Issuu on Google+

R I T/ NTID Information and Computing Studies


Welcome Welcome to the 2012-2013 academic year at Rochester Institute of Technology and the Information and Computing Studies (ICS) department of the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Information and Computing Studies department’s mission is to provide the best academic experience for all students enrolled in the program. As we begin the new year, I am pleased to present to you this year’s Student Handbook. Please use this handbook whenever you need information about the ICS department. The 2012-2013 year is off to a good start with two new lecturers joining the department: Christopher Campbell Mark Jeremy Welcome aboard, Chris and Mark! They both are RIT/NTID alumnus! As the chair, I have an “open door” policy. If my door is open, you are most welcome to stop in. If I am not available, please feel free to make an appointment through Nancy Raco, the department’s Senior Staff Assistant. Have a great year 2012-2013. Elissa Olsen, Chairperson Information and Computing Studies Department

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


2

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


Table of Contents The ACT program ........................................................................................................... 5 The AOS and AAS Degree Options.................................................................................. 6 Concentrations .............................................................................................................. 6 Co-op ............................................................................................................................. 7 AOS Degree Course Schedule – Students entering Fall 2012.......................................... 8 AAS Degree Course Schedule – Students entering Fall 2012 ........................................ 10 AOS Degree Course Schedule (Quarter) ....................................................................... 12 AAS Degree Course Schedule (Quarter) ....................................................................... 14 The AS Degree Option .................................................................................................. 16 AS Degree Course Schedule – Students entering Fall 2012 .......................................... 17 AS Degree Course Schedule (Quarter) ......................................................................... 20 Program Entry Requirements ....................................................................................... 22 Schedule of Course Availability - Quarter..................................................................... 23 Schedule of Course Availability - Semester .................................................................. 24 Facilities ....................................................................................................................... 25 Course Descriptions - Quarter...................................................................................... 26 Course Descriptions - Semester ................................................................................... 30 ICS Faculty and Staff .................................................................................................... 33 ICS Counselors ............................................................................................................. 36 Employment Advisors .................................................................................................. 36 Support Services .......................................................................................................... 37 ICS Policies ................................................................................................................... 38 NTID Policies ................................................................................................................ 40 RIT Policies ................................................................................................................... 42 2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

3


4

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


The ACT program What is Applied Computer Technology (ACT)? Almost every career today involves working with computers. The Applied Computer Technology major will train you for a computer-related career. Students who major in ACT learn how to maintain computer software and hardware, and how to set up and secure computer networks, which are skills that are essential to every industry. Upon completing the AOS or the AAS degree program, students qualify for a number of positions, including computer technicians, personal computer support specialists, and network support specialists. Upon successful completion of the AS degree, students are qualified to transfer to a BS degree program in the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. The ACT program is in the Information and Computer Studies (ICS) Department.

Quarter to Semester Conversion This year will be the final year that RIT will be offering classes in the quarter system. Beginning next fall, RIT will convert to the semester system. For most students, the 10 week quarter (fall, winter, spring and summer) will give way to 15 week semesters (fall and spring) with a 3 week intersession between fall and spring semesters. RIT courses will continue to be offered for 10 weeks during the summer, however, the ACT program will offer classes only during the fall and spring semesters. Students entering the ACT program during the Fall 2012 will take core classes to ensure smooth transition to the semester system. Below is an excerpt from the www.rit.edu/conversion website explaining the reasons RIT has decided to switch to the semester system. For more information, please check this website.

Why semesters at RIT? The decision to move RIT from a quarter academic calendar to a semester academic calendar was made by President Bill Destler in February 2010 following extensive discussions with students, faculty, and staff; as well as comprehensive research on the topic of academic calendars; and implementation recommendations by a faculty committee. In his letter to the RIT community announcing the move to semesters, Dr. Destler wrote that his decision was largely driven by the semester calendar's potential to enhance academic quality. Other factors influencing the conversion decision were: a national movement away from the quarter calendar that complicates RIT's interactions with other institutions in such areas as credit transfer, student exchange, and study abroad; the semester calendar's potential for improving student retention and graduation rates; the opportunity for greater curricular interactivity among Rochester area colleges; the added value of a January intersession term that would allow students to catch up on or move ahead with their coursework, earn extra money, or work intensively on a project; the benefits to students of having vacations and breaks coincide with those of their friends at other institutions.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

5


The AOS and AAS Degree Options An Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) or an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree in Applied Computer Technology (ACT) will prepare you for a career in computer support occupations that involve: Installing, maintaining, upgrading, and repairing computer hardware and software. Networking and security that allows computers to be secured and safely communicate and share resources with one another. As a student in the Applied Computer Technology program, you will select an area to specialize in by choosing a program concentration in either Computer Technical Support or Networking and Cybersecurity.

Concentrations Computer Technical Support If you select this concentration, you will develop skills specific to working with people to solve their computer-related problems. These skills prepare you to work at a help desk responding to client's computer problems, and perform setup, upgrades and repairs to computers and computer peripherals.

Networking and Cybersecurity If you select this concentration, you will develop skills specific to network and network security support, including server set-up, support and administration; network set-up, troubleshooting and repair; identifying and implementing security policies; and installing appropriate hardware and software to support a secure and robust network.

How to Choose Your Concentration You will need to select a concentration at the end of your first year. To select your major: First talk to your counselor during the Spring quarter of your first year to talk about which concentration is right for you. Then fill out an ICS Concentration form. The form is available from Nancy Raco, the ICS Department Staff Assistant.

6

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


Co-op To graduate with an AAS or AOS degree in Applied Computer Technology you must satisfactorily complete one co-op. The co-op must be: A minimum of 10 weeks long Full-time (35-40 hours/week) Related to your computer major The co-op should be paid work, but if it is a volunteer position the work expectations must be the same as they would be for a full-time paid employee.

To complete your co-op and receive a grade, you must: Pass the course Job Search Process (0806-101). After you find a job, but before you start the job, fill out the ICS Department Co-op Approval Form: o o o o o

Go to http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics and click on the Co-op link. On the Co-op page, click the link to the ICS Co-op Approval Form Fill out the form and then save it (File/Save As) Email the completed form as an attachment to Karen.Beiter@rit.edu. If you have a copy of the job description for your co-op job, email that to Karen.Beiter@rit.edu as well.

After your form is received, your request will be reviewed. If the co-op is approved, you will get an email message telling you that you have been registered for the co-op course. (You cannot register for the co-op course yourself.) After your co-op has been approved, register your co-op in Job Zone using the information you provided in the Co-op Approval Form. It is very important that you enter the correct information in Job Zone, particularly your supervisor name and email. The Job Zone website is www.rit.edu/oce. Before you complete your co-op, remind your supervisor to fill out the supervisor evaluation. Your supervisor will get an email telling him or her where the evaluation can be accessed on-line. After completing your co-op, go to back to the ICS web site at http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics and fill out and submit the On-line Co-op Self-Evaluation to receive your co-op grade.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

7


AOS Degree Course Schedule – Students entering Fall 2012 Students in the AOS degree option take their math, science, and English courses at NTID, as well as NTID Communication, Social Science, and Humanities courses. Credits First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 0805-217 PC Hardware II 3 0805-216 PC Hardware I 3 0805-251 Introduction to Web 0805-224 Intro to Networking & Development 3 Security Awareness 3 0805-225 Networking Essentials 3 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 0805-220 Intro to Unix 3 0883-212 Career English I 4 0884-180 Foundations of Algebra 4 0883-213 Career English II 4 16 16 Fall Semester (2nd year) NACT-200 Help Desk NACT-230 Intro to Programming NACT-240 World of Work NACT-XXX Concentration LAS Perspective Course

Third Quarter Credits 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 3 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 3 0805-351 Intro to MAC 3 0883-214 Career English III 4 LAS Perspective Course 3 16

Credits Spring Semester (2nd year) 3 NACT-235 Intro to Database Applications 3 NACT-XXX Concentration 3 NACT-XXX Concentration 3 LAS Perspective Course 3 LAS Perspective Course 15

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15

Summer (2nd year) Credits NACT-299 Co-op: Applied Computer Technology 0 Fall Semester (3rd year) NACT-295 ACT Technical Capstone NACT-XXX Technical Elective NACT-XXX Technical Elective LAS Perspective Course Wellness Education

8

Credits Concentration Courses Networking and Cybersecurity 3 NACT-260 LAN/WAN Design 3 NACT-261 Network Security 3 NACT-262 Fund of Systems Admin 3 Computer Technical Support 0 NACT-250 Computer & Data Security 12 NACT-251 Digital Systems Integration NACT-252 Server Management and Security

3 (F) 3 (S) 3 (S) 3 (F) 3 (S) 3 (S)

1

Math Elective:

Students must select math courses at the B-level or higher. The following courses cannot be used as a math elective: 0884-120 Preparation for Algebra; 0884-150 Concepts of Measurement and Mathematics 0884-155 Applications for the Business Technologies.

2

Technical Elective:

Students may select ACT electives or approved electives from other NTID departments.

3

LAS Perspective Courses: Students will need to work with their counselors to determine approved Liberal Arts and Science Perspective Courses.

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


AOS Course Requirements

Name_____________________________

Note: This checklist is for students entering the ACT program during the academic year 2012-2013.

Core Courses

Math Requirements

Term

Grade Course Taken

Term

Grade Course (B level or higher)

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____

_____ ____-____ _________________

_____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____

_____

0805-215 PC Operating Systems 0805-216 PC Hardware I 0805-217 PC Hardware II 0805-220 Intro to Unix 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness 0805-225 Networking Essentials 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 0805-251 Intro to Web Development 0805-351 Intro to the Mac NACT-200 Help Desk Support NACT-230 Intro to Programming NACT-235 Intro to DB App. NACT-240 World of Work NACT-295 ACT Technical Capstone NACT-299 Co-op

Concentration Courses (Choose one) Networking & Cyber Security: Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____ _____

_____ NACT-260 LAN/WAN Design _____ NACT-261 Network Security _____ NACT-262 Fund. of Sys. Admin.

Career English Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____ _____

_____ 0883-212 Career English I _____ 0883-213 Career English II _____ 0883-214 Career English III

Interdisciplinary Courses Quarter Grade Course Taken _____

_____ 0887-200 Freshman Seminar

Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses Term

Grade P# Course Taken

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

___ ___ ___ ___ ___

____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________

(P# - enter the Perspective Number for courses taken)

Physical Education Term

Grade Wellness or PE Activity Taken

_____

_____ ____-____ _________________

Computer Tech Support: Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____

_____ NACT-250 Comp & Data Security _____ NACT-251 Digital Systems Integration _____ NACT-252 Server Management & Security

_____

Technical Electives Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____

_____ ____-____ _________________ _____ ____-____ _________________

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

9


AAS Degree Course Schedule – Students entering Fall 2012 Students in the AAS degree option take math and science courses at NTID but take Writing, Social Science, and Humanities courses in the College of Liberal Arts. Credits First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 0805-217 PC Hardware II 3 0805-216 PC Hardware I 3 0805-251 Introduction to Web 0805-224 Intro to Networking & Development 3 Security Awareness 3 0805-225 Networking Essentials 3 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 0805-220 Intro to Unix 3 0502-227 Writing Seminar 4 0884-180 Foundations of Algebra 4 LAS Foundation Course 3 16 15 Fall Semester (2nd year) NACT-200 Help Desk NACT-230 Intro to Programming NACT-240 World of Work NACT-XXX Concentration LAS Perspective Course

Third Quarter Credits 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 3 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 3 0805-351 Intro to MAC 3 LAS Perspective Course 3 LAS Perspective Course 3 15

Credits Spring Semester (2nd year) 3 NACT-235 Intro to Database Applications 3 NACT-XXX Concentration 3 NACT-XXX Concentration 3 LAS Perspective Course 3 LAS Perspective Course 15

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15

Summer (2nd year) Credits NACT-299 Co-op: Applied Computer Technology 0 Fall Semester (3rd year) NACT-295 ACT Technical Capstone NACT-XXX Technical Elective NACT-XXX Technical Elective LAS Perspective Course Wellness Education

10

Credits Concentration Courses Networking and Cybersecurity 3 NACT-260 LAN/WAN Design 3 NACT-261 Network Security 3 NACT-262 Fund of Systems Admin 3 Computer Technical Support 0 NACT-250 Computer & Data Security 12 NACT-251 Digital Systems Integration NACT-252 Server Management and Security

3 (F) 3 (S) 3 (S) 3 (F) 3 (S) 3 (S)

1

Math Elective:

Students must select math courses at the B-level or higher. The following courses cannot be used as a math elective: 0884-120 Preparation for Algebra; 0884-150 Concepts of Measurement and Mathematics 0884-155 Applications for the Business Technologies.

2

Technical Elective:

Students may select ACT electives or approved electives from other NTID departments.

3

LAS Perspective Courses: Students will need to work with their counselors to determine approved Liberal Arts and Science Perspective Courses.

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


AAS Course Requirements

Name_____________________________

Note: This checklist is for students entering the ACT program during the academic year 2012-2013.

Core Courses

Math Requirements

Term

Grade Course Taken

Term

Grade Course (B level or higher)

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____

_____ ____-____ _________________

_____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____

_____

0805-215 PC Operating Systems 0805-216 PC Hardware I 0805-217 PC Hardware II 0805-220 Intro to Unix 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness 0805-225 Networking Essentials 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 0805-251 Intro to Web Development 0805-351 Intro to the Mac NACT-200 Help Desk Support NACT-230 Intro to Programming NACT-235 Intro to DB App. NACT-240 World of Work NACT-295 ACT Technical Capstone NACT-299 Co-op

Concentration Courses (Choose one) Networking & Cyber Security: Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____ _____

_____ NACT-260 LAN/WAN Design _____ NACT-261 Network Security _____ NACT-262 Fund of Sys Admin

College of Liberal Arts Term

Grade Course Taken

_____

_____ 0502-227 Writing Seminar

Interdisciplinary Courses Term

Grade Course Taken

_____

_____ 0887-200 Freshman Seminar

Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses Term

Grade

Foundation Course Taken

_____

_____

____-____ _______________

Term

Grade P# Perspective Course Taken

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________

(P# - enter the Perspective Number for courses taken)

Physical Education Computer Tech Support: Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____

_____ NACT-250 Comp & Data Security _____ NACT-251 Digital Systems Integration _____ NACT-252 Server Management & Security

_____

Term

Grade Wellness or PE Activity Taken

_____

_____ ____-____ _________________

Technical Electives Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____

_____ ____-____ _________________ _____ ____-____ _________________

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

11


AOS Degree Course Schedule (Quarter) This schedule is for students who enrolled into the program prior to Fall 2012 and are taking courses under the quarter system. Students in the AOS degree option take their math, science, and English courses at NTID, as well as NTID Communication, Social Science, and Humanities courses. Credits First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 0805-217 PC Hardware II 3 0805-201 Applications Software 3 0805-216 PC Hardware I 3 0805-251 Introduction to Web Development 3 0805-224 Intro to Networking & 0805-225 Networking Essentials 3 Security Awareness 3 0883-213 Career English II 4 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 13 0883-212 Career English I 4 15

Third Quarter Credits 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 3 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 3 0805-220 Intro to Unix 3 0884-180 Foundations of Algebra 4 0883-214 Career English III 4 17

Credits Fourth Quarter Credits Fifth Quarter 0805-xxx Concentration 3 0805-230 Intro to Programming 3 0805-xxx Concentration 3 0805-351 Intro to the Mac 3 0805-310 Microcomputer DB 3 0806-101 Job Search 2 C-level Humanities 3 B-level Science 3 1 Math Elective 4 C-level Communications 3 15 15

Sixth Quarter Credits 0805-xxx Concentration 3 0805-xxx Concentration 3 2 Technical Elective 3 C-level Social Science 3 12

Seventh Quarter Credits Concentration Courses 3 Networking and Cybersecurity 0805-xxx 2Technical Elective 0805-395 ACT Technical 0805-335 LAN/WAN Design Capstone 3 0805-336 Network Security 0806-201 Employment Seminar 1 Computer Technical Support Deaf Cultural Studies/ 0805-352 Help Desk Support ASL 3 0805-353 Intro to Computer 3 Capstone Seminar 4 Forensics 14

Concentration Courses 3 3 3 3

Networking and Cybersecurity 0805-337 Server Management and Security 0805-338 Firewall and IDS Computer Technical Support 0805-337 Server Management and Security 0805-350 Digital Technology Integration

3 3

3 3

Total Credits: 100 Wellness Education:

One wellness or PE activity is required and may be taken anytime.

Co-op Requirements: One co-op is required. Co-op should be taken after the sixth quarter.

12

1

Math Elective:

2

Technical Elective: Student may select ACT electives or approved electives from other NTID departments.

3

Capstone Seminar:

Student must select math courses at the B-level or higher. The following courses cannot be used as a math elective: 0884-120 Preparation for Algebra; 0884-150 Concepts of Measurement and Mathematics 0884-155 Applications for the Business Technologies. Students must select either Capstone: Society and Technology (0882-297) or Capstone: Explorations in Social Responsibility (0880-294)

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


AOS Course Requirements (Quarter) Core courses Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

ACT Concentration courses (Choose one): Course 0805-201 Application Software 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 0805-216 PC Hardware I 0805-217 PC Hardware II 0805-220 Intro to Unix 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness 0805-225 Networking Essentials 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 0805-230 Intro to Programming 0805-251 Intro to Web Development 0805-310 Microcomputer DB 0805-351 Intro to the Mac 0805-395 ACT Technical Capstone 0805-299 Co-op

Technical electives Quarter _____ _____

Grade _____ _____

Course taken ____-____ _________________ ____-____ _________________

Quarter Grade Course taken (B level or higher) 0884-180 Found. of Algebra or higher: _____ _____ ____-____ _________________

Math elective Grade _____

Course taken (B level or higher) ____-____ _________________

Science elective Quarter _____

Grade _____

Course taken (B level or higher) ____-____ _________________

Interdisciplinary courses Quarter ______ ______ ______

Grade _____ _____ _____

Networking & Cyber Security: Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____ _____

Course 0805-335 LAN/WAN Design 0805-336 Network Security 0805-337 Server Mgmt & Security 0805-338 Firewall and IDS

Computer Tech Support: Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____ _____

Course 0805-352 Help Desk Support 0805-353 Intro to Computer Forensics 0805-337 Server Mgmt & Security 0805-350 Digital Technology Integration

Career English Quarter _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____

Course 0883-212 Career English I 0883-213 Career English II 0883-214 Career English III

NTID Arts & Sciences electives

Math requirement

Quarter _____

Name______________________________

Course 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 0806-101 Job Search 0806-201 Employment Seminar

For Quarter Grade Deaf Course taken: Studies? Communications: _____ _____ Y / N ____-____ _____________ Social Science (C level): _____ _____ Y / N ____-____ _____________ Humanities (C level): _____ _____ Y / N ___-____ ______________ Humanities (C level): _____ _____ Y / N ____-____ _____________ _____ _____ Y / N ____-____ Capstone Seminar

Physical Education Quarter ______

Grade _____

Wellness or PE Activity taken: ____-____ _________________

2011-2012 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

13


AAS Degree Course Schedule (Quarter) This schedule is for students who enrolled into the program prior to Fall 2012 and are taking courses under the quarter system. Students in the AAS degree option take math and science courses at NTID but take Writing, Social Science, and Humanities courses in the College of Liberal Arts. Credits First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 0805-217 PC Hardware II 3 0805-201 Applications Software 3 0805-216 PC Hardware I 3 0805-251 Introduction to Web Development 3 0805-224 Intro to Networking & 0805-225 Networking Essentials 3 Security Awareness 3 0884-180 Foundations of Algebra 4 0502-227 Writing Seminar 4 13 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 15

Third Quarter Credits 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 3 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 3 0805-220 Intro to Unix 3 1 4 0884-xxx Math Elective Deaf Cultural Studies/ ASL 3 16

Credits Fourth Quarter Credits Fifth Quarter 0805-xxx Concentration 3 0805-230 Intro to Programming 3 0805-xxx Concentration 3 0805-351 Intro to the Mac 3 0805-310 Microcomputer DB 3 0806-101 Job Search 2 4 B-level Science 3 0884-xxx 1Math Elective CLA Humanities 4 CLA Humanities 4 16 16

Sixth Quarter Credits 0805-xxx Concentration 3 0805-xxx Concentration 3 2 Technical Elective 3 CLA Social Science 4 13

Seventh Quarter Credits Concentration Courses 3 Networking and Cybersecurity 0805-xxx 2Technical Elective 0805-395 ACT Technical Capstone3 0805-335 LAN/WAN Design 0806-201 Employment Seminar 1 0805-336 Network Security CLA Social Science 4 Computer Technical Support 3 Capstone Seminar 4 0805-352 Help Desk Support 15 0805-353 Intro to Computer Forensics

Concentration Courses 3 3 3 3

Networking and Cybersecurity 0805-337 Server Management and Security 0805-338 Firewall and IDS Computer Technical Support 0805-337 Server Management and Security 0805-350 Digital Technology Integration

3 3

3 3

Total Credits: 100 Wellness Education:

One wellness or PE activity is required and may be taken anytime.

Co-op Requirements: One co-op is required. Co-op should be taken after the sixth quarter.

14

1

Math Elective:

2

Technical Elective: Student may select ACT electives or approved electives from other NTID departments.

3

Capstone Seminar:

Student must select math courses at the B-level or higher. The following courses cannot be used as a math elective: 0884-120 Preparation for Algebra; 0884-150 Concepts of Measurement and Mathematics 0884-155 Applications for the Business Technologies. Students must select either Capstone: Society and Technology (0882-297) or Capstone: Explorations in Social Responsibility (0880-294)

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


AAS Course Requirements (Quarter) Core courses Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

Name______________________________

ACT Concentration courses (Choose one): Course 0805-201 Application Software 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 0805-216 PC Hardware I 0805-217 PC Hardware II 0805-220 Intro to Unix 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness 0805-225 Networking Essentials 0805-226 Client/Server Networks 0805-230 Intro to Programming 0805-251 Intro to Web Development 0805-310 Microcomputer DB 0805-351 Intro to the Mac 0805-395 Technical Capstone 0805-299 Co-op

Networking & Cyber Security: Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade Course _____ 0805-335 LAN/WAN Design _____ 0805-336 Network Security _____ 0805-337 Server Management & Security _____ 0805-338 Firewall and IDS

Computer Tech Support: Quarter _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____

_____

_____

Course 0805-352 Help Desk Support 0805-353 Intro to Computer Forensics 0805-337 Server Management & Security 0805-350 Digital Technology Integration

Technical electives Quarter _____ _____

Grade _____ _____

Course taken ____-____ _________________ ____-____ _________________

College of Liberal Arts (CLA) Quarter Grade _____ _____

Course taken: 0805-227 Writing Seminar

_____

_____

CLA Social Science: ____-____ ______________

_____

_____

CLA Social Science: ___-____ _______________

_____

CLA Humanities: ____-____ ______________

_____

CLA Humanities: ____-____ ______________

Math requirement Quarter

_____

Grade

____

Course taken (B level or higher) 0884-180 Foundations of Algebra or higher: ____-____ _________________

_____

Math electives Quarter _____ _____

Grade _____ _____

Course taken (B level or higher) ____-____ _________________ ____-____ _________________

NTID Arts and Sciences:

Science elective Quarter _____

Grade _____

_____

Course taken (B level or higher) ____-____ _________________

Interdisciplinary courses

Quarter _____ _____

Grade Course taken (B level or higher) _____ ____-____ Capstone Seminar _____ ____-____ Deaf Cultural Studies

Physical Education

Quarter

Grade

Course

Quarter

Grade

Wellness or PE Activity taken:

_____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____

0887-200 Freshman Seminar 0806-101 Job Search 0806-201 Employment Seminar

_____

_____

____-____ _________________

2011-2012 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

15


The AS Degree Option The AS degree option in Applied Computer Technology is an Associate to Baccalaureate degree program that prepares students to transfer to a Baccalaureate degree in RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences (GCCIS). The program is a combination of preparatory courses in the ACT major, bridging courses, and courses in a Baccalaureate program in GCCIS. To transfer to the Golisano College, students graduating with an AS in Applied Computer Technology must possess a GPA of 2.75 or higher. The AS degree option does not require a co-op.

Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences The Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences (GCCIS) has a variety of Bachelor of Science degrees that students in the AS program may be interested in pursuing once they have successfully completed the AS program. These include:

Bachelor of Science in Information Sciences and Technologies The role of an IT professional, or information technologist is diverse and multifaceted. To develop and maintain truly effective systems, information technologists need core competencies in four essential areas: Web design and development and interactive media; database, programming, and application development; networking and system administration, which includes the design, deployment, and security of computing infrastructure; and technology integration and deployment in user communities, including needs assessment, user-centered design, technology transfer, and ongoing support.(http://www.ist.rit.edu)

Bachelor of Science in Applied Networking and System Administration The BS degree in applied networking and system administration is designed to teach students to be the designers, implementers, operators, and maintainers of computing networks and networked systems (both clients and servers). Graduates will evaluate existing networks and computing systems, suggest improvements, monitor such systems for faults, and plan for growth. They work in small- to large-scale companies. (http://nssa.rit.edu)

Bachelor of Science in Information Security and Forensics The BS degree in information security and forensics produces professionals who understand people and processes. In addition to possessing state-of-the-art knowledge in the preservation of information assets, students will become experts in the identification of computer security vulnerabilities. Students will also understand the forensic requirements needed to prove an attack occurred, identify its origin, assess the extent of the damage or loss of information, and design strategies that ensure data can be recovered. (http://nssa.rit.edu)

16

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


AS Degree Course Schedule – Students entering Fall 2012 Students in the AS degree option spend the first year taking technical, math and science courses at both NTID and RIT to receive a foundation in computer hardware, networking, and computer programming. Successful students then go on to take courses in the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences well as the College of Liberal Arts. There are 2 tracks listed below.

IT Track Credits First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 1016-205 Discrete Math for Tech I 4 0805-251 Intro to Web Dev. 3 4002-320 Intro to Multimedia 4 0805-224 Intro to Networking & Security Awareness 3 4002-217 Programming for IT I 4 0805-390 Programming Fund. 4 0502-227 Writing Seminar 4 0884-275 Advanced Math 4 16 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 16 Fall Semester (2nd year) ISTE-121 Comp. Problem Solving II ISTE-190 Found. Modern Info Processing MATH-161 Applied Calculus LAS Perspective 2 Course LAS Perspective 6 Course

Third Quarter Credits 1016-206 Discrete Math for Tech II 4 4002-218 Programming for IT II 4 0805-225 Networking Essentials 3 LAS Perspective 1 Course 4 15

Credits Spring Semester (2nd year) 3 ITSE-230 Database and Data Modeling 3 ISTE-260 Designing the User Experience 3 ISTE-240 Web II 3 LAS Perspective 3 Course 3 LAS Perspective 4 Course 15

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15

ANSA & ISF Track Credits First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 0805-225 Networking Essentials 3 0805-251 Intro to Web Dev. 3 1016-205 Discrete Math for Tech I 4 0805-224 Intro to Networking & Security Awareness 3 4002-208 Intro to Programming 4 0805-390 Programming Fund. 4 0502-227 Writing Seminar 4 0884-275 Advanced Math 4 15 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 16

Third Quarter Credits 1016-319 Data Analysis I 4 4002-210 Programming w/ Classes 4 4050-350 Computing Sys Fund 4 LAS Perspective 1 Course 4 16

Fall Semester (2nd year) Credits Spring Semester (2nd year) ISTE-101 Computational Problem Solving in the NSSA-161 Fundamentals of Info Security Networking Domain II 3 NSSA-220 Intro to Scripting NSSA-241 Networking I 3 NSSA-242 Networking II LAS Perspective 2 Course 3 NSSA-243 Networking II Lab LAS Perspective 3 Course 3 LAS Perspective 4 Course LAS Perspective 6 Course 3 15

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15

Physical Education requirements are not shown.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

17


AS Course Requirements (Semester)

Name_________________________

(For students entering Fall 2012 – IT Track) Note: This checklist is for students entering the ACT AS program during the academic year 2012-2013.

Core Courses

College of Liberal Arts

Term

Grade Course Taken

Term

Grade Course Taken

_____

_____ 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness _____ 0805-225 Networking Essentials _____ 0805-251 Intro to Web Development _____ 0805-390 Programming Fund

_____

_____ 0502-227 Writing Seminar

_____ _____ _____

IT Programming Courses Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____ _____

_____ 4002-217 Programming for IT I _____ 4002-217 Programming for IT II _____ ISTE-121 Comp. Problem Solving II

Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses Term

Grade P# Perspective Course Taken

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____

_____ 4002-320 Intro to Multimedia _____ ISTE-190 Found. Modern Info Proc. _____ ISTE-230 Intro to DB and Data Mod. _____ ISTE-240 Web II _____ ISTE-260 Designing the User Exp.

_____ _____ _____

Physical Education Term

Grade Wellness or PE Activity Taken

_____

_____ ____-____ _________________

Math Requirements Term

Grade Course (D level or higher)

_____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____

0884-275 Advanced Math 1016-205 Discrete Math I 1016-206 Discrete Math II MATH-161 Applied Calculus

Interdisciplinary Courses

18

Term

Grade Course Taken

_____

_____ 0887-200 Freshman Seminar

____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________

(P# - Perspective Number for courses taken)

Other IT Requirements Term

1 2 3 4 6

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


AS Course Requirements (Semester)

Name__________________________

(For students entering Fall 2012 – ANSA & ISF Track) Note: This checklist is for students entering the ACT AS program during the academic year 2012-2013.

Core Courses

Interdisciplinary Courses

Term

Grade Course Taken

Term

Grade Course Taken

_____

_____ 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness _____ 0805-225 Networking Essentials _____ 0805-251 Intro to Web Development _____ 0805-390 Programming Fund

_____

_____ 0887-200 Freshman Seminar

_____ _____ _____

College of Liberal Arts Term

Grade Course Taken

_____

_____ 0502-227 Writing Seminar

Programming Courses Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____ _____

_____ 4002-208 Intro to Programming _____ 4002-210 Program with Classes _____ ISTE-101 Comp Prob Solving II (NW)

Other ANSA & ISF Requirements Term

Grade Course Taken

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

4050-350 Computer Systems Fund NSSA-161 Fund of Info Security NSSA-220 Intro to Scripting NSSA-241 Networking I NSSA-242 Networking II NSSA-243 Networking II Lab

Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses Term

Grade P# Perspective Course Taken

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____

1 2 3 4 6

____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________ ____-____ _______________

(P# - Perspective Number for courses taken)

Physical Education Term

Grade Wellness or PE Activity Taken

_____

_____ ____-____ _________________

Math Requirements Term

Grade Course (D level or higher)

_____ _____ _____

_____ 0884-275 Advanced Math _____ 1016-205 Discrete Math I _____ 1016-319 Data Analysis I

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

19


AS Degree Course Schedule (Quarter) Students in the AS degree option spend the first year taking technical, math and science courses at NTID to receive a foundation in computer hardware, networking, and computer applications. Successful students then go on to take courses in the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences as well as the College of Liberal Arts.

First Quarter Credits Second Quarter 0805-216 PC Hardware I 3 0805-217 PC Hardware II 0805-220 Intro to Unix 0805-224 Intro to Networking & Security Awareness 3 0884-275 Advanced Math 0884-220 Elements of Trig 4 0502-227 Writing Seminar 0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2 1 Communication Elective 3/4 15/16

Credits 3 3 4 4 14

Third Quarter Credits 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 3 0805-390 Programming Fundamentals 4 05xx-xxx CLA Humanities 4 2 Lab Science 4 15

Fourth Quarter Credits Fifth Quarter Credits 4002-217 Programming for IT I 4 4002-218 Programming for IT II 4 4002-320 Intro to Multimedia 4 1016-205 Discrete Math 4 05xx-xxx CLA Social Science 4 05xx-xxx CLA Social Science 4 05xx-xxx CLA Humanities 4 Arts of Expression 4 16 16

Sixth Quarter Credits 4002-219 Programming for IT III 4 4050-351 Networking Fundamentals (IT) 4 2 Lab Science 4 12

Physical Education requirements are not shown. 1

Communication Elective: Options include a course in professional communication, technical writing, foreign language, public speaking, sign language, or another course relating to interpersonal communications (including Written Communication II).

2

Lab Science:

20

Any NTID science courses numbered 200 or higher offered for 4 credits with an included lab component. These courses include: Human Genetics and Evolution (0885-281), Scientific Basis of Social Responsibility (0885-282), and Physiology of Human Development and Maturation (0885-283). Any two courses with a lab component from the College of Science can also be used.

http://www.rit.edu/ntid/ics


AS Course Requirements (Quarter)

Name______________________________ Note: This checklist is for students entering the ACT AS program prior to the academic year 2012-2013.

Core courses Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____

_____

IT Programming courses: Course 0805-215 PC Operating Systems 0805-216 PC Hardware I 0805-217 PC Hardware II 0805-220 Intro to Unix 0805-224 Intro to Network & Security Awareness 0805-390 Programming Fundamentals

Math requirement (B level or higher) Quarter _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____

Course taken (D level or higher) 0884-220 Elements of Trig 0884-275 Advanced Math 1016-205 Discrete Math

Three-course Programming Sequence: Quarter _____

Grade _____

Course taken 4002-217 Programming for IT I

_____

_____

4002-218 Programming for IT II

_____

_____

4002-219 Programming for IT III

Other IT Requirements: Quarter _____ _____

Grade _____ _____

Course taken 4002-320 Intro to Multimedia 4050-351 Networking Fundamentals

Liberal Arts Requirements Lab Science Quarter _____ _____

Grade _____ _____

Course taken 0885-____ _________________ 0885-____ _________________

Interdisciplinary courses Quarter _____

Grade _____

_____

_____

Course 0887-200 Freshman Seminar Communication elective: ____-____ _________________

Quarter _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Grade _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Course taken 0502-227 Writing Seminar ____-___ Social Science Elective ____-___ Social Science Elective ____-___ Humanities Elective ____-___ Humanities Elective ____-___ Arts of Expression

Physical Education Quarter _____

Grade _____

Wellness or PE Activity taken: ____-____ _________________

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

21


Program Entry Requirements AOS English: Placement into Career English I (0883-212) or above. Students successfully completing the AOS degree typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test. Mathematics: Placement into Foundations of Algebra (0884-180), Elements of Geometry (0884170), or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

AAS English: Placement into the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course. Students typically enter Writing Seminar with reading scores equivalent to 10.0 on the California Reading Test. However, students who complete AAS degrees typically enter NTID with reading scores equivalent to 9.0 on the California Reading Test. Mathematics: Placement into Foundations of Algebra (0884-180) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics. Science: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

AS ACT score: A composite ACT test score of 18 or better. English: Placement into the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course; students who qualify for Written Communications II (0502-111) will be considered for admission. Mathematics: Entrance into NTID’s Elements of Trigonometry (0884-220) course.

22

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


Schedule of Course Availability - Quarter Course Number

Course Title

Prerequisite 0805-

Class Lab Credit Quarters Hours Hours Hours Offered

0805-201 0805-211 0805-215 0805-216 0805-217

Applications Software Web for Business PC Operating Systems PC Hardware I PC Hardware II

None None 216 None 216

3 3 2 2 2

1 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3

0805-220 0805-224 0805-225 0805-226 0805-230

Introduction to UNIX Intro to Networking& Security Networking Essentials Client/Server Networks Introduction to Programming

3 2 2 2 3

1 2 3 3 1

3 3 3 3 3

0805-251 0805-252

Introduction to Web Development Web Applications

201 None 224 225 251 201 or dept permission 251

3 3

1 1

3 3

0805-299 0805-310 0805-335 0805-336 0805-337 0805-338 0805-350 0805-351 0805-352 0805-353 0805-380 0805-381 0805-382 0805-383

Co-op Work Experience Microcomputer Database LAN/WAN Design Network Security Server Management & Security Firewalls and IDS Digital Technology Integration Introduction to the Mac Help Desk Support Introduction to Computer Forensics A+ Core Certification Prep I A+ Core Certification Prep II Network+ Certification Prep Security+ Certification Prep

3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

1 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 2

0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2

0805-390

Programming Fundamentals

3

2

4

F,S

0805-395 0805-398, 399

ACT Technical Capstone

None 201 226 226 226 335, 336 217, 225, 230 215,226 215,226 215,226 217 380 335 336 0502-111, 1016204 or 0884-275 Completion of concentration

W, S F, S F, W, S, Su F, W W W S S S F,W W W W S S S

1

4

3

F

Special Topics, Independent Study

Varies

F, W, S S F, S F, W W, S F, W (AS), S F, W W, S F, S F, W

Varies F, W, S

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

23


Schedule of Course Availability - Semester Course Number

Course Title

Prerequisite NACT-

NACT-120 NACT-150 NACT-151 NACT-155 NACT-160 NACT-161 NACT-170 NACT-199 NACT-200

Intro to Computer Applications Intro to PC Hardware Windows Operating Systems Non-Windows Operating Systems Networking Essentials Client-Server Networks Intro to Web Development Independent Study: ACT Help Desk Support

None None 150, co-155 150, co-151 None 160 None Varies 151, 161 170, NMTH NACT-230 Introduction to Programming 120 or higher NACT-235 Introduction to Database Applications None NACT-240 The World of Work 251 NACT-250 Computer and Data Security 151, 161 NACT-251 Digital Systems Integration 155, 160, 230 NACT-252 Server Management & Security 151, 161 NACT-255 A+ Certification Prep 151, 160 NACT-260 LAN/WAN Design 161 NACT-261 Network Security 161, co-262 155, 260, NACT-262 Fund of Systems Administration co-261 NACT-265 Network+ Certification Prep 161 NACT-266 Network Defense Technologies 260, 261 NACT-270 Web Applications 170, 230, 235 NACT-271 Client-Side Scripting 170, 230 NACT-289 Special Topics-ACT Varies 170, 200 and [251&252] or [262] NACT-295 ACT Technical Capstone 240 and [251&252] or Co-op: Applied Computer [262] NACT-299 Technology

24

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics

Class Hours

Lab Credit Semesters Hours Hours Offered

3 2 2 2 2 2 2

2 2 3 3 3 2

2

2

2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

2 2

2 2 2 2 2 1-4

3 3 3 2 3

3 3 3 3 3 1-4

1

4

3

F

0

F, S, Su

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1-4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

F, S F S S F S F W, S, Su F F S F F S S F F S S S S S F F, S


Facilities Self-Instruction Lab: (14-1220) This is a large PC lab that you can use for any type of homework, class-related project, or personal computer use any time the lab is open. A schedule of times that the lab is open is posted on the door. Lab assistants are qualified to tutor students in most classes. A list of rules regarding use of equipment and student behavior in the lab is posted on the bulletin board in the lab. Lab assistants are authorized to dismiss students for disruptive behavior and misuse of equipment.

Programming and Multi-Media Lab (14-1201) This is a PC lab used for a variety of applications courses.

NSF lab (14-1285) This is a mixed lab containing both PC's and Mac's used for a variety of application courses.

Network Lab: (14-1222) This is a very large lab used for networking classes.

Network Lab: (14- 1345) This is a smaller lab used for networking classes.

Hardware Lab: (14-Room 1205) This is the smaller lab used for hardware classes.

Hardware Lab: (14-1335) This is the larger lab used for hardware classes.

Golisano College Lab: (70-1510) This lab is used for classroom instruction for AS and BS-level students and for tutoring support.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

25


Course Descriptions - Quarter 0805-201 Applications Software This course is an introduction to computers and problem solving using general-purpose application software. Students solve a variety of problems by using application software tools such as a word processor, a spreadsheet, a presentation package and a database program. Class 3, Credit 3 (F, W, S) 0805-211 Web Development for Business This course will provide students with the tools to design and develop Websites containing multiple linked Web pages using a current Web development application. Topics will include inserting and formatting text and images, creating links and navigation bars, and creating Web page layouts and tables. Class 3, Lab 1, Credit 3 (S) 0805-215 PC Operating Systems This course is designed to acquaint students with the structure and function of Windows and DOS operating systems and to provide the skills required to install, configure and maintain them. Topics include system concepts, system level commands and commands relating to program, file and applications management. Students perform a variety of functions, including OS installation and configuration, application program installation and management, creation and management of directories and file structures, partitioning and preparation of storage media. (0805-216) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F, S) 0805-216 PC Hardware I This course introduces the fundamental hardware concepts of personal computer (PC) systems, including their structure and components. The skills required to install, upgrade and maintain PCs are presented. Hands-on topics include the identification and handling of basic computer hardware, input/output devices and data communications. Various methods of upgrading computers are presented. Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F, W) 0805-217 PC Hardware II This course provides students with methodologies and hands-on activities related to the configuration, diagnosis, repairing, and preventive maintenance of personal computers (PCs). Topics include familiarization with the basic functions and use of test equipment, logical troubleshooting of internal system conflicts and faulty peripherals, electrical safety, and methods of maintaining computer equipment. (0805-216) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (W, S) 0805-220 Introduction to UNIX This course is designed to address the basics of the UNIX computer operating system. Salient features of mainstreamed operating systems covered in PC operating systems and other systems are reviewed in this course and compared with similar UNIX functions to illustrate efficiencies of various operating systems. Topics include language commands; mail; network communications; directory and file structure; the editor; shell, pipe and filter concepts. (0805-201) Class 3, Lab 1, Credit 3 (F, W (AS only), S) 0805-224 Introduction to Networking and Security This first course focuses on stand-alone local area networks (LANs) of microcomputers. Students study network configurations, cabling, physical layer protocols, and network operating systems. Students add computer equipment to a LAN, install software and identify and correct hardware and software incompatibility problems. Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F, W) 0805-225 Networking Essentials This second course in networking builds on concepts learned in Introduction to Networking and Security. Topics focus on connecting local area networks (LANs) of personal computers with other LANs; wide area networks (WANs) and minicomputer/mainframe computers. (0805-224) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (W, S) 0805-226 Client/Server Networks This third course is designed to provide students with skills in implementing and maintaining the network infrastructure required to support intranets/internet. Topics include implementing and administering internet/intranet services of the appropriate server platform, applications, WAN technologies, security, reliability and coordination with content providers. There is heavy emphasis on hands-on problem solving. (0805-225) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (F, S)

26

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


0805-230 Introduction to Programming A first course in programming that introduces students to general programming concepts and enables them to design simple Windows-based business applications. Course focus is on problem-solving methods, design and writing of simple Windows-based applications with an emphasis on logic skill development. The course serves as a foundation for future programming courses. Programming projects are required. (0805-251) Class 3, Lab 1, Credit 3 (F, W) 0805-251 Introduction to Web Development This course addresses Internet-related topics, including Web browsers, multimedia for the Web, and creating basic Web pages using valid coding techniques.(0805-201) Class 3, Lab 1, Credit 3 (W, S) 0805-252 Web Applications This course continues Introduction to Web Development by addressing intermediate topics for the World Wide Web, including more advanced coding techniques to enhance Web pages, and advanced multimedia techniques. (0805-251) Class 3, Lab 1, Credit 3 (F, S) 0805-299 Co-op: Applied Computer Technology Credit 0 (F, W, S, Su) 0805-310 Microcomputer Database Software Creating, inquiring, reporting and other functions of databases. A leading database software product for microcomputers is studied. Students design a database, establish criteria for data to be accepted and coded, and prepare views of the database contents. Database utilization in the business environment and application to the student’s expected work environment is presented. (0805-201) Class 3, Lab 1, Credit 3 (F, W) 0805-335 LAN/WAN Design This course is designed to provide a hands-on introduction to multi-protocol routers and multi-switched networks. The class will include basic router operations, architecture, and configuration; switched Ethernet networks; virtual LAN technology; configuration of switching devices; and troubleshooting. Students will set up, wire, and configure expansion technologies in an internetwork environment. (0805-226) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (W) 0805-336 Network Security This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of computer and data network security. Students will examine an infrastructure design process for securing computer systems and data networks, as well as methodologies and best practices for implementing security, security policies, security testing, and incident response. The underlying principles used to secure networks including security technologies, intrusion detection, authentication, and cryptography basics will be discussed. This course will also introduce students to network security planning, technology, and organization, and the legal and ethical issues associated with network security. (0805-226) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (W) 0805-337 Server Management and Security The course is an introduction to server management. Students taking the course will learn to implement and administer network servers by managing server devices, file system, users and groups, and application software. Students will also learn how to monitor and fine-tune server security and performance and to implement backup and fault tolerance. (0805-226) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) 0805-338 Firewalls and IDS This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the various methodologies used by firewalls and IDS for defending a network from security attacks. Students will be introduced to the concepts, principles, types and topologies of firewalls to include packet filtering, proxy firewalls, application gateways, circuit gateways and stateful inspection. Various defense methodologies associated with Virtual Private Networks (VPN), Host Intrusion Detection Systems (HIDS) and Network Intrusion Detection Systems (NIDS) will also be covered. Students will learn best practices associated with properly securing businesscritical network systems using VPNs with countermeasurement tools and techniques. (0805-335, 336) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S)

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

27


0805-350 Digital Technology Integration This course provides a basis for understanding the technologies that are often integrated as part of larger automated systems. Some of these technologies include but are not limited to the control and management of audio and video systems, security and surveillance systems, lighting control systems, access control systems, communication systems, assistive technologies, and other automated business features. This course will introduce some of these integratable technologies and provide a basis for connecting, testing, controlling, monitoring and maintaining these systems. (0805-217, 225, 230) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) 0805-351 Introduction to the Macintosh This course is designed to equip students with general competency and familiarity with the Macintosh platform. Designed primarily for PC/Windows users, previous and current Mac operating systems will be thoroughly reviewed. Macintosh applications, hardware, networking and troubleshooting will also be covered. (0805-215, 226) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F, W) 0805-352 Help Desk Support This course is designed to acquaint students with the computer desktop support environment. The course covers the technical skills needed to successfully troubleshoot a variety of computer platforms and the soft skills needed to support end-users and provide satisfactory customer service. Policies and customer issues related to the technology needs within large and small businesses and government entities are discussed. Emphasis is given to problem solving and troubleshooting techniques, team dynamics, and interpersonal communication skills. (0805-215, 226) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (W) 0805-353 Introduction to Computer Forensics This course will introduce students to the field of computer forensics. Using current forensics tools and procedures, students will learn how to find and preserve digital data resulting from criminal or illicit activities. Hands-on lab activities will be used to reinforce concepts and to provide real-life situations that give students experience in handling suspected digital evidence.(0805-215, 226) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (W) 0805-380 A+ Certification Preparation I The course will prepare students to take and pass the first step in the CompTIA’s A+ certification exam. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to text book(s), students will be required to purchase a certification exam voucher for this course. Students must pass the certification exam to pass the course. (0805-215, 0805-217, 0805-226) Class 3 (W) 0805-381 A+ Certification Preparation II The course will prepare students to take and pass the second step in the CompTIA’s A+ certification exam. Students will review advanced material beyond what was required from the first certification course, 0805380. This will include more advanced practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the actual certification exam. In addition to text book(s), students will be required to purchase a certification exam voucher for this course. Students must pass the certification exam to pass the course. (0805-380) Class 3, Credit 3 (S) 0805-382 Network+ Certification Preparation The course will prepare students to take and pass the CompTIA’s Network+ certification exam. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to textbook(s), students will be required to purchase a certification exam voucher for this course. Students must pass the certification exam to pass the course. (0805-335) Class 1, Lab 2, Credit 2 (S) 0805-383 Security+ Certification Preparation The course will prepare students to take and pass the CompTIA’s Security+ certification exam. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to textbook(s), students will be required to purchase a certification exam voucher for this course. Students must pass the certification exam to pass the course. (0805-336) Class 1, Lab 2, Credit 2 (S)

28

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


0805-390 Programming Fundamentals This pre-programming course is for students pursuing a major in the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences (GCCIS) and is designed to help them develop the programming, logic and problemsolving skills needed for success in the GCCIS majors. This course will provide students with a study of the fundamental concepts, logical structures and algorithms inherent to computer programming. Students will learn how to write basic object oriented programs in a contemporary programming language. (0502-111, 1016-204 or 0884-275) Class 3, Lab 2, Credit 4 (F, S) 0805-395 ACT Technical Capstone This course provides an opportunity for students to work on technical projects that integrate the skills they have developed in earlier Applied Computer Technology courses. Students will work both independently and in teams to solve real-life computer support problems in a professional manner. (Completion of all ACT Technical course requirements.) Class 1, Lab 4, Credit 3 (F) 0805-398 Special Topics: Applied Computer Technology Credit variable (F, W, S) 0805-399 Independent Study: Applied Computer Technology Credit variable (F, W, S)

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

29


Course Descriptions - Semester NACT-120 Intro to Computer Applications This course is an introduction to using general-purpose software tools. The tools to be covered include word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software as well as an email client. Students will do hands-on work in each application. Class 3, Credit 3 (F, S) NACT-150 Intro to PC Hardware This course introduces the fundamental hardware concepts of Windows-based computers. The skills required to install, upgrade and maintain computers are presented. The course provides students with methodologies and hands-on activities related to the configuration, diagnosis, repair, upgrade, and preventive maintenance of computer hardware, input/output devices and data communications. Topics include the basic functions and use of test equipment, logical troubleshooting of internal system conflicts and faulty peripherals, and electrical safety. Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F) NACT-151 Windows Operating Systems This course is designed to acquaint students with the structure and function of windows-based operating systems and to provide the skills required to install, configure and maintain them. Topics include system concepts, system level commands, and commands relating to program, file and applications management. Students perform a variety of functions, including OS installation and configuration, application program installation and management, creation and management of directories and file structures, and partitioning and preparation of storage media. (NACT-150, Co-requisite: NACT-155) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (S) NACT-155 Non-Windows Operating Systems This course exposes students to Unix and other Unix-based operating systems such as Linus and Macintosh systems. It acquaints them with system services that are of interest to normal users, power users, and administrators. Students learn basic commands, scripting, and navigation from a terminal window and experience management of their user environment, files, and directories. Students are also exposed to administering some common aspects of the operating environments such as groups, users, privileges, and process management. There is also some exposure to the operating system's GUI interface. (NACT-150; corequisite: NACT-151) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) NACT-160 Networking Essentials This course introduces students to the basics of user security on their computers as well as the basics of computer networking. Students will learn the importance of user security and some of the tools and procedures needed to protect and secure their information, computers and networks against attack. Basic concepts and terminology of wired and wireless networking including networking hardware, media, communication technologies and protocols, and network management will be covered. Lab activities will develop skills in installing, configuring, managing, and troubleshooting a basic network. Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (F) NACT-161 Client-Server Networks This course continues the concepts of computer networking with an emphasis on the networking client/server model. Various networking operating systems (NOS) will be examined as well as both peer-to-peer and client/server network applications. NOS hardware and software security tools are investigated and students learn how to install, configure, update/maintain and troubleshoot both the client/server hardware devices as well as the appropriate security tools. (NACT-160) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) NACT-170 Intro to Web Development This course introduces students to designing and coding a multipage web site. Topics include an overview of the internet and web addressing, coding valid HTML and CSS, design principles, implementation on a server, and use of web development software. The use of hyperlinks, graphics, and multimedia in web pages will be covered. Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F) NACT-199 Independent Study The description for each Independent Study will be specified in each course proposal. Credit 1-4 (F, S, Su)

30

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


NACT-200 Help Desk Support This course focuses on key information and proficiencies needed to support users, including troubleshooting, problem solving, successful communication, determining a client's needs, and using appropriate people skills. (NACT-151, 161) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F) NACT-230 Intro to Programming This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and terminology of computer programming. Emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving skills in designing and writing simple computer programs. The course covers such topics as developing flowcharts, algorithms and pseudocode, and introduces students to variables, operators, conditional statements, looping statements, data structures, errorhandling and debugging, and user interface design. The course assumes no programming background. (NACT-170, NMTH-120 or above) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (F) NACT-235 Intro to Database Applications In this course students will learn to create database tables, queries, forms and reports using a leading database software product for personal computers. Students will also learn how to design a database from user specifications, and to form basic SQL commands. Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (S) NACT-240 The World of Work The goal of the course is to provide students with the business-related skills to acquire a cooperative or permanent job, and the personal and social skills to succeed on the job. Topics related to workplace communication and relationships, as well as financial management, employer expectations, and personal goal setting will also be covered. The course will also include the development of job search skills, resume writing and interviewing, along with skills in word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software as needed in the workplace. Class 3, Credit 3 (F) NACT-250 Computer and Data Security This course will explore the unique computer and data security issues encountered by computer technicians. Using current computer security tools and procedures, students will develop more advanced skills in finding and eliminating security weaknesses, breaches, and malware programs. Computer security incident response procedures will also be introduced in this course. Hands-on lab activities will be used to reinforce concepts and to provide real-life situations that give students experience in handling suspected security breaches. (NACT-151, 161) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (F) NACT-251 Digital Systems Integration This course explores the technologies that are integrated as part of larger control/automated systems. Some of these technologies include, but are not limited to, the control and management of audio and video systems, security and surveillance systems, lighting control systems, access control systems, communication systems, assistive technologies and other automated business features. This course will introduce some of these integratable technologies and provide a basis for connecting, configuring, testing, controlling, monitoring and maintaining these systems. (NACT-155, 160, 230) Class 2, Lab 3, Credits 3 (S) NACT-252 Server Management and Security Students taking the course will learn to implement and administer network servers by managing server devices, file systems, users and groups, and application software. Students will also learn how to monitor and fine-tune server security and performance and to implement backup and fault tolerance. (NACT-151, 161) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) NACT-255 A+ Certification Prep This course will prepare students to pass the two certification tests necessary to earn CompTIAs A+ Certification. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to text book(s), students will be required to purchase two certification exam vouchers for this course. To pass the course, students must pass both certification exams. (NACT-151, 160) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (F)

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

31


NACT-260 LAN WAN Design This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with multi-protocol routers and multiswitched networks. The class includes basic router operations, architecture, and configuration; switched Ethernet networks; virtual LAN technology; configuration of switching devices; and troubleshooting. Students set up, wire, and configure expansion technologies in an internet work environment. (NACT-161) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (F) NACT-262 Fund of Systems Administration This course extends students' skills at securing and managing networks and servers. Students taking the course will practice implementing and administering networked servers in multiple operating systems by managing server devices, file system, users and groups, and application software. Students will design and test custom LAN environments, using both physical and virtual computers and servers. Students will also learn to secure shared data across platforms, securing both the physical/virtual network environment and the operating systems' shared resources. (NACT-155, 260; co-requisite: NACT-261 Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) NACT-265 Network+ Certification Prep The course will prepare students to take and pass the CompTIA's Network+ Certification exam. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to text book(s), students will be required to purchase a certification exam voucher for this course. Students must pass the certification exam to pass the course. (NACT-161) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) NACT-266 Network Defense Technologies This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the technologies used to defend a network against security attacks. Students will be introduced to the concepts, principles, types, and topologies of current and future defense technologies. Various defense methodologies associated with various Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS), and future technologies will be covered. Students will also learn best practices associated with remotely securing and accessing business resources. (NACT-260 LAN WAN Design, NACT-261 Network Security) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (S) NACT-270 Web Applications This course continues to build students' skills in developing well-designed Web pages using the most current Web development tools. By creating server-side scripts combined with embedded SQL students will be able to build professional-quality, database-driven Web sites. Accessibility issues related to Web site development will also be emphasized. Only limited programming experience is required. (NACT-170, 230, 235) Class 2, Lab 2, Credit 3 (S) NACT-271 Client-Side Scripting This course is an introduction to client-side scripting for the Internet using a common scripting language. Students will be introduced to the syntax of the scripting language, and then learn to build practical and interactive client-side applications. (NACT-170, NACT-230) Class 2, Lab 3, Credit 3 (F) NACT-289 Special Topics-ACT The description for each Special Topics course will be specified in each course proposal. Class 1-4, Credit 1-4 (F, S) NACT-295 ACT Technical Capstone This course provides an opportunity for students to work on technical projects that integrate the skills they have developed in earlier Applied Computer Technology courses. Students will work both independently and in teams to solve "real world" networking and computer support problems in a professional manner. (NACT170, 200 & [NACT-251 & NACT-252] OR [NACT-262]) Class 1, Lab 4, Credit 3 (F) NACT-299 Co-op: Applied Computer Tech This course provides students with a 350-hour work experience in the computer field. Students have an opportunity to gain experience on the job, to apply what they have learned in their course work, and to evaluate their own technical, communication, and interpersonal skills. Placement assistance is provided to help students find a relevant work experience. (NACT-240 & [NACT-251 & NACT-252] OR [NACT-262]) Credit 0 (F, S, Su)

32

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


ICS Faculty and Staff Karen Beiter Assistant Professor

Christopher Campbell Lecturer

2418 Carey (585) 286-4546 (vp)

2211 Carey (585) 286-4079 (vp)

Karen.Beiter@rit.edu

cmcdas@rit.edu

Tao Eng Lecturer

Mark Jeremy Lecturer

2321 Carey (585) 286-4581 (vp)

2323 Carey (585) 512-8077 (vp)

Tao.Eng@rit.edu

Mark.Jeremy@rit.edu

Raja Kushalnagar Assistant Professor

Donna Lange Associate Professor

1517 GCCIS (585) 643-6773 (vp) Raja.Kushalnagar@rit.edu

2237 Carey (585) 475-5620 (v/t)

David Lawrence Associate Professor

James Mallory Professor

1511 GCCIS (585) 475-6395 (v) (585)743-1375 (vp)

2235 Carey (585) 475-2865 (v/t)

dalndp@rit.edu

James.Mallory@rit.edu

delnet@rit.edu

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

33


ICS Faculty and Staff Elissa Olsen Chairperson 2215 Carey (585) 286-4639 (vp) (585) 475-2225 (v)

Myra Pelz Associate Professor 2437 Carey (585) 475-6097 (v/t)

Myra.Pelz@rit.edu

emondp@rit.edu

34

Tom Simpson Lecturer

Joseph Stanislow Assistant Professor

2328 Carey (585) 475-2532 (v/t)

tesndp@rit.edu

2219 Carey (585) 286-4664 (vp) Joseph.Stanislow@rit.edu

John Sweeney Assistant Professor

Brian Trager Instructor

1515 GCCIS (585) 475-6912 (v/t)

2337 Carey (585) 286-5278 (vp)

John.Sweeney@rit.edu

bptnbs@rit.edu

Mark Wambach Assistant Professor

Werner Zorn Lecturer

1509 GCCIS (585) 475-7958 (v/t)

2313 Carey (585) 286-4185 (vp)

mlwnbs@rit.edu

wmzndp@rit.edu

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


ICS Faculty and Staff David Johnston Technical Associate 1108 Carey (585) 286-4601 (vp) (585) 475-2225 (v)

Nancy Raco Staff Assistant 2201 Carey (585) 475-2225 (v)

njr9717@rit.edu

drj1591@rit.edu

Kristine Brown Staff Assistant 2201 Carey (585)475-7545

kjbndp1@rit.edu

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

35


ICS Counselors All students are assigned an academic advisor/counselor to help them with their academic performance including selecting appropriate courses and developing personal skills to maximize their academic performance. The academic advisors/counselors assigned to the Information and Computing Studies department are shown below:

Meg Kangai 2217 Carey (585) 286-4606 (vp)

Laurie Mousley 2335 Carey 1519 Golisano

meksai@rit.edu

(585) 286-4632 (vp)

lamncd@rit.edu

Employment Advisors All students are assigned an employment advisor to help them find both co-op and permanent jobs. Employment advisors work in NTID's National Center for Employment (NCE). The employment advisors assigned to the Information and Computing Studies department are shown below:

Lynne Morley 2817 LBJ

Regina Kiperman-Kiselgof 2814 LBJ

(585) 475-6206 (585) 286-4630 (vp)

(585) 286-4610 (vp)

reknod@rit.edu

lmmnce@rit.edu

You can learn about co-op and permanent jobs at the NCE web site at: http://www.ntid.rit.edu/nce.

36

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


Support Services Advising Academic advising and career/personal counseling are available for every student. NTID Counseling & Academic Advising Services assigns a counselor for every NTID student when he or she arrives on campus. To find out the name of your counselor, go to http://www.ntid.rit.edu/counseling, log in with your RIT computer account, and click the Who is My Counselor link.

Tutoring Tutoring is available for students in both NTID and RIT majors. NTID students in ICS courses can go to the Labs and Tutoring link on the ICS website (http://www. rit.edu/ntid/ics) for information on when tutoring is available. NTID supported students in courses in the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences can get tutoring from NTID faculty housed in that college.

Access Services – Other Colleges of RIT Access services for students in the other colleges of RIT include interpreting, note taking, C-Print, and FM Loops in the classroom. Requests for access services can be made by using the online Student Information System (SIS) when registering for courses in those colleges or through the Department of Access Services (DAS) web site at https://myaccess.rit.edu.

Special Needs and Accommodation Services Other special needs and accommodations may be requested by contacting the Disability Services Office in the Student Alumni Union (SAU) Room 1150.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

37


ICS Policies Academic Dishonesty Policy RIT’s Academic Dishonesty Policy Plagiarism and other academic actions contrary to RIT’s code of conduct and the ICS Academic Dishonesty Policy will be addressed in accordance with these policies. The following statement is the Policy on Academic Dishonesty for the Department of Information and Computing Studies: The Department of Information and Computing Studies does not condone any form of academic dishonesty. Any act of improperly representing another person’s work as one’s own (or allowing someone else to represent your work as their own) is construed as an act of academic dishonesty. These acts include, but are not limited to, plagiarism in any form or use of information and materials not authorized by the instructor during an examination or for any assignment. If a faculty member judges a student to be guilty of any form of academic dishonesty within the ICS department, the following consequences will occur based on the number of incidents: 1. For the first offense, the student will receive a FAILING GRADE FOR THE ASSIGNMENT. A required team meeting will occur with his/her counselor and the department chairperson following the first incident. 2. The second offense will result in a FAILING GRADE FOR THE COURSE and a team meeting with his/her counselor and the department chairperson. 3. For the third offense, if the faculty member or the faculty member’s immediate supervisor feels that the alleged misconduct warrants more severe action than failure in the course, the case may be referred to the Academic Conduct Committee. The Academic Conduct Committee can recommend further action to the dean of the college including academic suspension or dismissal from the Institute. Academic dishonesty involving the abuse of NTID/RIT computing facilities may result in the pursuit of more severe action. If the student believes the action by the instructor to be incorrect or the penalty too severe, the faculty member will arrange to meet jointly with the student and with the faculty member’s immediate supervisor. If the matter cannot be resolved at this level, an appeal may be made to the Academic Conduct Committee of the college in which the course is offered. The following definitions will be used to clarify and explain unacceptable conduct. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list of specific actions but a reasonable description to guide one’s actions. CHEATING includes knowingly using, buying, stealing, transporting or soliciting in whole or parts the contents of an administered/unadministered test, test key, homework solution, paper, project, software project or computer program, or any other assignment. It also includes using, accessing, altering, or gaining entry to information held in a computer account or disk owned by another. COLLUSION means the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing written work or computer work (including electronic media) offered for credit. Final work submitted by a student must be substantially the work of that student. Collaboration on an assignment is expressly forbidden unless it is explicitly designated as a group project.

38

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


PLAGIARISM, as defined in the RIT Academic Dishonesty Policy, is the representation of others' ideas as one's own without giving proper credit to the original author or authors. Plagiarism occurs when a student copies direct phrases from a text (e.g., books, journals, Internet) and does not provide quotation marks or paraphrases or summarizes those ideas without giving credit to the author or authors. In all cases, if such information is not properly and accurately documented with appropriate credit given, then the student is guilty of plagiarism. When there is any doubt, a student should consult the instructor (NOT ANOTHER STUDENT) as to whether some action is considered cheating, collusion and/or plagiarism. Whenever there is any question as to whether a particular action is considered academic dishonesty, the instructor should be consulted prior to commencing that action.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

39


NTID Policies Communication RIT is committed to providing access to communication for all students, faculty and staff. If you can, use sign language in all public areas.

Attendance You are expected to attend all classes. Attendance is your responsibility and although attendance may not be taken in all classes, you will be more successful if you attend all classes. If you miss a class with a valid reason, the instructor will discuss the material you missed, if you ask him/her to do so. If you miss a class without a valid reason, the instructor has the right to decide not to discuss any material presented during that class with you. It is your responsibility to contact your classmates for the material discussed to get handouts or assignments given out in class.

Conduct Disruptive behavior in the classroom and labs will not be allowed. If a student is being disruptive, the instructor has the right to tell him or her to leave the classroom or the lab. The chairperson can also become involved when students are disruptive.

Exams If you miss a test, you will receive a grade of “0" (zero) for that test. You may get permission to make up a missed test if you missed the test for a valid reason. It is your responsibility to show a valid reason, with proof, to the instructor for that class.

Course Prerequisites You must meet the course prerequisites for any ICS course for which you register. If you do not, the ICS department will drop you from the course. To get credit for a technical course in the ACT major you must pass with a "C" or better. If you do not get a "C" or better in a technical course, you must repeat the course.

Communicating with NTID Faculty and Staff All NTID faculty and staff will communicate with you using electronic mail. It is your responsibility to check your RIT e-mail daily for important information.

Office Hours Each instructor will have individual office hours scheduled for student appointments. Each instructor has his or her available times posted on the office door. To speak to an instructor outside of class, sign up for an appointment during a time that the instructor has available.

Challenge Exams The ICS Department recognizes that students may already have computer skills when they enter the major. If you think that you already have the skills taught in an ICS course, you can take a challenge exam within the first five (5) days of the quarter. If you pass the exam, you will get credit for the course. You cannot take a challenge exam for a course in which you already received a grade.

Mid-quarter Evaluations You may receive mid-quarter evaluations from your instructor during the 5th or 6th week of the quarter. These evaluations report your grade status and any other comments on your performance in the course. An evaluation with a satisfactory grade indicates that you are doing well, and with continued hard work you should do well in the course. 40

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


An evaluation with a poor grade means you need to improve the low grade. When you receive a poor midquarter evaluation, you can: See your instructor to find out why you are doing poorly and to find out what you can do to improve your grade. Your instructor may give suggestions such as: participate in class more, complete homework assignments, prepare more for tests, etc. Meet with your counselor to get help/ideas. Your counselor can help you if you are concerned about a lack of motivation in the course or in your major, if you have difficulties with organizing your time, if you need help finding tutoring, if you have problems with tests, etc.

Change of Major If you are not happy with the Information and Computing Studies major, you may find another major. You should contact your counselor for the proper procedures.

Career Exploration Students who have officially withdrawn from the ICS major can join the Career Exploration program in order to find a new major. While you are in Career Exploration you can sample a variety of different majors to find the right one for you.

Transferring to another college of RIT If you wish to transfer to in another college of RIT for a Bachelor's degree, you should see your career counselor to discuss that option.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

41


RIT Policies Add/Drop To add or drop a course, you must do so within the first seven days of the quarter (including weekends) beginning on the first day of classes. You can add or drop classes on-line via the Student Information System (SIS), with the ICS department secretary, or at the Registrar's Office. If you drop a class during the first seven days, no record is kept and the class will not show up on your RIT transcript. When dropping classes remember that, to be a full-time student, you must have a minimum of 12 credits. If your schedule falls below 12 credits, you may lose your financial aid or VR support.

Withdrawing from a Course After the seven day add/drop period, if you wish to remove yourself from a class, you may withdraw from the course until the end of the 8th week of the quarter. You will be given a grade of “W” for the course and the withdrawal becomes part of your permanent record and will appear on your transcript. You can withdraw from a course using the on-line Student Information System (SIS). In processing the request, the student, the student's instructor, the students' advisor and the student's home program or department head will be notified via email. You should talk to your counselor or instructor before withdrawing from a class.

Repeating a Course You may repeat a course to raise a “D” or “F” grade. If you repeat a course, the second grade will be your final grade for that course regardless of the grade you get the second time.

Grades You will receive the following quality points for each letter grade you receive in a course: A-4 points, B-3 points, C-2 points, D-1 point, F-0 points. Your total credits earned for a course will be the number of quality points multiplied by the number of course credits.

Final Exams You are expected to take your final exams, at the scheduled times, during the 11th week of the quarter. The final exam schedule for each quarter is posted at the beginning of that quarter in the Student Information System. You should not plan to leave RIT/NTID before you have taken all of your scheduled exams.

Cheating RIT/NTID takes academic dishonesty very seriously. Academic dishonesty can include copying another student’s work or cheating on a test. If an instructor thinks that you have cheated, that instructor can give you a failing grade on the test or homework, or can fail you for the course. Check the ICS Policy on Academic Dishonesty.

Dean’s List To qualify for Dean's List, your grade point average must be 3.40 or higher and you cannot have any grades of “I,” “F,” “E,” or “D” for that quarter. You must also have registered for, and completed, at least 12 quarter credit hours for the quarter.

Academic Probation and Suspension You will be placed on Academic Probation if your quarterly cumulative GPA falls below 2.0. You will be suspended from RIT if you are placed on academic probation for three quarters in a row or if your GPA falls below 1.0 in any quarter.

42

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics


Withdrawal/Leave of Absence from RIT/NTID You must discuss withdrawal or Leave of Absence (LOA) issues with your counselor and chairperson before you leave the Institute. This discussion is required before you obtain the required forms from your counselor.

Academic Appeals If you think that a faculty member has not been fair, you may appeal a faculty member's decision or grade through RIT's Academic Appeals process. To begin an appeal, see the Chairperson for the ICS department. For information on any of these RIT policies, see the RIT Student Rights and Responsibilities handbook.

2012-2013 Information and Computing Studies Student Handbook

43


http://www.ntid.rit.edu/ics

Information and Computing Studies National Technical Institute for the Deaf Rochester Institute of Technology


ics-handbook-2012-2013