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The Nugget Vol. XLIII No. 32

POSTAL CUSTOMER

News and Opinion from Sisters, Oregon

www.NuggetNews.com

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

New Peterson Ridge Trailhead dedicated By Sue Stafford Correspondent

Peterson Ridge Trail, a popular destination for cyclists, hikers and runners across the Pacific Northwest, has a new trailhead. It took a concerted collaborative effort to get a project approved, funded, designed, and to build the new 25-space parking lot with restrooms and a soonto-be-completed kiosk for trail information and maps. The old trailhead, located on the south side of Sisters off Elm Street and Tyee Drive, has for a long time been inadequate to keep up with the popularity of the PRT. According to Sisters Trails Alliance member Gary Guttormsen, “It didn’t take long for the Sisters Trails Alliance, the Forest Service, and the City to start getting complaints from the residents on Tyee adjacent to the trailhead parking area.” He went on to say, “The complaints were justified because trailhead users started parking their vehicles wherever they could find room, often on the lawns of neighboring houses. Also, folks would park illegally on the undeveloped private

PRE-SORTED STANDARD ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID Sisters, OR Permit No. 15

Schools will be online for six weeks By Charlie Kanzig Correspondent

completion. Adam and Jana Novotny of Buck Run were instrumental in organizing

In a letter shared with school district staff and families dated July 30, Superintendent Curtiss Scholl announced that school will be conducted under Comprehensive Distance Learning (CDL) model for the first six weeks of the 2020-21 school year, based on health metrics in Deschutes County. Scholl’s announcement came just two days after Governor Kate Brown’s press conference which outlined the latest state and county health guidelines that are required to allow in-person education. School districts throughout the state have made similar decisions and announcements since Brown’s press conference, including Bend-La Pine School District, which additionally made the decision to push its start date to September 14 in order to give

See TRAILHEAD on page 6

See SCHOOL on page 16

PHOTO BY SUE STAFFORD

Longtime trails advocate Gary Guttormsen was the symbolic first person across the threshold of the new Peterson Ridge Trailhead. property on the north side of the street. A huge issue (was) folks relieving themselves out in the forest closest to the trailhead and within view

of the houses! Not a pretty picture.” It took many hands to do the groundwork to get the project from an idea to

SAR teams recover body of climber

Battling invasive weeds in Sisters

Search and Rescue teams from across the region coordinated last Saturday to recover the body of a climber who fell to his death on Mt. Jefferson last week. According to Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Atkins, on Saturday, July 25, a group of experienced mountain climbers were traversing a glacier on the east side of Mount Jefferson. One of the climbers, David Freepons, 65, from Kennewick, Washington, slipped and fell. Freepons, who had decades of experience, was unable to stop his descent. He fell several hundred feet downhill. His climbing companions found him dead. Due to hazardous

There is a weed among us, and we need to be on the lookout for it because, left to its own devices, it will take over our fields, gardens, public rights-of way, and stream beds. Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) fools some people because it looks like a wildflower — but “wild” is the operative word. When the flowers of the weed are through blooming, which is about this time of the summer, they form fluffy white seed heads that blow in the wind, leading to approximately five million acres in the U.S. infested with knapweed. These groups of weeds (there are seven varieties) are highly competitive and

Inside...

conditions, distance, and the inability to safely move Freepons to a Life Flight helicopter’s location, personnel returned to the airport. In the early morning hours of Saturday, August 1, expert mountain climbers from several counties recovered Freepons’ body from Mt. Jefferson. Sheriff Atkins reported that the recovery team started hiking into the remote wilderness location on Friday afternoon, hiking approximately 15 miles and climbing Mt. Jefferson until about 10 p.m. They spent the night on the mountain and began their day at 3 a.m. preparing See RECOVERY on page 22

By Sue Stafford Correspondent

PHOTO BY MATT LAVIN

Don’t let appearances fool you, Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) is a destructive noxious weed... and it’s illegal to allow it to proliferate. invasive, crowding out native plants. They create havoc on Western rangeland and invade pastures and fields

in the Midwest and Eastern states. See KNAPWEED on page 22

Letters/Weather................ 2 Announcements................. 8 Sisters Naturalist............... 9 Bunkhouse Chronicle........15 Classifieds................... 19-21 Meetings........................... 3 Entertainment................... 9 Artisan Showcase.........11-14 Crossword . ......................18 Real Estate..................21-24


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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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Restoring the Hatfield legacy The Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse in downtown Portland, which has become the epicenter of more than two months of protests and clashes between rioters and federal law enforcement bears the name of one of the truly great Oregonians. Mark Hatfield was not a mere politician — he was a genuine public servant; a statesman, in fact. A state representative, state senator, governor and U.S. Senator, Hatfield served Oregon and America for almost a half a century, and was, with notable (and honorably-earned) exceptions, loved, trusted and respected by Democrats and Republicans alike. Hatfield was a Republican, but of a stripe that, sadly, no longer has a place in the GOP. He’d be known today as a RINO (Republican In Name Only). He was pro-business (particularly small business) and favored limited and fiscally responsible government and the sacred rights of all individuals. But he understood that government has an important role in civil society, and that political divides can and must be bridged in order to do the people’s work; that politics and policy are about good governance, not ideological and cultural warfare. Gerry Frank, who knew Hatfield for decades, wrote a guest column in last Sunday’s Oregonian contemplating what his friend would think about the current state of affairs in Portland, the state of Oregon, and the United States (https://www.oregonlive. com/opinion/2020/08/opinion-what-wouldmark-hatfield-think.html). It’s worth taking the time to read. There’s a certain symbolic poignancy to seeing the landmark federal building named after this towering figure in its current state.

“Mark would … have defended the absolute right of citizens to peacefully protest,” Frank wrote. “Mark was one of the earliest and most prominent opponents of America’s military involvement in Vietnam. He earned his spot on President Nixon’s ‘enemies list’ through his sponsorship of the McGovernHatfield amendment, which called for a complete withdrawal of U.S. troops from Vietnam. Mark was heartened by peaceful anti-war protests on the nation’s college campuses and traveled to many of them to lend his prestige and support. “Republicans and Democrats alike agreed that decency, civility and bipartisanship were the hallmarks of Mark’s years in public service. He was, first and foremost, a statesman. For that reason, he would grieve over the lack of those qualities coming from the White House, Congress, social media and the streets of Portland, where some have used the protests as an excuse for vandalism and violence. A strong supporter of Oregon’s small businesses, he would also sympathize and stand with the many shops and restaurants in downtown Portland who have been harmed by their proximity to the Hatfield Courthouse.” The unrest around the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse will eventually abate, the damage that scars it will be repaired; the graffiti will be scrubbed and sandblasted away. The yearslong deterioration of the values of “decency, civility and bipartisanship” that Hatfield embodied will be harder to restore. But maybe we owe it to him — and even more to ourselves — to start.

Jim Cornelius, Editor in Chief

Letters to the Editor…

To the Editor: I am anxious enough living in a time of pandemic and so limit myself to about 30 minutes of reading the news about the latest outrage from Trump. Unfortunately, I stumbled across the opinion piece by Jim Cornelius published July 29 opining on the Portland Troubles (“Echoes of tumult,” page 6). If evidence-free “both sides do it”

nonsense is the best thing he can do, he should stop. “[S]omebody was going to take action” he says. You mean like tear-gassing peaceful protestors, stopping bystanders and demanding identification with the threat of arrest, taking media personnel off public sidewalks and throwing them in unmarked See LETTERS on page 7

Sisters Weather Forecast

Courtesy of the National Weather Service, Pendleton, Oregon

Wednesday

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Mostly Sunny

Partly Cloudy

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Sunny

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86/52

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83/48

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The Nugget Newspaper, LLC Website: www.nuggetnews.com 442 E. Main Ave., P.O. Box 698, Sisters, Oregon 97759 Tel: 541-549-9941 | Email: editor@nuggetnews.com Postmaster: Send address changes to The Nugget Newspaper, P.O. Box 698, Sisters, OR 97759. Third Class Postage Paid at Sisters, Oregon.

Editor in Chief: Jim Cornelius Production Manager: Leith Easterling Creative Director: Jess Draper Community Marketing Partner: Vicki Curlett Classifieds & Circulation: Lisa May Owner: J. Louis Mullen

The Nugget is mailed to residents within the Sisters School District; subscriptions are available outside delivery area. Third-class postage: one year, $55; six months (or less), $30. First-class postage: one year, $95; six months, $65. Published Weekly. ©2020 The Nugget Newspaper, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. All advertising which appears in The Nugget is the property of The Nugget and may not be used without explicit permission. The Nugget Newspaper, LLC. assumes no liability or responsibility for information contained in advertisements, articles, stories, lists, calendar etc. within this publication. All submissions to The Nugget Newspaper will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyrighting purposes and subject to The Nugget Newspaper’s unrestricted right to edit and comment editorially, that all rights are currently available, and that the material in no way infringes upon the rights of any person. The publisher assumes no responsibility for return or safety of artwork, photos, or manuscripts.

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Police reform takes leadership and time By Chris West Guest Columnist

“There is always a wellknown solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.” — H. L. Mencken, 1917 I’ve been thinking about this quote recently because it seems especially relevant today, more than a century later. My professional experience includes 30 years of police work, both in the military and as an officer, detective, and supervisor in Los Angeles Police. The human problem that concerns us all is how best to rethink and reform policing in our communities. Two questions must be addressed: What can and should the public reasonably expect from law enforcement? Given the current, contentious debate about policing, how can reform best be done? The primary mission and top priority of law enforcement is to keep the peace and to provide protection from injury or death while upholding civil rights and the law. So, what should the public expect from good officers? Honesty, constancy, practical knowledge, respect, neutrality, compassion, and stamina, all while exhibiting a command presence and providing good role models for their fellow citizens — and of course, to magically appear when needed. Two bonus characteristics: a sense of proportion and an inherent sense of right and wrong. An officer is motivated by (and is paid to have) an overt commitment to law and to public service, to exhibit physical and moral courage in difficult circumstances, and to endure potentially arduous working conditions. Police act as arbiters much more often than they do in stereotypical cops and robbers scenarios. Problemsolving skills are expected and should be demanded. Law enforcement officers wield two solemn powers: the power to arrest and trigger a prosecution, and to take a life without due process of law (albeit in extreme circumstances). If officer candidates or serving officers are unable or unwilling to fulfill these expectations, they should not be trained, hired, or retained. The public is absolutely right to expect this from those who pledge to protect and serve.

But too often these expectations are not met. Several well-known reform solutions — more training, more money, a few highprofile firings after the fact —seem neat and plausible. Even some ideas of “defunding the police” can seem, to a few, neat and plausible. But, as Mencken points out, that does not mean they are right. Let’s look at what reform actually entails. Law enforcement is an essential component of local government, and as such, wields power and demands funding priority. These hierarchical organizations typically exhibit internal solidarity and value the shared experience peculiar to police work. Selling major change to the rank and file, never mind the command staff, can be daunting. It’s roughly analogous to changing religion. Additionally, finding collaborative solutions to long-festering problems is especially challenging when those problems explode. The propensity to throw out the baby with the bath water is a dangerous solution that serves no one. But does that mean that reform is impossible? It does not. The harder the problem, the greater the value of the solution. Internal change in response to external problems can help: new technologies, changes in the law, and better policies and procedures. However, leadership is key. Successful leaders will have several traits: experience backed by a strong intellect; moral certitude and honesty; creative thinking and problem-solving abilities; political skills and proven consensus-building attributes; iron willpower, and an elephant hide. Major stakeholders must be included in the process. Reform in a police agency requires complicated, expensive training and re-training. Resources, usually money, must be identified. And then there is luck and time. Luck is preparation that meets opportunity. Change — real change — will take time. Americans are famous for perseverance, not so for patience. We must insist on leadership that will provide a model for the changes that are needed. In the end, we have no choice but to pursue a police reform solution that is not only neat and plausible but, most important, right.

Opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the writer and are not necessarily shared by the Editor or The Nugget Newspaper.


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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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The history of a successful trail By Sue Stafford Correspondent

The Peterson Ridge Trail, which now has a new trailhead (see story, page 1) has become one of the signature recreational amenities of Sisters. Its creation was a true grassroots effort. Beginning in 1987, Eurosports owner Brad Boyd and a few friends created the first “lollipop” section of a trail out into the Deschutes National Forest, south of town. Two years later in 1989 it was ready for use. The trail went out into the forest, made a loop at the end, and returned along the same route. John Rahm, an early trail

proponent, worked with former Sisters District Ranger Bill Anthony, also an avid cyclist, to form a partnership between the U.S. Forest Service and the Sisters Trails Alliance (STA) as part of a community vision process in 2005. Since that time, the STA has become a force in the community, not only advocating for expanded and improved bike, hike, and equestrian trails, but taking on rallying public support, putting their money and physical labor where their mouth is. According to STA’s Gary Guttormsen, the original trail was called the Sisters See HISTORY on page 6

Defending Sisters against wildfire By Jim Cornelius Editor in Chief

The Pole Creek Fire in September 2012 posed a serious threat to Sisters Country. Firefighters and forest managers agree that previous treatments in the fire area — selective thinning, mowing and prescribed burning — made it possible for fire crews to grab and hold the fire and prevent greater devastation to the forest south of town.

Deschutes County Board of Commissioners candidate Phil Chang led a small field trip to the fire area on Thursday, July 29, to provide on-the-ground evidence of the effectiveness of fuelsreduction projects, and to advocate for more. “These fuels-reduction projects are incredibly important,” he said. Maret Pajutee, retired Sisters Ranger District See WILDFIRE on page 18

PHOTO BY JAY MATHER

Beth Wood, Ron Artis II, Haley Johnsen and David Jacobs-Strain shared the stage at the Sisters Folk Festival’s Close to Home concert on August 1.

Folk festival stays ‘Close to Home’ By Ceili Cornelius Correspondent

For Sisters Folk Festival, “Close to Home” meant just that — bringing live music close to home in Sisters Country. Last Saturday, Sisters Folk Festival (SFF) put on their first live, in-person music event since the start of the pandemic in March. For a few weeks, they were doing Bandwagon performances where local musicians played tunes on the back of a trailer rolling through town. They had also done a livestream for the My Own Two Hands fundraiser auction event online.

But the first day of August was reserved for a small, intimate, live concert event at the Sisters Art Works building, on the back lawn. The featured musicians for the event were all based in Oregon, so they didn’t have to travel out of state. These artists included newcomer to the Sisters Folk Festival, Hayley Johnsen, as well as alumni of the Americana song academy and the festival, Jeffery Martin, David Jacobs-Strain, Beth Wood and Ron Artis II, who brought his trio along with him. Artis and his family had only last year moved from Hawaii to permanently live in the Portland area after playing the festival for the

first time in 2018. Patrons purchased “pods” for the event; there were two-person and four-person pods available, all spread six feet apart on the back lawn. There were only 190 spots available for the event to make the gathering number appropriate to follow state regulations. Audience members brought their low-back chairs and picnic blankets and were able to gather with their podmates for some live music. Masks were required to be worn outside of the pod, and hand-washing stations were available at every corner. See CONCERT on page 16

As the COVID-19 crisis continues to affect gatherings, please contact individual organizations for current meeting status

SISTERS AREA MEETING CALENDAR East of the Cascades Quilt Guild 4th Wednesday (September-June), Stitchin’ Post. All are welcome. 541-549-6061. Al-Anon Mon., noon, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church. / Thurs., 10 a.m., Friends of the Sisters Library Board Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church. of Directors 2nd Tuesday, 9 to 11 a.m., 541-549-1527. Sisters Library.www.sistersfol.com. Alcoholics Anonymous Thurs. & Go Fish Fishing Group 3rd Monday, Sun., 7 p.m., Episcopal Church of the 7 p.m. Sisters Community Church. All Transfiguration / Sat., 8 a.m., Episcopal ages welcome. 541-771-2211. Church of the Transfiguration / Mon., Heartwarmers (fleece blanketmakers) 5 p.m., Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 1 p.m., Sisters City Church / Big Book study, Tues., noon, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church / Hall. Materials provided. 541-408-8505. Gentlemen’s meeting, Wed., 7 a.m., Hero Quilters of Sisters Thursday, 1 to Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church / 4 p.m. 541-549-1028 or 541-719-1230. Sober Sisters Women’s meeting, Thurs., Citizens4Community, Let’s Talk noon, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church / Step & Tradition meeting, Fri., 3rd Monday, 5:30 to 8 p.m. RSVP at citizens4community.com noon, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church. 541-548-0440. Military Parents of Sisters Meetings are held quarterly; please call for details. Alzheimer’s & Dementia Caregiver 541-388-9013. Support Group 1st Tuesday, noon, SPRD bldg. 800-272-3900. Oregon Band of Brothers – Sisters Chapter Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m., Black Butte Ranch Bridge Club Tuesdays, 12:30 p.m., BBR community Takoda’s Restaurant. 541-549-6469. room. Partner required. 541-595-6236. SAGE (Senior Activities, Gatherings & Enrichment) Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. Central Oregon Fly Tyers Guild to 4 p.m. at Sisters Park & Recreation For Saturday meeting dates and District. 541-549-2091. location, email: steelefly@msn.com. Sisters Aglow Lighthouse Central OR Spinners and Weavers 4th Saturday, 10 a.m., Ponderosa Lodge Guild One Saturday per month, Jan. Meeting Room. 503-930-6158. thru Oct. For schedule: 541-639-3217. Sisters Area Photography Club Council on Aging of Central Oregon Senior Lunch Tuesdays, noon, Sisters 2nd Wednesday, 4 p.m., Sisters Library Community Church. 541-480-1843. community room. 541-549-6157.

BOARDS, GROUPS, CLUBS

Sisters Area Woodworkers 1st Tuesday, 7 to 9 p.m. 541-639-6216. Sisters Astronomy Club 3rd Tuesday, 7 p.m., SPRD. 541-549-8846. Sisters Bridge Club Thursdays, 12:30 p.m., The Pines Clubhouse. Novices welcomed. 541-549-9419. Sisters Caregiver Support Group 3rd Tues., 10:30 a.m., The Lodge in Sisters. 541-771-3258. Sisters Cribbage Club Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Ray’s Food Place community room. 541-923-1632. Sisters Habitat for Humanity Board of Directors 4th Tuesday, 6 p.m. Location information: 541-549-1193. Sisters Kiwanis Thursdays, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Brand 33 Restaurant at Aspen Lakes. 541-410-2870.

Sisters Trails Alliance Board 1st Monday, 5 p.m. Sisters Library. Public welcome. 808-281-2681. Sisters Veterans Thursdays, noon, Takoda’s Restaurant. 541-903-1123. Three Sisters Irrigation District Board of Directors 1st Tuesday, 4 p.m., TSID Office. 541-549-8815. Three Sisters Lions Club 2nd Tuesday, noon, Ray’s Food Place community room. 541-419-1279. VFW Post 8138 and American Legion Post 86 1st Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., Sisters City Hall. 541-903-1123. Weight Watchers Thursdays, 8:30 a.m. weigh-in, Sisters Community Church. 541-602-2654.

SCHOOLS

Sisters Parent Teacher Community 2nd Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. at Sisters Saloon. 541-480-5994.

Black Butte School Board of Directors 2nd Tuesday, 3:30 p.m., Black Butte School. 541-595-6203.

Sisters Parkinson’s Support Group 2nd Tuesday, 2 p.m., The Lodge. 541-668-6599.

Sisters Christian Academy Board of Directors Monthly on a Friday. Call 541-549-4133 for date & time.

Sisters Red Hats 1st Friday. Location information: 541-279-1977. Sisters Rotary 1st and 3rd Thursdays, Noon, Aspen Lakes. 541-760-5645.

Sisters School District Board of Directors One Wed. monthly, SSD Admin Bldg. See schedule online at www.ssd6.org. 541-549-8521 x5002.

Sisters Speak Life Cancer Support Group 2nd & 4th Wednesday, 1 p.m. Suttle Tea. 503-819-1723.

Sisters Middle School Parent Collaboration Team 1st Tuesday, 2 p.m., SMS. 541-610-9513.

CITY & PARKS Sisters City Council 2nd & 4th Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., Sisters City Hall. 541-549-6022. Sisters Park & Recreation District Board of Directors 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 4:30 p.m., SPRD bldg. 541-549-2091. Sisters Planning Commission 3rd Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Sisters City Hall. 541-549-6022.

FIRE & POLICE Black Butte Ranch Police Dept. Board of Directors Meets monthly. 541-595-2191 for time & date. Black Butte Ranch RFPD Board of Directors 4th Thursday, 9 a.m., Black Butte Ranch Fire Station. 541-595-2288. Cloverdale RFPD Board of Directors 3rd Wed., 7 p.m., 67433 Cloverdale Rd. 541-548-4815. cloverdalefire.com. Sisters-Camp Sherman RFPD Board of Directors 3rd Tuesday, 5 p.m., Sisters Fire Hall, 541-549-0771. Sisters-Camp Sherman RFPD Drills Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Sisters Fire Hall, 301 S. Elm St. 541-549-0771. This listing is for regular Sisters Country meetings; email information to lisa@nuggetnews.com


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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Running commentary By Charlie Kanzig Correspondent

I don’t watch much on television when it comes to sports — or anything else for that matter, — but the Summer Olympics usually keeps me riveted to the screen. Especially when it comes to the track and field and the marathon. The Tokyo Olympics were originally scheduled to start last week, but the pandemic has postponed the Games until 2021. Given the way the pandemic is going, and the toll it has taken on the health, economies, and stamina of the world, I wonder if they will happen at all before 2024. A recent poll showed that only about half of the Japanese population thinks it’s a good idea to hold the Olympics next year. But the pandemic has not thwarted the training and aspirations of some elite runners training here in Oregon, many with the Beaverton-based Bowerman Track Club (BTC), who missed the chance to compete in the 2020 Olympic Trials, but will hopefully get the chance next year.  The BTC conducted three intra-squad meets at Jesuit High School earlier this month and the results were as fast (or faster) than some Olympic Trials races from 2016.  The meets — which were

unpublicized and included no spectators and held to strict health guidelines — produced a Canadian record, an American record and some of the fastest times ever run on American soil. I find this to be remarkable given all of the circumstances the athletes, and the entire world, have been dealing with for the past many weeks. Maybe everyone was ready to do something amazing after months of shutdowns, interruptions, and disappointments.  Shelby Houlihan, a 2016 Olympian, broke her own American record for 5000 meters on July 10 by more than 10 seconds, lowering the mark to 14:23.92. Her BTC training partner and fellow Iowan, Karissa Schweitzer, also ran under the previous record, finishing in 14:26.34. The pair now rank 12th and 14th alltime in the world. The world record is held by Tirunesh Dibaba, who ran 14:11.15 in 2008.  In the men’s 5000, Canadian Moh Ahmed, ran a stunning 12:47.2 to lower his own national record by almost 11 seconds. Lopez Lomong placed second in 12:58.78, which was the ninth fastest time ever run by an American. The world record for the event was established in 2004 by Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele

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in 12:37.35. July 21, at the third intrasquad meet, Ahmed took a turn at the 1500 meters, along with eight of his BTC teammates in what they termed to be a “time trial.� Ahmed won the race in 3:34.89 seconds. For perspective, this clocking matches the winning time for the 1500 at the 2016 Olympic Trials in which the top three runners were vying for a shot at qualifying for the Games.  T h e w o m e n ’s 1 5 0 0 turned out to be even more impressive as Schweitzer ran 4:00.02 to win over Colleen Quigley (4:03.98) and five other BTC racers. In 2016 Jenny Simpson won the Olympic Trials 1500 in 4:04.74.  I’d say that the Bowerman Track Club and its lead coach Jerry Schumacher, are making the most of a difficult situation and appear to be the preeminent training group for distance runners in America — particularly after the dismantling of the Nike Oregon Project which folded after coach Alberto Salazar was suspended from coaching by the U.S. Center for SafeSport for misconduct related to alleged doping violations.  If the BTC athletes are able to keep their spirits and training up, it seems likely some club members will be

PHOTO BY CHARLIE KANZIG

The brand new Hayward Field, complete with a tower representing Oregon track and field legends, sits idle until competitions resume. at the next Olympics. On a related track-andfield note, the new state-ofthe-art Hayward Field facility is complete and ready to be used as soon as competition is allowed to start once again. Hayward Field will be the site of the Olympic Trials, if they are held, in 2021. Eugene will also host the 2022 World Track and Field Championships, originally scheduled for 2021. The event will mark the first time that the World Championships have been held in America. 

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

TRAILHEAD: New location will have less impact on neighbors Continued from page 1

a citizen letter-writing campaign in support of the new trailhead. Approval for the project was received in 2012 from the Forest Service, but it took four years to obtain the project funding. After two unsuccessful attempts to obtain funding for the approved project, STA’s Guttormsen and Patrick Eckford worked on the 16-page grant appropriation request, adding actual trail data to the request. The third time was the charm when Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s Recreational Trails Program granted $152,000 to be matched by $38,661.40 from other sources for a total project cost of $190,661.40. That OPRD money comes from Federal gas tax funds. Jodi Bellefeuille with OPRD told the people assembled for the ribbon cutting ceremony for the new trailhead last Thursday that the money was granted in part due to all the work done by so many people. Not only did the proposal have to be written, but the trail data had to be collected and a formal presentation had to be made in front of an OPRD advisory committee. Jerold Wesley, a 15-year civil engineer with the Deschutes National Forest, served as the project engineer on the new trailhead. He used the dimensions of a Sprinter van to design the parking spaces. Besides 25 designated off-road gravel parking spaces and the installation of a CXT prefabricated toilet, the trailhead will also have an informational kiosk built by the STA, bike racks, space for user staging, and room for future expansion. Sisters District Ranger, Ian Reid, who emceed the ribbon cutting, is himself a fan of the PRT, having discovered it three years ago upon his arrival in Sisters. He pointed out that trails in Sisters meet strategies of all four pillars of the Sisters Vision project. Reid expressed

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appreciation for the collaborative effort surrounding the trailhead. “The Deschutes National Forest can’t overstate our appreciation for our community partners, such as the City of Sisters and Sisters Trails Alliance, who have provided volunteer time and financial support,” she said. “Having a shared vision for a sustainable trails network and leveraging our individual strengths is part of the ‘Central Oregon way’ of cooperation and collective problem solving. We would also like to thank the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the Recreational Trails Program, which have substantially funded this project.” The City of Sisters provided letters of support and funding through the City Grant Program. The Sisters Trails Alliance has provided thousands of volunteer hours in planning, labor, and grant writing, as well as money. OPRD provided the grant that will cover 80 percent of the costs. The new Deschutes Trail Coalition has offered their support with a small grant. McKenzie Cascade Heavy Equipment did the actual excavation of the new parking lot. Sara Baughman

is the new Recreation Team Lead for the Sisters Ranger District, replacing Amy Radke who was on staff for the majority of the project. Sisters Mayor Chuck Ryan was on hand, commenting he is biased because he is a trail runner. He told those assembled, “What we have here in Sisters is an outdoor gem… Businesses are appreciative of the trail system and the people it brings to town.” STA president Catherine Hayden praised the ability of government, nonprofits, and the community to come together in collaboration to build the new trailhead “Here’s to the PRT and its new welcome mat,” she said. The old trailhead on Tyee will be decommissioned by the City, with all signage removed. It will remain a neighborhood access point to the trail. STA is not resting on its laurels. Their next two projects will include a Whychus Creek foot bridge on the old Brooks-Scanlon road to take trail traffic away from a wildlife area and a new foot trail to the Peak View overlook. The new PRT is open, just 850 feet south of the old trailhead.

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Mountain Bike Trail. He has an old oak trail sign that has that name on it. Rahm conceived of a new trail system that created the current ladder system with many connectors between the west and east legs of the system. Equestrians were at first opposed to Rahm’s plan because they feared they would lose the area for riding to the new trail system. The compromise they worked out created a PRT horse trail system. The compromise was a win-win, said Guttormsen, and “was the reason that STA emerged as an organization that builds and maintains many miles of horse trails besides the ones for hikers and cyclists.” When STA had the opportunity to have an NEPA analysis (environmental impact study) done on new trail projects in 2011, STA asked the Forest Service to analyze a new location further along Elm Street (Three Creeks Lake Road), where a proper trailhead could be built. The

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FS approved the spot where the new trailhead sits. It took seven years to obtain a Recreational Trails grant to get the facility built. STA is responsible for building the facilities kiosk and signage to the connector trail that takes people out to west and east legs of the PRT. Besides providing a variety of over 15 loop options through beautiful ponderosa pine forests and open sagebrush country, and areas of challenging rock, breathtaking mountain views are seen from the Whychus Overlook and Peak View. The trail is well-marked and, with the available trail map, riders and hikers are able to design their own riding and hiking experience. The Sisters Stampede mountain bike race, held every spring (except this year due to COVID-19), draws riders from near and far.

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LETTERS

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rental vans and putting them in custody, all done by federal agents with military gear and weapons but little or no identification? I didn’t see Mr. Cornelius stand grimly brandishing automatic weapons to protect us from the federal “jack-booted thugs” or black helicopters circling overhead. Perhaps he thinks it is okay to assault the moms linking arms to protect the protesters and even club our military veterans who are attempting to do the same. I admit that it has been years since I practiced law, but I recall that the right of the people to peaceably assemble for a redress of grievances is protected by the First Amendment and freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures and arrest only upon probable cause enshrined in the Fourth. But perhaps his interest in the U.S. Constitution is limited to the Second Amendment. Without evidence, he states that the Portland mayor and city commissioners are “overtly hostile to law enforcement.” Does he mean that they will not turn a blind eye to law enforcement killing unarmed black men? The Tell in his piece is that he mentions George Floyd only in passing. He couldn’t resist throwing a jab at our governor. Well, our petite female governor stood up to the bully boys of Chad Wolf, acting head thug of the DHS and got them to back down. T. Lee Brown’s thoughtful and evidencebased piece on the opposite page more eloquently answers Mr. Cornelius’s vacuous writing. What Mr. Cornelius needs to do is watch the excruciating videos of federal agents’ actions in Portland and then write and have published his apology. Michael Wells

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To the Editor: A road cleanup of Highway 242 — one of four scheduled per year — between Cold Springs Campground and Sisters Middle School, was organized by Crossroads HOA activities committee Joanne Anttila and Amber Barton on July 22.

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

It is a great way to make the community a nicer place, and social distance at the same time. From the seven volunteers who participated, nine yellow bags of trash of “various” items were collected. This was unexpected as we thought COVID-19 travel would eliminate some of the debris. What is disheartening is the amount of trash that traffic has dumped on that section of the road in just two weeks since that event. I hope it is not Oregonians doing it. Another issue I want to mention is that traffic is supposed to slow down between the orange ODOT signs warning of litter crews, not speed up. It is hard to control a yellow trash bag when people drive by you as if they are being chased by an OSP! There will be another road cleanup scheduled, probably in September. Bill Anttila

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To the Editor: This letter is to the citizens of Sisters. I am encouraging you to run for office. Bah-humbug, you may say, but please read this. You see, I am working on running. Yep. I am not a candidate yet — takes a little reading and a splash of paper work to get approved and confirmed. So, in the meantime, if the possibility of Cobb on Sisters’ City Council sounds like a bad omen to you, then you may want to reconsider your first reaction of poo-pooing the idea of running. The last two election cycles, in which three City Council seats always become open, only three candidates ran. So, of course they won. I think that is sort of sad. I know from being on an HOA board for the past three years that many folks will complain and a few will be very supportive, but even a smaller number, indeed, will run for office. It appears this is also the case for council seats. Let’s change that. To run for City Council (a volunteer job), you only need to have lived in Sisters for last 12 months continuously, be a registered voter in the City of Sisters (the seat is non-partisan), and have a functioning heart (yeah, I added that last bit).

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To get a feel for the job, you will want to check out the City Council meetings on www.ci.sisters. or.us/meetings and if you want to be apprised about up-coming meetings go to www.sisters. teamaha.com/newsletter/subscriptions. To explore running, go to the main website to review the information www.ci.sisters.or.us/administration/ page/elections-information. If you decide you want a hard copy of the process or have questions, call or email the City Recorder, Kerry Prosser at City Hall (541-323-5213 or kprosser@ ci.sisters.or.us). I found Kerry is extremely helpful. Here’s the skinny on running: There are three simple forms to fill out to get the ball rolling. You formally let the City know you seriously want to run by filling out and submitting to City Hall an SE101 and a partially filled out SE121. If your content checks out, City Hall will give back your SE121s to be completed with names/signatures from registered voters living in our precinct 30. One only needs 10 names but, getting twenty names assures you’ve got all you need in case someone signs twice or is not in fact a registered voter or is in another precinct. Once the SE121s (only 10 names to one form) are filled out, then you fill out an SEL338 to go with each SEL121 – so, two of those. Lastly, the City Recorder and Deschutes County Clerk make sure all is copacetic and let you know if you need to resubmit one of the SE121s or SE338s. If all checks out, they let you know if you are a candidate. This all must get done before August 25 by 5 p.m. and might take you three weeks at most. Plenty of time left for you to run after reading this letter. Once a candidate, there are decisions to be made about having a campaign or not and assuring you track your spending. So, please, join me in running for a seat on Sisters City Council. Let’s have a lively election this time. Susan Cobb

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Commentary...

Coast Guard recollections

By Capt. Craig F. Eisenbeis USCG (retired)

The arrival of Coast Guard Day this week set me to reminiscing about my years in the U.S. Coast Guard. My personal connection with the Coast Guard actually began early in World War II, before I was even born. In the weeks following the Pearl Harbor attack, my father joined the Coast Guard under what I like to call the “BYOB” program — that’s Bring Your Own Boat. At that time, the Coast Guard had no resources for maritime security patrols; and a program was created for potential recruits to join the service and patrol in their own boats! My father had grown up with and around boats on Puget Sound; so, he and a buddy bought a used Chris Craft and joined up. For the first year of the war, operating out of Cascade Locks on the Columbia River, they patrolled between Astoria and Bonneville Dam, guarding against saboteurs. By the end of that first year of war, military picket boats were finally built; and the BYOB sailors were replaced. As a result, my dad was reassigned, first as a port security and chemical warfare instructor in Portland, Maine, and then aboard a Coast Guard patrol frigate, the USS Burlington (PF-51), in the Pacific Theater. Patrol frigates were similar to destroyer escorts (DE), smaller versions of the classic destroyer. His service there took him to the battles of the South Pacific and the retaking of the Philippines at Leyte Gulf. Next, his ship was sent north to the Aleutian Islands in preparation for the planned invasion of Japan, where he patrolled off the Kuril Islands and northern Japan. The invasion, of course, never happened because the atomic bombs were dropped; and the war was suddenly over. I grew up in the postwar era, where it seemed like everything that took place was somehow in reference to, or in the shadow of, World War II; and I always just assumed that, if it became necessary, I would join the Coast Guard, too. So, when I graduated from Oregon State University during the Vietnam War, that’s exactly what I did. At the time, I didn’t know that I would make it a career. Like my dad, my first assignment was also in port security, although in Corpus Christi, Texas, where I also took part in hurricane recovery operations. For many

people, their image of the Coast Guard has to do with coastal helicopters and surf rescue boats. While that’s a key part of the Coast Guard’s mission, my first assignment aboard a seagoing cutter illustrated that the service guards other coasts, as well. So, that ship took me in my father’s wake to the far western Pacific, off the coast of Asia. Our midpatrol break was in Japan. Compared to the other armed services, the Coast Guard is quite small, not quite as big as the New York City Police Department. In many ways, that’s a big plus, because we have to be always ready for anything required of the Coast Guard. In fact, that’s the Coast Guard’s motto: Semper Paratus — Always Ready. As a result, unlike many of those in other services, Coast Guard members are not necessarily “stuck” doing just one thing. At various times in my career, I was a ship’s Officer of the Deck, a law enforcement boarding officer, a port security officer, port disaster control officer, a commercial ship inspector, an investigator, oil spill cleanup coordinator, a marine licensing officer, a civil judge, a war planner with the U.S. Navy, and the Captain of the Port in North Carolina. My second sea tour took me to the Aleutian Islands and the Bering Sea on winter fisheries patrols, where we boarded foreign ships to enforce U.S. laws and treaties. That tour also showed me how the Coast Guard entrusts its members with special responsibility. When that ship was at U.S. Navy refresher training in San Diego, the Navy instructors actually excused a handful of us Coast Guard officers from part of the curriculum because “you guys already know all this stuff.” At the time, I was a Lieutenant junior grade (O-2) and was operations officer on a major cutter, in charge of navigation and ship operations. The Navy O-2 next to me in the class was in charge of filling pop machines on an aircraft carrier. A Navy Commander (O-5) from that same carrier, came to me to ask about operations officer duties on a ship. Later, as a Lieutenant (O-3), one of the best jobs I had was as the sole officer in charge of a maritime safety detachment on the northern Maine coast. The intraservice responsibility levels afforded us were very different from what I observed in other services. In Corpus Christi, we were closely tied to the See COAST GUARD on page 23

A N N O U N C E M E N T S Free Weekly Grab-N-Go Lunches For Seniors

The Council on Aging of Central Oregon is serving seniors (60+) free Grab-N-Go lunches on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays each week. The lunches are distributed on a firstcome, first-served basis drivethrough style from 12 to 12:30 p.m. at the Sisters Community Church, 1300 W Mckenzie Hwy. Seniors may drive through the parking lot and pick up a meal each day of service. Come on by, no need to make a reservation. Questions? Call 541-678-5483.

SMS Selling Sisters Strong Shirts/Decals

The student leadership group at Sisters Middle School is hoping to make a difference in our community. They are selling shirts and decals featuring a newly designed Sisters Strong logo. The proceeds of the sales will go to Kiwanis Food Bank, Family Advocate Network, and the school’s leadership program. So far they have raised $1,200, although they are still hoping to raise more money for these organizations. Shirts and decals can be purchased online and picked up downtown at either Paulina Springs Bookstore or Canyon Creek Pottery. Please go to sistersstrong.org to purchase your items. Shirts are $15 and car decals are $4. For more info email jeff.schiedler@ssd6.org.

Weekly Food Pantry

Wellhouse Church has a weekly food pantry on Thursdays. For the next several weeks, food will be distributed drive-through style from 12:30-1:30 p.m. at the Wellhouse Market building, 222 N. Trinity Way. People in need of food may drive through the parking lot and pick up a bag of food for their household. Other Sisters-area churches are joining with Wellhouse Church to contribute both financially and with volunteers to help sustain the program. Call 541-549-4184 for more information.

DLT Walk & Hike Series

Deschutes Land Trust volunteer naturalists will be leading virtual events where you can learn from the comfort of your own home. Upcoming events include Magnificent Monarchs on Wednesday, August 12 at noon and Virtual Nature Meditation on Thursday, August 20 at 5 p.m. Registration is required to receive the virtual event link. Register for this event at deschuteslandtrust. org/hikes. Info: 541-330-0017.

Veterans Meeting

The Sisters VFW Post 8138 and American Legion Post 86 are meeting at Village Green Park at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 5. All veterans in the area are encouraged to join! For more info call Lance at 541-903-1123.

Sisters Habitat for Humanity Thrift Store Extends Saturday Hours

Sisters Habitat for Humanity Thrift Store has extended Saturday shopping hours to 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Face masks and sanitized hands are required before entering the store. For more information please contact the Habitat office at 541-549-1193 or email info@sistershabitat.org.

Sisters Habitat Volunteers!

The Habitat Thrift Store, ReStore, and Construction sites have recently opened up and could use your help! New volunteer orientations will take place every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at noon at the Sisters Habitat office upstairs at 141 W. Main Avenue. An RSVP is required as space is very limited in the socially-distanced meeting room. Each person must wear a mask and sanitize their hands when entering the building. A mask will be provided if needed. Please contact Marie at marie@ sistershabitat.org or 541-549-1193.

Antiques & Jewelry Donations Needed

Sisters Kiwanis takes donations of antiques, collectibles and jewelry throughout the year for its annual Antiques, Collections & Jewelry Sale, held on Saturday every Memorial Day weekend. Your donation is tax-deductible! New jewelry donation drop-off box at Washington Federal Bank in Sisters. For more information and to arrange for pickup of large or small items, please call Pam at 541-719-1049.

Furry Friends Has Moved!

The Furry Friends office is now located at 412. E. Main Ave., Ste. 4 behind The Nugget office. Though the office is closed to the public, the pet food bank is still open for no contact porch pick ups. Call to order your pet food for pick up during our regular weekly pickup time on Thursdays from 12:30 to 4 p.m. or by appointment the rest of the week. For more information call or text 541-797-4023.

PET OF THE WEEK Humane Society of Central Oregon 541-382-3537

Sisters Community Church

Do you need help with running errands or deliveries or more? Sisters Community Church has volunteers available and is cultivating a caring community. Call Wendy at 541-389-6859. Visit the church website at www.sisterschurch.com.

Circle of Friends

Circle of Friends, a mentoring program in Sisters, is continuing to find innovative ways to reach out and assist their mentors, children and families. Current needs include childcare to allow parents to continue to work, internet/computer access for online learning, supplies for athome learning and activity kits, and even basic needs, such as food and medical access. Circle of Friends has also established an emergency fund to provide immediate response for the most pressing needs. Contact Kellie at 503-396-2572 to help.

Meet DAKOTA, an incredibly adorable and handsome eightyear-old golden retriever who is looking for his forever family! This very friendly pup has a passion for tennis balls and swimming pools and considers himself an expert on recreation and leisure! Dakota loves being around people and is going to make some lucky family very happy! If you are looking for a wonderful dog to add to your family then Dakota is the pup for you! Come meet him today!

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Sponsor an Impoverished Child from Uganda

Hope Africa International, based in Sisters, has many children awaiting sponsorship! For more information go to hopeafricakids. org or call Katie at 541-719-8727.

ALI MAYEA, Principal Broker/Owner 541-480-9658 • 541-588-6007

Please call the church before attending to verify schedules as buildings begin to reopen.

SISTERS-AREA CHURCHES Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church (ELCA) 386 N. Fir Street • 541-549-5831 10 a.m. Sunday Worship shepherdofthehillslutheranchurch.com Sisters Community Church (Nondenominational) 1300 W. McKenzie Hwy. • 541-549-1201 10 a.m. Sunday Worship (with signing) sisterschurch.com | info@sisterschurch.com St. Edward the Martyr Roman Catholic Church 123 Trinity Way • 541-549-9391 5:30 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass 9 a.m. Sunday Mass 8 a.m. Monday-Friday Mass Calvary Church (NW Baptist Convention) 484 W. Washington St., Ste. C & D • 541-588-6288 10 a.m. Sunday Worship | ccsisters.org The Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration 68825 Brooks Camp Road • 541-549-7087 8:30 a.m. Ecumenical Sunday Worship (Sunday school, childcare) 10:15 a.m. Episcopal Sunday Worship (Sunday school, childcare)

Chapel in the Pines Camp Sherman • 541-549-9971 10 a.m. Sunday Worship Sisters Church of the Nazarene 67130 Harrington Loop Road • 541-389-8960 | sistersnaz.org 10:45 a.m. Sunday Worship | 2sistersnaz@gmail.com Westside Sisters 442 Trinity Way • 541-549-4184 | westsidesisters.org 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 6 p.m. Worship the 3rd Tuesday of each month Vast Church (Nondenominational) 541-719-0587 • 9:37 a.m. Sunday Worship Meeting virtually and in small groups. See vastchurch.com for details. Seventh-Day Adventist Church 386 N. Fir Street • 541-595-6770, 541-306-8303 11 a.m. Saturday Worship The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 452 Trinity Way • Branch President, 541-420-5670; 10 a.m. Sunday Sacrament Meeting Baha’i Faith Meetings Devotional Gatherings, Study Classes and Discussion Groups. Call for location and times • 541-549-6586


Tales from a

Sisters Naturalist by Jim Anderson

There’s no such thing as a free lunch Just about everyone who reads, watches or listens to nature stories is familiar with the plight of monarch butterflies in the Western United States. Their numbers have dropped from millions to thousands in the last 20 years for a variety of reasons, most wrapped around habitat and their food plant, milkweed. Well, there I was over at Clarno, on the banks of the John Day River, visiting and delighting in the large milkweed growing operation the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service have teamed up on. They were growing milkweed for replanting on their lands in hopes of producing hundreds of monarch butterflies. Imagine my horror when I was photographing a very beautiful, fat and healthy caterpillar on the milkweed when suddenly a big paper wasp flew by, carrying one of the caterpillars off. My first impulse was to knock the wasp out of the sky and save the caterpillar, but thank goodness I checked that action and just watched it go by, headed for its huge nest in a cottonwood right alongside the monarch garden. As I watched the huge wasp nest I could see other wasps returning with their

prizes, so I got out my binocs, sat down in the edge of the monarch garden to watch the show. As I was observing it, a magpie suddenly came flying through my field of vision, and as I watched it snatched one of the fully-loaded wasps out of the air. I thought of the old saying, “There’s no such thing as a free lunch in the world of nature.” Sure, when things are going smoothly, the caterpillar will be getting a free lunch from the plant’s life (and the plant may be getting fertilized by the caterpillar’s frass/poop). But, then a wasp comes by, snatches up the caterpillar and hauls it off to feed its babies, and then along comes the magpie who grabs the wasp out of the sky and hauls it home as food for its babies. The pages keep turning, and along comes a bird hawk/accipiter, who sees the magpie and decides it would be just the right thing to feed its young, and the tale goes on and on… And, if a bird doesn’t get the wasp, a fence lizard watching from a nearby rock may swallow the wasp, not bothered a bit by all the stinging going on — and then a kestrel comes along and grabs up the lizard to feed its hungry nestlings. But let’s go back to the wasp: The paper wasp is classified as a predatory wasp, in the vespidae family, known as killer wasps. They are very good at ridding a cash crop of insects that interfere with a farmer’s trying to make a living, and way better than pesticides. And there’s no chemical residue left lying around to kill everything else. For a bigger caterpillar, wasps will use their stinger to subdue it and then after feeding on it themselves, roll it up into a ball and haul it back to their kids for breakfast, lunch

FRIDAYS FOR FUTURE 2ND & 4TH FRIDAY – EACH MONTH Join us 3-4 p.m. at the intersection of Hwy. 20 (Cascade Ave.) & Larch Streets

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon or evening meal. For harmful larvae, such as the cabbage butterfly, for example, that’s an end to the farmer’s problem. I’ve been told it is possible to purchase parasitic wasps from a garden shop that sells insects, and use them to destroy caterpillars causing serious damages to a cash crop. The wasps lay their eggs in caterpillars, then when the caterpillar enters the chrysalis stage to become an adult insect, the eggs hatch, the larvae feed on the developing butterfly, then metamorphose into an adult wasp then exit through a tiny hole and fly off. My wife Sue and I saw the evidence of that phenomenon back in the 1980s when we brought 10 or so California tortoiseshell butterfly chrysalids home with us from a huge hatch near Tumalo Falls. We wanted to obtain emerging butterfly photos. However, we observed (and photographed) only jewellike adult parasitic wasps emerging from the chrysalid cases, not the butterflies we hoped for. I don’t think anyone offers paper wasps for sale, as they can become a serious pest when they build their big paper-like bag nests near people. Any perceived threat to the wasps’ welfare will cause a lot of buzzing and

summer at suttle lodge

PHOTO BY SUE ANDERSON

Becker’s White butterfly caterpillar about to become food for an Oregon Sand Wasp. stinging on humans nearby and that makes everyone unhappy. If you get bored with television, and the library hasn’t got the book you want to read, take a hike out to the nearest tent caterpillars’ nest, set your picnic chair and lunch close by and watch the action. But remember, when the wasps complain about your presence and snack on your peanut butter and jam sandwich, “There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch in nature…”

5-7 PM FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED ALL AGES AUG 5 AUG 12

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Everybody’s WAYFINDER BEER

DEMAND ACTION ON CLIMATE CRISES Sidewalks only • Bring your masks & signs

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Nashville Songwriter & Recording Artist

Rhonda Funk Thursday, August 6, 6 to 8 p.m. | Performing outdoors, seat seats are limited

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Or join i us dduring i regular l di dining i hhours TTuesday d th throughh SSunday Lounge & Dining Room open at 4:30 p.m.

370 E. Cascade Ave. | 541-549-6015

THURSDAYS ON THE DECK Every Thursday, different wines from the Willamette Valley & PAIRED small-plates

SEATINGS 1-4 PM RSVP REQUIRED AT SUTTLELODGE.COM/HAPPENINGS AUG 6 AUG 13

DAY WINES BETHEL HEIGHTS

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FREE LIVE MUSIC Friday & Saturday Nights

6:30 p.m. Now Open

8 a.m. for Breakfast! Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

175 N. Larch St. 541-549-6114

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Entertainment & Events

WEDNESDAY COOKOUTS rotating breweries & BBQ SPECIALS every Wednesday

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Black Butte Ranch Live Music with Julie Southwell and Friends 6 to 8 p.m. Socially distant on the lawn near The Lakeside Bistro. For information call 541-595-1282 or go online to www.blackbutteranch.com. Paulina Springs Books Virtual Event Books In Common Regional Literary Event Series with Larry Watson 6:30 p.m. The author will share from his new book “The Lives of Edie Pritchard.” For more info call 541-549-0866 or go to BooksinCommonNW.com. Chops Bistro Live Music with Rhonda Funk 6 to 8 p.m. Limited seats. For information call 541-549-6015. The Suttle Lodge Thursday on the Deck Summer Wine Series Seatings every 30 minutes from 1 to 4 p.m. Wine paired with small-plates from the chef. Reservations required at www.thesuttlelodge.com/happenings. Food Cart Garden at Eurosports Trivia Night 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. Family-friendly trivia. Socially-distant. Free. For additional information call Eurosports at 541-549-2471. Chops Bistro Live Music with Tony Lompa 6 to 8 p.m. For information call 541-549-6015. Hardtails Bar & Grill Live Music with Juju Eyeball 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Beatles tribute. Free. No cover! For more information call 541-549-6114 or go to hardtailsoregon.com. Food Cart Garden at Eurosports Friday Car Show 5-6:30 p.m. Bring your cool or vintage car for the free Friday car show. For more information call Eurosports at 541-549-2471. Hardtails Bar & Grill Live Music with Nightlife 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Portland classic rock & more. Free. No cover! For more info call 541-549-6114 or go to hardtailsoregon.com. Chops Bistro Live Music with Bob Baker & Mark Barringer 6 to 8 p.m. For information call 541-549-6015. Fir Street Park Sisters Farmers Market 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Every Sunday: fresh local produce and more. Pre-order and details at sistersfarmersmarket.com. Chops Bistro Live Music with Bill Keale 5 to 7 p.m. For information call 541-549-6015. Black Butte Ranch Live Music with Julie Southwell and Friends 6 to 8 p.m. Socially distant on the lawn near The Lakeside Bistro. For information call 541-595-1282 or go online to www.blackbutteranch.com. Events Calendar listings are free to advertisers. Submit items by 5 p.m. Fridays to lisa@nuggetnews.com

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Commentary...

Artisans ‘re-enchant’ Sisters Country By Jim Cornelius Editor in Chief

“If America could be, once again, a nation of self-reliant farmers, craftsmen, hunters, ranchers, and artists, then the rich would have little power to dominate others. Neither to serve nor to rule: That was the American dream.” — Edward Abbey Modern living offers us many blessings. Who would seriously want to live in a world without antibiotics and hot showers? But our modern comforts and conveniences come with a cost. Most folks are completely disconnected from where their food comes from. Tools, appliances, and furniture are deliberately designed to fall apart and be replaced; repairing things is a dying art. It’s hard to find “stuff that works; stuff that holds up… stuff that’s real.”* We’re not only filling landfills with our junk, we’re also fraying the solid yeoman’s culture that lay at the bedrock of America’s founding. We’re surrendering our autonomy and self-reliance to unfathomably wealthy and powerful global megacorporations that keep supplying us with dubious “needs” and profiting off of planned obsolescence. All is not lost, though. A cultural movement is growing that runs counter to the mainstream current. Small farmers and ranchers are producing quality, wholesome foodstuffs for their neighbors — who not only know where their food comes from, they

Fit For

Sisters Andrew Loscutoff Columnist

ISTOCK.COM/LAKSHMI3

know the people who grow it. Craftsmen are building stuff that’s real, heirloom quality functional art that profoundly enhances the quality of our lives. Central Oregon is chocka-block with artisans creating everything from foodstuffs to furniture, musical instruments to decorative arts. Turns out, our region is at the epicenter of a worldwide movement of creative entrepreneurs — in the parlance of the moment known as “makers.” Blogger Joy Poe noted in a June 4, 2020 post at ToughNickel.com that: “Today, almost every government in the world is researching the economic impact of the creative industries in their country. The study by the British Council concludes that small businesses ‘at the cutting edge of creativity, may not only be of growing economic significance, but in some sense, are a harbinger of a whole new economic order.’”

Gypsy Wind Clothing

SUNDRESSES, SUN TOPS & COTTONS! HOURS: WED.-SAT., 10 A.M.- 4 P.M.

In an essay on “The artisanal movement, and 10 things that define it,” Grant McCraken cites farmer’s markets as an avatar of the movement: “The best example here perhaps is the farmer’s market…. (W)e want to see the face of the man who grew the food and shake his hand. We prefer to deal with a small retailer, someone who calls us by our first name, and knows our tastes so well, he sets things aside awaiting our arrival on Saturday morning. It is as if we have declared war on anonymity. It is as if we are attempting to ‘re-enchant’ the world with personalization.” It is our good fortune to live in a thoroughly “reenchanted” corner of the world, a region at the forefront of a movement that is bringing back to life values of simplicity, authenticity and quality — stuff that works. *Hats off to Guy Clark: Craftsman.

Painted Lady

Antiques Come explore Sisters’ newest Antique Store! Delivery available!

5541.904.0066 41 904 0066

141 E. Cascade Ave., Suite 104 Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7 days a week

Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good In health and fitness there is a common fallacy that leaves some people stuck and not making progress. This person’s intentions are pure, their motivation high. It’s not lack of ability; the cards aren’t stacked against them; they are not “too far gone.” This person leads a perfect life four or five days a week then when something derails perfection, it’s all over. A person chasing perfection will sideline basic skill, habit, and behaviorbuilding and seek out absolute purity. Once perfection cracks, all is out the window and their feelings plunge to the negative, condescending, and harsh, depleting their ego. This depleted ego turns to comfort and indulgence.

All of the sudden the perfectionist is on a bender, pounding donuts and ice cream. Back to square one. It’s Monday and this will all change. Starting again with a no-carb, no-sugar, 60-minutes-of-cardio, 30-minutes-of-weights, leading a don’t-eat-thismake-sure-that’s-organic pure, yoga lifestyle of perfection. Thursday strikes and a pounding headache means skipped morning cardio. Then a cookie tray is brought over from the neighbor. Time runs out for dinner — gotta order fast takeout. To hell with it. Off the rails. Back at it Monday morning. Does this at all sound familiar? It’s a story that many have imitated. The key to lifestyle is first “life.” Follow the basics: nutrition, exercise, and health all revolve around some very simple principles. If adherence is 80 percent, that will produce 95 percent of your results. Allow for a cookie and extra cup of coffee. Live with freedom — but know that on a day-to-day basis you must be flexible and just do the best you can.  Over-analysis of the latest nutrition fad, or getting obsessed with a new trendy workout, lifestyle hack, or wellness mantra will be a house of cards that will topple at first breeze of life’s challenges. Don’t allow perfectionism to stand in the way of pretty darn good!

NuggetNews.com THE GARDEN ANGEL Organic landscaping... We feed the soil! Have a great summer, Sisters! 23 years in business • LCB#9583

541-549-2882


Artisan Showcase

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

A R T I S T S , M A K E R S , B U I L D E R S , C R E AT O R S , CRAFTERS, DREAMERS, DESIGNERS, INVENTORS

Finding flavor in locally raised meat

Proud to be the B E S T !

HoneySmoked Steelhead & Honey-Smoked Steelhead Spread

Mouthwatering, moist, and no bones!

Gourmet Baskets & Boxes... Loaded with your favorite Dan’s Honey-Smoked Steelhead treats and local artisan goodies.

Available locally in Bend, Sisters, and Black Butte Ranch or order online at

www.danssmokedsalmon.com — 970-623-5804 —

Honey-smoked steelhead a hit Down the road in Tumalo, in a fivestar cedar-log smoking facility, Dan Rasmussen is producing honey-smoked steelhead that is as close to perfect as it gets. This is truly artisanal honey-smoked steelhead, produced in small batches using pure honey, with every aspect of the process from brining to smoking to packaging handled with personal care on-site. “We don’t do any more than 100 pounds at any smoking,” Rasmussen told The Nugget. “That’s so we get perfection instead of doing 5,000 pounds at a time.” There are no bones. Dan’s HoneySmoked Steelhead is also particularly famous for steelhead spread. Gift baskets include fresh nuts roasted to perfection. Dan’s facility on his 10-acre property in Tumalo is top-notch. “Cleanliness is the most important thing to us,” he said. Dan’s Honey-Smoked Steelhead products are available in Sisters at Oliver Lemon’s and Ray’s Food Place, and on Sundays at Sisters Farmers Market. Their online store at www.danssmokedsalmon. com offers steelhead as well as gourmet gift baskets.

Evan and Amanda Moran found their way to providing high-quality, delicious beef and pork pretty much by accident. Raising livestock with some friends, he decided to feed them on the byproducts of Central Oregon’s thriving brewing and distilling industries. “When I first started, it was just about not wasting all the byproduct and such,” he recalled. “Turned out that I enjoyed doing it — and it tasted pretty good.” Pretty good is a bit of an understatement. Pioneer Ranch has developed a reputation for delicious sweet-tasting pork and savory beef – all influenced by what and how they’re fed. “Different types of products are complementary with different meats,” Moran said. Brewers’ spent grain and yeasts provide a healthy, well-rounded diet that results in great flavor. The distiller’s spent grains provide the sugar backbone, which creates greater marbling and tenderness in Pioneer Ranch meat. The store is located just a few minutes drive east of Sisters in Tumalo, where you’ll find a full stock of Oregon-grown products. Delivery is available.

LOCALLY RAISED, NATURALLY CRAFTED

BEEF & PORK • Pasture-raised, hand-cut •N  o hormones, GMOs, or antibiotics •F  ed byproducts from local breweries and whiskey distillers enhancing flavor •G  reater marbling, superior tenderness

Butcher boxes • Oregon coast seafood

Order at www.pioneerranch.com FREE DELIVERY on orders of $100+ to Sisters when you mention this ad

Or visit our store in Tumalo 64702 Cook Ave. 559-681-1310

Think of your yard as a painting! Currently producing custom fused-glass totems in all sizes for your yard landscaping.

Piece shown is four-feet tall.

Each piece is handmade and weather tolerant. Contact Z Glass Act through Hood Avenue Art or at her studio, 281 Sun Ranch Dr., Sisters, Oregon

541-556-9068

Creating functional art from glass Susie Zeitner has created a thriving business called Z Glass Act and built a fine reputation as a glass artist, firing kiln glass in her home studio in Sisters. “Lighting is kind of the anchor part of my business, but in the last year-and-ahalf, I’ve done lawn art,” she said. The lawn art has proven desirable to clients. This summer, she’s partnering with Stitchin’ Post to impart the joy of creating glass lawn art to all sorts of folks. She provides the cut glass and the students provide the enthusiasm — no particular experience or aptitude is required. Those in “Making Memories” classes (conducted in COVID-safe conditions) go home with a mosaic glass piece to ornament their yard — pieces Zeitner calls “totems.” “They walk away having made something very successful themselves,” she said. “Glass has an energy — it literally is made of minerals, and minerals have a certain energy. And it has, for thousands of years, been kind of seductive for people.”

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Oregon Artisan Showcase Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

A R T I S T S , M A K E R S , B U I L D E R S , C R E AT O R S , C R A F T E R S , D R E A M E R S , D E S I G N E R S , I N V E N T O R S

400 Acres of Hazelnuts... OREGON GROWN TREE-TO-TABLE

At Hazelnut Hill outside Eugene, from raw to roasted to seasoned, from brittles to buttery spreads and mixes, our hazelnuts are harvested and packaged for freshness. When hand-dipped in high-quality chocolate, our hazelnuts become luscious toffee, brittle, and truffle treats for yourself or as a gift for someone you love. Eat your fill...we’ll grow more! Order online at www.hazelnuthill.com 541-510-4464

The art and craft of hazelnuts Rachel and Ryan Henderson are on a mission to make Oregon hazelnuts readily available for local folks — as one of the few tree-to-table hazelnut producers in the U.S. Their farm, Hazelnut Hill near Eugene, is where the Hendersons craft truly artisanal hazelnut specialty products from roasted nuts to hazelnut-and-chocolate confections. Each order is roasted on demand, and candy is handmade in a commercialgrade kitchen. Rachel tests and develops all recipes, and she’s recently created new hot-and-spicy nut flavors and new flavors of toffee. The tree-to-table approach provides Hazelnut Hill customers with highquality, delicious nut-based products with a full chain of control that assures source and sustainability. “I think it’s important to know where our food comes from, who’s growing it, and how it grows,” Rachel said. The hazelnut is Oregon’s state nut — but, as Rachel points out, most of the product available here is — strangely enough — grown in Turkey. By enjoying Hazelnut Hill’s products, you are supporting a family farm operation with wholesome and sustainable practices.

Adding Caribbean spice to life

Zoe Ditmore has built a business and a way of life around bringing the flavors of the Caribbean to Central Oregon. “I grew up in Barbados,” she told The Nugget. “So my childhood memories were eating spicy food.” Moving to Bend in 2003, “one of the things that I noticed was that there was an absence of Caribbean cuisine.” Ditmore moved to fill that void with The Jerk Kings — a food truck operation serving Central Oregon. The trucks featured Jamaican-style jerk dishes on a Caribbean-themed menu, which grew to be popular. Their marinade and sauce were key components of the flavor. Now local folks can create such Caribbean-themed dishes at home — because The Jerk Kings buttoned up their food trucks and turned to producing and bottling hand-crafted, artisanal Jerk Marinade and Jerk Sauce. “These recipes were honed over a fiveyear period and they’re very unique to The Jerk Kings,” Ditmore said. “The feedback has been tremendous.” Jerk Marinade and Jerk Sauce will soon be available in retail locations in Sisters. Order online at www.thejerkkings.com.

Here’s to Warm Nights & Spicy Dishes!

Bring a little authentic Caribbean jerk into your kitchen today! For recipes, retail locations in Bend & Redmond, or to purchase online www.thejerkkings.com

541-771-5403

A little bit of everything at Sisters Farmers Market

HIGH DESERT STAINED GLASS

20 Years Designing & Installing Custom Stained Glass & Beveled Glass Masterpieces for Your Home or Business

541-213-2346

Monday-Saturday By Appointment — Brad Logan — highdesertstainedglass@gmail.com www.highdesertstainedglass.com

An ancient art form thrives in Central Oregon Stained glass is an ancient and revered art form in Western civilization. In the Middle Ages, it added beauty, light, and majesty to medieval cathedrals. Artisans today bring that beauty into peoples’ homes, with windows, door panels, and imaginative installations. Working with glass is a nearly lifelong passion for Brad Logan, who started working in stained glass in the 1980s. Logan, who has a day job as the operations manager at Bend Broadband, has turned his passion for this venerable art form into a creative artisanal business, High Desert Stained Glass. Logan perfected his craft in a stained glass studio in southern California through the 1980s, before shifting into a career in telecommunications. Moving to Bend in 2012, he has created glass for homes in Central Oregon and is working to move back fully into the creative field. “Stained glass is what I would like to do for the remaining part of my career,” Logan told Bend Magazine last year. “I want to get back to what’s comfortable and what I’m passionate about.”

Nothing showcases the artisanal creations of the Sisters community more thoroughly than Sisters Farmers Market. As Caroline Hager, manager, notes, “You can leave the market with an entire meal and things to serve it on and a beverage to have after, and art to hang…” The market specializes in locally grown produce and other locally produced wares from pottery to skin-care products — and the range is wide and eclectic. “We have a little bit of everything this year, which I think makes it really unique,” Hager said. “No two vendors are the same. Even our produce vendors have different things. There’s a lot of diversity in the vendors.” The Sunday-afternoon market is set up in a COVID-19-safe manner, and offers online ordering and curbside service for those who desire it. The Sisters Farmers Market is a way for local people to support local artisans and the local economy in a time when that is more valuable and important than ever.

20 YEARS OF OREGON ARTISTRY...

CRAFTING FINE CUSTOM STEEL-STRING ACOUSTIC GUITARS

“Urlacher Guitars are easily the finest and best-sounding acoustic instruments I have ever played. Rebecca has a gift for selecting the perfect tonewoods, and her guitars are capable of producing unbelievably deep, rich, resonant and complex sounds. The custom parlor guitar she built for me is tonally and visually stunning, plays flawlessly, turns heads at every show and is an endless source of inspiration for me as a performing artist.” — Adam Sweeney

Hand-crafted guitars make beautiful sound With a deep love of music, a background in the arts, and an appreciation for beautiful wood, Rebecca Urlacher was drawn to craft handmade steel-string guitars — though she’s not herself a musician. “Coming from the angle of an artist, I love having endless wood choices and combinations to build with,” she said. The process begins with selecting woods that will contribute to producing a desired tone. “Among my favorite tonewoods to work with are various rosewoods, ebonies, and koa.” Urlacher focuses on quality custom builds, rather than producing a large number of guitars. She builds multiple body styles while specializing in small-bodied fingerstyle guitars that sparkle and shimmer on the high end and whose aesthetics take the breath away. The artisan’s guitars may be seen by appointment. Guitar making is a life’s passion for the artisan, who said, “I’m continually inspired by the craft, the instruments, and the music they make.”

The art of quality service

Sisters Meat and Smokehouse comes out of a deep three-generation tradition of serving up craft meats. In fact, many of the practices they use today come out of that family tradition. Their legendary jerky, pepperoni sticks, and deli meats are all crafted in-house, and their lamb and elk are locally raised. “People like good quality, pure foods here,” says Sisters Meat and Smokehouse Founder Jeff Johnson. The actual product is not the only thing that gets personal, hands-on attention. Customer service is an art — and an ethic — at Sisters Meat and Smokehouse. “Our success depends 100 percent on the locals,” Johnson said. He expressed the Smokehouse’s appreciation for their support in challenging times. The Smokehouse worked hard to get ahead of coronavirus-related supplychain interruptions and the community was patient and supportive. That relationship of trust and support means a lot. Being integrally tied to the Sisters community is everything to Sisters Smokehouse, as Johnson notes: “We are a Sisters-based company. The people who buy our product, we run into every day.”

OUR 4TH ANNIVERSARY... THIRD-GENERATION ARTISAN MEAT EXPERTS

HAND-CUT BEEF, PORK & POULTRY House Smoked: Summer Sausage, Jerky, Pepperoni, Turkey & Ham, Cold Smoked Cheeses Alaskan line-caught seafood & locally raised lamb & elk Grilling sauces, seasonings & condiments

EATERY • DRINKERY

Restaurant & to-go Sandwiches & sides made in-house Family owned, staffed & operated

541-719-1186

110 S. Spruce St., Sisters Open 9-6 Every Day

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Oregon Artisan Showcase Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

A R T I S T S , M A K E R S , B U I L D E R S , C R E AT O R S , C R A F T E R S , D R E A M E R S , D E S I G N E R S , I N V E N T O R S

400 Acres of Hazelnuts... OREGON GROWN TREE-TO-TABLE

At Hazelnut Hill outside Eugene, from raw to roasted to seasoned, from brittles to buttery spreads and mixes, our hazelnuts are harvested and packaged for freshness. When hand-dipped in high-quality chocolate, our hazelnuts become luscious toffee, brittle, and truffle treats for yourself or as a gift for someone you love. Eat your fill...we’ll grow more! Order online at www.hazelnuthill.com 541-510-4464

The art and craft of hazelnuts Rachel and Ryan Henderson are on a mission to make Oregon hazelnuts readily available for local folks — as one of the few tree-to-table hazelnut producers in the U.S. Their farm, Hazelnut Hill near Eugene, is where the Hendersons craft truly artisanal hazelnut specialty products from roasted nuts to hazelnut-and-chocolate confections. Each order is roasted on demand, and candy is handmade in a commercialgrade kitchen. Rachel tests and develops all recipes, and she’s recently created new hot-and-spicy nut flavors and new flavors of toffee. The tree-to-table approach provides Hazelnut Hill customers with highquality, delicious nut-based products with a full chain of control that assures source and sustainability. “I think it’s important to know where our food comes from, who’s growing it, and how it grows,” Rachel said. The hazelnut is Oregon’s state nut — but, as Rachel points out, most of the product available here is — strangely enough — grown in Turkey. By enjoying Hazelnut Hill’s products, you are supporting a family farm operation with wholesome and sustainable practices.

Adding Caribbean spice to life

Zoe Ditmore has built a business and a way of life around bringing the flavors of the Caribbean to Central Oregon. “I grew up in Barbados,” she told The Nugget. “So my childhood memories were eating spicy food.” Moving to Bend in 2003, “one of the things that I noticed was that there was an absence of Caribbean cuisine.” Ditmore moved to fill that void with The Jerk Kings — a food truck operation serving Central Oregon. The trucks featured Jamaican-style jerk dishes on a Caribbean-themed menu, which grew to be popular. Their marinade and sauce were key components of the flavor. Now local folks can create such Caribbean-themed dishes at home — because The Jerk Kings buttoned up their food trucks and turned to producing and bottling hand-crafted, artisanal Jerk Marinade and Jerk Sauce. “These recipes were honed over a fiveyear period and they’re very unique to The Jerk Kings,” Ditmore said. “The feedback has been tremendous.” Jerk Marinade and Jerk Sauce will soon be available in retail locations in Sisters. Order online at www.thejerkkings.com.

Here’s to Warm Nights & Spicy Dishes!

Bring a little authentic Caribbean jerk into your kitchen today! For recipes, retail locations in Bend & Redmond, or to purchase online www.thejerkkings.com

541-771-5403

A little bit of everything at Sisters Farmers Market

HIGH DESERT STAINED GLASS

20 Years Designing & Installing Custom Stained Glass & Beveled Glass Masterpieces for Your Home or Business

541-213-2346

Monday-Saturday By Appointment — Brad Logan — highdesertstainedglass@gmail.com www.highdesertstainedglass.com

An ancient art form thrives in Central Oregon Stained glass is an ancient and revered art form in Western civilization. In the Middle Ages, it added beauty, light, and majesty to medieval cathedrals. Artisans today bring that beauty into peoples’ homes, with windows, door panels, and imaginative installations. Working with glass is a nearly lifelong passion for Brad Logan, who started working in stained glass in the 1980s. Logan, who has a day job as the operations manager at Bend Broadband, has turned his passion for this venerable art form into a creative artisanal business, High Desert Stained Glass. Logan perfected his craft in a stained glass studio in southern California through the 1980s, before shifting into a career in telecommunications. Moving to Bend in 2012, he has created glass for homes in Central Oregon and is working to move back fully into the creative field. “Stained glass is what I would like to do for the remaining part of my career,” Logan told Bend Magazine last year. “I want to get back to what’s comfortable and what I’m passionate about.”

Nothing showcases the artisanal creations of the Sisters community more thoroughly than Sisters Farmers Market. As Caroline Hager, manager, notes, “You can leave the market with an entire meal and things to serve it on and a beverage to have after, and art to hang…” The market specializes in locally grown produce and other locally produced wares from pottery to skin-care products — and the range is wide and eclectic. “We have a little bit of everything this year, which I think makes it really unique,” Hager said. “No two vendors are the same. Even our produce vendors have different things. There’s a lot of diversity in the vendors.” The Sunday-afternoon market is set up in a COVID-19-safe manner, and offers online ordering and curbside service for those who desire it. The Sisters Farmers Market is a way for local people to support local artisans and the local economy in a time when that is more valuable and important than ever.

20 YEARS OF OREGON ARTISTRY...

CRAFTING FINE CUSTOM STEEL-STRING ACOUSTIC GUITARS

“Urlacher Guitars are easily the finest and best-sounding acoustic instruments I have ever played. Rebecca has a gift for selecting the perfect tonewoods, and her guitars are capable of producing unbelievably deep, rich, resonant and complex sounds. The custom parlor guitar she built for me is tonally and visually stunning, plays flawlessly, turns heads at every show and is an endless source of inspiration for me as a performing artist.” — Adam Sweeney

Hand-crafted guitars make beautiful sound With a deep love of music, a background in the arts, and an appreciation for beautiful wood, Rebecca Urlacher was drawn to craft handmade steel-string guitars — though she’s not herself a musician. “Coming from the angle of an artist, I love having endless wood choices and combinations to build with,” she said. The process begins with selecting woods that will contribute to producing a desired tone. “Among my favorite tonewoods to work with are various rosewoods, ebonies, and koa.” Urlacher focuses on quality custom builds, rather than producing a large number of guitars. She builds multiple body styles while specializing in small-bodied fingerstyle guitars that sparkle and shimmer on the high end and whose aesthetics take the breath away. The artisan’s guitars may be seen by appointment. Guitar making is a life’s passion for the artisan, who said, “I’m continually inspired by the craft, the instruments, and the music they make.”

The art of quality service

Sisters Meat and Smokehouse comes out of a deep three-generation tradition of serving up craft meats. In fact, many of the practices they use today come out of that family tradition. Their legendary jerky, pepperoni sticks, and deli meats are all crafted in-house, and their lamb and elk are locally raised. “People like good quality, pure foods here,” says Sisters Meat and Smokehouse Founder Jeff Johnson. The actual product is not the only thing that gets personal, hands-on attention. Customer service is an art — and an ethic — at Sisters Meat and Smokehouse. “Our success depends 100 percent on the locals,” Johnson said. He expressed the Smokehouse’s appreciation for their support in challenging times. The Smokehouse worked hard to get ahead of coronavirus-related supplychain interruptions and the community was patient and supportive. That relationship of trust and support means a lot. Being integrally tied to the Sisters community is everything to Sisters Smokehouse, as Johnson notes: “We are a Sisters-based company. The people who buy our product, we run into every day.”

OUR 4TH ANNIVERSARY... THIRD-GENERATION ARTISAN MEAT EXPERTS

HAND-CUT BEEF, PORK & POULTRY House Smoked: Summer Sausage, Jerky, Pepperoni, Turkey & Ham, Cold Smoked Cheeses Alaskan line-caught seafood & locally raised lamb & elk Grilling sauces, seasonings & condiments

EATERY • DRINKERY

Restaurant & to-go Sandwiches & sides made in-house Family owned, staffed & operated

541-719-1186

110 S. Spruce St., Sisters Open 9-6 Every Day

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Artisan Showcase

14

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

A R T I S T S , M A K E R S , B U I L D E R S , C R E AT O R S , CRAFTERS, DREAMERS, DESIGNERS, INVENTORS

Sisters studio focuses on local artwork

Chris Nelson is an artist who is helping to build a community of artists at her Wildflower Studio in Sisters. An oil painter and ornament maker, known for her paintings of landscapes, songbirds, and flowers, she is also an expert framer. In that role, she enhances the work of all kinds of artists. That’s part of a way of life for Nelson in her working studio. “What I’ve tried to do is focus on local artwork,” she said. “There’s so many talented people here, so it’s fun to do and you become friends.” The sense of community built around the arts has never been more vital than it is right now. She notes that since the coronavirus pandemic struck, many people have contacted her just to check in and to offer support. Mutual support is critical. “If we’re shopping local and doing local things, we can support ourselves – and that’s pretty awesome,” she said. “Those things make a huge difference when you’re looking for a place to be. I know that’s what drew me here.”

Come Shop With Us! • Artisan Boutique • Leather Goods, Candles, Cards • Fiber Goods • Jewelry • Original Paintings • Prints •

• Custom Picture Framing • THANK YOU, WILDFLOWER CUSTOMERS!

Wildflower Studio Ar t B ou t ique & F raming

541-904-0673• 103-B E. Hood Ave., Sisters

wildflowerstudioartandframing.com

Vineyard is a hub of agritourism

Western Art • Jewelry • Rustic Lodge Furniture Native American Decor • Shed Antler Lighting Antler Dog Chews • Hides & Pelts

ONE-OF-A-KINDHANDCRAFTED ARTISANGIFTS&HOMEDECOR

311 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters facebook.com/antlerartsinc | 541-549-4251 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 7 days a week

Turn your home into a Western lodge Each year, deer and elk shed their antlers naturally. Collectors, like local vendor Joey Wood, find them in forests and meadows and artisans turn them into works of functional art that grace homes across Sisters Country. Antler Arts carries the creations of those local artisans — chandeliers, tables, table lamps, cribbage boards. Just about anything you can conceive of can be made from the natural, renewable resource of shed antlers. “If you can think of it, we can do it with antler,” said Antler Arts co-owner Jim Warren. “We take custom orders and we don’t charge any extra for custom orders.” Jim and his wife, Jaimi, are passionate about the business that has become a destination for many people across the Northwest. They are always developing new product lines to help customers create the Western lodge aesthetic in their home. More juniper creations are on the way, to complement the antler creations that are a part of nature’s beautiful bounty.

Faith Hope and Charity Vineyard is helping to turn the Lower Bridge area northeast of Sisters into a hub for agritourism. It starts with a vineyard that produces cold-hardy Oregon grapes. “They are doing beautifully in Central Oregon and they are producing beautiful wines from our estate vineyard here,” said Cindy Grossman, who owns and operates Faith Hope and Charity Vineyard. “We are so pleased with the quality. It pairs very nicely with our wood-fired pizza.” That pizza is fired in a custom outdoor oven, and features custom, hand-crafted sauces. On Thursday through Saturday nights, that wine and pizza can be enjoyed to the accompaniment of music performed by local artists, in an outdoor setting that is both beautiful and safe for the times. Visitors can tour the property on an electric-assist bicycle. The full experience makes for a celebration for a life connected to place. “We are so blessed to be where we are,” Grossman said. “It’s a pretty nice little product of true, local, artisan agritourism.”

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The Bunkhouse Chronicle Craig Rullman Columnist

Lights. Camera. Cowboys. It was late June, but there was frost on my bedroll when I woke up in the dark at the Murphy Ranch cow camp on South Flat, about 25 miles up the Chewaucan River from Paisley, Oregon. I was there — along with cinematographer Samuel Pyke — to begin filming The Len Babb Movie Project, which was an idea that flashed into my head two months earlier while riding my colt. I had just finished watching a couple of documentary films about cowboys and the life — “Fishtail,” and “The Highly Exalted” — and couldn’t shake the thought: I can do one better than that. Which was an especially arrogant idea, given I had zero experience making movies. I could barely make my iPhone camera work. But I have learned to listen to that little creative voice — in this case it was simply screaming in my ears—and also I am prone to creative manias that smash any fear of failure like an ugly bug. The challenges of making a world-class movie — with world-class production

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

values — are immense, but sometimes we arrive at a confluence of vision, preparation, and opportunity that’s better left unexamined. Sometimes we just have to embrace the confidence to go where the waters are taking us. In this case I was drawn to make a film about the Paisley, Oregon, artist and cowboy Len Babb. I wanted to make a film about his 80 years making a living in the saddle — a feat almost unheard of anymore — and about his accomplished artwork… but also about something else. In an era where it seems we have gone internal, and are intent on devouring ourselves, I wanted to make a film about values — about faith, family, friends, and community, set against a backdrop of some of Oregon’s most intensely beautiful country — and in a town where working cowboys remain the pillars of a threatened culture. But there was something else. I wanted to get as many local people involved as I could. I wanted original music from Sisters local musicians — Jim Cornelius, Mike Biggers, Lilli Worona, and a talented ZX Ranch cowboy named Jody Cooper — and to have Keith Banning at Grange Recorders lay it all down in his Sisters studio. I wanted adult supervision and a local producer, and got one when Cris Converse came on board the project. I wanted Samuel Pyke, a Sisters native, to film it because he has travelled the world with his cameras — and he has a lot of them — filming sequences

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that are second to nobody. I wanted to build a movie around local collaborations — on the production end in Sisters, and on the narrative end by Len’s family and friends around Paisley — and as far out east as Juntura. All of these big ideas cost money, of course. So one day I sat in my barn while the horses ate and the rain came down and put together a call to action, a request for help, and tossed it out into a world seething in the grip of a pandemic, lousy politics, and apparently endless strife. And in the midst of all that ugliness the world has answered with a tremendous outpouring of enthusiasm and assistance, and with an often-expressed desire to see something built around cycles of life, natural beauty, and creativity, rather than cycles of despair, distemper, and destruction. That first morning on South Flat, where Len Babb and half dozen other cowboys from neighboring ranches had gathered to help the Murphy’s gather and brand some 800 calves — I felt that odd frisson, that elevating lightness of mind, that can only come when a creative project has real legs. Five minutes into filming, when the light was perfect and there was a lacecurtain of steam rising out of Morgan Creek, young Paisley buckaroo Tyler Mecham got in a bronc ride on a cold-backed palomino — just as they were trotting out to get around the cows. It was dicey for a minute, but in the end Tyler forked that bronc, and Sam got the shot.

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Branding at Murphy Ranch, South Flat. The Len Babb Movie Project is an artisan project — with every aspect of the production rooted in Sisters and Central Oregon. And that’s when I knew beyond a doubt — come hell or high water — we were going to see this all the way to the end. We can never know what will become of our projects in the long run. We build them on a vision, and like children they grow up with their own ideas. This movie project has grown exponentially, and in surprising fashion, from where it started. It has led to other opportunities. It has helped a spectrum of people understand

how valued they are, and how valued their work is. Which, I think, is ultimately why we create such things: to show care for each other, and to find value in each other. Which is what my cowboy movie is really about. Editor’s note: To view a trailer from The Len Babb Movie Project, visit https:// w w w. g o f u n d m e . c o m / f / len-babb-movie-project or find The Len Babb Movie Project on Facebook.

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

SCHOOL: Metrics pose a challenge for in-person return Continued from page 1

PHOTO BY JAY MATHER

Sisters Folk Festival staff laid out “pods” for concert-goers and strictly limited attendance to produce a COVID-safe event. Masks were required to move through the venue on the back lawn at Sisters Art Works.

CONCERT: Event was designed to be Covid-safe Continued from page 3

The six-person SFF staff worked diligently to make sure that rules were being followed and that the event could be possible and safe for everyone. “I think it went really well overall, everyone was super compliant,” said Executive Director, Crista Munro. “We were all so happy to be there, no one minded the extra precautions; it made everyone feel safer. Our biggest concern was people wouldn’t comply, but everyone complied with the rules. All of the feedback I heard from the audience to the musicians was that they were grateful to be there and doing this. We now have this opportunity to explore local talent as well, which is exciting,” Creative Director Brad Tisdel was also pleased with how the event was received. “I felt like we were thoughtful in the re-imagining of what an event could be amidst COVID protocols for the audience and artist experience. We worked on the details of an evening that felt comfortable, safe and exciting. It was really an experience true to what we have done as an organization. The livestreaming, the pods, we had to re-imagine a new model — I felt we did really well,” he said. “It was exhilarating to hear live music again, as well,” said Tisdel. The event was also livestreamed on Facebook, so those who couldn’t make it could still enjoy the show. The livestream was made possible with Alpine Internet and Grange Recordings. Comments flooded in on the livestream from people across the nation tuning in and stating how grateful they were to be able to watch the show from a distance. Diane Kowalski, who was tuning in on the livestream said: “Thanks for the music. I am from Western NY and volunteer at the festival every year. I have had such a hard year am missing this year

very much, it is renewing my spirit!” The effort put into the event was greatly appreciated by everyone in attendance, including Sisters High School graduate and Americana Project alumni, Kendra Kemp. “While it was weird not being able to sit close and hug and dance with friends and family like normal, you could still feel the love and togetherness that is always a staple at SFF events. I was sure appreciative to be back in my community surrounded by music, even if it was only for one night,” she said. Sisters Folk Festival is hoping to put another event on in September, similar to this one. “I think we can do this and have music again if we are all safe,” said Munro. To see the live stream of the event, visit the Sisters Folk Festival’s Facebook or their YouTube page at: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=UxtAMx8OpAE.

staff more time to prepare for online instruction. The Redmond School District announced CDL will be implemented until November 2 at a minimum and will start two days later than originally planned. Sisters has not announced any plans to change its Tuesday, September 1 start date.  The current metrics to hold classes in person require the county in which the school exists to achieve a level of 10 or fewer cases per 100,000 residents per week and five percent or fewer positive tests per week. Additionally the state must have five percent or fewer positive tests as a whole. For reference, according to the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), there were 108 cases of COVID-19 the week ending July 26. With a population of close to 200,000 for Deschutes County, this calculates to a rate of well over 50 per 100,000. Infection rates have steadily risen in the county since late June. The county was well under the metric threshold from midMarch to mid-June. The 97759 zip code that encompasses most of Sisters Country has had a total of 12 reported cases.  Scholl’s announcement came as a blow to students, families, and teachers alike, who spent the entire spring under a less-developed distance-learning model.

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Under the CDL model students will be graded, attendance will be recorded, and direct contact with teachers will be increased. There is some hope that grades K-3 could get started in person sooner than the higher grade levels because the threshold of infection rates of 30 new cases per 100,000 applies to that age group. The rationale behind this difference is that younger children reportedly not only show lower infection rates, but appear less likely to transmit the disease.  Sisters School District received a state “Preschool

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Promise” grant of around $200,000 to be used starting this school year and is in the process of hiring staff, but Scholl is not certain what the safety guidelines will be for this younger age group. “Preschool guidelines are up in the air for now. We are waiting for more information from the State on that,” he said. “This is a very important issue for our families given that there is such a need for child care for kids, which is why we are moving ahead to be prepared to serve this age group.” Governor Brown also announced she would release an additional $28 million under the Emergency Education Relief Fund in order to help schools cover additional costs related to access to technology, WiFi hotspots, online curriculum and teacher training.  Scholl acknowledged that much work remains for school district employees. “We are looking to create structures to support all of our students as well as possible,” he said. “We hope that we can provide in-person small-group opportunities, including from our counselors. It is our desire to keep our students and families as well connected as any district in Oregon.” Detailed information regarding K-12 education issues in Oregon, including Comprehensive Distance Learning, can be found at the ODE website, www.oregon. gov/ode.

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Scholl emphasized, however, that the key difference for distance learning for the 2020-21 school year is that it clearly will be much more comprehensive. “What we required educationally in Oregon for the spring was minimal since we were in an emergency,” he said. “With the strength of our staff we believe we can do a good job for our students. If and when the metrics improve we want to make sure we have a seamless reentry for in-person learning.”

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LETTERS

Continued from page 2

To the Editor: I’d like to thank Olivia Hougham for her words that were reported in Katy Yoder’s informative article “Sisters vigil takes on racial issues,” printed in the July 29 issue of The Nugget. Olivia called us all “to take responsibility for the things that still need improvement. Just because you ignore something doesn’t make it any less real. In so many ways it seems like our world’s in chaos. The headlines scream this news at every opportunity. I hear this and I read about it, but wonder what does that really mean. My world is made up of family, friends and neighbors. For me life is content. I ask myself, “Why listen to protests? It’s their world, not mine. Why must I change?” It’s now becoming apparent that a bubbling boil has been simmering far too long. We hear a lot of yelling and the words, “We’ve been wronged!” Those of us far away from this chaos wonder, why and where did this anger come from? It’s easy to feel we’re not the ones who have caused this unrest. I’m sure, I haven’t— my life has been blest. Or, have I? Why should I pay any attention when I hear them cry, “protest — yes, protest.” Yes, it’s easy to sit back and reflect on the situation, feeling we’re not to blame. But still, I wonder what are they asking for. Could it be respect? Isn’t that something we all have? I know I do. How is it denied to them? What difference does this “chaos” make for me? I hear about it in the news but what does that really mean for me? I live in Sisters, not Portland. As I said before, my life has been blessed which allows me to cruise along with few worries. Why should I care? Can’t I just pass them by? Yes, our world’s in chaos, the headlines scream. I hear, I read. But what does that mean? As Olivia said, “We all have privilege if we’re not Black.” It is time for all of us to realize our role in the chaos that’s no longer a simmer. We must take responsibility to improve all that’s gone wrong. Just because our lives are blest and we can cruise along with few worries, we can’t just ignore it as if it isn’t real. Thank you, again Olivia. We needed this wakeup call. Edie Jones

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To the Editor: In response to T. Lee Brown’s column, “Oregon is not a TV show,” (The Nugget, July 29, page 7): It’s important to note what may have started out as peaceful protests by Americans exercising their First Amendment rights has now been hijacked by criminals unwilling to be peaceful. Stating that “a few protestors….who want to light fires and make big noises” is a GROSS understatement. Footage shows hundreds of these rioters causing damage to businesses and federal buildings resulting in the escalated enforcement of law and order.  Peaceful protestors should consider that their voice is NOT being shut down by the federal

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

government, but rather by the violent hijacking rioters. Cheryl Pellerin

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To the Editor: Re: “Fire closed Hwy. 20 east of Sisters,” (The Nugget, July 29, page 1): This type of thing could happen in downtown Sisters. It is way past time for the state and city to get together with a route for Highway 20 using the old Shevlin-Hickson right of way used to bypass town. The bypass down Barclay Drive is terrible, located between schools and difficult for big trucks. Blaine McGillicuddy

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To the Editor, I write to applaud, support and affirm three courageous former Sisters’ graduates, Keegan, Zidane and Olivia, whose recent editorial and a speech at the Black Lives Vigil illuminated their experiences of discrimination while living in Sisters. Please know many of us are aware of the “whiteness” of Sisters and Oregon, but keep working in small ways to change things. Having been privileged to become acquainted with numerous members of our Latinx community through a former volunteer English tutoring program, I also know stories and believe you! The question often asked is, “What can we do?” As a former teacher starting in the 1960s, I learned through the Civil Rights Movement and a very diverse Denver-area student body how to see and behave differently. Yes, I hold teachers and coaches responsible for tuning in to what’s happening in their classes and hallways, merely because of their positions of power and influence. When kids get messages, they do impact their families and community. The first lesson is to not assume one person of color speaks for every person of color! Then stop using the word “they” referring to any race, culture, or group; instead choosing “some, one person or a few.” Generalities in language propagate stereotypes. Another error we “well-intentioned” make is becoming “saviors” rather than “allies.” We do “for” instead of “with” people different than ourselves. To step outside our own comfort zones we can view or buy art, listen to music, attend lectures, discussions, watch educational programs, shop in ethnic stores, try different foods, travel, learn 10 words of another language, read books by otherculture-race authors or settings, tutor non-English speakers, bring “other” holidays into your family, look or smile at someone directly, instead of away. When you hear racial slurs, speak up gently, stating that the words are hurtful and make you uncomfortable. Don’t expect everyone to accept your words but feel empowered inside for being true to your own values. Much of our inherent racism stems from fear of differentness, of not knowing, so we cling to the comfort of those like us. Take the risk of stepping out! Paulina Books has a wide choice of materials;

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COCC sponsors the Nancy Chandler Visiting Scholar programs and the multicultural lectures and discussions; the Bend Latino Organization needs tutors; volunteer in Sisters’ schools at any level; host a dialogue with Latinx folks in your church; invite your cleaning woman or landscaper for a potluck to SHARE each other’s foods; attend a protest! Learn! Don’t give up, just show up, stand up, speak up! Wendie Vermillion

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To the Editor: Regarding your editorial “Echoes of tumult” and the continuing civil unrest in Portland, Oregon (The Nugget, July 29, pg. 6): Upon graduation from Portland State University I entered the behavioral health field. I have lived downtown, near PSU, since 2006. What was once a vibrant, intermingling community of race, culture, ideologies, gender, and remarkable interaction is no more. COVID-19 has driven us behind masks and indoors. Unbridled violence has ruptured what was once the wonderful weirdness of Portland. Sixty-plus days of peaceful protest followed by rioting has shuttered businesses and run others, some here for decades, out. Those who live downtown, particularly those over 60, must be extra cautious when we go out. The police are not supported by the city leadership and certainly not respected. Their hands are tied and in return we are put at great risk. Worse is the growing atmosphere of hopelessness, vulnerability, and increasing anger among those who live downtown. The sights, sounds, smells, destruction of buildings and landmarks, along with the closure of schools, museums, and places of worship echoes the same witnessed during my multiple tours in Baghdad, Iraq, in 2003/2004. I understand, after now years of meeting with refugees and working with service members and veterans, how an entire population becomes “shellshocked” under such conditions. In Portland’s case the one-two punch of unending pandemic and politically condoned violence by all levels of leadership are to blame. It seems as if Kate Brown, Ted Wheeler, and the federales have all taken the position that “in order to save the village we have to destroy it.” For any person, faction, or side involved to claim the moral high ground is blasphemy. Gregory Walker

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The Nugget welcomes contributions from its readers, which must include the writer’s name, address and phone number. Letters to the Editor is an open forum for the community and contains unsolicited opinions not necessarily shared by the Editor. The Nugget reserves the right to edit, omit, respond or ask for a response to letters submitted to the Editor. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. Unpublished items are not acknowledged or returned. The deadline for all letters is 10 a.m. Monday.

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

The Nugget Newspaper Crossword

WILDFIRE: Projects help protect Sisters Country

By Jacqueline E. Mathews, Tribune News Service

Continued from page 3

biologist, explained that a small restoration project in / Glaze Meadow built trust and a collaborative spirit with environmental groups that helped get the major Sisters Area Fuels Reduction Project (SAFR) off the ground. SAFR treated thousands of acres, including the area that would be hit by the Pole Creek Fire. “First we did it on 1,200 acres, then we did it on 20,000 acres,” she said. “And SAFR really saved Sisters.” Fire manager Rod Bonacker explained how that happened. He was part of the team that was trying to get ahead of the spreading conflagration, building fire breaks at night. “Strategically, we needed to stop the fire spreading east and southeast,” he said. When a moving wildfire hits previously thinned and treated areas, it tends to drop to the ground and slow down, giving firefighters an opportunity to fight it safely and get containment lines around it. Areas treated in SAFR provided an opportunity for fire crews. “That’s where we elected to do our work,” Bonacker recalled. “We were essentially linking those treated units that we already had. We essentially put a U-shaped control line around the southeast and the south end of the fire.” Without those previously treated areas, “we would have had 10 times more work to do,” Bonacker said. In contrast to treated areas, spots that were dense and overgrown after decades of fire suppression took a heavy hit. Just south of the area where the field trip was held is an area where the main fire ran up against a fire crew’s burnout. Where treated areas withstand fire and come back healthy and even stronger, the wildfire created 100 percent mortality in the overgrown stand. “You have a snag patch,” Bonacker said. How to get those treatments done on the scale required to truly enhance forest health and the safety of local communities is a vexing question for forest managers. Retired Sisters District Ranger Kristi Miller explained that it takes several years to prepare the environmental analysis for a project — and the public doesn’t always like what they see in a project — particularly the prescribed burning that can smudge up Sisters Country on the first nice days of spring. “Mostly what they don’t like is the cutting of the trees and the smoke in the air,” Miller said. However, she noted,

PHOTO BY JIM CORNELIUS

Dense, untreated woodlands are vulnerable to devastating fire. Treated areas withstand fire well and slow its progress. Sisters has seen the devastating smoke impacts of weeks of uncontrolled wildfire — and prescribed fire and thinning is a small price to try to avoid that. “In Central Oregon, it’s not a matter of if you’re going to have fire move across your landscape, it’s when,” Miller said. “It’s better to control when you have fire and how much smoke you put into the air than to let Mother Nature do it.” Chang said that citizens should prod their elected officials to advocate more strongly for federal funding for fuels-reduction projects. “We often hear from elected officials that environmental review is the hold-up,” Chang said. “The big challenge is not environmental review. We need our elected officials advocating for that funding from Congress. We are ready to go on the work. What we need is a Marshall Plan for funding to get this done.” Chang is running to unseat Phil Henderson from the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners. Henderson, who represents the County on the Deschutes Forest Collaborative, says that funding isn’t the crux of the issue. He said he would be happy to advocate for funding from Congress if the Forest Service needs that support — but he sees the bottleneck in another area: limitations on the number of days when the Forest Service can burn. “That’s the big bugaboo,” he said. “It’s not having the resources, it’s having the days to do it. “I don’t really think our problem… is really a shortage of dollars to do the treatment. We can’t do the treatments we have.” Chang acknowledged that the coronavirus pandemic and the economic fallout from it could have as yet unforeseen impact on funding. But he noted that forest restoration has been used in the past as economic stimulus. He believes the work can provide jobs and is a long term investment in the health of forests and communities like Sisters. “This is a great time to be advocating for these funds,” he said.

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

C L A S S I F I E D S

ALL advertising in this newspaper is 101 Real Estate subject to the Fair Housing Act Charming A-Frame Cedar which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or Cabin on Big Lake Road. discrimination based on race, color, Willamette National Forest religion, sex, handicap, familial Service Land Lease, quarter mile status or national origin, or an intention to make any such from Hoodoo Ski Area. 600 sq. preference, limitation or discrim- ft. main floor, 270 sq. ft. sleeping ination.” Familial status includes loft. Full kitchen, wood-burning children under the age of 18 living stove, electric lights. Fully with parents or legal custodians, furnished. Cabin updates pregnant women and people securing completed in summer of 2018 custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly with new double-pane windows, accept any advertising for real estate skylight, new outdoor stairs and which is in violation of the law. Our metal fire skirt. Price: $160,000. readers are hereby informed that all 503-358-4421 or dwellings advertised in this vabreen@gmail.com newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 102 Commercial Rentals 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free HEATED GARAGES telephone number for the hearing Leases, Private, 24-hr. Access, impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Hot-wash Room, Bath, Lounge. CLASSIFIED RATES Jack At 541-419-2502. COST: $2 per line for first insertion, $1.50 per line for each additional Prime Downtown Retail Space insertion to 9th week, $1 per line Call Lori at 541-549-7132 10th week and beyond (identical Cold Springs Commercial ad/consecutive weeks). Also included in The Nugget online classifieds at no CASCADE STORAGE additional charge. There is a (541) 549-1086 • (877) 540-1086 minimum $5 charge for any 581 N. Larch – 7-Day Access classified. First line = approx. 20-25 5x5 to 12x30 Units Available characters, each additional line = approx. 25-30 characters. Letters, 5x5 - 8x15 Climate Control Units spaces, numbers and punctuation = 1 On-site Management character. Any ad copy changes will be charged at the first-time insertion Ground-floor suite, 290 sq. ft. rate of $2 per line. Standard 581 N Larch St. Available now, abbreviations allowed with the $325/month. Call 541-549-1086. approval of The Nugget classified SNO CAP MINI STORAGE department. NOTE: Legal notices www.SistersStorage.com placed in the Public Notice section are charged at the display advertising LONG-TERM DISCOUNTS! rate. Secure, Automated Facility DEADLINE: MONDAY, noon • • • preceding WED. publication. 541-549-3575 PLACEMENT & PAYMENT: Office, 442 E. Main Ave. Phone, MINI STORAGE 541-549-9941 or place online at Sisters Storage & Rental NuggetNews.com. Payment is due 506 North Pine Street upon placement. VISA & MasterCard accepted. Billing 541-549-9631 available for continuously run Sizes 5x5 to 15x30. 7-day access. classified ads, after prepayment of Computerized security gate. first four (4) weeks and upon On-site management. approval of account application. CATEGORIES: 101 Real Estate 102 Commercial Rentals 103 Residential Rentals 104 Vacation Rentals 106 Real Estate Wanted 107 Rentals Wanted 200 Business Opportunities 201 For Sale 202 Firewood 203 Recreation Equipment 204 Arts & Antiques 205 Garage & Estate Sales 206 Lost & Found 207 The Holidays 301 Vehicles 302 Recreational Vehicles 401 Horses 402 Livestock 403 Pets 500 Services 501 Computer Services 502 Carpet Upholstery Cleaning 503 Appliance Repair & Refinish 504 Handyman 505 Auto Repair 600 Tree Service & Forestry 601 Construction 602 Plumbing & Electric 603 Excavations & Trucking 604 Heating & Cooling 605 Painting 606 Landscaping & Yard Maint. 701 Domestic Services 702 Sewing 703 Child Care 704 Events & Event Services 801 Classes & Training 802 Help Wanted 803 Work Wanted 901 Wanted 902 Personals 999 Public Notice

U-Haul trucks, trailers, moving boxes & supplies. STORAGE STEEL CONTAINERS FOR RENT OR SALE Delivered to your business or property site Call 541-678-3332 STORAGE WITH BENEFITS   • 8 x 20 dry box     • Fenced yard, RV & trailers     • In-town, gated, 24-7 Kris@earthwoodhomes.com

103 Residential Rentals

PONDEROSA PROPERTIES –Monthly Rentals Available– Call Debbie at 541-549-2002 Full details, 24 hrs./day, go to: PonderosaProperties.com Printed list at 221 S. Ash, Sisters Ponderosa Properties LLC 4-BR, 2-BA, $2,400. No pets/no smoking. 856 E. Black Butte. 503-551-7751.

104 Vacation Rentals

CASCADE HOME & VACATION RENTALS Monthly and Vacation Rentals throughout Sisters Country. (541) 549-0792 Property management for second homes. CascadeVacationRentals.net In the Heart of Sisters 3 Vac. Rentals – Quiet 1-2 Bdrm Sleep 2-6, start at $145 per nt. vrbo.com/442970 or /180950 or /337593 • 503-730-0150

~ Sisters Vacation Rentals ~ Private Central OR vac. rentals, Property Management Services 541-977-9898 www.SistersVacation.com

201 For Sale

New leather sewing machines. One is Cowboy Outlaw, $1,295. Cowboy 797 with table $1,500. Call 503-843-2806, text for pics. FREE LASERJET PRINTER • HP LaserJet 5200 (black and white laser printer), plus two 16A cartridges. FREE INKJET ALL-IN-ONE PRINTERS • Epson Workforce Pro WF-4740* (*802XL Black Cartridges available at a discounted price) • Epson Workforce Pro WF-2650 • HP PSC 1350 Stop by The Nugget to look at or pick up.

Happy Trails Estate Sales! Selling or Downsizing? Locally owned & operated by... Daiya 541-480-2806 Sharie 541-771-1150 Organ Donor Awareness Fundraising Sale Pet, garden, patio stuff. Bikes, windows, doors, gates, pavers & more. Come through the day all week through 8/16. 572 S. Fir. 541-419-2204. Multi-Family Garage Sale Fri. 8/7, Sat. 8/8, 9-3. Tools, horse tack, house decor, clothing, games & more! 925 E. Ranch Ave., Sisters Garage Sale Fri. Only, 8 to 1. Scrubs size 2X-5X, kitchen/household items & decor, pillow forms, records/CD player, new scroll saw, new-in-box contractor's series generator (diesel power) model DA7000SS, ladies skis, boots & poles. Shoes (10-12 women's) & much more! 1023 E. Ranch Ave., Sisters

19

GEORGE’S SEPTIC TANK SERVICE “A Well Maintained Septic System Protects the Environment” 541-549-2871 SMALL Engine REPAIR Lawn Mowers, Chainsaws & Trimmers Sisters Rental 506 North Pine Street 541-549-9631 Authorized service center for Stihl, Briggs & Stratton, Honda, Tecumseh

Junk removal, garage & storage clean-out, yard & construction debris. You Call – We Haul! 541-598-4345. 202 Firewood 301 Vehicles BOOKKEEPING SERVICE SISTERS FOREST PRODUCTS We Buy, Sell, Consign Quality ~ Olivia Spencer ~ DAVE ELPI – FIREWOOD Cars, Trucks, SUVs & RVs ~ Expert Local Bookkeeping! • SINCE 1976 • Call Jeff at 541-815-7397 Phone: (541) 241-4907 Doug Fir – Lodgepole – Juniper Sisters Car Connection da#3919 www.spencerbookkeeping.com DRIVE-IN WOOD SALES SistersCarConnection.com Black Butte – 18155 Hwy. 126 East – It's All About Sisters! WINDOW CLEANING SistersForestProducts.com The Guide is online at Commercial & Residential. Order Online! 541-410-4509 SistersOregonGuide.com 18 years experience, references available. Safe, reliable, friendly. 203 Recreation Equipment 401 Horses Free estimates. 541-241-0426 Farrier Service – Trim Only ~ WEDDINGS BY KARLY ~ Natural balance bare-hoof Happy to perform virtual or trimming. $45 per horse in-person weddings. 541-640-1687. Custom Wedding Ceremonies Certified Weed-Free HAY. 20+ years • 541-410-4412 Laser Blade Fiberglass Orchard Grass or Alfalfa Hay, revkarly@gmail.com Sit-On-Top Kayak Sisters. $275 per ton. Fun, fast, 14’ long, 24” wide. • DERI’s HAIR SALON • Call 541-548-4163 Easily loads and rides on car-top Call 541-419-1279 rack. REDUCED! $300 $250. ALFALFA HAVE A SERVICE 541-977-8494 TRITICALE TO PROVIDE? ORCHARD GRASS HAY Place your ad in The Nugget 204 Arts & Antiques New crop. No rain. Barn stored. 3-tie bales. $195-$235/ton. Hwy. 501 Computers & Shop On-line! Muskox Skin 126 & Cline Falls. 541-280-1895 Communications with Qiviut. Large Spinning SISTERS SATELLITE 403 Pets wheel/sheep feet. Old Navajo TV • PHONE • INTERNET Rug 3' x 4'. Arrowhead and FURRY FRIENDS Your authorized local dealer for button collection. Prehistoric helping Sisters families w/pets. DirecTV, ViaSat HS Internet super bison and walrus skulls... FREE Dog & Cat Food and more! CCB # 191099 Materials for craftsman — Air No contact pick-up by appt. 541-318-7000 • 541-306-0729 tools, hoses and new burrs! 412 E. Main Ave., Ste. 4 Computer Repair Services Fossil walrus ivory and bone... 541-797-4023 kdmpcs.com • 541-480-6499 Trade beads Bend Spay & Neuter Project Technology Problems? chaforthefinest.com Providing Low-Cost Options for I can fix them for you. Private Showings by Appt. Spay, Neuter and more! Solving for business, home & Call Cha at 541-549-1140 Go to BendSnip.org A/V needs. All tech supported. or call 541-617-1010 205 Garage & Estate Sales Jason Williams Three Rivers Humane Society Sisters local • 25 yrs. experience Workshop & Pole Barn Sale Where love finds a home! See the 541-719-8329 18235 & 18263 Fadjur Ln., doggies at 1694 SE McTaggart Sisters. 2 neighbors, 2 great in Madras • A No-kill Shelter 502 Carpet & Upholstery sales. 9-3, Aug. 7 & 8. Like-new Go to ThreeRiversHS.org Cleaning chair, misc. furniture & home or call 541-475-6889 decor galore from recent M & J CARPET CLEANING remodel. Generator, shop vac, Area rugs, upholstery, tile & 500 Services Simco roping saddle & tack, dryer-vent cleaning. Established 14-ft. boat w/ trailer, vintage & family-owned since 1986. Bombardier dirt bike & lots more 541-549-9090 misc. treasures! BULLSEYE CARPET & MASKS REQUIRED! UPHOLSTERY CLEANING HAIR SHIMMERS Moving Estate Sale New owner of Circuit Rider By Kayster Prineville Area Carpet Cleaning 503-260-1145 4600 NE McKay Creek Rd., Over 30 years experience, wiljorest@gmail.com Fri. & Sat. 9-4. TYM T451 specialize in rugs & pet stains. Your shimmers will last for tractor, 250 Yamoto ATV, Licensed & Insured weeks on end. Just treat them like antiques, silver, household – Sisters owned & operated – you do your hair. You can wash, furnishings & tools. bullseyecarpetcleaning.net condition, color, use heated hair View pics on estatesales.net • 541-238-7700 • appliances and more. – Hosted by Happy Trails –


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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

GORDON’S LAST TOUCH Cleaning Specialists for CARPETS, WINDOWS & UPHOLSTERY Member Better Business Bureau • Bonded & Insured • Serving Central Oregon Since 1980 Call 541-549-3008

C L A S S I F I E D S

Sisters Tree Care, LLC Preservation, Pruning, Removals & Storm Damage Serving All of Central Oregon Brad Bartholomew ISA Cert. Arborist UT-4454A 503-914-8436 • CCB #218444

601 Construction

504 Handyman

LAREDO CONSTRUCTION 541-549-1575 Maintenance / Repairs Insurance Work CCB #194489 Home Customizations, LLC Res. & Commercial Remodeling, Bldg. Maintenance & Painting Chris Patrick, Owner homecustomizations@gmail.com CCB #191760 • 541-588-0083 JONES UPGRADES LLC Home Repairs & Remodeling Drywall, Decks, Pole Barns, Fences, Sheds & more. Mike Jones, 503-428-1281 Local resident • CCB #201650 SISTERS OREGON SistersOregonGuide.com

600 Tree Service & Forestry

Pat Burke LOCALLY OWNED CRAFTSMAN BUILT CCB: 288388 • 541-588-2062 www.sistersfencecompany.com

SIMON CONSTRUCTION SERVICES Residential Remodel Building Projects Bruce Simon, Quality craftsman for 35 years 541-948-2620 • CCB #184335 bsimon@bendbroadband.com

4 Brothers Tree Service Sisters' Premier Tree Experts! – TREE REMOVAL & CLEANUP – Native / Non-Native Tree Assessments, Pruning, High-Risk Construction & Renovation Removals, 24 Hr. Emergency Custom Residential Projects Storm Damage Cleanup, All Phases • CCB #148365 Craning & Stump Grinding, 541-420-8448 Debris Removal. – FOREST MANAGEMENT – Fire Fuels Reduction - Brush Mowing, Mastication, Tree Thinning, Large & Small Scale Residential Building Projects Projects! Serving Sisters area since 1976 Serving Black Butte Ranch, Strictly Quality Camp Sherman & Sisters Area CCB #16891 • CCB #159020 since 2003 541-549-9764 ** Free Estimates ** John Pierce Owner James Hatley & Sons jpierce@bendbroadband.com 541-815-2342 4brostrees.com JERRY WILLIS DRYWALL Licensed, Bonded and Insured & VENETIAN PLASTER CCB-215057 All Residential, Commercial Jobs 541-480-7179 • CCB #69557 Top Knot Tree Care can handle all of your tree needs, LAREDO CONSTRUCTION from trims to removals. 541-549-1575 Specializing in tree assessment, For ALL Your Residential hazard tree removal, crown Construction Needs reduction, ladder fuel reduction, CCB #194489 lot clearing, ornamental and fruit www.laredoconstruction.com tree trimming and care. CASCADE GARAGE DOORS • Locally owned and operated • Factory Trained Technicians • Senior and military discounts • Since 1983 • CCB #44054 • Free assessments • 541-548-2215 • 541-382-4553 • Great cleanups • Carl Perry Construction LLC • Licensed, Insured and Bonded • Residential & Commercial Contact Bello @ 541-419-9655, Restoration • Repair Find us on Facebook and Google – DECKS & FENCES – CCB#227009 CCB #201709 • 541-419-3991 TIMBER STAND CENIGA'S MASONRY, INC. IMPROVEMENT Brick • Block • Stone • Pavers Tree care and vegetation CCB #181448 – 541-350-6068 management www.CenigasMasonry.com Pruning, hazard tree removal, SPURGE COCHRAN stump grinding, brush mowing, BUILDER, INC. certified arborist consultation, General Contractor tree risk assessment qualified, Building Distinctive, wildfire fuels assessment and Handcrafted Custom Homes, treatment, grant acquisition, lot Additions, Remodels Since ’74 clearing, crane services. A “Hands-On” Builder Nate Goodwin Keeping Your Project on Time ISA-Cert. Arborist PN-7987A & On Budget • CCB #96016 CCB #190496 * 541.771.4825 To speak to Spurge personally, Online at: www.tsi.services call 541-815-0523

JOHN NITCHER CONSTRUCTION General Contractor Home repair, remodeling and additions. CCB #101744 541-549-2206

TEWALT & SONS INC. 605 Painting Excavation Contractors Riverfront Painting LLC Sisters’ Oldest Excavation Co. Interior/Exterior • Deck Staining Our experience will make your SHORT LEAD TIMES $ go further – Take advantage Travis Starr, 541-647-0146 of our FREE on-site visit! License #216081 Hard Rock Removal • Rock ~ FRONTIER PAINTING ~ Hammering • Hauling Quality Painting, Ext. & Int. Trucking • Top Soil • Fill Dirt Refurbishing Decks Ground-to-finish Site Prep CCB #131560 • 541-771-5620 Building Demolition • Ponds & www.frontier-painting.com Liners • Creative & Decorative Rock Placement • Clearing, 606 Landscaping & Yard Leveling & Grading Driveways Maintenance Utilities: Sewer Mains, Laterals Lara’s Construction LLC. Water, Power, TV & Phone J&E Landscaping Maintenance CCB#223701 Septic System EXPERTS: LLC Clean-ups, raking, mowing, Offering masonry work, Complete Design & Permit hauling debris, gutters. fireplaces, interior & exterior Approval, Feasibility, Test Holes. Edgar Cortez 541-610-8982 stone/brick-work, build Sand, Pressurized & Standard jandelspcing15@gmail.com barbecues & all types of Systems. Repairs, Tank masonry. Give us a call for a free All Landscaping Services Replacement. CCB #76888 estimate. Mowing, Thatching, Hauling... Cellular: 419-2672 or 419-5172 Call Abel Ortega, 541-815-6740. 541-350-3218 • 541-549-1472 • TewaltAndSonsExcavation.com

Custom Homes Residential Building Projects Concrete Foundations Becke William Pierce CCB# 190689 • 541-647-0384 Beckewpcontracting@gmail.com McCARTHY & SONS CONSTRUCTION New Construction, Remodels, Fine Finish Carpentry 541-420-0487 • CCB #130561 Earthwood Timberframes • Design & construction    • Recycled fir and pine beams    • Mantles and accent timbers Kris@earthwoodhomes.com CCB #174977 THE NUGGET NEWSPAPER 541.549.9941

602 Plumbing & Electric

MONTE'S ELECTRIC • service • residential • commercial • industrial Serving all of Central Oregon 541-719-1316 lic. bond. insured, CCB #200030 SWEENEY PLUMBING, INC. “Quality and Reliability” Repairs • Remodeling • New Construction • Water Heaters 541-549-4349 Residential and Commercial Licensed • Bonded • Insured CCB #87587 R&R Plumbing, LLC > Repair & Service > Hot Water Heaters > Remodels & New Const. Servicing Central Oregon Lic. Bond. Ins. • CCB #184660 541-771-7000 CURTS ELECTRIC LLC – SISTERS, OREGON – Quality Electrical Installations Agricultural • Commercial Industrial • Well & Irrigation Pumps, Motor Control, Barns & Shops, Plan Reviews CCB #178543 541-480-1404

Cascade Bobcat Service is now SCHERRER EXCAVATION Lic. & Bonded – CCB #225286 scherrerexcavation.com Mike • 541-420-4072 Logan • 541-420-0330 ROBINSON & OWEN Heavy Construction, Inc. All your excavation needs *General excavation *Site Preparation *Sub-Divisions *Road Building *Sewer and Water Systems *Underground Utilities *Grading *Snow Removal *Sand-Gravel-Rock Licensed • Bonded • Insured CCB #124327 (541) 549-1848 Your Local Online Source! NuggetNews.com

604 Heating & Cooling

ACTION AIR Heating & Cooling, LLC Retrofit • New Const • Remodel Consulting, Service & Installs actionairheatingandcooling.com CCB #195556 541-549-6464

Complete landscape construction, fencing, irrigation installation & trouble-shooting, general cleanups, turf care maintenance and agronomic recommendations, fertility & water conservation management, light excavation. CCB 188594 • LCB 9264 541-515-8462

From design to installation we can do it all! Pavers, water features, irrigation systems, sod, plants, trees etc. 541-771-9441 LCB #8906 – All You Need Maintenance – Pine needle removal, hauling, mowing, moss removal, edging, raking, weeding, pruning, roofs, gutters, pressure washing... Lic/Bonded/Ins. CCB# 218169 Austin • 541-419-5122

701 Domestic Services

BLAKE & SON – Commercial, Home & Rentals Cleaning WINDOW CLEANING! Lic. & Bonded • 541-549-0897

703 Child Care

Highly educated, experienced private nanny. Call or text 541-690-4080

SUDOKU Level: Difficult

Answer: Page 22

603 Excavation & Trucking BANR Enterprises, LLC Earthwork, Utilities, Grading, Hardscape, Rock Walls Residential & Commercial CCB #165122 • 541-549-6977 www.BANR.net

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down, and each small nine-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.


Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

21

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associated with leasing the NOTICE associated OF RECEIPT with leasingOF the NOTICE OF RECEIPT OF 802 Help Wanted property, any property taxes property, BALLOT anyTITLE property taxes BALLOT TITLE YARDCounty WORKwill be levied by Marion Notice levied by is hereby Mariongiven County thatwill a be Notice is hereby given that a Need 1 day/week. the solehelp responsibility of $15/hr. the ballotthe title sole forresponsibility a measure referred of the ballot title for a measure referred Flexible Lessee. schedule (if needed) by Road District Lessee. #18 (Camp by Road District #18 (Camp with future A mandatory siteadvancement. visit meeting Sherman) A mandatory was filed site visit withmeeting the Sherman) was filed with the will be held541-409-2175. onsite on Tuesday, will County be held Clerkonsite of Jefferson on Tuesday, County Clerk of Jefferson CASCADE MEADOW August 11, 2020 betweenRANCH 1-2 County August on 11, July2020 28, 2020. between This1-2 County on July 28, 2020. This SISTERS, OREGON p.m. All proposers must be measure p.m. will Allbeproposers on the November must be measure will be on the November CMR is a at private residentialsite represented the mandatory represented 3rd, 2020 General at the mandatory Election site 3rd, 2020 General Election community of a visit meetingintosearch be considered visit meeting Ballot. to be considered Ballot. full-time manager. The further. Allranch proposers are asked further. The ballot All title proposers captionareis asked The ballot title caption is hired must liveof in the the “Renewal to employee indicate their attendance to indicate oftheir current attendance three-year of the “Renewal of current three-year 2-bedroomsite house mandatory visitprovided meeting on by the local mandatory optionsite tax visit for general meeting by local option tax for general property and must have voice message to 503-877-8229 operations.” voice message The full to 503-877-8229 text of this operations.” The full text of this experience in12 thep.m. following no later than Friday,areas: ballotnomeasure later than is available 12 p.m. Friday, at the ballot measure is available at the • Good mechanical skills August 7, 2020. The mandatory Jefferson AugustCounty 7, 2020.Clerk’s The mandatory office, Jefferson County Clerk’s office, Knowledge irrigation site•visit meetingof will be the only 66site SE visit D Street, meeting Suitewill C, be Madras, the only 66 SE D Street, Suite C, Madras, systems: their operation opportunity to review theand OR 97741 opportunity or on the to review Jefferson the OR 97741 or on the Jefferson maintenance property. Countyproperty. website: County website: • General ranch skills:the fence Proposals must identify firm Proposals www.jeffco.net/cc must identify the firm www.jeffco.net/cc mowing, and harrowing orrepair, individual by name and An elector or individual may fileby a petition name and for An elector may file a petition for • Good mailing communication skills include address and review include of this mailing ballot address title in the and review of this ballot title in the • Ability tonumbers, work alone telephone list and the be Jefferson telephone County numbers, Circuitlist Court the Jefferson County Circuit Court self-motivated intended use of the property, no later intended than 5:00 use of p.m. theAugust property, 6, no later than 5:00 p.m. August 6, • Ability totowork outdoors in 2020.willingness willingness establish/repair Published to Pursuant establish/repair to ORS 2020. Published Pursuant to ORS adverseappropriate weather: cold/heat, fencing for the 250.195. fencingKatherine appropriate Zemke, for the 250.195. Katherine Zemke, rain/snow intended use, remove weeds and intended Jefferson use, County remove Clerk. weeds and Jefferson County Clerk. • Ability manageas and oversee maintain thetoproperty well as maintain the property as well as IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT help the part-time ability to provide insurance theOF ability provideOF insurance THEtoSTATE OF THE STATE OF • Get the along well with others meeting following minimum meeting the following minimum OREGON FOR THE OREGON FOR THE • Somerequirements: knowledge of and COUNTY requirements: OF DESCHUTES COUNTY OF DESCHUTES comfortable or around horses Comprehensive Commercial or estate Commercial InComprehensive the matter of the of: In the matter of the estate of: Duties include not limited to: Virginia General Liabilitybut - $1,000,000 GeneralCharlotte Liability Jacobsen, - $1,000,000 Virginia Charlotte Jacobsen, runningLimit and maintaining the (Single per Occurrence) (SingleCase LimitNo. per20PB03846 Occurrence) deceased. deceased. Case No. 20PB03846 grounds; settingLiability and operating Automobile Automobile Liability Notice to interested persons. Notice to interested persons. the irrigation(Single system; mowing $1,000,000 Limit per $1,000,000 per Notice is hereby(Single given Limit that the Notice is hereby given that the pastures;Occurrence) plowing roads in winter undersigned Occurrence) has been appointed undersigned has been appointed feeding proposals of horses. must To&bedaily considered, To be considered, proposals personal representative. All must personal representative. All Competitive DOE be submittedsalary via mail to plus be be having submitted via against mail to be persons claims the persons having claims against the benefits. received not later than not later than estatereceived are required to present estate are required to present Interested parties please August 15, 2020 at: send August 15, 2020 at: to them, with vouchers attached, them, with vouchers attached, to your resume of to:Corrections – Department Department of Corrections the undersigned personal – the undersigned personal Cascade Meadow Ranch, PO Box representative Facilities Services Facilities Services at 431 Main St., representative at 431 Main St., 687 Sisters, Oregon Attn: Tracy L. Wilder97759 or Attn: Tracy Wilderwithin Klamath Falls, L. Oregon, Klamath Falls, Oregon, within email:CascadeMeadowRanch123 3601 State Street 3601 State four months after theStreet date of the four months after the date of the @gmail.com Salem, Oregon 97301 Salem, of Oregon 97301or first publication this notice, first publication of this notice, or www.cascademeadowranchhoa. Proposals will be evaluated Proposals willbe bebarred. evaluated the claims may the claims may be barred. com. following receipt. Firms or following receipt. All persons whose rightsFirms may or be All persons whose rights may be individuals submitting NEEDED! proposals affected individuals proposals HOUSEKEEPER by thesubmitting proceedings may affected by the proceedings may determined to be use of determined to beinformation the best use of Looking forthe an best energetic, obtain additional obtain additional information the property and and interests of the from thethe property interests independent experienced recordsand of the court,ofthethe from the records of the court, the State and the for Department State representative, and the Department housekeeper vacation of homes personal or theof personal representative, or the Corrections willSisters. be notified bypay Corrections willpersonal be notified by in and around Good lawyer for the lawyer for the personal mailfor to good beginwork. lease negotiations. mail to begin lease negotiations. Part/full time, representative, Jennifer J. representative, Jennifer J. seasonal. CallContractors Anna @ Sisters Schade, Construction Construction Contractors 431 Main St., Klamath Schade, 431 Main St., Klamath Vacation Rentals, 541-420-5296. Licensing Information Licensing Falls, OR Information 97601. Falls, OR 97601. OR lawDavis requires those who work OR law requires those who Dated and first published onwork Dated and first published on Towing & Tire for FT compensation (except bona for compensation July 1, 2020. Llori(except Meeko,bona July 1, 2020. Llori Meeko, & PT positions available. fide employees) in construction employees) in construction Personal Representative. Personal Representative. CDL not required. Pay dependent fide activity involving improvements activity upon experience. Apply in T H Einvolving N U G improvements GET THE NUGGET to real property be Sisters licensedPark withDr. to real with person, 188 W. N Eproperty W S P AbePlicensed ER NEWSPAPER Oregon CCB. (There areavailable. several Oregon CCB. (There are several Immediate positions 442 E. Main Avenue 442 E. Main Avenue exemptions.) An active license exemptions.) An active Sisters, Oregon 97759license Sisters, Oregon 97759 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ means contractors are bonded means contractors are bonded 541.549.9941 541.549.9941 FULL CHARGE Bookkeeper in and insured. oregon.gov/CCB and insured. oregon.gov/CCB www.NuggetNews.com www.NuggetNews.com Sisters. No remote work. Starting $25/hr. Email: ledgeracct77@gmail.com

999 Public Notice

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS To Lease Property The Oregon Department of Corrections is accepting proposals from firms or individuals interested in leasing property for agricultural or livestock grazing purposes in the Salem area. The property available is located in southeast Salem near Mill Creek Correctional Institution and is generally bordered by Turner Road. The property is currently exempt from property taxes. Lease of the property to a taxable entity may result in property taxes being levied. In addition to all other fees

PHOTO BY BILL BARTLETT

Rocky Mountain goats were released into Mt. Jefferson Wilderness in 2010. Every year the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife contracts with JL Aviation to do an aerial census. The helicopter survey went out of Sisters Eagle Airport for several mornings last week.

Oregon to offer quicker benefits to unemployed PORTLAND (AP) — Oregon officials said Friday that an administrative change will enable the state to offer early prepayments to “tens of thousands” of unemployed workers waiting to have their claims adjudicated. The adjudication process has been clogged by a backlog that usually runs 12-16 weeks, leaving many newly jobless Oregonians without income for months, The Oregonian/ OregonLive reported. Qualifying workers will receive prepayments while their claims work through the adjudication process. They will have to pay the money back if their claim is ultimately denied. The state says it chose participants who are likely to have claims approved. The prepayments will still take “several weeks,” according to Oregon Employment

Department Interim Director David Gerstenfeld. “We think that it will help a lot of people but it will still take some time,” he said. Unemployed workers may face claims adjudication for many reasons including if they have left the state or if they have been laid off by a school district from jobs that typically continue through summer. The state says it will notify those who qualify for the adjudication prepayments by email or robocall. There is no process to apply to participate. Email notifications began going out Friday. Inundated by more than 650,000 jobless claims since the state’s COVID-19 shutdown began in March, and grappling with a computer system that dates to 1993, the employment department has struggled to pay benefits.

THE REAL ESTATE MARKET IS BOOMING…CALL ME FOR

BLAZING FAST RESULTS!

“We recently worked with Ross to sell our home in Sisters, and things couldn’t have gone better. Ross was recommended to us by his many clients in Sisters as the go-to guy. From day 1, Ross moved with speed, experience, and efficiency. We felt his analysis and knowledge of the market in Central Oregon was spot-on, and that helped give us great comfort and hope that our sale would be completed on time and on budget. As fortune would have it, a buyer was found in short order. In negotiating with the wouldbe buyers, Ross gave us great advice and when it came down to brass tacks, he fought for us. We never once had the impression we were just another sale. In the end, our house sold, and we moved on, but Ross will remain a friend and trusted advocate.” Vanissa B.. - Je JJeff ff & V anis an issa sa B

As a principal broker AND loan originator, I offer a single point of contact for your real estate transaction.

Ross Kennedy Principal Broker

Loan Originator NMLS #1612019

541-408-1343 Serving Black Butte Ranch & The Greater Sisters Area


22

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

RECOVERY: Search and rescue teams came together for effort

KNAPWEED: Weeds must be disposed of properly

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 1

for the arrival of a helicopter from Leading Edge Aviation to transport Freepons to Metolius Meadows in Camp Sherman where family and friends were waiting. “My heart aches for David Freepons’ family and friends during this most difficult time,” the sheriff stated. “I can’t imagine the pain of losing a friend in such a manner and being helpless to help or recover David from such a remote and precarious location, and having to wait so long to get him off the mountain.” Atkins said, “I want to personally thank Sergeant David Pond for his caring and tireless pursuit to gather so many experts from other counties to get the job done. When he reached out to other search and rescue coordinators in Oregon, their expertise and knowledge were able to put a recovery plan into action. I’m so thankful for our working relationship with other sheriff’s SAR teams.” Leading Edge Aviation of Bend provided a helicopter for the effort. Teams involved included: Corvallis Mountain Rescue Team with Benton County SAR; Eugene Mountain Rescue with Lane County SAR; Mountain Rescue Team with Deschutes County SAR; Lane County amateur radio operators; Linn County Posse members (shuttling gear for teams); and volunteers of the Jefferson County SAR team who were support and command. The remote location where the accident occurred is located on the east side of Mt. Jefferson, within the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness area, within the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Indian Reservation, in Jefferson County. “I’m proud to be able to help our friends from the Warm Spring Police Department who don’t have a mountain rescue crew, but were able to assist financially to make this operation happen,” Sheriff Atkins stated. “Thank you to Chief William Elliot and tribal council.”

Oregon is the adopted home of six different knapweeds and here in Sisters the spotted knapweed is the one causing trouble. It is tough to control, spreads its seeds easily, and requires aggressive eradication efforts. The best time to deal with them is when they are nothing more than a small broadleaf rosette and can be pulled. If they have already gone to seed, if there are only a few, very carefully pull them by hand so as to not spread the seed. There is a great deal of knapweed information on the internet. For larger areas of knapweed, biological control using insects is proving very effective. Each knapweed species has biological enemies (insects) that attack different parts of the knapweed at different times of the year. For example, knapweed flower weevil larvae feed in the seed heads, destroying the knapweed seeds before they mature. The biological control agents can be ordered online. Spotted knapweed is a perennial herbaceous plant that grows two- to three-feet tall and produces light purple flowers. People who don’t know what a noxious weed they are have been known to cultivate them in their yard. Knapweed is a native of Europe and Asia. It was introduced to North America in the 1890s as a contaminant in agricultural seed and through soil discarded from

SUDOKU SOLUTION for puzzle on page 20

ship ballast. It has become a serious problem in pastures and rangeland in the western U.S. and Canada. Cattle avoid eating it and, if it invades, it will reduce usable grazing land. What we do or don’t do can have consequences for people we don’t even know. Spotted knapweed can be found growing in places like gravel pits, railroad beds, and field margins, from where it can spread to adjacent intact woodlands and prairies. A prime example of a knapweed infestation can be seen in Sisters in the field at the corner of Camp Polk Road and West Barclay Drive. The City is currently working with the property owner to find a way to mitigate the situation. The City of Sisters addresses noxious weeds like spotted knapweed in the Sisters Municipal Code, 8.15.060 (2) (a) (i and ii) which reads: (2) Weed and Brush Removal. The owner or person responsible for the care of any property located in the Sisters city limits shall: (a) Remove or destroy all invader weed species, including but not limited to knapweed, Russian and domestic thistle, Scotch broom, and cheat grass from private property, as follows: (i) All invader weed species that are in flower shall be hand-pulled and bagged, and subsequently removed from the premises. (ii) If not in flower, by using the most efficient and practical means available. [Ord. 479 § 3 (Exh. A), 2017; Ord. 444 § 1 (Exh. A), 2014; Ord. 282 § 1, 1997. Code 2002 § 8.12.042].

Superior Escrow Execution Ultimate Service

Knapweed is a perennial herbaceous weed (returns every year) that is on full display around Sisters, ready to release 1,100 seeds per plant, to be carried by the wind to surrounding areas. Seeds can remain viable for seven to 10 years before they produce another plant. So, what can the ordinary citizen do to help quell its spread? In the broadest sense, weed management strategies have three objectives: to prevent the introduction of new weeds; to discourage weeds so they can’t compete with desired plants; to stop weeds from going to seed, thus reducing, over time, the weed seed burden in the soil. Cultivate a relationship with your neighbors that allows for a coordinated approach to creeping perennials like spotted knapweed and cheat grass. Good weed management can be done without using herbicides, but

if you do use them, be sure you have the right one for your purposes and follow the directions on the container to the letter. Don’t till the weeds into the soil. Hand pull them when they first appear. Don’t wait until they have gone to seed to do something about them. Use of good thick mulch can keep some weeds from ever sprouting. Don’t put spotted knapweed that has gone to seed in the yard-waste bin. Bag in black plastic bags and put in trash.

‘TIS THE SEASON...

BUYING OR SELLING? SELLIN I CAN HELP!

“As first-time home buyers we needed a realtor that could answer all of our questions with patience and enthusiasm. Jim made the home-buying process smooth and enjoyable! If you’re looking for someone who is excited to help make your dreams a reality, then Jim Goodwin is the perfect fit.” — Molly and Garrett J.

Jim Goodwin, 541-214-1297 Reed Bros. Realty

291 W. Cascade Ave. Sisters, OR 97759 541-549-6000 www.reed www. reedbros bross.com www.reedbros.com

Stop by and visit with Tiana Van Landuyt & Shelley Marsh. 220 S. Pine St., Ste. 102 | 541-548-9180

Peaceful Property On Over An Acre!

14420 Crossroads Loop, Sisters. Open floor plan, vaulted

ceilings, wrap-around deck, covered porch and cozy sunroom. 2,481 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Circular driveway, gazebo, detached RV garage/shop with full hookups and fully fenced backyard. $595,000. mls#220106312

Call Jen McCrystal, Broker

541-420-4347 • jen@reedbros.com Reed Bros. Realty

Comments? Email editor@nuggetnews.com

Stopping the spread of knapweed

291 W. Cascade Ave. Sisters, OR 541-549-6000 | www.reedbros.com Licensed in the State of Oregon

Each office independently owned and operated.

Each office is independently owned and operated.

17217 Ivy Lane, Sisters 4-bedroom, 4-bath, 2,900 sq. ft. home of quality craftsmanship on .065 acre in a desirable location. 22-foot ceilings, unobstructed views, gourmet kitchen, 2-car garage, 35-ft. RV garage with hookups, fully fenced yard. Beautifully maintained, turnkey. $749,000. MLS#220104918

PENDING!

Khiva Beckwith - Broker

541-420-2165

khivarealestate@gmail.com www.khivasellscentraloregon.com

Mayfield Realty 809 SW Canyon Dr., Redmond


23

Coast Guard celebrates 230th birthday

COAST GUARD: Career often felt ‘tailor-made’

By Capt. Craig F. Eisenbeis USCG (retired)

Continued from page 8

massive Navy base, and our oldest two children were born in the Navy hospital there. Yet, there was only one tour in three decades when we actually lived on a military base; that was my first permanent Alaskan assignment in Valdez, at the end of the Alaska Pipeline. During the course of my career, we moved 12 times, lived at every corner of the continent, and traveled in all 50 states. It was during my assignment to Valdez, that I took part in the largest at-sea rescue in Coast Guard history. The cruise ship Prinsendam caught fire and eventually sank in the Gulf of Alaska. We successfully rescued every single one of the more than 500 passengers and crew. I headed a rescue team with emergency supplies that boarded one of the rescue ships at sea. With multiple ships and helicopters involved, the survivors, including separated families, were scattered over several sites along the Alaska coast. When our ship made it to Valdez, we had the largest contingent of survivors; and I was put in charge of coordinating the survivor count among the various locations. The operation could not be concluded until we were certain that everyone was safe; and I remember the elation when — at 0400 in the morning — we were able to confirm that we had every single person safely accounted for. I am often asked which duty station was the best, and that’s not an easy question because each assignment had things about it that we liked. We were fortunate in that each location was well suited to the ages of our children and the needs of our family. One thing was definite; when our kids were little, they were certain in the knowledge that Santa arrived on a Coast Guard helicopter! The largest chunks of time in my career were spent in the San Francisco Bay area, Puget Sound, and Alaska. Even while stationed in California, I spent quite a bit of time in Alaska as the Pacific Area Liaison Officer to the joint military Alaska Command. One of the more unusual tasks I was assigned involved training U.S. Navy reservists in coastal defense of the Aleutian Islands. One of my “achievements” was that I successfully managed to avoid assignment to Headquarters in Washington, D.C. On the other side of the ledger, though, I was unsuccessful in ever being assigned to my home state of Oregon. I had to retire to get back here! My final tour was another

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

PHOTO PROVIDED

CAPT Craig F. Eisenbeis ­— Commanding Officer, Coast Guard Marine Safety Office, Wilmington, North Carolina (1991-1994). in Alaska, where one of my responsibilities was to visit every Coast Guard unit in our far-flung operational area. That was one of several Coast Guard jobs I had that seemed to be tailor-made just for me. I still have to periodically return to the north for an “Alaska fix.” People sometimes ask me if I miss guarding the coast, and I like to respond that I’m enjoying guarding the mountains now. Editor’s note: Craig F. Eisenbeis, USCG (ret.) is the recipient of the Meritorious Service Medal, five Coast Guard Commendation Medals, and is a graduate “with highest distinction” of the U.S. Naval War College.

On August 4, 1790, at the urging of Treasury Secretary, Alexander Hamilton, Congress created the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to enforce U.S. tariff laws. In observance of that date, Coast Guard Day is to be celebrated this week, marking the service’s 230th birthday. Upon its creation, Alexander Hamilton’s Cutter Service was the nation’s only naval force, the U.S. Navy having been disbanded at the close of the Revolutionary War. The Navy was not reconstituted until several years later, leaving the Cutter Service — or Coast Guard as it is now known — to claim the title of the nation’s oldest “continuing” seagoing service. In addition to enforcing U.S. tariff laws, the fledgling Cutter Service soon took on responsibility for at-sea ship rescues and combating piracy. Shortly thereafter, the service was also charged with intercepting ships engaged in the illegal slave trade. By the time of the Civil War, the cutters were credited with capturing approximately 500 slave ships; and the Revenue C u t t e r Harriet Lane is recognized as having fired the first naval shots of the Civil War during the siege of

Fort Sumpter. The modern name, Coast Guard, was created in 1915, when the Revenue Cutter Service was merged with the U.S. Lifesaving Service, itself having roots back into the 1700s, when volunteerstaffed lifesaving stations were established in New England. The Lifesaving Service had already been under the administration of the Revenue Cutter Service since the 1800s. The U.S. Lighthouse Service was added later, in 1939, and the Bureau of Marine Inspection in 1942. Following World War I, there was pressure to merge the Coast Guard into the Navy. However, the Coast Guard is the only military service that also has domestic law enforcement responsibilities, so the service is kept separate from the Defense Department, which is precluded from domestic action. In time of declared war, however, the Coast Guard can be transferred to the operational control of the Navy. This occurred in both World Wars. Since then, the Coast Guard has acted in support of military operations in other conflicts. After nearly two centuries, the Coast Guard was transferred from the Tr e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t to the Department of Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n w h e n President Lyndon B. Johnson sought to combine all federal

transportation interests; and the Coast Guard has always been closely intertwined with the maritime industry. The Coast Guard assumed its present departmental status when it was moved into the newly created Department of Homeland Security in 2003. Notably, the Coast Guard has set some interesting precedents in areas of equality. In 1865, Mike Healy, born a slave in Georgia, was commissioned an officer in the Cutter Service and rose to the rank of captain. In 1881, Healy was given his first command and, in 1887, took command of the Cutter Bear and became a legendary figure in the history of Alaska. Today, the Coast Guard’s largest ship, a 420foot icebreaker is named for him. In 1979, Beverly Kelley became the first woman to command a U.S. military vessel, the Coast Guard Cutter Cape Newhagen. In her 30-year career, she went on to command the Coast Guard’s largest high endurance cutters. With the highest entry standards of any service, the Coast Guard remains the most difficult service to gain entry to. Further, even with the highest entry standards, the Coast Guard also has the highest boot camp failure rate of any service, at 20 percent. As rewarding as it can be, pursuing a Coast Guard career is not for everyone.

THE ARENDS & SCOTT REALTY GROUP Discover the Difference

Phil Arends

Principal Broker

541-420-9997

phil.arends@cascadesir.com Licensed in the State of Oregon

Chris Scott Broker

541-588-6614

chris.scott@cascadesir.com Licensed in the State of Oregon

SPRING HOME 42 • $499,000 • mls 220104205 Home has style and charm. Close to Paulina Pool.

PE N D I N G !

34.33 Acres on Whychus Creek! — 69 6 69870 87 870 70 STARDUST LANE, SISTERS — 1,500 feet of frontage on the creek! 2,718 sq. ft., 3-bedroom, 2-bath, home. 3,600 sq. ft. shop, paved RV pads, 2.7 acres water rights, 4+ acres irrigated grounds. Too many upgrades to list. $1,450,000. MLS#220104492

Sheila Reifschneider, Broker, 541-408-6355 Licensed Broker in Oregon | sheila@reedbros.com Coldwell Banker Reed Bros. Realty 291 W. Cascade Ave. | 541-549-6000

GLAZE MEADOW 239 • $695,000 • mls 201910745 Privately located home with indoor hot tub.

Exclusive Onsite Realtor for the Ranch Don Bowler, President and Broker 971-244-3012 Gary Yoder, Managing Principal Broker 541-420-6708 Ross Kennedy, Principal Broker 541-408-1343 Carol Dye, Broker 541-480-0923 | Joe Dye, Broker 541-595-2604 Corrie Lake, Broker 541-521-2392

Open daily, 9 to 5, by the Lodge Pool Complex 541-595-3838 Black Butte Ranch 541-549-5555 in Sisters, 414 W. Washington Ave. see all our listings at blackbutterealtygroup.com


24

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon

Serving the Sisters, Camp Sherman and Black Butte Ranch Areas

Ponderosa Properties R E A L T O R S

541-549-2002

1-800-650-6766

A N D

P R O P E R T Y

www. P onderosa P roperties.com

M A N A G E M E N T

221 S. Ash St. | PO Box 1779, Sisters

New Listings

CLASSIC CAMP SHERMAN RETREAT This wonderful setting on .57 acres borders National Forest, facing south into the mature forest with a cute, cozy Park-Model cabin and spacious yurt for year-round use. Enjoy summer BBQs using the fully functional outdoor kitchen under a playhouse in the trees. The large yurt features a propane heating stove for wintertime use. Immediate access to walking/biking trails spring, summer and fall. Meander those same trails while cross-country skiing through the winter. Truly a wonderful easy-to-use year-round camp in the forest. A special opportunity that doesn’t come around very often. $329,000. MLS#220106043

ASPEN LAKES GOLF ESTATES Updated single-level home, overlooking Aspen Lakes' 18th Green, is ready for you to enjoy the Central Oregon lifestyle. Three bedrooms, 2.5 baths plus den/office, 2,095 sq. ft., oversized double garage on 1.1 acres. Open & light greatroom floor plan, tastefully updated throughout with hardwood floors, vaulted wood ceiling, stone fireplace, eating bar, beautiful kitchen & updated bathrooms. Two master suites and separate den/office. Beautiful setting with landscaped grounds and ponderosa pines. The Aspen Lakes neighborhood offers golf, swimming, tennis, security gate and more. $799,500. MLS#220106089

GRAND PEAKS AT SISTERS Grand Peaks is synonymous with well-being. From day one, the choices are many for discerning seekers of luxury & adventure! This exclusive 38-homesite community offers cutting-edge design using natural, sustainable materials on the exterior, sleek and stylish interiors, and a wealth of recreation including 2 Cushion Extreme professional pickleball courts, butterfly gardens along the Grand Peaks trail, private parks and community pavilion. Close to downtown Sisters. Add the extraordinary views of the Cascades & Central Oregon’s natural beauty and you've found your new home. Lot prices starting at $135,000.

40 ACRES – 17672 WILT ROAD Private, yet close in, less than 10± miles from downtown Sisters. Forty acres with elevated building site and modest mountain views. Mix of pine and juniper. This property would be a great candidate for off-grid power, but power access is available. Call listing agent regarding power. Needs septic feasibility. Conditional-use permit to build a home was recently renewed for two years. Borders government land, State of Oregon, BLM and Deschutes County on three sides Owner will consider short terms. $275,000. MLS#201908158

GOLF COURSE FRONTAGE A beautiful setting overlooking Aspen Lakes' 16th Fairway with tee-to-green fairway views. The vista includes fairway ponds and a forested ridge/open space as the backdrop. Ponderosa pines and open skies highlight this large homesite ideal for your custom-home dreams. Underground utilities and water available, septic approval and close to Aspen Lakes Recreational Center. $299,500. MLS#220106225

LIKE-NEW TOWNHOME! Three bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Ultra-modern interior design features upper-level living. Light and bright greatroom with south-facing windows, cozy propane fireplace and high vaulted ceilings. Sunny patio with mountain view and feeling of openness. Comfortable upper-level master suite with high ceilings, plenty of closet space and spacious bathroom. Also, a half-bath plus utility room upstairs for convenience. Lower level has 2 bedrooms plus guest bathroom. Heat pump on upper and efficient in-floor radiant heating on lower level. Single attached garage. $449,000. MLS#202000010

ROOM TO ROAM – 40 ACRES Cascade mountain views from every corner of this property. Stretch out and star gaze at night or hike onto the adjoining BLM land to the south. Off grid but has cell phone reception. A short drive to the Lake Chinook Store and airstrip. The Lake is about 10 minutes away. Access the property through Culver and cross the bridges or travel out Wilt Road. In Jefferson County the Range Land zone may allow a home on 40 acres. Blue skies will be smiling at you! $71,000. MLS#220102468

60030 RIVER BLUFF TRAIL Build your dream home close to skiing, biking and the Deschutes River in Bend's popular Sunrise Village neighborhood. This large .58-acre homesite is septic approved, flat and one of the last remaining opportunities to build a new home in this quiet, gated community. Walking/biking paths, tennis courts, pool and community center. Great trail access to the river corridor, mountain bike trails to the west and paved trails toward Old Mill. $350,000. MLS #202002312

Kevin R. Dyer 541-480-7552 CRS, GRI, Principal Broker

Rad Dyer 541-480-8853 ABR, CCIM, CRB, CRS, GRI, Principal Broker

Carol Davis 541-410-1556 ABR, GRI, Broker

Catherine Black 541-480-1929

CRS, Broker, Realtor Emeritus 40+ years

PEAKS AT PINE MEADOW Wonderful townhome complex in Pine Meadow Village. Like-new, 2-level unit with upstairs reverse living. Lots of windows and natural light. Greatroom space with modern design features gas fireplace and access to upper-level patio. Master bedroom is on lower level and has functional and practical workspace cubby. $397,000. MLS #202000483.

SOUTH MEADOW #8 One-third ownership! Enjoy an open floor plan with views of pine trees from the living room, featuring stone fireplace, vaulted ceilings, kitchen and dining room. Three bedrooms, 2 baths, master on ground floor, offering a private retreat for guests or a place for kids to hang out. Huge windows provide abundant natural light. Loft for additional sleeping area. Wood detail throughout gives off the classic BBR feel. Black Butte Ranch amenities include restaurants, golf courses, spa, indoor and outdoor pools and hot tubs, fitness facilities, tennis and pickleball courts, hiking and biking trails, and more! $185,500. MLS#201909261

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS Located in the Coyote Springs neighborhood, end of a quiet cul-de-sac bordering the forest buffer, this homesite offers the best of both worlds. Access over 100 miles of Peterson Ridge and other forest trails right out your back door. Enjoy the nearby amenities of FivePine Lodge, Three Creeks Brewing, Sisters Athletic Club, Shibui Spa and Sisters Movie House or stroll into downtown to enjoy Creekside Park, the Village Green, art galleries, fine restaurants and gourmet markets. Ready for your new home with underground utilities, paved streets, city sewer and city water. CCRs and design guidelines have helped create a beautiful neighborhood of quality homes. Low HOA fees. Get your hiking shoes on or pull out your mountain bike and enjoy all that Sisters Country has to offer! $260,000. MLS#201910116

1087 E. CREEKSIDE COURT Premier building lot in one of Sisters' finest neighborhoods. 12,320 square feet of level land with city utilities available. Nicely treed with native pines. Whychus Creek access. A quiet corner of Sisters, yet easy access to town. $235,000. MLS#220102860

Shane Lundgren 541-588-9226 Broker

Debbie Dyer 541-480-1650 GRI, Broker

Greg Davidge 808-281-2676 Broker

SPRING HOME #14 Special setting at Black Butte Ranch with mountain feel and sense of privacy from its perch on the side of a forested ridge. Centrally located to all amenities at the Ranch. Greatroom kitchen overlooks family room. 2 spacious dining areas. 2 living areas, multiple fireplaces. 3 spacious bedroom suites, plus 2 bunk-room suites. Extensive outdoor living by large main-level deck overlooking the forest, covered lower-level patio, private morning courtyard & more. Timeless contemporary design apparent from cul-de-sac entrance, paved drive & parking, triple garage & formal covered entrance. $1,200,000. MLS#220104124

EXCITING NEW TOWNHOME Located in The Peaks at Pine Meadow Village. Two bedrooms, 2 baths and 1,455 sq.ft. Contemporary style and design features upper-level living for privacy and view from the greatroom. Practical kitchen opens to a large spacious living/dining with vaulted ceilings and lots of windows to let the natural light in. Propane fireplace provides a cozy and warm living space in the cooler months. Ductless heat pump and lower-level radiant floor heating gives year-round efficiency. Master is on the entry level and enjoys a large closet and luxurious bathroom. Guest suite is located off the greatroom, as well as an enjoyable upper-level patio to enjoy the outdoors. An auto courtyard leads to the attached garage. $432,500. MLS#202000020

NEAR THE DESCHUTES RIVER Climb the slight ridge and the mountain views open big and wide from Mt. Hood to Broken Top. Every peak is visible as well as the valley below. Bordering BLM directly on the eastside. Paved access, underground utilities, existing well and septic available. Enjoy the quiet setting and night sky in this beautiful secluded corner of Deschutes County. $395,000. MLS#201506281 MOUNTAIN-VIEW ACREAGE! 11.5 acres slope gently to the northwest with great mountain views and high-desert beauty. Paved access, electricity and approval for a septic system, this acreage is ready for your Central Oregon dream home. The property offers views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Jefferson, Three Fingered Jack, Black Butte, Mt. Washington, Black Crater and the Three Sisters, plus elevated views of the surrounding area. There are adjacent parcels for sale on either side that expand the possibilities. BLM lands are nearby and the fishing is great along this stretch of the Middle Deschutes. $239,500. MLS#201910345

Jackie Herring 541-480-3157 Broker

Guy Lauziere 541-410-9241 Broker

Profile for Nugget Newspaper

The Nugget Newspaper // Vol. XLIII No. 32 // 2020-08-05  

Professional community journalism based in Sisters, Oregon providing comprehensive coverage of city government, school, forest service and o...

The Nugget Newspaper // Vol. XLIII No. 32 // 2020-08-05  

Professional community journalism based in Sisters, Oregon providing comprehensive coverage of city government, school, forest service and o...

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