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Dorm Room Decor pg. 21

Whether your comin’ . . .

WHAT’S

. . . or goin’

Job Hunting pg. 10

Spring 2010


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Student’s Fondest Memories pg. 12

First Impressions pg. 8

Famous Alumni pg. 6

Job Hunting pg. 10

Decorating your Dorm pg. 21

Dressing the Part pg. 16

ST Study Tips pg. 26

Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Stu Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tip Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Stu Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tip Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Stu Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tip Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Stu Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips 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Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tips Study Tip

Summer Movies pg. 24


C S

5

OMMENCEMENT CHEDULE

Friday, May 14: Masters Commencement Ceremony • 4 p.m. at the UNT Coliseum Participants: Masters candidates, guests and faculty Reception following event at Gateway Center Ballroom Doctoral Commencement and Hooding Ceremony • 7 p.m. at the Murchison Performing Arts Center Participants: Doctoral candidates, guests and faculty Reception following event at Gateway Center Ballroom

Saturday, May 15: Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony for College of Education and College of Public Affairs and Community Service • 9 a.m. at the UNT Coliseum Participants: All undergraduate candidates, guests and faculty Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony for College of Information, College of Business, College of Visual Arts and Design, School of Merchandising and Hospitality Management, College of Music, Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism, College of Engineering • 1 p.m. at the UNT Coliseum Participants: All undergraduate candidates, guests and faculty

– Vince Graziano, contributing writer

Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony for College of Arts and Sciences • 5 p.m. at the UNT Coliseum Participants: All undergraduate candidates, guests and faculty Undergraduate Commencement Reception • 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Gateway Center Ballroom Participants: All undergraduate candidates, guests and faculty Note: The Registrar’s Office recommends that graduating students show up one hour before the scheduled time of their ceremony.

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Famous Alumni – William Walsh, contributing writer

Students graduating from UNT this year will find themselves joining a large and supportive network of graduates all over the world. According to The North Texan Online, the university boasts nearly 175,000 alumni, 100,000 of whom still live in the DFW area. Though many people associate UNT only with its jazz program, graduates of the university have had enormous impact in many different arenas, including entertainment, athletics and politics. As one might expect, UNT has helped develop a large number of prominent musicians. Singer and songwriter Norah Jones spent two years studying jazz piano until she moved to New York City to pursue her career in music. Musicians Meatloaf and Don Henley both transferred to UNT from other schools in the late ‘60s. Denton staple Brave Combo, a polka band that has been producing albums since 1979, features many musicians who attended UNT. Many former attendees of the university have become respected concert players, session musicians and composStone Cold Steve Austin holds nineteen championships throughout his professional wrestling career, and is a six-time WWF Champion. Photo By Rich Freeda/Titan Sports Inc.

GIVE CATS NINE LIVES

6

LIFE #2: FERAL CATS •

A feral cat is one that was dumped or abandoned  and through fear, is attempting to survive on it’s  own.  It could also be one that was born to a feral  mother and has never been socialized to human  beings. 

Removing and euthanizing does not work.     However, Trap, Neuter and Return (TNR) does  effectively and humanely reduce  the feral cat  population by neutering and stopping the  reproduction cycle. 

There are 80+ million feral cats in the U.S.

There will always be feral cats.  You can have them  one of two ways: 1.  Unhealthy and reproducing, or  2.  Healthy and not reproducing‐(TNR)

For more information: go to Alley Cat Allies – http://www.alleycat.org

“You must be the  change you wish to  see in the world.” Ghandi

ORGS.UNT.EDU/FERALCAT


Dr. Phillip (Phil) McGraw heads a courtroom consulting firm and is known for his appearances on programs such as the Oprah Winfrey show. Photo by David Woo/Dallas Morning News Norah Jones poses with her Grammys during the 45th Annual Grammy Awards at the Madison Square Garden in New York City, Sunday, February 23, 2003. Photo by Abaca Press

ers. Many of ABC’s iconic “School House Rock” songs were composed by UNT graduate Bob Dorough. Along with the prominent music school, UNT’s long tradition of strong liberal arts curriculum has produced many celebrated actors, writers and other artists. Among the most famous are Thomas Hayden Church, who starred in the film hits “Sideways” and “Spider Man 3,” “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, a professional wrestler who has appeared many action movies, and Peter Weller, better known as RoboCop. UNT was also instrumental in the development of novelist Larry McMurtry, of Lonesome Dove fame, and non-fiction author Jim Marrs. Phil McGraw, better known to the world as Dr. Phil, received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from UNT in 1979. UNT’s athletics programs have also helped develop some of America’s most distinguished athletes, the most famous being “Mean” Joe Green, after whom the UNT Mean Green sports teams are named. Green played for North Texas State University between 1966 and 1968 until he was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers, where he had a successful career, and later starred in one of the most famous Coke commercials of all time. Among other well-known athletes to have attended UNT are Abner Haynes, who played for the Dallas Texans and later the Kansas City Chiefs, and Ray Renfro, who played for the Cleveland Browns for 12 seasons. The football program has honored their achievements by retiring their numbers. Along with football, UNT has a distinguished golfing program. PGA senior golf tour players Billy Maxwell and Don January both attended the university. Graduates of UNT have gone on to become policy makers and national leaders. Dick Armey, the House Majority Leader of the United States from 1995 to 2003, received his M.A. from UNT and taught economics here until his election to the House of Representatives. Michael Burgess, another UNT graduate, won Armey’s house seat shortly after Armey retired from government. Saudi Arabian student Adel A. Al-Jubeir received his B.A. from UNT in 1982 and today serves his country as Saudi diplomat to the United States. UNT’s dedication to its students and its rigorous courses of study have helped shape generations through the work of its thousands of alumni. With each graduating class, the university continues to extend its influence and prestige.

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– Mary Gallagher Williams, contributing writer

First Impressions: Successfully navigating the job search market requires homework, networking and knowing yourself and what you have to offer, according to recruiters from J. C. Penney, Target and The Travelers Companies, Inc. There is very little that this tech-savvy college generation cannot find out about potential employers on the Internet, so be prepared before an interview, said Steve Kelly, human resources manager for The Travelers Companies. Recognized by its red-umbrella corporate logo, Travelers offers property and casualty insurance. Kelly likes to ask applicants what they know about his company and what research they did for the position, he said. “If a candidate can’t answer those first two questions, they’re not going to get much further in the [interview] pro-

Navigating the interview process and putting your best foot forward

cess,” Kelly said Soon-to-be college graduates should start the job search early, as well as limit their resume to one page, said Kelly, who was one of several panelists at an April 15 seminar hosted by the UNT Career Center. “Be descriptive, but don’t be wordy,” Kelly said, “There is nothing worse than opening up a three-page résumé. At the interview, it is important to let the interviewer see your personality, the true you, he said. Networking also is essential. UNT career specialist Rosalyn Smith said that 70 percent to 80 percent of all positions are filled by employee recommendations, referrals, recruiters or direct contact known as networking. Smith listed the most important steps of networking:


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• knowing yourself and knowing what you have to offer because you are the product • creating a list of contacts that includes classmates professors, alumni, family, friends; parents of friends, professional organizations and former employers • determining your purpose for those contacts • practicing self introduction • making contact • following up The panel highly recommended joining a professional networking site on the Internet, such as LinkedIn.com. Leadership roles, volunteering, organization involvement, internships, and summer activities are just a few areas students can include on a résumé to show experience and initiative outside their class schedule. “You have to have something on your résumé that makes you stand out from somebody else—those things will make you stand out,” said Taylor Lyons, a Target front end and sales floor manager. Rick Farr, JC Penney senior human resources manager,

said that tailoring your résumé to a specific company instead of giving a generic résumé will “differentiate you” from others. In addition, applicants should practice a two-minute selfintroductory commercial in order to grab a recruiter’s attention. Farr said he likes to ask a tell-me-about-yourself question to observe a candidate’s communication skills, level of confidence and ability to carry on a conversation. “Be ready for that question,” Farr said, “because most interviewers will use it at some point.” On the topic of whether to send a thank-you note or e-mail after an interview, Farr said by doing so a candidate lets a company recruiter know that he is really interested in the job. Journalism major Cassie Smith said she already has joined LinkedIn.com, created a résumé, and written her own mission statement since she is creating her own job as a freelance copy editor. Spanish major Will Swan said he has a résumé, but does not have a professional Web site or blog. He said he already has been networking with contacts.


10

The Big Hunt

I

t is Industry Day at UNT’s Career Center. Inside, a handful of students in business attire sit upright on couches, their legs crossed and their notebooks out. They are waiting to be interviewed by employers who, despite the slumped economy, are on the prowl for fresh workers. One of the hopefuls is Clair O’Brien, an applied technology and performance improvement senior who is graduating in December. She is aspiring to land an internship with KXTU –TV, to get an edge on the competition when her time comes to start a career. Clair is one of many graduates who will be entering the job market during the current recession, and despite national unemployment hovering around 10 percent, her chances of getting a job are improving, experts say. “We are seeing more companies who said we were in a hiring freeze last fall starting to trickle in,” said Dan Naegeli, director of UNT’s Career Center. The Career Center is responsible for connecting students and alumni with employers and making sure students have the skills to find a job. Hundreds of companies have used the center this year alone to dip into the student labor pool, Naegeli said. – Graphic by Steve Thomas/MCT Campus


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– Drew Gaines, contributing writer This marks a change from previous years, when the economic wounds were a little deeper. Now, the economy is thought to be on the mend. “The economy is coming out of recession,” said Todd Jewell, acting chairman of UNT’s economics department. “The job market and unemployment rate are lagging indicators. “It takes a while,” he said. “People who are graduating this year are better off than the last year.” Both Jewell and Naegeli pointed out that economic recovery is a slow process, meaning graduates may not find their dream jobs and salaries for months or even years to come. Some graduates are choosing to return to graduate school to weather the storm. Others are opting take jobs outside of their desired fields. Jewell has seen a rise in graduate school applications in the economics department since the recession peaked in 2008. Before her interview at the fair last month, O’Brien admitted that grad school is a real option for her as well. “I think the masters’ is going to secure what I want to go into specifically,” she said. However, economists say that pursuing a second degree is not the best option for everybody. “Just because you have a college degree does not mean things are going to open up for you,” Jewell said. Instead, Jewell recommends that graduates stick out their first job for at least a year, even if it is not their preferred position. This allows time to gain experience and build a résumé, he says. “Businesses don’t immediately hire people back. They need to see a permanent trend that things are getting better,” Jewell said. “I would suggest grads be patient and lower their expectations a little bit.”

Naegeli suggests that students start their job search early and look everywhere for employment opportunities. He and his team of advisors stress that students and alumni make use of the Career Center to practice interviewing, construct a good résumé, manage their image and partake in networking. “Be ready for it,” he says. “That job is not going to walk through the front door because you are available.” Still, job hunters in Texas have it easier than those in other parts of the nation. The state’s unemployment rate has remained a few points below the national average and last month sat at 8.2 percent. Naegeli attributes this to Texas’ diverse industry. Rather than relying on a single enterprise, as Detroit relies on automobile manufacturing, Texas is home to a multitude of industries, including healthcare, energy, financial and human services. A handful of these entities are on the rise, spelling good news for some graduates. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, healthcare, government jobs, manufacturing and construction are industries that experienced growth the last few months while financial services, real-estate and media professions remain in a slump. “It is not all a rosy picture, but compared to a lot of places, it is better,” Naegeli said. The upcoming months are expected to be marked by gradual economic growth, leaving job seekers and employers chomping at the bit. “We are probably one of the only schools nationwide that has seen increased recruitment,” Naegeli said. “I do think we will see as the year comes out UNT will be positioned pretty well.” Information regarding UNT’s Career Center can be found at www.careercenter.unt.edu.

Employment Growing

Still Slumping

• Healthcare • Government Jobs • Manufacturing • Construction

• Financial Services • Real Estate • Media Professions – Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics


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Whyour at is fondest Alexa Hapgood Grapevine Painting & Drawing Major “My fondest memory has probably been biking around the Denton community with all of my friends.”

Mike March, 23 Farmer’s Branch General Business major “My fondest memory is being a founder of Omega Delta Phi fraternity here in fall of ’08.”

Anum Habib, 19 Richardson Biology major “My fondest memory is just basically the atmosphere of UNT.”

Aaron Milligan, 33 Houston Music major (voice & percussion) “My fondest memories of college are of all of the connections I’ve made, like professors and all of the professionals in my area.”

Amber Jones, 20 Arlington Psychology major “My fondest memories of college are just the times that I went out with my friends or had a close bonding moment with my professors.”

Adam Thompson, 22 Austin Entrepreneurship major “My fondest college memory, I guess, is playing disc golf with all my friends.”

August Gonzalez, 22 Trophy Club Applied Arts major “My fondest memory is whenever I went on a study abroad trip to Europe. I went to Edinburgh, Scotland; London, England; and Paris, France; and also Morocco. It was pretty cool.”

Christine Hill, 22 Arlington Marketing major “My fondest memory: We were sitting in my Foundations in Marketing class. We sat on one row. My friend came to class late, and she was trying to step over everybody, and in the Lyceum, the aisles are really small. She tripped over a backpack and fell literally right in my lap, and her butt was under my chin, and I was SO mad. I was going like, ‘Get off me’ in the middle of class. Everybody turned and looked at us. The teacher looked at us. Finally, I just pushed her off, and she landed in the row in front of me.”


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– Anam Bakali and Alexis Ashcraft, contributing writers

memory? Marcia Bilbo, 21 Houston English major “My fondest memory of being at UNT is, um, a majority of them have to do with being in Phi Sigma Pi, which is a national co-ed honors fraternity. We do a lot of things on campus, and my favorite event that we’ve done for the past three years is Shack-A-Thon, which is with the Habitat for Humanity.” Alicia Starmack, 22 Sociology major Spring, TX “My fondest memory of college would probably have to be getting up here and finding the church that I go to, and just meeting a lot of my really close friends that I have now. I met them through that, so that’s probably the best thing that happened when I was in college.” Yusuk Kasuga, 23 Japan Hospitality Management; International Studies major “My fondest memories are actually right now, because, right now, we have International Weeks. We have, like, a bunch of events. Every day, I get e-mailed some events as Japanese students. So right now are my fondest

Kirbi Favier, 25 Carbondale, Ill. Accounting major “My fondest memory is definitely applying for graduation and being done.”

Ashley Jinks, 20 Accounting major Dallas (laughing) “Me and my friend were chasing our flip flops down the street when it rained. I had to catch it before it went down the drain. And then I was crawling up under a car trying to get it. I had to get it. I didn’t want to walk around with no shoes like other people. They were walking barefoot, and all on the bus barefoot. That was disgusting.” Laronnica Washington, 20 Accounting major Waco “Joining Alpha Kappa Psi fraternity. I think my pledge brothers is what made it fun, getting to know my pledge brothers, and growing the brotherhood with each other.”

memories.” Joe Fanthuruthil, 23 Accounting major Irving “My fondest memory is probably the time when my friends Jackson and Ronnie and I bought water guns. We went to about 30 people’s apartments, and we went inside and soaked everyone with water. We got about 30 people, so that was my fondest memory.”

Richard Ramos, Jr., 24 Ft. Worth/Keller Business & Finance major “My fondest memory is having all these great parties on Fry Street, and studying with everybody and knowing everybody. It’s a great place to hang out. I’ve made a lot of friends here, so it’s awesome. That’s my fondest memory: making friends and using them as contacts in the legitimate business world.”


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16

D I ress to

When graduating students don their caps and gowns for spring graduation, they will continue a tradition that goes back nearly 800 years and reaches across thousands of miles. Caps and gowns evolved out of necessity and are now recognized around the world as the dress of university graduates. The regalia known today originated in medieval Europe and began as the dress of clerics. Most universities did not have their own buildings when they were first established, and studies were conducted at local churches. The majority of these churches were made of stone and unheated, leading to the wearing of long robes and hoods for warmth. In 1321, the University of Colombia stipulated that all “Doctors, Licentiates, and Bachelors” wear robes, beginning the formal recognizing of academic dress. In the 14th century, conservative ideals at European universities forbid an “excess in apparel” and all scholars were required to wear long gowns. Cambridge and Oxford were the first to have a defined code of academic dress, and they controlled all aspects of it. There was a gradual distinction formed between the dress of Bachelors, Masters and Doctors. The distinction between Masters and Doctors is a more recent change, with both degrees implying the ability to teach. In the late 19th century, specific colors signifying

mpress

certain faculties were standardized in the United States. An 1895 meeting of the Intercollegiate Commission at Colombia University established the first academic costume code and regulated the style, cut and materials used for gowns and specified colors for specific areas of academic study. Gardner Cotrell Leonard of Albany, New York, designed gowns for his class at Williams College in 1887. The gowns were made by his family’s firm. In 1893 he published an article on academic dress and he was invited to the 1895 meeting to participate in establishing the costume code. The code was used informally in the United States until 1932 when the American Council on Education approved it. In Europe, there is no governing body regulating academic dress and it continues to be very diverse at their universities. The code was updated in 1959 and most recently in 1986 when the American Council on Education clarified the use of dark blue for Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The dress of doctoral candidates is one aspect that falls with individual universities. When a university is granted the ability to confer doctoral degrees, is also has the right to design unique regalia for its graduates. Sources: American Council on Education- www.acenet. edu; Texas A&M University- http://graduation.tamu.edu/ history; Herff-Jones- www.herff-jones.com

– Vince Graziano, contributing writer


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Traditional area of study colors Agriculture - Maize Arts, Letters, Humanities - White Commerce, Accountancy, Business- Drab Dentistry - Lilac Economics - Copper Education - Light Blue Engineering - Orange Fine Arts, including Architecture - Brown Forestry - Russet Journalism - Crimson Law - Purple Library Science - Lemon Medicine - Green Music - Pink Nursing - Apricot Oratory (Speech) - Silver Gray Pharmacy - Olive Green Philosophy - Dark Blue Physical Education - Sage Green Public Administration, including Foreign Service Peacock Blue Public Health - Salmon Pink Science - Golden Yellow Social Work - Citron Theology - Scarlet Veterinary Science - Gray Regalia Pricing*: Outfit (Cap, Gown and Tassel): Bachelor- $37 Master (includes hood)- $68 Doctoral (includes hood)- $77 Individual Items: Cap - $9 Official Tassel - $5 Bling Tassel - $10 Keychain Tassel - $6 Honors Stole (w/letter**) - $29 Hoods only: Master- $28 Doctoral- $28

Cap: Or “Mortarboard,� has origins dating back to the skull caps worn by clergy. The square was eventually affixed on top, with a tassel hanging from the middle. It should be worn with the square parallel to the floor. They are generally made of cotton poplin, broadcloth or silk. Velvet is reserved for doctoral graduates. Tassel: Only one may be worn at a time and traditionally in either black or the color of the area of study. Gold tassels are reserved for doctoral graduates. It is usually worn on the right and moved to the left after the degrees are conferred. Hood: First used by clerics and early scholars for warmth in the unheated churches. It was replaced by the skull cap. Worn over the shoulders and down the back, the hood has subject-specific colors and symbols, and is either put on by a head faculty member or flipped down before crossing the stage so the schools colors can be seen. Hoods must be 3-feet long for Bachelors, three-and-a-half feet for Masters, and four feet for Doctors. Gown: First used for warmth by medieval scholars, the style and color has changed over time signifying different stages of academic progress (Bachelor, Master, Doctor).

*All prices are from the UNT Bookstore, the authorized seller of graduation regalia. **A letter from the Registrar informing you that you are graduating with honors must be verified by the bookstore before honors stoles will be sold. ***Honor Cords are handed out by various departments, organizations, or fraternities. In some instances, the cords are held on-site and given out prior to the ceremony. Check with the individual organization before contacting the bookstore.


D Make sure you collaborate with your roommate when you are decorating your dorm room. Photo by Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT

orm ecor

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– Stacy Powers, contributing writer

When planning to live in a dorm, think ahead about which items you will need to make your room feel more like home. “We encourage students to bring whatever is going to make them comfortable living in their room,” said James Fairchild, residence life coordinator. “Anything that any normal person in the real world would have in their home, or that they’ve had as they were growing up in their parent’s home, they bring those things with them and it helps their adjustment.” One of the main items many students find essential for a dorm room is a mini fridge. His fridge is the most essential item for Glenn Sapien, an electrical engineering sophomore. It holds food for weekends and keeps his drinks cold, he said. The mini fridge is also good for those who don’t have a meal plan or who do have one but don’t always eat in the UNT cafeterias. “Even if you have a seven-day meal plan, you are not going to want to eat in the cafeterias all the time,” said Alex Morgan, a choral and instrumental music sophomore and resident assistant at Legends Hall. “It’s good to have place to store your food so you can eat in your room if you want to.” Other items that make a dorm room feel more like home are dec-

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orations, such as attractive bed linens, posters or photographs. “An empty room in one of the residence halls isn’t exactly pretty when you walk into it,” Fairchild said. “It doesn’t have anything that’s decorative.” It is up to the student to add personal touches. “Pictures are good because you don’t get to see your family every day. So it is nice to see them in pictures,” said Lauren Ory-Flowers, an interior design freshman. Many students bring all kinds of electronics, such as their laptop, televisions, video game systems and DVD players. Many say the items are essential for doing homework or to unwind from a stressful day. “I like to listen to the TV,” Sapien said. “When I do homework, I got to have something else going on because if it is too quiet, I can’t focus.” Your needs may depend on which hall you live in. Legends and Honors have semi-private rooms with a living area and kitchenette. Students living there may want to bring a small couch or futon to lounge in while watching TV with friends. Be sure to check out how you room is set up. “Some of our buildings where there’s a small kitchenette space that’s specifically designed for small kitchen appliances, they can have a toaster or toaster oven,” Fairchild said. “The traditional buildings that have two people sharing a room together are not designed to have those kinds of cooking appliances.” Among items never allowed in dorms are candles, hibachi

grills, string lights and anything with an open heating element. They are a fire hazard. But headphones are a must, especially for students who will have a roommate, Fairchild said. They help to avoid roommate conflicts when it comes to studying, listening to music or sleeping, he said. What is considered to be essential for living in a dorm varies from student to student. It’s all about bringing what will make you feel comfortable in your home away from home.


SM 24

ummer ovies to see

– Mary Gallagher Williams, contributing writer Salt Release date July 23, 2010 In this spy thriller Angelina Jolie stars as a CIA covert operative on the run after being wrongly accused of being a Russian spy. CIA officer Evelyn Salt uses all her skills and years of experience to elude capture and to prove her innocence. “‘Salt’ sounds like a good movie,” said UNT speech therapy major Antoinette Hamilton, 23. “I kind of like the suspense stuff.” “‘Salt’ looks pretty good,” said RTVF sophomore Zach Werblo, 18. “It’s kind of a throwback to the old Soviet-Cold War thrillers.”

Toy Story 3 Release date June 18, 2010 Wide-eyed cowboy doll Woody and action figure Buzz Lightyear take viewers on another computer-animated adventure when the toy box gang is abandoned by their college-bound owner and given to a daycare center. “Toy Story 2” co-director Lee Unkrich goes solo in this third installment of the 3-D Pixar series. “Pixar [Animation Studios] has never disappointed me,” said UNT pre-psychology major Rebekah Pierce, 20. “They make really, really good stories.” “I loved the first one and kind of liked the second one, and I’m hoping the third one will be just as good,” said UNT music sophomore Ben Grigsby, 19.


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The Last Airbender Release date July 2, 2010 Based on the hit Nickelodeon series “Avatar: The Last Airbender,” this first installment of director M. Night Shyamalan’s planned trilogy tells the tale of a 12-year-old boy, known as the Avatar, who is the last hope for restoring harmony to a chaotic land. In a world balanced on the four nations of Water, Earth, Fire and Air, the Avatar is the only one with the power to manipulate all four elements. The Fire nation initiates a global war for world domination after the Avatar appears to die. After being freed from 100 years of suspended animation, the Avatar (not to be confused with James Cameron’s blue creatures) embarks on a quest to restore harmony among the four war-ravaged nations. UNT senior Lock Gramblin, 23, said he likes movies by director M. Night Shyamalan. “He’s like hit or miss,” the mechanical engineering technology major said. “‘Lady in the Water’ was weird, but ‘Signs’ was good.” The Other Guys Release date August 6, 2010 Set in New York City, this buddy-cop comedy pairs Detective Allen Gamble (Will Ferrell), a forensic accountant who’s more interested in paperwork than hitting the streets, with Detective Terry Hoitz (Mark Wahlberg), a tough guy who’s been stuck with Gamble ever since an unfortunate run-in with Derek Jeter. The crime-fighting duo steps up to the plate when an opportunity arises, but things don’t go quite as planned. Also starring Samuel L. Jackson, Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson and Michael Keaton. “Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlburg—there’s a funny combination,” said UNT music freshman Andrew McMillian, 18. “I’d probably go see the funny one with Will Ferrell,” said English major Kate Thompson, 20. “I’ll see anything with Will Ferrell in it.”

Movie review information gathered from MovieFone.com and GordonAndTheWhale.com Web sites.

The A-Team Release date June 11, 2010 A remake of the 1980’s actionpacked TV series, this new version uses the unique talents of a band of Iraq war veterans on a mission to clear their name for a crime they did not commit. Bradley Cooper, Liam Neeson, Sharlto Copley (“District 9”) and UFC star Quentin “Rampage” Jackson are the mercenaries for hire that round out “The A-Team.” “I’m just kind of curious [to see] how they make that crappy show into a big blockbuster!” said RTVF major Zach Werblo, 18. Journalism major Kate Grable, 24, said she wants to see “The A-Team” for its action as well as for its nostalgia.

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