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COASTAL BEND

NSIDE

MD FEBRUARY.MARCH 2013

EMBRACING THE NO-KILL PHILOSOPHY GULF COAST HUMANE SOCIETY CHILD’S PLAY PEDIATRIC REHABILITATION THERAPY

ANSWERING THE CALL DR. DAN ROBERTS

PUTTING PATIENTS FIRST

JANE T MONTAGNE and RIVER CITY HOSPICE N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Protect Your Financial Freedom!

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Alice 361-664-4888 路 Corpus Christi 361-882-5900 www.rivercityhospice.com


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Dear Doctor: Interim Homecare provides a comprehensive array of healthcare services in your patients’ home. Helping your patients with new medications, diabetes management, CHF and other related cardiac complications, COPD, wound care, helping regain strength and mobility or other services that will aid in your patients’ recovery process. We at Interim Healthcare look forward to serving all your needs.

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Interim Homecare 361.887.4850 Corpus Christi


Kingsville

HOME REHAB Serving South Texas, San Antonio and Austin.

Focused on restoring function and regaining independence. Kingsville Home Rehab Services, Inc. was established in 2004 and is a leader in home health rehabilitation. We provide to our patients quaility and evidencebased rehabilitaiton services. Integrity, excellence, trust and compassion are the core values in which Kingsville Home Rehab therapist’ and staff follow day to day, and from one home to the next. Kingsville Home Rehab’s primary goal is to enhance a patient’s quality of life with subtle changes. Whether teaching a fall prevetion program or making small postural changes to relief lower back pain, our goal is to maximize our patient’s potential.

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www.kingsvillehomerehab.com N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Come Visit Our House! Always in need Of volunteers! Visit gchscc.org For info!

Looking for a place to bring those old towels and newspapers? Bring em’ to us!

NSIDE Coastal Bend MD

P U BFebruary/March L I C A T 2013 IONS

publisher adrian garza

South Texas’s Largest True No Kill We currently have HUNDREDS of wonderful pets awaiting loving, responsible homes. Adoption = more lives saved. Hours of Operation:

staff executive editor Erin O’Brien

creative director Elisa Giordano

graphic designers

Monday-Saturday 11am-6pm Sundays noon-6pm 361-225-0845 318 Cabaniss Pkwy. CC, TX 78415 Add Us on Facebook!

Damaris Fike Cristina Villa Hazar

executive assistant Elena Flores

photography Steven Alford Dustin Ashcraft

contributing writers

Don’t get caught sitting arounD

Steven Alford Mandy Ashcraft Dr. Naveen Kella Ashley Ley Cody M. Rice Dr. Marcus Sorenson Sarah Tindall

editorial intern Katrina Torres

get

nsiDe magazine www.getnside.com find out more at

www.getnside.com /coastalbend

For advertising information, please call 361.548.1044 or email adrian@getnside.com. For editorial comments and suggestions, please email adrian@getnside.com.

PUBLIC ATIONS

18402 U.S. Highway 281 N, Ste. 201 San Antonio, Texas 78259 Phone: 210.298.1761

Copyright © by NSIDE Media Productions. All rights reserved. Reproduction without the expressed written permission of the publisher is prohibited.

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nsidethisissue February/March 2013 cover story 14

Janet Montagne and River City Hospice

The owner of River City Hospice and her special team provide high-quality, compassionate care with a focus on the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of patients and their families at the end of life.

profile

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Dr. Dan Roberts

Through his work with CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi -- Memorial and the Corpus Christi Fire Department, this emergency medicine physician likes to share his medical knowledge and make a difference in the lives of others.

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departments

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Nonprofit Patient Health & Wellness Tech MD

cover story | Janet Montagne and River City Hospice

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NSIDE nonprofit

The No-Kill Equation Embrace the true no-kill philosophy with the Gulf Coast Humane Society, one of the few safe havens in the nation where no animal dies unjustly. By: [Cody M. Rice] The Gulf Coast Humane Society (GCHS) is one of the few true no-kill shelters in the nation. We can stand proud and say that when animals find their way here, it is a new beginning, not the end of the line. A true no-kill is just that: No life dies unjustly, and no life is killed for treatable illnesses or behaviors such as food aggression. Many shelters across the nation claim to be no-kill facilities, but in fact, put animals down for treatable illnesses such as heartworms and unjust temperament testing at very high rates. Not killing for lack of space availability alone does not justify or constitute no-kill. Killing is the correct terminology when referring to an animal dying unjustly. As in the accurate terminology of euthanasia, it is ending a life for means of mercy to end pain and suffering. GCHS has modeled the true no-kill by the implementation of lifesaving programs and excluding certain unjust temperament tests. Temperament tests should be used to determine what issues or needs the animal has so they can be addressed accordingly – not killed for something as simple as food aggression. This, unfortunately, happens in many shelters and pounds across the United States. At GCHS, we will only resort to euthanasia when

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When animals find their way to GCHS, it is a new beginning, not the end of the line. there is no remaining quality of life due to extreme pain and suffering that cannot be alleviated by medical treatment, and only after exhausting every avenue to save the animal, regardless of expense. In my 13 years here, I have seen so many dogs come through our doors that would have certainly perished anywhere else, as the first impression of these wonderful creatures would be aggression. The implementation of comprehensive adoption programs, networking, reaching out to communities regarding adoption outside the realm of the community alone, public education and awareness, foster care and fundraising are all vital components of the no-kill equation. Along with that, having willing participants such as shelter directors and those (policy makers) willing to learn and understand the no-kill movement saves thousands of lives each year. Saving lives –

what could be better than that? We hope you will join us in embracing the nokill movement in our community with your continued support and asking your friends and family for theirs. We hope that as we function as a true no-kill, this community will see that we are demonstrating and achieving our lifesaving mission and goals. Please help us continue to give them all a chance at a happy, healthy life. We do what we can, but we need you to help us and to help them. Are you in? If so, come out and see us. You will be glad you did.

The Gulf Coast Humane Society is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. For more information, call 361-225-0845.


Recovery Isn’t Simply a Goal, It’s Our Mission.

Kindred Healthcare understands that when people are discharged from a traditional hospital, they often need continued care in order to recover completely. That’s where we come in.

Doctors, case managers, social workers and family members don’t stop caring simply because their loved one or patient has changed location. Neither do we.

Kindred offers services including aggressive, medically complex care, intensive care and shortterm rehabilitation.

Come see how we care at www.continuethecare.com.

Dedicated to Hope, Healing and Recovery

CONTINUE THE CARE 6226 Saratoga Blvd · Corpus Christi, Texas 78414 · 361-986-1600 www.khcorpuschristi.com N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Special Care,

Special People

For Janet Montagne, it’s all about the patients at River City Hospice, a successful hospice provider dedicated to meeting the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of patients and their families at the end of life.

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By: [Sarah Tindall] Photography: [Dustin Ashcraft]

It takes a special person to dedicate one’s life to making sure patients spend the last months at the end of their lives gracefully, fully and with dignity. Janet Montagne, the owner of River City Hospice, is so proud that her staff of 250 at River City Hospice is comprised of just that kind of special people. Montagne opened a home health business in Beaumont in 1993. She enjoyed the work, making sure that all of the patients under her care were well provided for and receiv-

But one thing always bothered her: If patients were dying, she observed that many of them and their families did not know of the many options available for them to ensure that the patient gets the best level of care, both emotionally and physically. “Like most people, when I heard the term, ‘hospice,’ I thought that just meant death was imminent,” Montagne said. “I thought nothing could beat home health. Then my friend’s parents were on it, and I saw what was provided.”

“Each of us has the right to die pain-free and with dignity.” ing the nursing care and therapy they needed to continue living as comfortably and well as possible. She was successful and felt rewarded by her work, knowing she was doing a great job taking care of her patients.

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The combination of physical and emotional support available to patients in hospice was a wakeup call to Montagne. She realized that many of her patients did not realize there was so much support available either, and she


knew this was the missing piece in her care of her patients. River City Hospice has been the answer to that need. “Hospice is a special kind of care for patients and families facing a life-limiting illness,” Montagne said. “At the center of hospice is the belief that each of us has the right to die pain-free and with dignity. Hospice offers highquality, compassionate care to persons who can no longer benefit from curative treatment, and once a patient is certified by their physician for hospice services, we immediately begin to administer to his or her needs.” People are sometimes unfamiliar with the services that are available once they are in hospice, which can be covered by Medicare, Medicaid or private-pay insurance. “We only have one chance to make the best of the experience for the patient and the family,” said Montagne, who takes that responsibility very seriously. “The perception is that once people are in hospice, they have to stay home, stay in bed, stop smoking and stop eating. But we see our job as preparing the patient for the journey he or she will be taking – to help the whole family through the process.” Patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, end-stage kidney disease and even heart and lung disease would be best served by hospice care, but these programs are underutilized because people do not know they are available. For many, hospice care conotates end-oflife care, but this is not always so. Many hospice patients leave hospice care because they have clinically improved, or remain on hospice longer than six months and live meaningful lives. The focus of River City Hospice is to treat the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of those they serve by providing care in a patient’s home or in a homelike setting. When a patient is enrolled at River City Hospice, the first thing Montagne does is send someone out to do an assessment of the patient and his or her needs. This takes around two hours and is followed by the assignment of a case manager to the case. In the first week, the patient will be visited by a registered nurse, a spiritual counselor if desired, a social worker and a nurse assistant. Then a volunteer is assigned to the patient – someone to stop by and visit if the patient needs company or the caregiver needs a short break. All of these visitors have one purpose: to make sure the patient’s physical, emotional and spiritual needs are met while the patient is in hospice care. Patients in hospice may be in therapy, they may need nurse visits three or even five times a week and they may need access to medication to ease pain – and the duty of all of the River City Hospice staff is to see that those needs are met in a timely and compassionate fashion.

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“Services are provided by a team of trained professionals that includes physicians, nurses, counselors, social workers, therapists, chaplains, aides and volunteers so that their needs are met in the absolute best possible way,” Montagne said. “Although the primary focus of River City Hospice is pain and symptom management, the individual needs and preferences of the patient and their family is always our top priority when a care plan is being developed.” As a result, River City Hospice has become renowned for its expertise in end-of-life care. The spiritual aspect of

“It’s an honor that a patient and a family would let us take care of them. I never take it for granted.” hospice care is very important to Montagne. It prepares people for the end of life with quality and dignity regardless of their spiritual beliefs. Patients spend meaningful time with the spiritual director of their choosing, and this helps the patient and family feel comforted at this time in their lives. This continues even after a patient has passed. For Montagne, the care for the family the patient leaves behind is tantamount. Her bereavement program makes sure their emotional needs are met for a full 13 months after the death of a patient. Each year, River City Hospice hosts a memorial ceremony to honor the patients who died that year. The families are invited and given a candle and a little paper dove to commemorate the passing of the loved one.

“For me, it’s all about the patients,” Montagne said. “I feel like my staff is my family, and I could not be as successful as I am without their support, so when they treat a patient, I feel it is my family treating the patient and his family.” That commitment to her staff family and her patients and their families has been the key to River City Hospice’s success. The little company that began in Beaumont now has 12 Texas locations: Alice, Austin, Bandera, Beaumont, Corpus Christi, Hemphill, Jasper, Kyle, Marble Falls, Orange, San Antonio and Sugarland, and two more in Idaho: Post Falls and Sandpoint. Montagne has, in fact, successfully started, managed and operated 28 health care entities in her career. River City Hospice, which began in 2010, is a family affair, as well: Montagne’s son and daughter both work for the business, which is good because Montagne is so committed to visiting each location each month and making sure her staff and patients are well cared for that she jokes she’d have trouble making time for family if they did not see each other so often at work. “It’s an honor and a privilege that a patient and a family would let us take care of them. I never take it for granted,” Montagne said – and that focus on putting the patient first is why her business has been so successful. “We didn’t have a big master plan to grow like this. We’ve just been blessed in that we’ve been so well-received in the market.” Montagne also expressed gratitude to the physicians who make her work possible, as well as the state and local legislators she works with every day to make sure her patients have access to the care they need. Another priority for Montagne is giving back to the communities that have welcomed her wholeheartedly. “River City Hospice gets involved in communitywide and national charity events such as the Alzheimer’s Association, LiveWell Women’s Conference, American Heart Association and American Cancer Society.” She also maintains membership in Leadership Southeast Texas, the Texas Association for Home Care, the National Association of Home Care and Hospice and the Texas & New Mexico Hospice Organization, as well as the End-of-Life Coalition. Special people, indeed: Montagne and her staff are proud that they spend their days providing excellent care to so many people each day.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 361-882-5900 (Corpus Christi), 361-664-4888 (Alice) or 1-877-537-4837, or go to www.rivercityhospice.com.


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Growing up outside Houston next-door to a fire chief, Dr. Dan Roberts has always had a knack for medicine and helping those in need. The trauma doctor works in the emergency department at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi – Memorial, and he serves as medical director for the Corpus Christi Fire Department, training firefighters and emergency medical technicians.

A man of many

Hats

By: [Steven Alford] Photography: [steven alford]

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With nearly 25 years in health care under his belt, emergency medicine physician Dr. Dan Roberts works around the clock to make a difference in the lives others, both at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi – Memorial and with the Corpus Christi Fire Department.


When Dr. Dan Roberts of the CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi – Memorial emergency medicine team isn’t saving lives, he likes to take photographs of birds in the wild and care for his longhorn cattle at his ranch.

F

or emergency medicine physician Dr. Dan Roberts, there just aren’t enough hours in each day. Whether caring for Corpus Christi trauma victims, training firefighters or flying cross-country with patients as an in-flight doctor, to say that Roberts wears many hats could be an understatement. “I don’t sleep much,” Roberts, 44, joked in his office between shifts. “I’ve always liked to stay busy.” The past five years, he’s worked at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi – Memorial, most recently in the emergency department caring for those recovering from life-or-death scenarios. He also serves as medical director of the Corpus Christi Fire Department, ensuring more than 400 firefighters and emergency medical technicians are

equipped with the knowledge they need to save lives in the field. The 6-foot-6-inch doctor is well-known around the Corpus Christi hospital he calls home. It’s hard to miss his warm smile and loud bellow as he greets colleagues and patients in the halls. Since growing up in Kingwood, Texas, next-door to a fire chief who would park an ambulance in the driveway, Roberts has had an itch to be a doctor and a fascination with helping those in need. “It’s a very rewarding job,” Roberts said. “You get a lot of personal satisfaction out of making a difference in people’s lives.” Working 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. each day works well for Roberts because it allows him to spend time with his three children each morning. He sleeps while they’re at school and then picks them up again in the afternoon. Before coming to Corpus Christi, Roberts worked

various medical roles around the country, including urban search and rescue, disaster response and even as a medical officer for the Carolina Panthers football team. Back in Texas, Roberts helps train the team at the Padre Island National Seashore in his free time, and he is part of a team that responds to natural disasters around the state – although, thankfully, there hasn’t been a major hurricane here since he signed on. But it’s the fast pace, the variety and the late nights that keep drawing Roberts back to work in trauma centers. One night in particular that will always stick in Robert’s mind was a grisly stabbing in Corpus Christi. The team at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital – Memorial had just finished caring for a teenaged car wreck victim when a man dropped his brother, suffering a stab wound to his chest, off at the emerN S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Dr. Dan Roberts of the CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi – Memorial emergency medicine team loves to work around the clock whether as a respected trauma physician, as medical director for the Corpus Christi Fire Department or in caring for his longhorn cattle.

“It’s a very rewarding job. You get a lot of satisfaction out of Making a difference in people’s lives.”

gency department door. The brothers had been arguing in the car while driving, when one reached for a knife and stabbed the other. “We opened up his chest and found there already was a lot of blood pooling around his heart,” Roberts said. The knife had severed the man’s coronary artery. Roberts and staff massaged the young man’s heart for nearly 15 minutes to bring him back to life. The man went on to make a full recovery. The staff still

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sees him from time to time, as he brings family for doctor’s visits at the Westside hospital. “We were instrumental in saving that man’s life,” Roberts said. “That was one of those things that will stay with you.” In his downtime, Roberts likes to take photographs of birds and nature, which he enters in area wildlife photography competitions. He’s even won a few top awards. But some of his most prized possessions are the five longhorn cattle he and his wife

of 11 years keep on a ranch in Petronila. They are from a bloodline directly related to Bevo, the University of Texas mascot, which is a source of pride for the former Austin student. “It’s just a way for me to leave it all behind and relax,” Roberts said. After nearly 25 years of working in health care, Roberts says he doesn’t have plans to slow down anytime soon. His family has settled in Corpus Christi, possibly for good, he said.


STAY IN THE KNOW! LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

com

www.GETNSIDE. It’s hard to miss 6-foot-6-inch-tall Dr. Dan Roberts, part of the emergency medicine team at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi – Memorial. He’s known for his warm smile and loud bellow as he greets colleagues and patients in the halls.

Whether teaching medical students, emergency personnel or park rangers, one of Roberts’ best gifts is his ability to share his enthusiasm about medicine with those around him. With new advances and changes around the corner, it’s an interesting time to be in the medical field, Roberts said. He just hopes the nurses, doctors and paramedics of tomorrow will hear the call. “It’s a big commitment. It takes a lot of dedication,” Roberts said. “But I couldn’t imagine doing any-

thing else. You’re solving people’s problems – you’re helping them out when they need it the most.”

Steven Alford is a communication specialist with CHRISTUS Spohn Health System. For more information, you may contact him at 361-861-9512 (office), 361-558-5935 (mobile) or steven.alford@christushealth.org. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE patient

The ideal pediatric therapy setting feels like a safe place where your child can relax.

Child’s Play If your child needs pediatric rehabilitation therapy, taking time to find the right facility and licensed therapist, as well as to educate yourself on the obstacles your child faces, can help put your fears to rest.

By: [Ashley Ley]

What do you do if you and your child’s physician have a concern about your child’s development? A prescription for therapy can often be a starting point in your child’s developmental journey. Finding the right therapy facility and licensed therapist is often just as important as educating yourself on what obstacles your child is facing. The three words, “pediatric rehabilitation therapy,” can be frightening and overwhelming to parents who are seeking to improve speech, occupational or physical skills for their children. However, with proper guidance and compassion, many of these fears can be easily put to rest. For many parents, the first concern may be “Does my insurance plan cover a therapy prescription?” or “How much will therapy sessions cost?” Most health

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insurance plans, including Medicaid, provide benefits for physical, speech and occupational therapies. Creating and designing the right therapy treatment plan, including the number of visits, can be facilitated by open communication between your physician and therapist. Communication between the two disciplines can help increase the number of visits your insurance plan will cover. Your insurance carrier will probably provide you with a list of therapy providers, but as a parent, you may have options outside of that preferred provider list. Take your time in selecting the right facility, and feel free to ask questions and tour the facility before making your decision. If the facility you select is not on your carrier’s list, let the therapy facility you select help navigate the process. Most therapy

facilities have longstanding relationships with the insurance carriers and can be of great assistance in this process. Parents, of course, want to make each therapy appointment enjoyable, as well as productive. Facilities that offer one-on-one treatment can often help ease your child’s anxiety at the beginning stages of therapy. A one-on-one treatment setting can help establish trust and build a positive rapport between the therapist and your child. Ask your therapy center if treatments will be done one-on-one. Also, seek out a facility that designs treatments on the play-based therapy model. Simple therapy treatments like swinging and bouncing, which are designed to be “fun” and stimulate the nervous system positively, can also help treat and calm anxiety. Centers that are pediatric-focused should employ games and activities that are enjoyable to children and allow the therapist to assess progress at the same time. The ideal pediatric therapy setting feels like a safe place where your child can relax. Right and wrong should typically not be emphasized as long as effort is being demonstrated. When touring a pediatric therapy center, look for brightly colored equipment and treatment areas that will help stimulate and engage your child. If your child is adverse to large noisy settings, check to see if the facility has individual treatment rooms, as well as larger gym settings. As more and more research becomes available regarding autism spectrum disorder (ASD), therapy centers have emerged as an important resource for parents of autistic children. Occupational therapy is, by design, a resource that can help enhance a child’s ability to participate in the activities associated with daily living. Occupational therapy can be advantageous for children diagnosed with ASD in many areas, including leisure skills, grooming, sensory integration and processing and communication with others. Parents may also search for therapy facilities that provide access to community autism support groups and community-based resources.

To learn more about the services mentioned in this article, please call Legacy Therapy Center at 361-8551345 or visit www.legacyhhc.com. You may also visit the American Occupational Therapy Association online at www.aota.org.


When you think of physical therapy... you most likely think of our ability to

treat the standard musculoskeletal injuries or conditions such as strains, sprains, low back pain, neck, shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, ankle, and foot pain, etc.,

...but did you know Humpal P.T. also has programs for:

• Pregnancy (Pre/Post Natal Care) • Diabetes • Fall Prevention • Neuropathy

• Cardiovascular Therapy • Osteoarthritis • Vertigo (dizziness) • Osteoporosis

• Athletic Rehab (Sport Specific) • Thoracic-Outlet Syndrome • Orthotic Evaluation/Fabrication • Pre-Op/Post-Operative Therapy

We have a program for you if you are unable to perform your activities of daily living due to pain or limited range of motion.

We will put you back in the Game of Life!

4500 sq.ft.Gym - Corpus Christi location

46’x 20’Indoor Pool - Corpus Christi location

All 6 locations offer carefully designed and supervised exercise programs in State of the Art gyms and Large Indoor Heated Pools.

Medicare, Medicaid, Workers Compensation, and most insurances accepted.

If you have a condition that is causing you pain or concern, ask your Doctor for a prescription to Humpal P.T., or stop by any of our locations to request a FREE physical therapy Screening to determine if your condition can benefit from physical therapy.

Humpal Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Centers

w w w. H u m p a l P h y s i c a l T h e r a p y. c o m w w w. F a c e b o o k . c o m / H u m pa l P T

Corpus Christi, 5026 Deepwood Cir., 361-854-2278 Calallen, 4040 Five Points Rd., 361-241-7399 Alice, 1302 E. 5th St., 361-664-9675 Portland, 114 Lang Rd. 361-643-8243 Aransas Pass, 2150 W. Wheeler Ave., 361-758-5199 Rockport, 1811 Broadway (aka Fulton Beach Rd.), 361-729-8777

6 Locations • 120 Employees • One Philosophy- Provide the Best Ncare! S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE patient

The Lowdown on Low T

Testosterone: The common misconceptions, the health benefits and the importance of speaking to your doctor if you think you may have low T By: [dr. naveen kella]

• Gels: These are currently the most commonly used and recommended

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because they are made by pharmaceutical companies and heavily regulated by the FDA, allowing for proper dosage. The gel is applied once a day and simply becomes part of your normal routine. The gel needs to be covered until completely dry because it can be transmitted to your wife, children or others. • Injections: Used and sometimes preferred by patients, injections are given every two weeks and typically supply a rapid spike liked by patients. However, it is followed by a crash. Studies have shown that regular use may have a negative effect on blood counts. • Creams: As compounds mixed with lotions, these can yield a questionable dosage. They are not FDA approved and for that reason, are not usually recommended. • Patches: These are also uncommon treatments due to the inability to accurately measure the amount of testosterone transmitted because of a lack of adhesive ability. They are also visible and can cause skin irritation. Upcoming treatments include a gel you apply to your gums twice a day and pellets that can be injected into the skin and provide testosterone treatment for up to about two months at a time. The average man may never fully understand his testosterone count, but his doctor should. Take the questionnaire to see if you may have low T. If your answers suggest you could be at risk, speak to your doctor as soon as you can. It just might help your sexual function and exercise regimen, and help create optimistic thoughts for 2013.

Could I have low T?

Ask yourself these questions to see if you may have low testosterone: ➊ Do you have less libido or sex drive? ➋ Do you have less energy? ➌ Have you lost weight? ➍ Have you noticed decreased enjoyment of life? ➎ Are you sad and/or grumpy? ➏ Have you lost height? ➐ Are your erections not as strong? ➑ Have you had a recent deterioration in your ability to play sports? ➒ Are you falling asleep after dinner? ➓ Has there been a recent deterioration in your work performance?

If you answered yes to question 1 or 7, or if you answered yes to any other three questions in the questionnaire, you may have low testosterone, and you should consult your doctor immediately.

For more information on low testosterone or any other urologic concern such as erectile dysfunction or prostate cancer, contact robotic urologic surgeon Dr. Naveen Kella at the Urology & Prostate Institute by calling his office at 210-5917171 or visiting www.theurologyandprostateinstitute.com.

Division of

photo by: sarah brooke lyons

There is a lot of information flying around about testosterone, and a lot of what is discussed paints testosterone in a negative light. Testosterone is used to cheat. Testosterone influences a man’s aggressive behavior. Ideas like this pervade the airways. Even within medicine, much of what is discussed shows a bias against testosterone. There are doubts of its efficacy and beliefs that its decline is a natural, unavoidable part of aging. Nonetheless, recent work on testosterone has shown that there may be many more benefits than previously realized. In addition, its replacement may not be as taboo as once thought. Testosterone is an anabolic steroid that helps build protein in the cells, is made by the body (primarily by the testicles) and comes from cholesterol. It causes the male and female brain to work sexually and plays a role in thinking and mood. It can also reduce fat, increase bone density, improve heart health and improve erections. In your 20s, your testosterone level reaches its peak. Beginning in your 30s, you start to see a natural 1 percent loss of testosterone per year. Low testosterone can cause trouble losing weight, tiredness, loss of sexual function, lower libido and poor mood, as well as distort the thought process. You can have normal total testosterone, which is the testosterone attached to proteins in your body, but there is also free testosterone, which is in your blood stream. If you have a normal total testosterone level, but are experiencing symptoms, you may have a low free testosterone. There are treatments available, so why don’t people seek them? Here are a few examples of treatment options:


AngelBrightHomeHealthInc.com 361-986-1102 N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE health & wellness

Your own body is what should determine your dietary needs, not a trend or product box.

Go With Your Gut Is gluten-free really the way to be? By: [Mandy Ashcraft]

If you’ve been in public at all lately, you’ve probably noticed the growing prevalence of gluten-free options in stores and restaurants. Signs and packages boasting a lack of gluten in their products certainly give you the impression that gluten must be the bad guy – the naughty “G word” of the health food industry. But is it? What is gluten, anyway? Gluten is a type of protein most commonly found in wheat, barley and rye. The more you look into it, gluten is in everything from the obvious like bread to the unexpected like cosmetics. Although its use as an additive is a more modern development to create desirable consistencies in various things, its existence in foods in general began with

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our consumption of the plants that contain it. In fact, it’s what gives bread the “elasticity” we desire. It’s likely that most humans have some level of gluten intolerance, but most symptoms are underthe-radar and never impact a person’s life or health. People it affects the most are those with celiac disease, a gastrointestinal autoimmune disorder found in approximately 1 percent of the population that prevents the absorption of essential vitamins and minerals. Those with celiac cannot tolerate any gluten without having a reaction to it, with symptoms similar to severe irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), as well as anemia, bleeding tendency and joint pain.

Most cases are misdiagnosed as IBS. With celiac being on the opposite end of the gluten-sensitivity spectrum from those with zero reaction to it, there is still a gray area in between. More commonly experienced is a reaction of a lesser degree, but in all cases, the solution is to eliminate gluten accordingly to see the symptoms subside. Those with celiac would react even to breadcrumbs containing gluten. If you suspect you may have this disorder, your doctor can perform a blood test to diagnose it. But what about people who don’t notice gluten sensitivity or suffer any symptoms? Would a glutenfree diet benefit them? In a word, no. Those actively avoiding gluten in the diet may be consuming more vegetables, fewer carbohydrates and less processed food and notice positive health changes from doing so. This would be the effect regardless of gluten awareness. It would be a misconception to think that if you’re eating only packaged food labeled “gluten free,” you are on a healthy diet. Often, additional sugar and artificial ingredients are added to try to improve taste and texture when gluten is omitted. This is similar to the way sugar is added to skim milk, where fat is removed for those conscious of milk fat, but carbohydrates are actually increased for flavor purposes. Consume naturally low-gluten foods such as brown rice, quinoa, lean meat and vegetables while reducing processed foods of any kind for an all-around positive change and a reduction of any sensitivity you may have. The bottom line is, your own body is what should determine your dietary needs – not a product box, a magazine cover or a Hollywood trend. Go glutenfree for a week and watch your body’s reaction to it; note the way you feel and the way your body functions. This is a simple test to determine whether it would be necessary for you to limit or restrict gluten, keeping in mind that gluten-free products are often specialty items that are more costly and difficult to find. Go with your “gut” instinct!

For more information, visit www.mandyashcraft.com.


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“The process helps eliminate any chance of error. It’s smart enough to catch critical mistakes.”

Nurse Heather Elizondo of CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice uses a new software program called CPOM to check through medicines and orders for patients in her wing. The program has several safeguards alerting doctors if a medication has been requested at too high a dose or conflicts with a patient’s allergies, for example.

A Focus on Patient Safety CHRISTUS Spohn Health System debuts its Computer Patient Order Management system, streamlined software that helps staff provide a higher quality of patient care. By: [Steven Alford]

It has the potential to save time, paper and most importantly, lives. Recently, CHRISTUS Spohn rolled out its new Computer Patient Order Management system, otherwise known as CPOM. The streamlined software is replacing the decades-old process of writing orders on paper for procedures, medicines and more. With a focus on patient safety, staff says the program provides a higher quality of patient care drawn from evidencebased studies.

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“This gives us that continuity of care, making things faster and safer,” said Margot Rios, chief nursing officer at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice. As physicians attend to their patients, they now enter their instructions and requests into the CPOM software, which takes them through several steps detailing exactly what they require of nurses and support staff. It makes things more precise, bringing everyone on the same page, staff members say. But it also has

several safeguards alerting doctors if a medication has been requested at too high a dose or conflicts with a patient’s allergies, for example. That’s welcome relief in the fast-paced world of health care, where in the past, paper orders could stack up in busy hospital wings. “The process helps eliminate any chance for error,” Rios said. “It’s smart enough to catch critical mistakes.” The first South Texas hospital to see the new program was CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice, which went live with CPOM requiring 12 new computer stations for nearly three-dozen physicians. The software also can be accessed via the health system’s Intranet from anywhere in the world, allowing doctors to check on their patients from smart phones, laptops and digital tablets. CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Beeville also just went live with the software, while other area CHRISTUS Spohn hospitals are working with their physicians, nurses and technicians to train staff and work out any kinks. During a recent weekday, nurses came and went at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice as Dr. Brian Brown punched in orders at his new CPOM station. Before him on the screen, each patient in the associate director’s wing was listed, showing identifying information and real-time medical updates. It was an adjustment getting used to placing orders through the computer program, he said, but he has gotten comfortable with the system. “I can already see how the fail safes are making things safer for our patients,” Brown said, scrolling through records. “It really makes you stop and think about what you’re doing each time.” If things ever get too hectic, or at the physician’s discretion, staff can always go back to handwritten paper requests based on the circumstances. But staff members say they’ve embraced the new way of doing things, which is currently being implemented around the country. “It’s pretty self-explanatory and easy to use,” said Heather Elizondo, a nurse at CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice, as she entered patient information from a station in the hallway. “It walks you through each step.” >>


Nurse Heather Elizondo of CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice said the recent addition of CPOM software to the hospital provides a higher level of quality care for patients.

Dr. Brian Brown of CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Alice scrolls through a new software program called CPOM that replaces the decadesold process of writing orders on paper for procedures, medicines and more.

Before the rollout, CHRISTUS Spohn staff worked for more than a year learning about the software, finalizing the launch and organizing training procedures for hundreds of nurses and physicians. By fall, all hospitals in the CHRISTUS Spohn system are expected to be actively using the CPOM software. It’s a step forward for the company’s Corpus Christi facilities and surrounding hospitals that staff say will save thousands of pieces of paper a year, aligning with the company’s mission to go green

and reduce waste. But more than that, it’s a way to keep staff in the loop together while providing quality care that’s increasingly mindful of patient safety. The first week the program was rolled out, a physician was ordering medicine for a patient and accidentally hit an extra “0” in the dosage, according to staff. The CPOM program caught it, alerted the physician immediately and asked again if that’s what he intended. The potential error was caught before ever going out.

It’s exactly those kinds of situations staff say the new software is intended for. “We’re always in the mode of quality and safety,” Rios said. “This is another great step on that path.”

For more information, contact Steven Alford, a communication specialist with CHRISTUS Spohn Health System, at steven.alford@christushealth.org or 361861-9512.

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361.993.7778 bayareavision.com

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Providing treatment in the home setting allows patients to remain at home while keeping insurance and health care costs to a minimum.

The Future of Medicine In the ever-changing world of medicine, home health care offers an efficient and cost-effective alternative to the traditional hospital model. By: [Dr. Marcus Sorenson]

The world of medicine is a constantly changing and evolving environment. With mounting Medicare costs, an aging and growing population and the upcoming Affordable Care Act, the demand for higher quality, yet less costly health care has never been higher. Hospital and insurance costs are through the roof, and there need to be drastic changes in the way patients are treated. Home health care offers many solutions to these problems, and it is the future of medicine. Hospitals have shown to be a dramatic burden on our health care system. Lengthy hospital stays were the norm 20 years ago. The average length of stay for childbirth was five to seven nights, but now mothers are being asked to leave within 24 hours of delivery. Gone are the days of people checking into hospitals for “rest” due to exhaustion and stress. People are being asked to leave sooner, and only the very sick are even getting admitted. There are many reasons for the shortened hospital stays. One reason is that technology with surgery and pharmacological intervention is vastly su-

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perior. Another reason is that we have learned that people recover faster, are less likely to develop infections and have a more desirable outcome when they are home quickly without prolonged hospital stays. However, the main reason is the skyrocketing costs of keeping people in the hospital. The average hospital stay in the United States is more than $16,000, and that cost continues to go up. Home health care offers an alternative to the traditional hospital model. Under home health care, patients can receive medical treatments under the

supervision of their physician in the comfort of their home. Patients can generally receive nursing care, physical care, occupational/speech therapy services and often even provider care to assist with essential daily tasks such as bathing, grooming and meal preparation. There are also many different medical procedures offered in the home setting that used to require a hospital or a physician’s office to perform. X-rays, dialysis, intravenous medications, blood draws, monitoring vital signs and management of oral medications are routinely being performed in the home health system. This allows patients to remain in their home while keeping insurance and health care costs to a minimum. Home health care is generally provided to a “homebound” patient. Most insurance companies define “homebound” as patients who are unable to easily leave their home or are unsafe to routinely leave their home. Generally, this is provided to a post-surgical or elderly patient, but it can also include pediatric patients with a large variety of diagnoses. This service is provided under most health insurances such as Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana and PHC. There will always be a need for hospitals, doctors, surgical centers and health clinics. We must all look at ways to treat patients more efficiently, quickly and cost-effectively. Home health care is one way to offer patients an alternative to traditional hospital or nursing home stays, while still effectively providing the health care the patient needs and deserves.

Marcus Sorenson, P.T., DPT, is the lead physical therapist and CEO of Kingsville Home Rehab Services, Inc., and an instructor in the Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Del Mar Community College. For more information on home health care, please visit www.kingsvillehomerehab.com.


THE GULF COAST HUMANE SOCIETY ❖ ❖ ❖

presents

❖ ❖ ❖

THE 15TH ANNUAL

Tom Keeler Memorial Golf Tournament CORPUS CHRISTI

COUNTRY CLUB

FRIDAY, MARCH 22ND, 2013 REGISTRATION AND BRUNCH AT 10:30 A.M.

SCRAMBLE AT 12 NOON.

Teams and sponsors will be accepted until March 18th, however entering earlier secures a place in the tournament **Award ceremony to follow the tournament along with distribution of raffle prizes*

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES $5,000 Banner on site, inclusion as a Tournament Partner on radio and TV, recognition on a hole, and entry of two 4 player teams

$1,000 Banner on site, inclusion as a Silver Sponsor on radio and TV,and entry of a four player team-Hole sign

$2,500 Banner on site, inclusion as a Tournament Partner on radio and TV, recognition on a hole, and entry of two 4 player teams

$700

Recognition on a hole and entry of one 4 player team

$500

Recognition on a hole and entry of two players-or one 4 player team

$200

Recognition on a hole

$1,500 Banner on site, inclusion as a Gold Sponsor on radio and TV, recognition on a hole, and entry of a single 4 player team

*Please provide your own business banners* / *Hole Sponsorship Signs will be provided and made to order*

CALL 225-0845 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR EMAIL MS. CODY RICE@ CODY@GCHSCC.ORG TO REGISTER!

THE GULF COAST HUMANE SOCIETY The Gulf Coast Humane Society has been providing Services to homeless animals of the Coastal Bend since it was founded nearly 67 years ago by Francis and Harvey Weil and is the largest True No Kill in South Texas. In April, 1998 Tom and Cora Keeler very generously donated a state of the art facility to the Humane Society for which it will forever be indebted. This shelter presently houses approximately 500 dogs and cats awaiting placement in loving homes. The Humane Society is active in the promotion of responsible pet care. The funds raised in the Tom Keeler Memorial Golf Classic are used to further the goals of the Gulf Coast Humane Society. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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January 19, 2013

Thank you to all of our sponsors! King & Queen: H-E-B | L&F Distributing SimpleLoan | Valero Prince & Princess: KFTX Real Country 97.5 Duke & Duchess: Aria Sky Terrace & Lounge American Bank Center Lord & Lady: Bay Ltd. | Corpus Christi IceRays La De Da Events | La Palmera NSIDE Magazine | Nueces Power Equipment Town & Country Restaurant Additional Supporters: Cardio Thoracic Assoc. | Fonzie Muñoz Photography KRIS Communications | Martin Ulisse Imports Meyer Frúge Group | OSP

Join the Junior League of Corpus Christi for our next event:

Saturday, March 23rd Sunrise Mall Doors open at 8am!

($5 per person donation at the door) FMI: www.jlcc.org Follow us on: 34

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I’m one rider, inspired by one little boy with diabetes, to join thousands of other riders across the nation, supported by contributions from thousands more. I ride for the 26 million people living with diabetes, and the 79 million more Americans currently at risk. I ride for one little boy. Who will you ride for?

START A CHAIN REACTION. STOP DIABETES.

Corpus Christi, TX

April 20, 2013 Texas A&M - Corpus Christi

Join us for the 1st Annual Coastal Bend Tour de Cure!

F i nd yo ur l o c alto ur and re gi s te r at

di abe te s . o rg/ c o as tal be ndto ur

36 1 85 0 87 7 8

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Sanctioned Competition: Chicken Pork Spare Ribs Pork Butt Brisket

Unsanctioned Competition: Beans

Festivities:

3.2.2013

Gulf Coast Racing 5302 Leopard St. - Corpus Christi, TX

For Event Information, please contact HALO-Flight at 361.265.0509.

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Silent Auction Live Entertainment Food 50 / 50 Raffle Team Showman Trophy Showcase Your Business! Vendor spots are available. $50 per spot. Limited Availability.


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CM

2008, 2009, 2010, 2011

Skilled Home Health Care Services

Anodyne Therapy, Assessment & Evaluation, Blood Pressure Monitoring, Central Line and PICC Line Management, Certified Diabetes Educator, Certified Nurses Aide, Disease Process Teaching and Management, Enteral Nutrition, Foley Catheter Care, Insulin Administration, IV Therapy, Medical Social Services, Medication Management, Occupational Therapy, Parenteral Nutrition, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Venipuncture/Lab Work, Wound Care Certified Nurses, Wound Care Management, Wound Vac

Coverage Area

Your Home. Your Health. Your Choice. BENAVIDES

119 W. Railroad Ave. Benavides, Texas 78341 Ph: (361) 256-3980 Fax: (361) 256-3981

CORPUS CHRISTI

6262 Weber Rd. Ste. 302 Corpus Christi, Texas 78413 Ph: (361) 853-3971 Fax: (361) 853-4309

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St. Peter’s Home Health, Inc. Certified by Medicare in 2005 and accredited by Community Health Accrediation Program in 2010 Registered Nurse and Referral Intake available 24/7

SERVICES PROVIDED:

SKILLED NURSING / HOME HEALTH AIDE SPEECH THERPY / PHYSICAL THERAPY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY / MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE

OTHER SERVICES:

LAB WORK / COLOSTOMY CARE / CATHETER CARE / WOUND CARE / INJECTIONS / PORTABLE X-RAYS INTRAVENOUS THERAPY / WOUND VAC THERAPY

1801 East Main St., Ste. A Alice, Texas 78332 Office: 361.664.7001 | 1.877.279.7710 | Fax: 361.664.7727 COUNTIES SERVED: Brooks, Duval, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Nueces, Bee, Hidalgo, Jim Hogg, Kenedy, Live Oak, Starr, Webb, Zapata, Cameron, Willacy, Aransas and San Patricio.

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NSIDE Coastal Bend MD Feb/Mar 2013