drinking establishment including development of a new 1,760 sq. ft. structure on tax lot 4600. The structure includes a bar with 880 sq. ft. of covered seating area, commissary kitchen, and baking facility. Uncovered seating, a firepit, stage, and four mobile food units are proposed to be located on tax lots 4700 and 4800. •   S u b d i v i s i o n Application: Jeriko Development Inc., north of Barclay (former Forest Service-owned property), 15.59 acres (assigned map/tax lot number 151005D000100), for approval of a master plan and subdivision tentative plan for a 14-lot light industrial subdivision. It will likely go to Planning Commission later this

winter. • Rezoning approved: Forest Service middle parcel owned by PX2 Development, but no specific development application has yet been submitted. The applicant received approval of a Comprehensive Plan Map Amendment (Type III/ IV) to redesignate the property from Public Facilities, Urban Area Reserve, and Landscape Management to Commercial, Residential M u l t i - F a m i l y, L i g h t Industrial, and Landscape Management and a zone change from Public Facilities, Urban Area Reserve, and Open Space, to Multi-Family Residential, North Sisters Business Park, Open Space, and Downtown Commercial, and text amendments to the Comprehensive Plan in support of the map amendment and zone change. • Site Plan recently submitted by Hayden Homes for review: 65 multi-family units on tax lot 5500, map 151005CB, also being a portion of Tract I, McKenzie Meadows Village Phase I. •  R e c e n t F i n a l P l a t approval for Hayden Homes: Phase 3 of McKenzie Meadows Subdivision. • Final Plat Approval granted summer 2020: Clear Pine Phase 5 allowing previously approved lots to be constructed upon.

Commentary...

‘Go ’Hawks!’ and predicting the NFL By Dave Tremblay Columnist

Seahawks players had been placed on the COVID19/Injured Reserve list since the NFL’s reporting began on July 26. Only Washington performed better with one reported incident.) Coach Pete Carroll, the NFL’s oldest head coach at 69 years old, lives up to his “coached up” advice. Pete knows and implements winning processes and now leads his Seahawks to their ninth playoff opportunity in 11 seasons. Carroll intuitively knows his team’s loss and wins thresholds. That is, if we score X amount of points, what is the probability of losing or winning? In other words, what

As you might know, on September 20, Week 2 of this National Football League (NFL) season, the NFL fined Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll $100,000 for violating the league’s new COVID-19 mask policy. His response is indicative of his intellect, enthusiasm, and professionalism. According to media, Carroll said he wasn’t upset at the fine. Rather, Pete was upset with himself — that he didn’t do better. “‘I know it’s important to wear masks. Sometimes you’ve just got to be reminded. Sometimes you’ve got to get coached up.’” (As of December 27, only two See PREDICTING NFL on pg. 15

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Fitness programs and gear • Beauty treatments Spa and massage services • Chiropractic, acupuncture and physical therapy Healthy food and supplements • Home cleaning services Senior living communities and programs • Veterinary and pet training services Financial and retirement management guidance

FOCUS ON HEALTH is a 2-week promotion in The Nugget Newspaper January 20 & 27, 2021 Each participating business receives a full-color ad both weeks and a 150-word mini-story with photo in one issue. Space and ad content deadline is Friday, January 8, 2021. Ad size: 2.85" wide by 3.52" high.

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PREDICTING NFL

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

15

Continued from page 14

Holistic Mental Health Solutions Medication Management Counseling • Functional Medicine

Audry Van Houweling PMHNP-BC

Quick and Affordable Help

541-595-8337 • www.shesoarspsych.com 204 W. Adams Ave., Ste. 202, Sisters

is an NFL team’s ability to win any football game? For instance, if they score X amount of points, will they win? Or lose? Calculating point thresholds are virtually guaranteed to predict whether they will win or lose. To interpret the table, the Buffalo Bills will lose 100 percent of the time if they score 12 or fewer points. Also, they will win 100 percent of the time if they score 32 points or more. Last year, I presented NFL score/outcome data, going back to the 2017 season. Seven teams’ results were presented in the December 2019 article. That analysis’s accuracy was an overall whopping 99.4 percent. Data was from 45 games for each team, starting with Week 1 of their 2017 seasons. I wrote this performance/process was statistically sustainable and predictable (Column A). The amount of points is the only factor in this extremely strong model. No consideration is made for home-field advantage, opponents’ season records, day/night game, injured reserve lists, etc. These latter factors are statistically insignificant over the longterm. With COVID-19-related practices enacted and associated turbulences, most teams’ predictability went down (Column B) when including games from the 2020 season. The last 19 games for these teams dropped the accuracy by 2.1 percent — still highly consistent and predictable. Just because a team has a higher ratio doesn’t necessarily mean it wins more games. Instead, it is an indicator of losing games — scoring fewer points established via the low (loss) threshold and winning games by exceeding the high (win) threshold. Column C averages the two different data points for each team. Column D shows regulation games won over the four seasons. Playoff-bound Buffalo (38) and Seattle (42) have the stronger performance factors in Column E over other teams; as well as better rankings by ESPN (Column F). Finally in Column G, statistical analysis company, FiveThirtyEight, assesses Super Bowlwinner probability for Buffalo (14 percent) and Seattle (4 percent). Buffalo is extremely consistent, with

Seattle very strong. Each is clearly more competitive than the other listed teams. So, what about the Seahawks’ score/outcome performance for the past two seasons? And their consistency and predictability? As written in prior articles, we will derive averages and standard deviation. Some key statistics from the Seahawks’ past two seasons:

Season

20192020

20202021

Record Average Points Per Game Standard Deviation

11-5

12-4

25.3

28.7

8.08

8.58

This season, while they increased wins and average points per game, the Seahawks were less consistent. In the left chart below, 2019-2020 season, the loss games per Table A’s defined thresholds (red dots). In the 2020-2021 season (right chart), the Seahawks had losses when they scored 34 points (Weeks 7 and 9). The three Seahawks’ seasons had three, distinct points scored/outcome phases: 1. “Let Russ Cook!” in the first five games; 2. “What Gives with the Offense/Defense?”; and 3. “Putting It Together Again!” in the last four games. The left chart below (2019-2020) shows greater consistency; although the season’s points per game somewhat lower. The ’Hawks seem to be putting it together and are playoff competitive. With all this in mind, Pete’s emphasis of learning, excellence, consistency, and “following the process” will hopefully be on display in this weekend’s playoff game versus the Los Angeles Rams. Cannot wait until this Saturday! Per Pete’s connected-at-the-hip pupil, quarterback Russell Wilson, who ends each press conference: “Go ’Hawks”. Send feedback/comments to DataDaveOR@gmail.com.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

JIM A.: 92-year-old naturalist has gifted knowledge to so many Continued from page 10

know that was an accidental double entendre. He came over clothed in bee regalia, head to toe. We slit open the back of the love seat, marveling at the wild bees that had made their home there. As he took the queen out to relocate, he squealed with 8-year-old excitement in the body of an 81-year-old, “She’s laying an egg! I have never, ever, seen that before!” I felt like I was in the middle of a National Geographic documentary as we moved the Bombus lapponicus (Jim knows Latin) to their new home. He later wrote about this adventure, complete with many idioms (there he goes, improving my vocabulary) in The Source newspaper August 26, 2009 “Buzzing in the Love Seat.” Sue Anderson understands that many people, including

me, love Jim A. When he turned 80, I got to go to his surprise party at The Tower Theatre and witness his excitement at being gifted a trip to The Galapagos. Jim gives so much more than he receives; this was a touching and meaningful gift. Then, he turned 90 and I got to hang at an intimate party for family, who he loves without holding back. At 92, he moved to Eugene to be nearer to family. Regrets? I never got to go to Fort Rock to band eagles with him, which I believe he was doing until his ninth decade. I was sad that I didn’t get to see him before he and Sue moved. Weeks went by, and I missed running into him. I got brave and called him up. Turns out, he loves reconnecting with his Central Oregon friends. About every week, I either email him the “worldwide wildlife photos of the week” from The Guardian newspaper or listen to him tell me how he likes his new nutritional program (Sue finally got him to eat more healthfully; I tried and failed

at that one.) Or, how he loves watching the birds at his bird feeder. He sounds like the Jim A. I know and love. He inspires me to try to live my life to be at least half as wonderful, loving, learning, and teaching, as he is at 92. He also is teaching me something new. Tears come to my eyes when I read his latest Nugget column of December 17, 2020 writing about the pine coffin friends have lovingly pre-built for him, going out to Fort Rock cemetery “when they put me under the soil with my old buckaroo pals…” as he ties it all together poetically with the story of the carrion beetle and reminds “death is the process of renewal.” My love for Jim A. is renewed every time I think about him and all the gifts he has give to many people, including me.

Now Open for INDOOR dining!

Tuesday-Saturday, 3 to 8 p.m.

Sisters salutes...

Previous strict COVID guidelines will be enforced.

Winter wonderland...

PHOTO BY SUE STRATER

Sisters backcountry is looking magical — while we wait for real snow in town.

MEAT S, GAME ALASKAN SEAFOOD CHEESES SANDWICHES BEER, WINE, CIDER

391 W. Cascade d Ave. | 541-549-2675 corkcellarswinebistro.com

110 S. SPRUCE ST. | 541-719-1186

ADVERTISING in The Nugget WORKS! The Aspen Lakes Estates Owners’ Association held their second annual “Spirit of Christmas Giving 2020” in conjunction with the Sisters-Camp Sherman Rural Fire Protection District’s sponsorship, providing Christmas gifts and assistance to families in need in Sisters Country this holiday season. Like most events this year, the format of our charitable opportunity took on a new look. ALEOA’s Social Committee donned masks and worked socially distant from one another, decorating their neighborhood Recreation Center into a festive holiday setting, complete with fireman’s helmet and boot. Homeowners who wished to contribute to the Sisters Community in a meaningful and charitable manner, were able to safely stop by individually during a month-long opportunity to donate financially, purchase gift cards, and Christmas shop for our community’s children. Committee members were

PHOTO PROVIDED

well received when they walked Aspen Lakes’ streets to personally extend a participation invitation to each neighbor. The loaned fireman’s boot was stuffed full of contributions! At least 45 Aspen Lakes homeowners gifted over $2,500 in monetary donations, as well as purchased ten large gift bags filled with the requests of the receiving families for their children. This local opportunity, developed and coordinated with the Fire District’s personnel, continues a refreshing meaning to the annual Aspen Lakes’ holiday celebration. Social Committee Co-Chairpersons Laurel Olson and Barbara DeLorenzo with their committee members, including Mary Fry, Christmas giving coordinator, gathered to showcase the “Spirit of Christmas Giving” opportunity. The ALEOA looks forward to continuing this tradition during their annual holiday festivities.

With the trust of the eS Sisters iste ist stterrss Comm Community y “We’re a small hazelnut and candy business in the Willamette Valley. Previously, we were able to participate in shows around Oregon, a favorite being Deschutes County Holiday Festival, and been very successful! This year due to COVID-19, we did not participate, and instead have been continuing our online sales, and advertising in The Nugget, with GREAT success! We’ve received many phone calls and emails saying they found our ad in The Nugget! Small business, small town community paper that works! Thank you for your continued support! ” — Rachel Henderson

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Call Vicki Curlett at 541-549-9941 today!


Of a certain

AGE Sue Stafford Columnist

Trees I have known and loved Growing up in Portland, our house was located on an acre-and-a-quarter lot outside the city on a two-lane road that received so little traffic I could safely ride my bike on the road. The road had giant fir trees on both sides with houses nestled into the trees. Behind our house was what I have always called “the hundred-acre woods.” The actual number of acres I don’t know, but the woods covered a huge hillside with a large field of blackberry bushes, trails, and a stream. I made multiple forts among the trees with moss, ferns, and fir boughs lining the floor. I dammed and undammed the creek which was named by me for our family. The blackberries were plentiful every summer, warm and juicy as we picked them, ate some, and took the rest home for jam and pies. That forested landscape is where my love affair with trees, and nature in general, began. Concurrently, I fell in love with the apple and pear trees that surrounded our house, heavy each fall with Gravenstein, king, and transparent apples and Bartlett pears. If I remember correctly, we had a few more than a dozen trees. The Gravenstein tree near the driveway was my favorite for climbing because one of its main branches grew up and off to one side, providing a perfect perch where I could sit and think, unseen by others. My dad loved and cared for all those fruit trees for all my years of growing up and after I went off to college. They were old trees that had been originally planted by the family who first lived in our house. My parents bought that house and lot in the 1940s and we didn’t sell it until both my parents were deceased. I remember the pink and white blossoms that perfumed our yard each spring. We sold boxes of apples along the side of the road in front

of our house. We had apple fights and occasionally lobbed them over the tall cedar hedge to see how close we could come to cars without hitting them. And our winter larder was always full of canned applesauce and pears. Throughout my growing up, trees provided secret hiding places, beauty, play areas, nourishment and bounty for some mischief. By the time I left for college, trees and I had a deeply rooted relationship which has continued throughout my life. While writing this column, I realized I have never lived anywhere that was not graced by the presence of trees. Up until 17 years ago, I lived west of the Cascades, both in the Willamette Valley/Portland and in the greater Seattle area. I have always been surrounded by evergreens — fir, hemlock, spruce, and cedar trees. Here in Sisters, my surrounding sentinels are ponderosa pines and a few junipers. The thought of removing any of these stalwarts is anathema to me. I have planted my share of trees everywhere I have lived — deciduous, evergreens, and flowering. The weeping cherry I planted in my front yard in Kirkland in 1994 is now a thick-trunked beauty that flowers every year to the delight of former neighbors who send me photos of its spring splendor. Hanging over my back fence in Kirkland was the neighbor’s big leaf maple with its five huge trunks and leaves twice the size of my hand. I loved sitting on my patio and watching the breeze flirt with the leaves while industrious squirrels clamored among its branches. Each fall it would provide a glorious golden show before the leaves dropped. Moving to Sisters, I traded a once-a-year cleanup

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon of maple leaves for a yearround cleanup of pine needles and cones. Here in Sisters, I planted two now magnificent ‘Autumn Blaze’ maples on the side of my house and a ‘Prairie Fire’ flowering crabapple in the backyard. My other crabapple fell to industrious rodents. In between my childhood and living in Kirkland, I was shaded, protected, inspired, and awed by all my tree friends that were part of the environment wherever I found myself. Here in Sisters, I am especially fond of the pondies in my front yard, with their plated bark that smells like vanilla when they get really big and old. I recently experienced the gut-wrenching felling of 15 big ponderosas two lots away from my house. It was a regular logging operation to make way for a new house — and then some. The 15 stumps and their attached roots were pried and ripped from the ground, leaving gaping holes. I figure Mother Nature got her revenge when the bottom of the holes filled with water because they had dug into the water table. From the thud of each full-length tree as it hit the ground, to the noise and vibration of the splitter attachment breaking apart the stumps, to the pounding of the soil compactor attempting to seal out the water from seeping into the open wounds left by the stump removal, my heart ached for the desecration occurring in our little neighborhood. Every other house has attempted to retain as many trees as possible while fitting in among them. The few trees left on this latest building site may very well die due to extreme disruption and damage to their roots. It was very difficult to watch this entire operation while feeling powerless to do anything to mitigate the permanent destruction of nature. The deer no longer rest among those trees. The squirrels and birds have lost their homes. And 15 large ponderosas are no longer taking in our carbon dioxide or providing welcomed shade from summer sun. Being named a Tree City USA for 10 years, I would hope we could provide more protection for these gifts of nature, some of which were here before Europeans settled in Sisters. The largest of the 15 trees removed had 120 rings, showing it started as a seedling in 1901. It was located toward the back of the property. Did it really have to be ripped out? It is missed.

PHOTO PROVIDED

17

SHOP Sisters. Give LOCAL. Bring Smiles The Nugget Newspaper is on a mission to deliver the news and opinions of the greater Sisters area to its residents. We also take pleasure in sharing the heartwarming stories that put a smile on your face as you read; tales of overcoming hardships, neighbors stepping up to help, a community that never quits putting its best foot forward. Readers of The Nugget Newspaper can support our mission by supporting our advertisers, as we will continue to do in any way possible through and beyond the pandemic. We encourage you to do business locally.

Those who would like to make a financial contribution to support SISTERS-AREA SMALL BUSINESSES and NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS can contribute advertising dollars that will allow them to get the word out about their goods and services to the entire Sisters community through the printed and digital Nugget. 100% of donated funds go to the chosen business or organization’s advertising account. Visit NuggetNews.com and click on “Subscriptions & Support,” choose “Sponsor Small Business Advertising in The Nugget” then indicate which business you’d like to provide funds for on the form, or drop a check in the mail with a business noted on the memo line to: The Nugget, PO Box 698, Sisters, OR 97759. Contributions are not tax-deductible.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

WALK: Labyrinth walk honored homeless who have died Continued from page 3

A f t e r w a r d , S e e l e y ’s daughter said in a voice full of longing, “I wish we could have a house. I don’t care if it’s in the middle of the wilderness!” She said she was tired of sharing a small bed with her little brother. The Seeley family stumbled onto Sisters Country over four years ago. They were experienced “full-timers” making their way to Oregon from Florida. Full-timing refers to living in an RV or trailer — sometimes a passenger vehicle — as one’s primary home, often while traveling. Some choose this lifestyle to explore the country, gain access to nature, and chase good weather yearround. Others wind up “living the dream” when they’re down on their luck. Perhaps their city gentrifies so much it becomes unaffordable and just doesn’t feel like home anymore. The theme pops up regularly in popular culture, from vagabond cowboys in classic Westerns to the new film “Nomadland,” which stars Oscar winner Frances

McDormand as a full-timer. A Facebook group for “Fulltime Families” helps homeschooling travelers share RV advice and meet up at historical sites. A popular variation on the theme is #VanLife. Camping in their tent outside Sisters, the Seeley family came to love the natural wonders of Deschutes National Forest and the deep sense of community in town. Since then, with help from individuals and from organizations including Neighbor Impact, the family has alternated between being housed and homeless. Seeley said that Sisters showed her what community means. On the East Coast, she never experienced civic and community engagement, and never got involved. Here, she felt welcomed and saw that she could make a positive impact. She began to volunteer, got a job at a local community organization, and initiated a biannual forest cleanup day. Today, Seeley coordinates the quarterly Houseless Networking Meeting in Sisters and is a member of the statewide Residents Organizing for Change. With a Central Oregon housing crisis in full tilt, the family recently planned a move closer to family in Florida. They found, however,

that they didn’t want to leave their friends and community here. Reasonably priced housing was hard to find in Florida, too. What could the housed people of Sisters Country better understand about homeless people here? “That we are all human beings and deserve to be treated as such,” Seeley explained. “It’s horrible the way some of our folks are treated simply because they don’t have a traditional house. “We all got here for different reasons and have a different story,” she said. “I just wish people would try to understand instead of judging right away.” As in other locales, homeless people in Sisters are sometimes subjected to condescension, judgmental attitudes, and even harassment. Some Sisters residents, on the other hand, show compassion and offer practical help. Organizations ranging from churches to Kiwanis to Family Action Network (FAN) provide assistance. Closed this year due to the pandemic, a temporary shelter was formed in 2016 after a local McDonald’s employee died of hypothermia during a cold night. He was sleeping in his car, his only form of housing. Seeley served on the Sisters Cold Weather

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Leading a contemplative walk through Sisters Community Labyrinth, housing advocate Mandee Seeley honored people who died while unhoused in Sisters Country. Shelter committee from the beginning. She and her husband, Ryan, who were housed at that time, volunteered at the shelter itself. They have also helped out other forest-dwelling, unhoused folks in the area, a population that includes children and the elderly. “I consider myself a housing advocate,” said Seeley, who won a scholarship to attend the National Conference on Ending Homelessness in Washington, D.C. “Without housing, everything else becomes more difficult. Housing is a right. Every one of us deserve a safe, warm place to sleep at night so we can deal with

anything else that pops up without the added stress.” As the housing crisis goes on, Seeley plans to do her labyrinth walk again. “It’s a national event and this is the 30th anniversary,” she said. “I will be doing it every year moving forward.”

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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The Nugget Newspaper Crossword

By Jacqueline E. Mathews, Tribune News Service

PHOTO BY JPAUL RENZE

This photo of a 2- or 3-year-old juvenile bald eagle (left) and a oneyear-old juvenile golden eagle was taken in 2015 by Paul Renze at the Finley National Wildlife Refuge near Corvallis.

Tales from a

Sisters Naturalist by Jim Anderson

Eagle Foolery In the December 9 edition of The Nugget, photographer Jerry Baldock captured a fantastic photo of an eagle in flight labeled a “magnificent golden eagle.” Sorry Jerry, you got fooled by the look-alike magnificent juvenile bald eagle. It was approaching the time when the bird’s head and tail will have adult white feathers, the entire body will be covered by all brown feathers, and the beak, legs and feet will be bright yellow. At that point, after about four years into its life, it will be easily recognized as the bald eagle. If you want to delve deeper into this eagle identification business, take a look at the differences between bald and golden heads. Even as juveniles, baldies have much larger beaks attached to a larger head. And as long as we’re on the subject of the symbol of our nation, our old pal Benjamin Franklin had something to say about the choice of our national bird. In a letter he wrote to his daughter from France, he had this to say: “For my own part I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He

does not get his Living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk (aka Osprey); and when that diligent Bird has at length taken a Fish, and is bearing it to his Nest for the Support of his Mate and young Ones, the Bald Eagle pursues him and takes it from him. “With all this Injustice, he is never in good Case but like those among Men who live by Sharping & Robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy. Besides he is a rank Coward: The little King Bird not bigger than a Sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the District. He is therefore by no means a proper Emblem for the brave and honest Cincinnati of America who have driven all the King birds from our Country... “I am on this account not displeased that the Figure is not known as a Bald Eagle, but looks more like a Turkey. For the Truth the Turkey is in Comparison a much more respectable Bird, and withal a true original Native of America... He is besides, though a little vain & silly, a Bird of Courage, and would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on.” Both bald and golden eagles are commonly seen in the Sisters area; more often baldies than goldens. If you’re not sure about the big dark bird you’re observing, I would pick up a copy of Pete Dunne’s book, “Birds of Prey.” On page 63 is a photo of a flying firstyear bald eagle, similar to Jerry’s.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

ALL advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. CLASSIFIED RATES COST: $2 per line for first insertion, $1.50 per line for each additional insertion to 9th week, $1 per line 10th week and beyond (identical ad/consecutive weeks). Also included in The Nugget online classifieds at no additional charge. There is a minimum $5 charge for any classified. First line = approx. 20-25 characters, each additional line = approx. 25-30 characters. Letters, spaces, numbers and punctuation = 1 character. Any ad copy changes will be charged at the first-time insertion rate of $2 per line. Standard abbreviations allowed with the approval of The Nugget classified department. NOTE: Legal notices placed in the Public Notice section are charged at the display advertising rate. DEADLINE: MONDAY, noon preceding WED. publication. PLACEMENT & PAYMENT: Office, 442 E. Main Ave. Phone, 541-549-9941 or place online at NuggetNews.com. Payment is due upon placement. VISA & MasterCard accepted. Billing available for continuously run classified ads, after prepayment of first four (4) weeks and upon approval of account application. CATEGORIES: 101 Real Estate 102 Commercial Rentals 103 Residential Rentals 104 Vacation Rentals 106 Real Estate Wanted 107 Rentals Wanted 200 Business Opportunities 201 For Sale 202 Firewood 203 Recreation Equipment 204 Arts & Antiques 205 Garage & Estate Sales 206 Lost & Found 207 The Holidays 301 Vehicles 302 Recreational Vehicles 401 Horses 402 Livestock 403 Pets 500 Services 501 Computer Services 502 Carpet Upholstery Cleaning 503 Appliance Repair & Refinish 504 Handyman 505 Auto Repair 600 Tree Service & Forestry 601 Construction 602 Plumbing & Electric 603 Excavations & Trucking 604 Heating & Cooling 605 Painting 606 Landscaping & Yard Maint. 701 Domestic Services 702 Sewing 703 Child Care 704 Events & Event Services 801 Classes & Training 802 Help Wanted 803 Work Wanted 901 Wanted 902 Personals 999 Public Notice

C L A S S I F I E D S 102 Commercial Rentals

Ground-floor suite, 290 sq. ft. 581 N Larch St. Available now, $325/month. Call 541-549-1086. MINI STORAGE Sisters Rental 331 W. Barclay Drive 541-549-9631 Sizes 5x5 to 15x30 and outdoor RV parking. 7-day access. Computerized security gate. Moving boxes & supplies. STORAGE WITH BENEFITS   • 8 x 20 dry box     • Fenced yard, RV & trailers     • In-town, gated, 24-7 Kris@earthwoodhomes.com Prime Downtown Retail Space Call Lori at 541-549-7132 Cold Springs Commercial Office space for lease. The Place on Main. 101 Main Ave. in Sisters. Three spaces available. $575/month and up. Call Ralph 541-390-5187 Prime retail space available in the Gallery Annex building (Sage Antiques location). Call Jim at 541-419-0210 for more info. FOR LEASE – Approx. 420 sq. ft. office suite available at 220 S. Pine St. building. Suite is light & bright, with views of Hood Ave. Email: lorna@nolteproperties.com or phone – 541-419-8380. Lorna Nolte, Principal Broker Lic. #200105010 CASCADE STORAGE (541) 549-1086 • (877) 540-1086 581 N. Larch – 7-Day Access 5x5 to 12x30 Units Available 5x5 - 8x15 Climate Control Units On-site Management

103 Residential Rentals

PONDEROSA PROPERTIES –Monthly Rentals Available– Call Debbie at 541-549-2002 Full details, 24 hrs./day, go to: PonderosaProperties.com Printed list at 221 S. Ash, Sisters Ponderosa Properties LLC HOME or CONDO TO SELL OR RENT? CLASSIFIEDS! Deadline is Mondays by noon, call 541-549-9941

104 Vacation Rentals

GEORGE’S SEPTIC TANK SERVICE “A Well Maintained Septic System Protects the Environment” 541-549-2871 BOOKKEEPING SERVICE ~ Olivia Spencer ~ Expert Local Bookkeeping! Phone: (541) 241-4907 www.spencerbookkeeping.com Find Hope in God’s Character RV repairs, yard cleaning, Transformed by God’s Nature hauling, have references. Call Daily readings accompanied by Andersen’s Almost Anything at beautiful illustrations explore the 541-728-7253. attributes of God as revealed in SMALL Engine REPAIR Scripture. Readers are Lawn Mowers, encouraged to know God more Chainsaws & Trimmers deeply and be spiritually Sisters Rental transformed in the midst of trials 331 W. Barclay Drive and suffering. Available at 541-549-9631 LogBridgeBooks.com, Amazon, Authorized service center for & Paulina Springs Books, Sisters. Stihl, Honda, Ariens/Gravely, Cub Cadet, Briggs & Stratton, 202 Firewood Kohler, Kawasaki Engines SISTERS FOREST PRODUCTS DAVE ELPI – FIREWOOD • SINCE 1976 • Doug Fir – Lodgepole – Juniper DRIVE-IN WOOD SALES – 18155 Hwy. 126 East – SistersForestProducts.com Order Online! 541-410-4509 FIREWOOD, dry or green Snow removal, junk removal, Lodgepole, juniper, pine. garage & storage clean-out, Cut & split. Delivery included. yard & construction debris. eaglecreekfire@yahoo.com You Call – We Haul! 541-598-4345. 205 Garage & Estate Sales SNOW REMOVAL Happy Trails Estate Sales! Residential driveways & Selling or Downsizing? sidewalks. Commercial snow Locally owned & operated by... blower & front loader. Daiya 541-480-2806 Guaranteed lowest prices. Sharie 541-771-1150 Call 541-678-3332. 301 Vehicles Black Butte We Buy, Sell, Consign Quality WINDOW CLEANING Cars, Trucks, SUVs & RVs ~ Commercial & Residential. Call Jeff at 541-815-7397 18 years experience, references Sisters Car Connection da#3919 available. Safe, reliable, friendly. SistersCarConnection.com Free estimates. 541-241-0426 MOVING TRUCK FOR HIRE 401 Horses –COMPLETE MOVING, LLC– Certified Weed-Free HAY. Sisters' Only Local Moving Co.! Orchard Grass or Alfalfa Hay, Two exp. men with 25+ years Sisters. $275 per ton. comm. moving. Refs! ODOT Lic. Call 541-548-4163 Class 1-B • Call 541-678-3332 TRITICALE ~ WEDDINGS BY KARLY ~ MEADOW GRASS HAY Happy to perform virtual or ORCHARD GRASS HAY in-person weddings. New crop. No rain. Barn stored. Custom Wedding Ceremonies 3-tie bales. $185-$250/ton. Hwy. 20+ years • 541-410-4412 126 & Cline Falls. 541-280-1895 revkarly@gmail.com T HE NUGGET 403 Pets S I S T ERS OREGON FURRY FRIENDS online at NuggetNews.com helping Sisters families w/pets.

50% Off Furnished Condo 2 BR/2 BA. Downtown. Available March thru May, 2021. Rent one month or more. Call 503-730-0150. FREE Dog & Cat Food ~ Sisters Vacation Rentals ~ No contact pick-up by appt. Private Central OR vac. rentals, 412 E. Main Ave., Ste. 4 Property Management Services 541-797-4023 541-977-9898 Bend Spay & Neuter Project www.SistersVacation.com Providing Low-Cost Options for CASCADE HOME & Spay, Neuter and more! VACATION RENTALS Go to BendSnip.org Monthly and Vacation Rentals or call 541-617-1010 throughout Sisters Country. Three Rivers Humane Society (541) 549-0792 Where love finds a home! See the Property management doggies at 1694 SE McTaggart for second homes. in Madras • A No-kill Shelter CascadeVacationRentals.net Go to ThreeRiversHS.org 201 For Sale or call 541-475-6889 Shop Avon from the THE NUGGET comforts of home. SISTERS OREGON Shop www.youravon.com/ 500 Services joannacooley Or call/text Joanna • DERI’s HAIR SALON • ~ 541-588-0886 ~ Shop local! Call 541-419-1279

501 Computers & Communications

SISTERS SATELLITE TV • PHONE • INTERNET Your authorized local dealer for DirecTV, ViaSat HS Internet and more! CCB # 191099 541-318-7000 • 541-306-0729 Technology Problems? I can fix them for you. Solving for business, home & A/V needs. All tech supported. Jason Williams Sisters local • 25 yrs. experience 541-719-8329 FREE LASERJET PRINTER HP LaserJet 5200 (black and white laser printer), plus two 16A cartridges. Stop by The Nugget to look at or pick up.

502 Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

GORDON’S LAST TOUCH Cleaning Specialists for CARPETS, WINDOWS & UPHOLSTERY Member Better Business Bureau • Bonded & Insured • Serving Central Oregon Since 1980 Call 541-549-3008 M & J CARPET CLEANING Area rugs, upholstery, tile & dryer-vent cleaning. Established & family-owned since 1986. 541-549-9090 CLASSIFIEDS! It pays to advertise in The Nugget Newspaper Deadline is Monday before noon, 541-549-9941 or online at NuggetNews.com Uploaded every Tuesday at no additional cost to you!

504 Handyman

No job too small. $15-25/hour. 40 years in the trade. References available. 541-549-4563. JONES UPGRADES LLC Home Repairs & Remodeling Drywall, Decks, Pole Barns, Fences, Sheds & more. Mike Jones, 503-428-1281 Local resident • CCB #201650 LAREDO CONSTRUCTION 541-549-1575 Maintenance / Repairs Insurance Work CCB #194489 Home Customizations, LLC Res. & Commercial Remodeling, Bldg. Maintenance & Painting Chris Patrick, Owner homecustomizations@gmail.com CCB #191760 • 541-588-0083

600 Tree Service & Forestry

Top Knot Tree Care can handle all of your tree needs, from trims to removals. Specializing in tree assessment, hazard tree removal, crown reduction, ladder fuel reduction, lot clearing, ornamental and fruit tree trimming and care. • Locally owned and operated • • Senior and military discounts • • Free assessments • • Great cleanups • • Licensed, Insured and Bonded • Contact Bello @ 541-419-9655, Find us on Facebook and Google CCB#227009 Sisters Tree Care, LLC Preservation, Pruning, Removals & Storm Damage Serving All of Central Oregon Brad Bartholomew ISA Cert. Arborist UT-4454A 503-914-8436 • CCB #218444 TIMBER STAND IMPROVEMENT Tree care and vegetation management Pruning, hazard tree removal, stump grinding, brush mowing, certified arborist consultation, tree risk assessment qualified, wildfire fuels assessment and treatment, grant acquisition, lot clearing, crane services. Nate Goodwin ISA-Cert. Arborist PN-7987A CCB #190496 * 541.771.4825 Online at: www.tsi.services


4 Brothers Tree Service Sisters' Premier Tree Experts! – TREE REMOVAL & CLEANUP – Native / Non-Native Tree Assessments, Pruning, High-Risk Removals, 24 Hr. Emergency Storm Damage Cleanup, Craning & Stump Grinding, Debris Removal. – FOREST MANAGEMENT – Fire Fuels Reduction - Brush Mowing, Mastication, Tree Thinning, Large & Small Scale Projects! Serving Black Butte Ranch, Camp Sherman & Sisters Area since 2003 ** Free Estimates ** Owner James Hatley & Sons 541-815-2342 4brostrees.com Licensed, Bonded and Insured CCB-215057 HAVE A SERVICE TO PROVIDE? Place your ad in The Nugget

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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located at any of these offices. SW Montana is a paradise for outdoors lovers. There are 6 ski From design to installation we resorts within a two-hour drive, Custom Homes • Additions can do it all! Pavers, water one of which is visible from the Residential Building Projects features, irrigation systems, sod, street in front of our Philipsburg Serving Sisters area since 1976 plants, trees etc. office. Our publication area is Strictly Quality 541-771-9441 LCB #8906 adjacent to five national forests, CCB #16891 • CCB #159020 bendorganiclandscaping.com the Bob Marshall Wilderness, 541-549-9764 numerous wildlife designated John Pierce regions, and near Yellowstone 603 Excavation & Trucking jpierce@bendbroadband.com and Glacier National Parks. It also offers some of the best TEWALT & SONS INC. JOHN NITCHER fly fishing in the US. Excavation Contractors CONSTRUCTION Complete landscape construction, We offer generous paid time off Sisters’ Oldest Excavation Co. General Contractor fencing, irrigation installation & and flexible work schedules. Our experience will make your Home repair, remodeling and trouble-shooting, general This is a salary and $ go further – Take advantage additions. CCB #101744 cleanups, turf care maintenance commission-based position with of our FREE on-site visit! 541-549-2206 and agronomic recommendations, additional performance-based Hard Rock Removal • Rock fertility & water conservation SPURGE COCHRAN bonuses. Base salary plus Hammering • Hauling management, light excavation. BUILDER, INC. existing commission range is Trucking • Top Soil • Fill Dirt CCB 188594 • LCB 9264 General Contractor $45-55,000/year with $20,000 in Ground-to-finish Site Prep 541-515-8462 Building Distinctive, performance-based bonus Building Demolition • Ponds & Handcrafted Custom Homes, – All You Need Maintenance – potential. To apply, please send a Liners • Creative & Decorative Additions, Remodels Since ’74 Pine needle removal, hauling, cover letter and resume Rock Placement • Clearing, A “Hands-On” Builder mowing, moss removal, edging, toinfo@adedpro.com. Leveling & Grading Driveways Keeping Your Project on Time raking, weeding, pruning, roofs, Utilities: Sewer Mains, Laterals Home caregiver needed. 2-3 & On Budget • CCB #96016 gutters, pressure washing... Water, Power, TV & Phone shifts per week. 541-598-4527. To speak to Spurge personally, Lic/Bonded/Ins. CCB# 218169 601 Construction Septic System EXPERTS: call 541-815-0523 Austin • 541-419-5122 FINANCE MANAGER Complete Design & Permit Sisters Habitat for Humanity McCARTHY & SONS Approval, Feasibility, Test Holes. 701 Domestic Services 20 hours/week. Starting wage is CONSTRUCTION Sand, Pressurized & Standard BLAKE & SON – Commercial, $20 - $25/hr DOE. New Construction, Remodels, Systems. Repairs, Tank Home & Rentals Cleaning Bookkeeping, HR, budgeting, Fine Finish Carpentry Replacement. CCB #76888 WINDOW CLEANING! mortgage processing, insurance. 541-420-0487 • CCB #130561 Cellular: 419-2672 or 419-5172 Lic. & Bonded • 541-549-0897 Full description is at • 541-549-1472 • sistershabitat.org/about/hiring. 802 Help Wanted TewaltAndSonsExcavation.com Email cover letter, resume and Lara’s Construction LLC. ADVERTISING MANAGER BANR Enterprises, LLC references to Custom Homes CCB#223701 Seeking an advertising Earthwork, Utilities, Grading, sharlene@sistershabitat.org. Residential Building Projects Offering masonry work, manager for a group of three Hardscape, Rock Walls Concrete Foundations fireplaces, interior & exterior 999 Public Notice community weekly newspapers Residential & Commercial Becke William Pierce stone/brick-work, build in SW Montana LEGAL NOTICE CCB #165122 • 541-549-6977 CCB# 190689 • 541-647-0384 barbecues & all types of (Bitterroot Star - Stevensville, Directors’ Positions www.BANR.net masonry. Give us a call for a free Beckewpcontracting@gmail.com Philipsburg Mail - Philipsburg, Three positions with incumbents ROBINSON & OWEN Earthwood Timberframes estimate. Silver State Post - Deer Lodge). running for re-election on the Heavy Construction, Inc.   • Design & construction 541-350-3218 The manager will lead a small Board of Directors at Central All your excavation needs department of advertising and CASCADE GARAGE DOORS    • Recycled fir and pine beams Electric Cooperative, Inc. are up *General excavation    • Mantles and accent timbers marketing representatives and Factory Trained Technicians for election. They are: *Site Preparation Kris@earthwoodhomes.com service a list of accounts. This is District # 1, Sisters Since 1983 • CCB #44054 *Sub-Divisions CCB #174977 a newly created position. 541-548-2215 • 541-382-4553 District # 7, Alfalfa *Road Building JERRY WILLIS DRYWALL These three newspapers are the District # 8, Bend *Sewer and Water Systems & VENETIAN PLASTER primary publications in each of Pursuant to the By-Laws of the *Underground Utilities All Residential, Commercial Jobs their counties as well as local Cooperative, members who live *Grading *Snow Removal 541-480-7179 • CCB #69557 circulation leaders. Our focus and in that district are eligible to run *Sand-Gravel-Rock primary growth area is print for election. Applications and Licensed • Bonded • Insured display advertising, which has led information for candidates, CCB #124327 us to revenue growth each year including district boundaries and (541) 549-1848 since 2016, with 2020 even to eligibility requirements, are SIMON CONSTRUCTION 2019. We expect to resume 604 Heating & Cooling available at the Cooperative’s SERVICES growth in 2021. We also offer office at 2098 NW 6th Street in Pat Burke ACTION AIR Residential Remodel limited digital advertising and Redmond Oregon. LOCALLY OWNED Heating & Cooling, LLC Building Projects branded marketing items. The application process involves CRAFTSMAN BUILT Retrofit • New Const • Remodel Bruce Simon, Quality craftsman We have offices in Deer Lodge, several steps and must be CCB: 288388 • 541-588-2062 Consulting, Service & Installs for 35 years Philipsburg, and Stevensville. completed and filed at the same www.sistersfencecompany.com actionairheatingandcooling.com 541-948-2620 • CCB #184335 This position may be primarily cooperative office by CCB #195556 bsimon@bendbroadband.com 602 Plumbing & Electric 5 p.m., February 5, 2021. 541-549-6464 MONTE'S ELECTRIC 605 Painting • service • residential Level: Moderate Answer: Page 22 • commercial • industrial ~ FRONTIER PAINTING ~ Serving all of Central Oregon Quality Painting, Ext. & Int. 541-719-1316 Refurbishing Decks Construction & Renovation lic. bond. insured, CCB #200030 CCB #131560 • 541-771-5620 Custom Residential Projects www.frontier-painting.com SWEENEY All Phases • CCB #148365 PLUMBING, INC. Riverfront Painting LLC 541-420-8448 “Quality and Reliability” Interior/Exterior • Deck Staining LAREDO CONSTRUCTION Repairs • Remodeling SHORT LEAD TIMES 541-549-1575 • New Construction Travis Starr, 541-647-0146 For ALL Your Residential • Water Heaters License #216081 Construction Needs 541-549-4349 CCB #194489 606 Landscaping & Yard Residential and Commercial www.laredoconstruction.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Maintenance CENIGA'S MASONRY, INC. CCB #87587 All Landscaping Services Brick • Block • Stone • Pavers Mowing, Thatching, Hauling... R&R Plumbing, LLC CCB #181448 – 541-350-6068 Call Abel Ortega, 541-815-6740. > Repair & Service www.CenigasMasonry.com > Hot Water Heaters J&E Landscaping Maintenance Carl Perry Construction LLC > Remodels & New Const. LLC Clean-ups, raking, mowing, Construction • Remodel Servicing Central Oregon hauling debris, gutters. Repair Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each Lic. Bond. Ins. • CCB #184660 Edgar Cortez 541-610-8982 row across, each column down, and each small nine-box CCB #201709 • 541-419-3991 541-771-7000 jandelspcing15@gmail.com square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.

SUDOKU


22

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

SFF PROGRAMS: Organization offering more virtual education Continued from page 3

course is geared toward musicians of all levels who are interested in improving their performance skills, whether their intentions are playing open mics, improving their professional stagecraft, or simply improving the delivery of their songs. Cost is $100 for all four weeks. “Writing the Songs Only You Can Write,” also taught by Beth Wood, will delve into the creative elements of songwriting. A limited class size will allow for personalized learning, interaction between participants, and a variety of energizing exercises to inspire maximum songwriting creativity. The six-week course takes place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday evenings, January 26 through March 2. Cost is $150 for all six weeks. Wood is a gifted singersongwriter and winner of the Oregon Book Award for Poetry. Pete Kartsounes, known to many as the “hardest working musician in Central Oregon,” will teach “Fundamentals of Bluegrass Guitar.” The class will dive into different techniques of playing bluegrass guitar as well as the etiquette of “the jam” and “the songs.” Participants will learn a variety of bluegrass-specific skills including flatpicking and cross-picking, in addition to learning a variety of traditional fiddle tunes to use as a basis for honing bluegrass guitar skills. This class is geared towards advanced-beginner or solid intermediate guitar players of all genres, who are interested in learning or developing more with bluegrass guitar. Cost is $150 for all six weeks. The course takes place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Monday evenings, January 25 through March 1. Kartsounes will also offer the workshop “Bringing your Songs to Life” on Saturday and Sunday February 2728. During this two-day workshop, participants will learn the steps in the process from the first song idea to a recorded, mixed, mastered, packaged and produced product ready for distribution. Whether your goals include creating a CD for friends and

family, marketing and selling recordings or inclusion on various streaming platforms, Kartsounes will offer the know-how and skills to put your best musical foot forward in order to meet your goals. This workshop is geared toward songwriters and those interested in recording and distribution, whether for personal or professional use. Songwriter and multiinstrumentalist Jenner Fox is offering a four-week “Americana Song Share” for high school students (grades 9-12) on Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 8 p.m., January 21 through February 18. Participants will listen together to their favorite songs and talk about what makes them so lovable, then make up their own songs in a supportive environment. All musical styles and ability levels are welcome and there will be no homework as the writing will be done as a group. Class size is limited to 12 students and cost is $50, with scholarship support available through SFF. When traditional courses in songwriting needed to switch to a virtual format, Beth Wood designed and implemented a successful three-day songwriting workshop in October 2020. This workshop proved to be the

catalyst for developing Studio 111 at the Sisters Artworks building from which Wood will host and offer three new Sisters Songworks weekends this winter and early spring — one each in February, March and April — with exceptional instructors. Sisters Songworks is an intimate and intensive virtual writing retreat celebrating and exploring the art of songwriting in community. The weekend workshops will bring in noted songwriters and poets, facilitated by Beth Wood, to delve into the magic of songwriting. Sisters Songworks is an opportunity to learn from professional singer-songwriters, connect with others who share a love of songwriting and poetry and share your work in a nonperformance focused, supportive environment. Cost is $175 per person and class size is limited: • February 5-7: North Carolina Songwriter Jonathan Byrd and the SFF veteran teaching artist Ellis, with a masterclass offered by awardwinning songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman. • March 5-7: SFF longtime friend Johnsmith and acclaimed songwriter Susan Gibson will serve as instructors with a masterclass session with multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter

Don and Shannon, it’s been a blessing representing you! Thank you for your friendship and our business relationship. Congratulations!

PHOTO PROVIDED

Beth Wood will teach several sessions with the Sisters Folk Festival, which is amping up its virtual content through the winter. Susan Werner. • April 9-11: Tom PrasadaRao plus one more instructor (TBA), will serve as the core instructors, with Martyn Joseph teaching a masterclass from Wales in the UK. “I cannot overstate my excitement about our early 2021 virtual offerings,” Wood said. “I was so amazed, sparked and comforted by our virtual classes and retreats in 2020. Those precious things that music-lovers and songwriters and artists lost in 2020: connection,

community, learning from and inspiring each other — we found through our virtual offerings. Songs may sometimes be born in solitude, but they can’t live and thrive there. They need to be heard, to be shared with others in order to grow into their full power and purpose. It’s amazing how effectively we can do that virtually. I believe in our model and our team, and I can’t wait to do more!” For registration and additional information visit www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

Happy New Year! Ross Kennedy Principal Broker

Loan Originator NMLS #1612019 Licensed in the State of Oregon

541-408-1343

Serving Black Butte Ranch & The Greater Sisters Area

610 S. Redwood, Sisters 2,550 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, PENDING!

Sheila Reifschneider, Broker, 541-408-6355 Licensed Broker in Oregon | sheila@reedbros.com Coldwell Banker Reed Bros. Realty 291 W. Cascade Ave. | 541-549-6000

Sisters, Oregon… WHERE DREAMS BECOME HOME!

SUDOKU SOLUTION for puzzle on page 21

Call Jen McCrystal, Broker

541-420-4347 • jen@reedbros.com Reed Bros. Realty 291 W. Cascade Ave. Sisters, OR 97759 541-549-6000 www.reedbros.com Each office is independently owned and operated.

plus 500-sq.-ft. bonus room. Hardwood floors, farmhouse sink in kitchen, granite-slab kitchen counters. Fenced, paver patio backs to the creek, mountain views.

1110 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters Updated farmhouse on a large fenced PENDING! corner lot in town. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2,354 sq. ft. Newly remodeled kitchen and master bath. New roof, furnace, heat pump and more. Backyard with paver patio and water feature for entertaining, chicken coop, woodshed and RV parking.

Khiva Beckwith - Broker

541-420-2165

khivarealestate@gmail.com www.khivasellscentraloregon.com

809 SW Canyon Dr., Redmond


RODEO CHAMP: Sisters’ Adriene Steffen took Reserve Champion

PERFORMANCE: Dance academy shares winter performance online

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 3

don’t like to go all-out in a smaller, enclosed space. Steffen noted that Bully’s p r e v i o u s o w n e r, C a t e Hepper, helped to coach her, reviewing video footage and suggesting small adjustments in technique. Steffen also competed in Breakaway Roping, but without a top finish. Steffen and her father, Randy, were in Fort Worth from November 29 through December 16. The imperative to spread out competitors due to the coronavirus pandemic meant that they had to stay out of town at Shepherd Valley Church, which is affiliated with the local Powell Butte Shiloh Church. That meant a 4 a.m. callout to get the horses ready and into the trailer for the trip in to Fort Worth’s legendary Stockyards. The Stockyards themselves were a remarkable experience, the Steffens said. “Every day at 11:30 and 3:00 they’d run longhorns down the main street,” Adriene recalled. Steffen’s performance in Pole Bending earned her a $6,200 prize paycheck and an assorted collection of prizes. Most gratifying is the honor of performing at a top level among qualifying rodeo athletes from across North America. The young high school sophomore told The Nugget that she’s now “kind of getting back more focused on high school rodeo.”

and was so accommodating to our students being able to use their beautiful facilities. We are so incredibly grateful,” said Liddell. The dancers were filmed by a local Sisters student, Jack Turpen, whom Liddell had been made aware of through other projects. “I am so very impressed by this young man,” Liddell said. “He is incredibly knowledgeable, he has hightech equipment, and through two days and approximately 12 hours of recording, he remained professional, optimistic, and so helpful. I can’t believe he is only in eighth grade!” Learn more about Turpen and his work at www. turpstudio.com. Jerry Baldock of Outlaw Photography was also onsite through the two-day recording session. “Jerry has shot live-action photography for us for the past nine years and I was so thrilled when he said he was available to take photos

NuggetNews.com

Mark Ossinger Ossinger, Broker — 206-713-1045 —

is your online source for

Breaking News Classifieds Weather Road Reports

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon while our dancers were being recorded,” Liddell said. “Since only parents of our youngest dancers were allowed into the building during our recording days, we know the recorded footage and photos will be of great value to so many of our families.” To view SDA’s Virtual Winter Showcase, “Gifts of the Season,” visit www.dance insisters.com. Since this show is free to view and the dance academy was unable to hold an in-person performance that brings in revenue to cover expenses for running the program throughout the year, there is also a way to donate on their website. “With all of the setbacks the dance academy has had to face this year, even the smallest donations will help us survive the continuing uncertainties ahead,” Liddell said. The dance academy began its winter/spring 2021 session on January 4 and is currently accepting new enrollments. The session will begin online to be in accordance with the state’s current mandates, but the academy is hopeful to resume in-person classes in the near future.

www.NuggetNews.com

23

PHOTO BY JERRY BALDOCK

The littlest dancers got in on the action in a Sisters Dance Academy virtual production of its winter program.

A partnership beyond expectations Stop by and visit with Shelley Marsh & Tiana Van Landuyt. 220 S. Pine St., Ste. 102 | 541-548-9180

Thank you, City of Sisters and local residents, for the holiday cheer…amazing holiday lights and decorations!

Licensed in the State of Oregon #201236356 and State of Washington #25554 61651 Gemini Way, Bend, Oregon 97701 Mark@fathomrealtywa.com www.fathomrealtywa.com

PATTY CORDONI Principal Broker

541.771.0931

SUZANNE CARVLIN Broker 818.216.8542

RealEstate@PattyandSuzanne.com | www.PattyandSuzanne.com Sotheby’s International Realty© is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, LLC. Each office is independently owned and operated. All associates are licensed in the State of Oregon.

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Don Bowler President Broker

From each one off uuss at at Black Butte Realty Group, thank you for your business in 2020. We look forward to assisting you with all your Real Estate needs in 2021. Come see us at The Ranch or our Sisters office!

Managing Pr Principal Broker kerr

Gary Yoderr

Principal Broker

Ross Kennedy

Carol Dye

Emerald Whitlatch

Corrie Lake

Joe Dye

Broker

Broker

Broker

Broker

Black Butte Ranch 541-595-3838 • blackbutterealtygroup.com • Sisters 541-549-5555


24

Wednesday, January 6, 2021 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Serving the Sisters, Camp Sherman and Black Butte Ranch Areas

Ponderosa Properties R E A L T O R S

A N D

M A N A G E M E N T

At Ponderosa Properties… …It’s About th e People

New Listing

SERENITY AWAITS YOU! Log home on 1.01 acre, main floor master, 2 upstairs bedrooms, loft & full basement suite with entrance & kitchenette. View of North orth rth Sister S from 2nd floor family room. New: ew: flooring, carpet ca upstairs, flooring downstairs, wnstairs, nsta ns ta rs, s, oven, ove ven, n, dishwasher, dishwash disshw hwas a h 2020 heat pump, paint inside, accent acce walls acc downstairs downstairs nstairs & tiled shower, vanity vva bath,, Murphy bed, new ne mini fridge & sink. New lighting. ng. Outside Outsid landscape front/back, sprinklers, drip on timers. Logs stripped, stained, chinked & sealed. New back deck, pavers, rain chains & gutters. Spa hot tub. RV parking & gazebo. Access to public land. Located between Bend & Sisters. $682,000. MLS#220114183

P R O P E R T Y

NEW TOWNHOME! Three bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Ultra-modern interior design features upper-level living. Light and bright greatroom with south-facing windows, cozy propane fireplace and high vaulted ceilings. Sunny patio with mountain view and feeling of openness. Comfortable upper-level master suite with high ceilings, plenty of closet space and spacious bathroom. Also, a half-bath plus utility room upstairs for convenience. Lower level has 2 bedrooms plus guest bathroom. Heat pump on upper and efficient in-floor radiant heating on lower level. Single attached garage. $449,000. MLS#202000015

Kevin R. Dyer 541-480-7552

Rad Dyer 541-480-8853

Debbie Dyer 541-480-1650

Shane Lundgren 541-588-9226

CRS, GRI, Principal Broker

GRI, Broker

ABR, CCIM, CRB, CRS, GRI, Principal Broker

Broker

Carol Davis 541-410-1556 ABR, GRI, Broker

Greg Davidge 808-281-2676 Broker

Catherine Black 541-480-1929

CRS, Broker, Realtor Emeritus - 40+ years

Jackie Herring 541-480-3157 Broker

541-549-2002 1-800-650-6766

COME SEE, COME BUY! Top-quality construction & finish products in this 1,655 sq. ft. single-level home. Vaulted greatroom boasts a cozy woodstove & wall of windows looking out to the fenced backyard. nced ced bac back Granite countertops, quiet-close et-close -close drawers & work island are just a few kitchen highlights. Ow Owner’s bedroom/bath m/bath /bath include French door do to patio, sixft. dual-headed tiled show shower & two sinks. Two showe guest bath located on other side of st rooms & ba livingg area area. Additional fenced side yard provides room for RV or boat. All of this tucked into NE Bend. 2015 construction with easy-care natural scape. $444,000. MLS#220114016

G N I D N E P

YOUR FUTURE STARTS HERE! This 2.5 acre property is waiting for your dream home. Level land with a nice mix of pines and junipers. Paved access and a community water hookup available. A separate shop or RV building is allowed. Just minutes to Sisters. Bring your builder and let’s walk the property corners. $299,000. MLS#220112822

BE A PART OF IT... Sisters’ Only Custom Mixed-Use Community INNOVATIVE NEW CONCEPT • Light Industrial/Commercial • Live/Work Loft Apartments • Opportunity for Economic Diversity • Small Condo-type Spaces • Perfect for Start-ups and Entrepreneurs Lot 5 MLS#201803205 ..........$240,000 Lot 4 MLS#201803206 ......... $250,000 Lot 7 MLS#201803202 ......... $260,000

ACREAGE & MOUNTAIN VIEWS! Enjoy the mountain views & beautiful setting on 9.3 acres near Sisters. Custom 4-bed./3.5bath, 3,330 sq. ft. home with family room, separate office & double garage. Three separate outbuildings offer incredible possibilities to protect your RVs, indulge hobbies & house overflow guests. There is a 36x40 shop with 2nd level guest suite, 48x60 RV barn with 1,650 sq. ft. finished studio, 12x12 greenhouse & gardening area plus high-fenced landscaped grounds for the master gardener. So many amenities and possibilities. $1,950,000. MLS#220113206

16676 JORDAN ROAD Mountain views! Part of the original Lazy Z Ranch. Fenced on two sides with Kentucky black fencing. Power close by. Septic feasibility in place, may need new evaluation. Close to town, yet off the beaten path, overlooking a 167± acre site of the R&B Ranch, which currently is not buildable. Needs well. Owner will consider short terms. $407,500. MLS#201802331

GOLF COURSE FRONTAGE A beautiful setting overlooking Aspen Lakes' 16th Fairway with tee-to-green fairway views. The vista includes fairway ponds and a forested ridge/open space as the backdrop. Ponderosa pines and open skies highlight this large homesite ideal for your custom-home dreams. Underground utilities and water available, septic approval and close to Aspen Lakes Recreational Center. $299,500. MLS#220106225

www. P onderosa P roperties.com 221 S. Ash St. | PO Box 1779 | Sisters Guy Lauziere 541-410-9241

Broker

The Locals’ Choice!

ON TOP OF MCKINNEY BUTTE Overlooking the Cascade mountains and Sisters, this property has a combination of special features not often found. Main house has a rustic yet modern interior with knotty pine & accented by juniper logs. Exciting 3-level floor plan, high vaulted ceilings & spaces filled with Cascade view windows providing natural light. The 9.9-acre rural lot features detached guest accommodations w/ garage & long-term cell site camouflaged into the charming architecture. End-of-the-road privacy – forested with ample sunlight – dramatic setting with Cascade views – private guest accommodations – income stream – what more could you want! $999,000. MLS#220110633

BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN VIEW Beautiful mountain view acreage located in the secluded Lower Bridge Basin near the Deschutes River. Views of all mountains from Mt. Jefferson to Broken Top. There is a very private elevated building site in the NE corner of the lot with huge mountain views and southern exposure. Lower Bridge Estates offers paved streets, electric power and phone. The lot is approved for a standard septic system. There is abundant BLM land in the area and the nearby Deschutes River corridor is great for hiking, fishing and wildlife viewing. $229,000. MLS#201702313

EXCITING NEW TOWNHOME Located in The Peaks at Pine Meadow Village. Two bedrooms, 2 baths and 1,455 sq.ft. Contemporary style and design features upperlevel living for privacy and view from the greatroom. Practical kitchen opens to a large spacious living/dining with vaulted ceilings and lots of windows to let the natural light in. Propane fireplace provides a cozy and warm living space in the cooler months. Ductless heat pump and lower-level radiant floor heating gives yearround efficiency. Master is on the entry level and enjoys a large closet and luxurious bathroom. Guest suite is located off the greatroom, as well as an enjoyable upper-level patio to enjoy the outdoors. An auto courtyard leads to the attached garage. $432,500. MLS#202000020

MOUNTAIN VIEWS! Mountain views from this 83-acre parcel. Tree groves or open skies…choose your estatecaliber homesite. US Forest Service public land borders one-half mile for added privacy. A water hook-up available if desired or drill your own. Horses, hermits or homebodies, a beautiful spot to create your custom dream. Eight miles to the Western town of Sisters. $980,000. MLS#220103712

Profile for Nugget Newspaper

The Nugget Newspaper // Vol. XLIV No. 1 // 2021-01-06  

Professional community journalism based in Sisters, Oregon providing comprehensive coverage of city government, school, forest service and o...

The Nugget Newspaper // Vol. XLIV No. 1 // 2021-01-06  

Professional community journalism based in Sisters, Oregon providing comprehensive coverage of city government, school, forest service and o...

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