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COASTAL BEND

NSIDE

MD

FAMILY MAN, FAMILY PHYSICIAN DR. SERGIO CANTU A BETTER TOMORROW ROXANNA VELA

DECEMBER.JANUARY 2012.2013

SIGHT SPECIALISTS DR. TIM WALZ AND BAY AREA VISION

» STYLE & SUBSTANCE FEATURING JASON ADAMS AND MARY CHAMPAGNE N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Celebrating

25

years of emergency medical service

Our mission is to provide medical

Hillary Reyna Membership Director 361.265.0509

transport for critically ill or injured persons requiring medical or trauma facilities within our South Texas service area. Emergency assistance is provided to all persons regardless of their ability to pay.

This is our mission...

This is our promise...


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Alice 361-664-4888 路 Corpus Christi 361-882-5900 www.rivercityhospice.com


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Dear Doctor: Interim Homecare provides a comprehensive array of healthcare services in your patients’ home. Helping your patients with new medications, diabetes management, CHF and other related cardiac complications, COPD, wound care, helping regain strength and mobility or other services that will aid in your patients’ recovery process. We at Interim Healthcare look forward to serving all your needs.

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Interim Homecare 361.887.4850 Corpus Christi


Kingsville

HOME REHAB Serving South Texas, San Antonio and Austin.

Focused on restoring function and regaining independence. Kingsville Home Rehab Services, Inc. was established in 2004 and is a leader in home health rehabilitation. We provide to our patients quaility and evidencebased rehabilitaiton services. Integrity, excellence, trust and compassion are the core values in which Kingsville Home Rehab therapist’ and staff follow day to day, and from one home to the next. Kingsville Home Rehab’s primary goal is to enhance a patient’s quality of life with subtle changes. Whether teaching a fall prevetion program or making small postural changes to relief lower back pain, our goal is to maximize our patient’s potential.

P.O. Box 1205 Kingsville, Texas 78364 Ph: (361) 221-9177 Fax: (361) 221-0178

www.kingsvillehomerehab.com N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Come Visit Our House! Always in need Of volunteers! Visit gchscc.org For info!

Looking for a place to bring those old towels and newspapers? Bring em’ to us!

NSIDE Coastal Bend MD

December/January PU B L I C A T2012/2013 IONS

publisher / Eliot Garza eliot@nsidesa.com

publisher / coastal bend / adrian Garza adrian@getnside.com

publisher / austin / angela strickland

South Texas’s

angela@getnside.com

Largest True No Kill We currently have HUNDREDS of wonderful pets awaiting loving, responsible homes. Adoption = more lives saved.

staff executive editor Erin O’Brien

creative director Elisa Giordano

Hours of Operation: Monday-Saturday 11am-6pm Sundays noon-6pm 361-225-0845 318 Cabaniss Pkwy. CC, TX 78415 Add Us on Facebook!

graphic designer Damaris Fike

executive assistant Elena Flores

photography Dustin Ashcraft Priscilla Boren Sarah Brooke Lyons

contributing writers

Don’t get caught sitting arounD

get

nsiDe magazine

Mandy Ashcraft Michael Barrera Dean Campbell Arnie Cisneros Katy Kiser Jody Joseph Marmel Cody M. Rice Ana Clarissa Rodriguez Brittany Sandbach Sarah Tindall

editorial intern Katrina Torres

NSIDE Coastal Bend Advisory Board J u d y L a p ointe and d r . c h a r les cam p bell

find out more at

www.getnside.com /coastalbend

www.getnside.com For advertising information, please call 361.548.1044 or email adrian@getnside.com. For editorial comments and suggestions, please email adrian@getnside.com.

PUBLIC ATIONS

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18402 U.S. Highway 281 N, Ste. 201 San Antonio, Texas 78259 Phone: 210.298.1761

Copyright © by NSIDE Magazine Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without the expressed written permission of the publisher is prohibited.


nsidethisissue december/january 2012/2013 cover story 14

Dr. Tim Walz and Bay Area Vision

Following his vision for safeguarding the most highly valued human sense, this star sight specialist, along with Drs. John Gill and Amber Jordon, positively impacts the lives of his patients at Bay Area Vision.

profiles

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roxanna vela

The president of the Bay Area Sleep Evaluation Center and her staff work to provide patients with a positive experience away from home and help them wake up to a better tomorrow.

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dr. sergio cantu

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cover story | dr. tim walz and bay area vision

A “local doc taking care of local people,� this family care physician caters to the basic health needs of his patients in San Antonio and South Texas from the comfort of their own homes at Brush Country Medical.

departments

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Feature Nonprofit MD Health & Wellness Style & Substance

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Saving eyesight...

Over 1,600 diabetic retina laser treatments

every year.

Charles H. Campbell, M.D.,F.A.C.S. and Walter E. Moscoso, M.D. Diseases and surgery of the vitreous and retina.

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5540 Saratoga Blvd. #200 361-993-8510 1-800-779-3482 with satellite offices in Kingsville, Beeville, Aransas Pass


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NSIDE feature

Great Opportunity, Great Responsibility In addition to her duties in Beeville, veteran nurse Marty Martinez-Kimbrell works to improve patient care as the CHRISTUS Spohn region’s newly elected shared governance chair. By: [Katy Kiser]

On May 4, 1992, Marty MartinezKimbrell walked into what is now CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Beeville as an admitted rookie. As a certified nurse assistant, she was learning the ropes, becoming entrenched on a busy surgical floor and discovering the value of patient care. Fast-forward 20 years: MartinezKimbrell is still at it. Except now she’s an R.N. who holds a master’s in leadership nursing from Texas A&M

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University-Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC). And these days, besides serving as a weekend charge nurse in Beeville, she’s got another title. Martinez-Kimbrell is the newly elected CHRISTUS Spohn region’s shared governance chair, and with that comes a strong belief in letting front-line nursing staff be the significant voice in their practice. “I believe it is possible to synergize both veteran and novice nurses’ ex-

periences,” explained Martinez-Kimbrell while sitting in CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi-Shoreline’s lobby. “All of us can provide the safest quality care that results in positive patient outcomes.” Martinez-Kimbrell will be in Corpus Christi weekly attending different Shared Governance Council meetings and working with Erika Lochner, CHRISTUS Spohn Health System’s director of nursing. “Life is too short not to be happy and make a difference in our profession,” Martinez-Kimbrell said. “As nurses, we should empower and involve ourselves in our profession to ensure that safe, efficient, highquality care is being provided.” The concept of shared governance is nothing new to CHRISTUS Spohn, but under new CHRISTUS Spohn nursing leadership, this innovative organization model is being revamped. Shared governance gives staff nurses just like MartinezKimbrell control over their practice so they can extend their influence into administrative areas previously controlled only by managers. In some situations, nurses who actually deliver care can be absent from policy-making processes. CHRISTUS Spohn Chief Nursing Executive Jim Cato believes that can change. “Nursing shared governance is an important way for nurses to have a voice in their professional practice,” Cato said. “It also allows them to participate in the decision-making processes related to the delivery of patient care. The best way to be an active part of the future of nursing at CHRISTUS Spohn is through shared governance.” Martinez-Kimbrell’s new position as elected chair means she’ll dedicate 12 hours of her week as the nurses’ shared governance chairperson. She’s been in a leadership role before. From December 2003 to April 2007, she was a nurse manager for her unit, but she made the decision to step down so she could finish her master’s degree. Her education was made possible through CHRISTUS Spohn’s employee benefit program. “My first manager encouraged me

to go back to school. I’m so glad I did. But I’ve put a lot of miles on my car along the way,” she said with a laugh. Martinez-Kimbrell, who lives in Kenedy, started her educational journey with the help of the hospital’s tuition reimbursement program.

“Life is too short not to be happy and make a difference in our profession.” She began at Coastal Bend Community College, then went to Victoria College and then to TAMU-CC. Through her schooling, she brought fresh ideas to the health system and was instrumental in creating a fall prevention program for CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital-Shoreline. The program resulted in a significant decrease in falls. She did this all with a great attitude. She said her loving husband, Bob Kimbrell, influenced part of that good attitude, as he supported her efforts along the way. “I met Bob when he was trying to sell me a car in Beeville,” she said. “It was a black GMC Jimmy. I wanted nothing to do with the whole carbuying process. My father told me, ‘Will you just give the young man a chance to explain?’” Twenty-one years later, MartinezKimbrell is glad she listened to her dad. She ended up with not just a 1988 Jimmy, but a rock of a husband. She celebrates 22 years of marriage in January, and she recently celebrated 20 years of service with CHRISTUS Spohn. When she’s not working or studying, Martinez-Kimbrell enjoys spending quality time with her husband and her four-legged kids (dogs, cats, etc.), gardening, shopping with her best friends, Ester and Linda, and having meaningful visits with her niece, Amanda.

For more information, contact Katy Kiser, communications manager, at 361-861-9509 (direct), 361-876-0263 (mobile) or katy. kiser@christushealth.org.


Recovery Isn’t Simply a Goal, It’s Our Mission.

Kindred Healthcare understands that when people are discharged from a traditional hospital, they often need continued care in order to recover completely. That’s where we come in.

Doctors, case managers, social workers and family members don’t stop caring simply because their loved one or patient has changed location. Neither do we.

Kindred offers services including aggressive, medically complex care, intensive care and shortterm rehabilitation.

Come see how we care at www.continuethecare.com.

Dedicated to Hope, Healing and Recovery

CONTINUE THE CARE 6226 Saratoga Blvd · Corpus Christi, Texas 78414 · 361-986-1600 www.khcorpuschristi.com N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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W at

c h i n g E ov e r p t h e e y e s y o f C o r p u s

C h r i s t i

Passionate about serving his community, Dr. Tim Walz has safeguarded the sight of his patients in the Coastal Bend for two decades with his colleagues at Bay Area Vision.

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By: [Sarah Tindall] Photography: [dustin ashcraft]

r. Tim Walz has been working to keep the eyes of Corpus Christi healthy for the past two decades at Bay Area Vision. In that time, he has seen amazing advances in technology that have led to better and faster diagnoses and treatments. A licensed therapeutic optometrist and optometric glaucoma specialist, Walz is trained to detect and treat eye disorders ranging from red eyes to managing debilitating diseases such as glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetes. Walz says what attracted him into the medical profession was the influence of his family and friends. While growing up in a small town in Nebraska, he was surrounded by friends and relatives in the medical profession. Walz followed suit and enjoys interacting with his patients and making a positive impact in their lives by safeguarding their vision. He initially studied respiratory therapy at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., but began to consider optometry when his roommate’s father brought an article about the field to their dorm room. The article proclaimed that optometry was one of the top 10 professions in the medical field, which appealed to Walz because of the amount of time doctors were able to spend with their patients and helping patients care for the most highly valued human sense: sight. He spent seven years working as a registered respiratory therapist, beginning at a life flight hospital in Omaha. This was followed by stints in the emergency room, the neonatal unit, the intensive care unit and coronary care units.  N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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uring this time, however, the article on optometry was not forgotten, and Walz began pursuing his degree from optometry school. He attended school during the week and worked at the hospital on weekends to pay his way through school. It was on one of those weekends that Walz met his future wife, Margaret. She was a registered nurse in the intensive care unit at the hospital, and the rest is history. Walz graduated with his optometry degree from the University of Houston College of Optometry in 1988, married and moved to San Antonio to join a group of doctors there. After some time with them, one of the doctors encouraged him to explore the idea of opening a practice in Corpus Christi. Walz subsequently pursued the idea and established his practice, Bay Area Vision, in Moore Plaza in 1992. He’s been enjoying the job ever since. Walz and his wife have raised three children, with two in college and one in middle school. His favorite part of the job is interacting with his patients. He says he now has multiple generations of families who are under his care. “Now parents will bring their children and say, ‘You know, I was about his age when I started to come here, Dr. Walz!’” Patient relationships remain at the core of the practice, but advancements in technology that make it easier than ever to detect problems are exciting. “When I first started, the technology that was in place to detect and manage some eye diseases such as glaucoma wasn’t as sensitive as what is available today,” he says. “We were unable to intervene as early in the disease process and make the impact that we can with today’s advances in technology. We can make a big difference in saving people’s vision because we can detect diseases so much sooner. “New instrumentation designed to scan the retina with a laser can identify changes in the eye over time. This means that diabetes and glaucoma damage can be discovered much earlier, and the treatment and management of the disease followed much more closely.” All of this is great, but if patients aren’t proactive, none of these advancements are helpful. “I have patients come in who haven’t seen an eye doctor in 20 years. I had one incident where a patient who hadn’t seen an eye doctor in years was capable of reading the 20/20 line without any help from glasses, but then remarked that he could only see half of the eye chart. After examining his eyes, it became apparent that the reason he could only see half the chart at a time was because glaucoma had destroyed the optic nerve, and that damage is irreversible.” Glaucoma is described as the “sneak thief of sight.” It leaves the central vision untouched initially, providing the patient with good acuity, but slowly erodes the peripheral vision. This peripheral vision loss initially goes unnoticed by the patient, but can be detected by specialized testing. “It is sad to see these patients come into our office unaware of the damage that has occurred and then have to deliver this devastating news,” Walz says. His recommendation: annual eye exams for the whole family, beginning at 5 years of age, even if you feel your vision is fine. He advises that school screenings for children are helpful in finding most children at risk who need vision correction. However, sometimes this can be misleading because some children in need of vision correction have learned to adapt to their situation. They have learned to squint or use the good eye to pass the screening. Besides the annual visit, it’s important to head to the eye doctor if you’re seeing flashes or floaters, or have headaches that are getting progressively worse. These can be symptoms

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of eye problems that must be addressed sooner rather than later. Another problem Walz addresses is the misuse of contact lenses and the consequences. “Patients in contact lenses should be aware of the complications associated with non-compliance with contact lens wear, especially overnight wear. I had a patient recently come in for an eye exam and report that he had been in his contacts for two-and-a-half years. I asked him how often he was throwing away his contacts, to which he replied that he had been in the same pair for the last two-and-a-half years, and that he had never taken them out during that time!” At that point, Walz typically starts showing the patient images of infectious corneal ulcers, which can potentially damage your vision permanently. Finally, Walz recommends that patients purchase their lenses from a reputable source. “Purchasing contacts at flea markets and corner stores is dangerous,” he says. “Those places are unlicensed, selling them and obtaining them illegally and misinforming people on the frequency of wear and care of contacts. They have no training, are often selling expired product, and as a result, people are showing up in my office with painful infected eyes.” Besides Walz, Bay Area Vision is also comprised of Drs. John Gill and Amber Jordon. The office is open six days a week to ensure ease of patient access. From a young boy growing up in a small town in Nebraska to having his own practice down in the Coastal Bend, Walz has enjoyed serving his community and his patients for many years, and looks forward to doing so for many more.

For more information about Dr. Tim Walz and Bay Area Vision, go to www.bayareavision.com, call 361-993-7778 or stop by the office in Moore Plaza between Target and H-E-B.

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bringing peace to the

Coastal Bend Thanks to Roxanna Vela and the Bay Area Sleep Evaluation Center, many Coastal Bend residents can rise and shine and truly wake up to a better tomorrow. By: [Jody Joseph Marmel] Photography: [Priscilla Boren]

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rowing up in Corpus Christi, Roxanna Vela is the eldest of four siblings. “As with many eldest children in the family,” she says, “I was responsible for more than the others, and there was not much time that was left for me.” Not that she is complaining. In fact, she is saying quite the opposite. If Vela had not grown up with these additional responsibilities, her aspirations might not have been as high as they are today. Being president of the Bay Area Sleep Evaluation Center (BASEC) has given Vela the opportunity to live and work with an infinite passion. Yet her first passion “is teaching the word of God to our youth, beginning with mine,” she says. “I have been married for 21 years, and we have two wonderful children that we are extremely proud of. Both my husband and I come from hardworking families.” And the results of this are apparent with the success and growth of BASEC in Corpus Christi. Vela has a bachelor’s degree in theology, which she attained while she worked at BASEC. “Six years ago, my husband and I decided to embark on this new journey of opening our own sleep facility. After long hours at the sleep facility, I would go straight to my classes in the evenings. As I run the day-to-day responsibilities at BASEC, my husband and father-in-law run the finances.” Vela emphasizes that her husband has become one of her best supporters and her best friend. Their mutual respect can be seen in the results of BASEC and the patients they have treated, as well as the fine members on staff. Having a business background as a supervisor with American Express, Vela had many employees working for her in the high-valued card member sector. “I hired my employees and trained them. Once they became a member of the team, I was still their supervisor and helped them every step of the way.” With this knowledge, Vela says, “I hand select each member of our staff, and each one of them brings great value to our business. I have always known that one of the keys to a successful business is placing the right person in the right place.” When Vela’s father suffered a work injury when she was in her N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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“To gain the trust of our physicians and our patients is and always will be our goal.”

late teenage years, she was the right person in the right place for her father, her family and what was to become an influential factor in her future path. “He was bedbound for many months and went through an extensive critical care plan. It took several years of doctors’ appointments and therapy for him to recover. Due to a language barrier, it was necessary for me to take him to all of his appointments, even after I married.” It was during this time that Vela became well educated in the medical industry. She and her father encountered both pleasant and unpleasant experiences. “Since then, I have always told myself that if I ever had an opportunity to be in the medical field, I would never turn a patient away. And today, praise God, I am able to implement my promise.” Vela’s medical experience comes from the home health care industry. She began establishing a rapport with the physicians in the community while marketing for home health, and she later became a marketing director. Today she has many wonderful physicians who entrust BASEC with the sleep evaluations of their patients, and she is extremely thankful to all of them. As an accredited sleep facility by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine,

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BASEC is also the official training facility in sleep for the Del Mar Respiratory Program. “Del Mar students spend time with our sleep technicians shadowing them as part of their curriculum. Dr. Paxton J. Longwell is our medical director. Our reading physicians are now inclusive of Juan Bahamon, M.D.; Bill Dennis, M.D.; Salim Surani, M.D.; and Alamgir Khan, M.D.” All BASEC reading physicians are board-certified sleep specialists. Within the last decade, there has been an increasing awareness of sleeping disorders. Snoring is no longer considered a normal sound one makes while sleeping as it used to be perceived many years ago. It is a serious matter that, if left untreated, can lead to strokes, obesity, anxiety, depression, poor concentration and memory, auto- and work-related accidents, irritability, loss of energy, high blood pressure, impotence and uncontrolled diabetes. You can easily obtain a self-questionnaire on BASEC’s website, or you can ask your doctor for one. Sleep evaluation consists of the patient spending the night at a sleep facility. “We have created our facility to be more of a bed-and-breakfast environment. Each patient has their own room with their own commodities, including a tele-


vision with cable.” Vela and the staff find this atmosphere is less intimidating to their patients. They have taken measures to make the patient’s experience away from home as pleasant as possible. Detailing the evaluation further includes the patient hookup, which is from head to toe. It consists of about 20 leads, two respiratory belts and a few other pieces of equipment. This equipment monitors several areas of the patient’s body, including heart rate and oxygen, as well as respiratory levels and the neurological system. Once you are evaluated and diagnosed positive for sleep apnea, a second night of sleep evaluation is important to the diagnosis. The same process is used, except this time a nasal mask (or other type of mask) is applied, along with a CPAP or bi-level machine. “This machine is now helping you breathe natural air while you sleep. This treatment will help you feel less tired throughout the day. You must be compliant with the usage of this machine; not doing so may result in future health issues.” Although there has been a keen awareness of sleep apnea, there are other types of sleeping disorders. These include insomnia, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), restless leg syndrome (RLS) and parasomnia. BASEC recently expanded to a four-bedroom facil-

ity. The goal is to be able to service the community in a timely manner without having to make patients wait for their evaluation. “To gain the trust of our physicians and our patients is and always will be our goal. In doing so, we have expanded and will continue to expand when required.” With a son who is currently in the pre-med program at the University of Texas in Austin and a daughter to follow in the next year-and-a-half to also pursue medicine, helping others is a major component that the Vela family values. One of their longterm goals is to be able to walk their children through the “ins and outs” of the medical industry. Looking ahead, they may all work together in educating and serving the community in health and wellness. Following the many lessons her mother taught her throughout her life, Vela and her family practice the doctrine of “actions speak louder than words.” Most importantly, they live life knowing that “with God, all things are possible.”

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The Bay Area Sleep Evaluation Center is located at 6000 S. Staples, Ste. 403, in the Brookhollow Office Condominiums in Corpus Christi, Texas. For more information, call 361-852-9200 or 1-800-605-9522. You may also visit www.basectx.com. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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“Local doc taking care of local people.” A fitting slogan for Brush Country Medical PLLC owner Dr. Sergio Cantu, a family care physician tending to the basic health needs of San Antonio and South Texas patrons by providing monthly mobile medical care services. “I started Brush Country Medical in August of 2011,” Cantu explained. “Our specialty is in basic clinic medicine, and our goal is to provide highquality, personalized and confidential health care in the comfort of your own home, personal care home, nursing home or assisted living facility.” Brush Country Medical services include, but are not limited to: comprehensive review of your medical history, physical examinations and ongoing treatment of your medical conditions, medication management and refills, coordination of all home care services and medical equipment and physician review for authorization. “We are a small company, and as of right now, I have only one employee: Office Manager Gilbert Perez,” Cantu said. “Brush Country Medical is based on quality and not quantity, and what

Bringing the

Best To You Self-described family man and proud South Texas native Dr. Sergio Cantu caters to both the care and the convenience of his patients at Brush Country Medical. By: [Ana Clarissa Rodriguez] Photography: [sarah brooke lyons] makes us unique is that we bring the entire office to our patients, which is a great convenience, especially here in San Antonio.” Cantu gives credit to partnering companies such as Hospice Home Health for helping him to be able to provide these quality mobile services. “I’m trying to grow my company to a point where I am able to not only do monthly visits, but also regular, acute home visits,” he said. “That’s where I see myself and Brush Country Medical in the next couple of years.” Right now his main focus is to continue doing what he is doing, and to try and expand his mobile services throughout San Antonio and eventually develop a full outpatient clinic in Alice. Cantu describes himself as a family man, rooted to his hometown in South Texas. “I was born and raised in a small town called San Diego,” Cantu said. “I attended elementary, middle and high school there. I appreciate being from a small town because it’s the kind of place where everyone knows your name and says hello.” After he graduated from San Diego High School, Cantu moved to Corpus Christi to work in the various refineries, but soon realized that it just wasn’t for him. » N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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“Brush Country Medical is based on quality, not quantity.” “I always knew that I wanted to do something different,” Cantu said. “My sister is a nurse in San Antonio, and she is the one who pushed me into pursuing a career in the health care industry.” Cantu said his first job was at Alice

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P&S Hospital. He was labeled an environmental tech – in charge of taking out the trash and linens. “Eventually I moved up the ladder and began working at various hospitals as a tech, which is what spiked my interest in the functions of prac-

ticing medicine,” Cantu explained. He received a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Texas San Antonio and attended medical school at Autonoma de Guadalajara in Guadalajara, Mexico, for two years; then he transferred to

Ross University School of Medicine in the Caribbean. “I did most of my rotations and my clerkships in Dallas, Fort Worth and at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio,” he explained. “I finished my schooling in 2007, and then completed my residency in Corpus Christi at Memorial Family Medicine from 2008 to 2011.” Cantu said his proudest career moment was becoming board certified in family medicine in 2011. “As a striving medical student and resident, the end of the tunnel is getting board certified in your specialty,” he said. “I have always had that drive within me to do something, so when I first started my company, I told myself that I would never look back and never quit.” Cantu is also a full-time medical director for EMCARE (Outsourced Physician Management Services) in Alice. “I work at EMCARE for two weeks out of every month, and the other two weeks, I focus on my company in San Antonio,” he said. “Driving to the doctor’s office in San Antonio is an effort, and I think providing a mobile option is a blessing for my patients.” Cantu enjoys living and working in San Antonio, but said his heart will always be in his hometown in South Texas. “The name for Brush Country Medical came from my upbringing,” Cantu said. “The area where I grew up was called the brush country because of the terrain and various plants, so I decided I would name my company Brush Country Medical in honor of where I grew up.” Cantu and his family are fourthgeneration Texas natives. “We have a family ranch down in Alice,” Cantu said. “My family and I love being in the country, and in our spare time, we manage the ranch. We have about 29 cattle out there right now.” Cantu gushes about his lovely fiancée, Valerie, and two children, Alejandro, 8, and Sergio II, 8 months. “I am very blessed to be able to do what I love and manage my own company,” he said. “I am hoping to keep moving forward with my company and expand my business within the next few years.”

For more information, contact Dr. Sergio Cantu by phone at 210-701-1050 or by email at sergio2878@yahoo. com.


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NSIDE nonprofit

Dispelling the Myths Don’t let the myths and misconceptions associated with rescue shelters and their animals stop you from saving a life. By: [Cody M. Rice] There are many misconceptions about the quality of animals found in rescue shelters. The stigma that shelter pets have been stuck with for many years is that they are “damaged goods, have issues or are sick and unhealthy.” There are so many myths that prevent people from adopting. Shelters are plagued with the misconception that they are sad, depressing places with dying, unadoptable animals. The assumption has also been that if the dog or cat were perfectly fine, the family wouldn’t have “gotten rid” of it in the first place. We hope this article will help dispel some of the most common myths surrounding shelter animals. If the main reason a pet gets brought to Gulf Coast Humane Society (GCHS) was because it was “bad,” sick or damaged, there would be thousands of empty cages in the shelter. Animals are brought to us for a large variety of reasons, some of which are: • Their guardians have passed away. • Irresponsible guardians didn’t get their pets spayed or neutered, so they found themselves with a litter of babies they could not keep or did not want. • The animal’s guardians were abusive to the animal, so the authorities removed the pet from the harmful environment. • An animal was purchased or adopted by someone who did not take into consideration all of the responsibility that caring for the pet would entail. A good example of this would be someone who adopts a pet in an apartment complex that does not allow animals and then is subsequently forced to “get rid” of the pet. • Sheer irresponsibility and neglect.

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Myth: Animals from abusive homes will never be good pets because they have been mistreated for so long. Most animals coming from abusive homes will make a full emotional recovery – with proper care and attention. In fact, many of them are so grateful to be rescued from their previous situation that they end up being more devoted and loyal than animals coming from non-abusive homes. Even those we have saved from death’s door at Animal Control have been healthy, adoptable pets. Often, they are left there because, as when people finish with their toys, they “get rid” of them. Myth: You never know what you’re getting with shelter pets. Although it’s true that the medical history and temperament of an animal adopted from a shelter are not always able to be tracked down, GCHS performs evaluations in order to match pets to the right homes, as well as assess them in order to address needs they may have, whether it be food aggression or needing an active home and family. You absolutely do know what you are getting when you adopt from GCHS. Myth: All animals in shelters are sickly or unhealthy. Once again, it certainly is possible that a pet adopted from a shelter may have medical problems. However, the majority of the animals adopted from shelters are perfectly healthy and just in need of a good home. At our house, we treat all illnesses upon arrival. Plus, you’re more likely to get an honest answer about an animal’s medical problems or other needs it may have from shelter volunteers or staff members who are clearly there because they

care about the animals, as opposed to pet store owners or breeders who are only it in for the money and will tell you whatever you want to hear. Additionally, animals in shelters are typically treated much better than animals in pet stores, which have

Most animals from abusive environments will make a full emotional recovery - with proper care and attention. often spent their short lives in cramped environments with little socializing and often unsanitary conditions. When you buy instead of adopting, you are more likely to get a sick, unhealthy pet, as these animals often originate from puppy mills. So shelters, especially GCHS, are not dark, dreary prisons. The animals we have are here through no fault of their own, as is the case with many other shelters across the United States. We are overcapacity with hundreds awaiting loving homes, but we are, by far, not places of doom – not at our house! We invite you to come by and see for yourself. Don’t let myths stop you from saving a life.

The Gulf Coast Humane Society is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. For more information, call 361-225-0845.


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NSIDE nonprofit

Happily Ever After

The Junior League of Corpus Christi gears up for Fairy Tale Ball 2013. [Special to NSIDE]

Pull out your ball gowns and shine your glass slippers: The eighth annual Fairy Tale Ball is just around the corner! Once a year, the Junior League of Corpus Christi Inc. (JLCC) hosts this enchanted evening as hundreds of attendees support developing the potential of women and advocating for child welfare. Ornate tables will fill the Henry Garrett Ballroom at the American Bank Center on Jan. 19, 2013, decorated with famous fairy tale themes like Cinderella, Snow White, Little Red Riding Hood and Alice in Wonderland. Enjoy cocktails and delicious hors d’oeuvres while browsing the robust silent auction, or try your luck at the roulette or hold ‘em tables. The Spazmatics, an Austin-based retro band, will provide the evening’s feature entertainment with an energetic full set. “Every year, we have a goal to make Fairy Tale Ball more successful in order to better fund our community projects,” said Jordan Michael, co-chairman of Fairy Tale Ball 2013. “This is a civic affair, not just an event for members of the Junior League. Without the tremendous support of many individuals and businesses in the Coastal Bend, we would not be able to support local children and families.” Preparations for this year’s event have been underway for months.  Committee members have been hard at work to ensure guests at the upcoming Fairy Tale Ball feel the magic as they walk into an enchanted forest. “The Junior League of Corpus Christi started this event as a way to focus on literacy,” said Katie Triplett, co-chairman of the event.  “Since its inception, we have been able to broaden the focus and grow the event to support various community outreach projects, including completing an extreme makeover of the visitation rooms at Child Protective Services and working with

Kids’ Café at La Armada’s after-school program. The Fairy Tale Ball is our way to continue to make fairy tales come true within our community. This year’s ball will be an unforgettable event!” “We originally came up with the idea of Fairy Tale Ball as an event where adults could have a unique way to understand that, with hard work and collaboration of community members, we can make fairy tales a reality,” said Jennifer Henderson, co-chairman of Fairy Tale Ball 2005. “After that first event in 2005, we knew we had started something truly special.” Over the past seven years, Fairy Tale Ball has raised more than $280,000. “Fairy Tale Ball is one of three major fundraisers for the Junior League of Corpus

“The Fairy Tale Ball is our way to make fairy tales come true within our community.” Christi,” explained Katherine Dain, JLCC president. “Funds raised help us with our overall mission of promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women and improving our community.” The JLCC recently completed a renovation project at the Rainbow Room, a nonprofit emergency center for children who have been rescued by Child Protective Services. In the spring, the JLCC held its second annual Fitness Fiesta, a citywide health festival that included nutritional information, games and health screenings. In December 2012, the Junior League will host its annual Christmas Tree Forest at the Art Museum of South Texas.  “Our league members work countless hours with a focus to help educate our youth and make our community a better place to live,” said Lillian Riojas, JLCC president-elect. “Our next community event, Christmas Tree Forest, will bring in thousands of young students and educate them on Christmas traditions around the world.” The JLCC currently has around 180 active and new members. The league has been in Corpus Christi since 1944. To date, the JLCC has been a driving force behind a number of high-profile projects, including the Cole Park KidsPlace Unlimited, the Cole Park skate park, CASA of Nueces County, the Women’s Shelter Inc. and the Texas State Aquarium. “We’ve had a remarkable history here in Corpus Christi,” Dain said. “We are still focused on continuing to develop the full potential of women and improving the lives of children. Fairy Tale Ball is a truly special event, and we hope that you will join us for a night of fun for some great causes.”

To learn more about the JLCC or the Fairy Tale Ball, or to purchase a table, please go to www.jlcc.org or visit their Facebook page. Contributing writers to this article: Darcy Jones, Katie Triplett, Jacqueline Rhodes and Gabby Dohse

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I’m one rider, inspired by one little boy with diabetes, to join thousands of other riders across the nation, supported by contributions from thousands more. I ride for the 26 million people living with diabetes, and the 79 million more Americans currently at risk. I ride for one little boy. Who will you ride for?

START A CHAIN REACTION. STOP DIABETES.

Corpus Christi, TX

April 20, 2013 Texas A&M - Corpus Christi

Join us for the 1st Annual Coastal Bend Tour de Cure!

F i nd yo ur l o c alto ur and re gi s te r at

di abe te s . o rg/ c o as tal be ndto ur

36 1 85 0 87 7 8

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NSIDE nonprofit

Fun, Fitness and a Great Cause

The American Diabetes Association brings the first annual Coastal Bend Tour de Cure to town, benefiting diabetes research, education and advocacy. By: [Brittany Sandbach]

The American Diabetes Association’s Tour de Cure is a nationwide cycling and fundraising event for fun, fitness and a great cause! On Saturday, April 20, 2013, the Tour de Cure will come to the Coastal Bend for a one-day ride. The ride will take place throughout the Corpus Christi area with 700-plus riders, volunteers and spectators from the South Texas area. Riders secure funds in advance of the event and receive incentive prizes for their fundraising. All riders will enjoy a safe and well-marked route, superior SAG (support and gear), medical support and outstanding volunteer support. The ride will begin and end at Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. There are a variety of route options to choose from, whether you are an avid cyclist or a new cyclist experiencing your first ride. The route lengths are 60 miles, 45 miles, 25 miles and 10 miles. One special part of this ride is the celebration of the “red riders.” If you have Type 1, Type 2 or gestational diabetes, you’ll be celebrated as a red rider! Whether you ride as an individual or on a team, red riders are heroes who represent the drive to stop diabetes. Red riders are recognized at the event start lines, raising awareness of the American Dia-

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betes Association mission by proudly wearing a red rider jersey. Go red rider! So what’s next? Go online to the Coastal Bend Tour de Cure website (www.diabetes.org/coastalbendtour) and register today! There is a small reg-

Common signs of diabetes are extreme thirst, frequent urination and/or unexplained weight loss. istration fee, and then the $100 fundraising minimum. Raising funds is really easy with the help of the online fundraising tools and mobile app. Once you register, your friends, family and coworkers can donate safely and securely online with their credit cards directly to your fundraising account. With the mobile app, the Tour de Cure is accessible from your smart phone. Each rider raises the required $100 minimum to

fund diabetes research, education and advocacy, and will receive the 2013 Tour de Cure commemorative T-shirt. But don’t stop there! Raise $250 or more and choose a special thank-you gift in recognition of your fundraising achievement. Gifts include cycling gear, popular electronics and more! Know the warning signs of diabetes. Diabetes can lead to blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and amputations. Common signs of diabetes are extreme thirst, frequent urination and/or unexplained weight loss. You are at an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes if you are African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, Asian American or Pacific Islander; over 45, underactive, overweight or obese; someone with a family history of diabetes; or a woman who has had gestational diabetes. To take the diabetes risk test online, visit www.diabetes.org/risktest. If you think you are at risk, talk to your health care provider.

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor, vendor, volunteer or participant, please call the Corpus Christi American Diabetes Association office at 361-8508778 or email Erin Wilder at ewilder@diabetes.org.


The Corpus Christi Education Foundation (CCEF) recognizes the following 2012-2013 Honor Society inductees who have made a real difference in education for thousands of CCISD students. in the last six years alone, their contributions have resulted in more than half a million dollars to provide new classroom programs and scholarships. many thanks to these outstanding partners, who are building the future of corpus christi by making education a priority today.

Superintendent’s Circle of Lifetime Membership - $50,000 +

Principal’s Circle - $30,000 + Coastal Community And Teachers Credit Union - Donor of the Year Optimist Club of Corpus Christi Educator’s Circle - $10,000 + AG|CM, Inc.  Coastal Bend Community Foundation  CITGO Corpus Christi Refinery Flint Hills Resources  Fulton-Coastcon  Linebarger, Goggan, Blair & Sampson, LLP NSIDE Coastal Bend Magazine  Stripes LLC  Thompson & Horton LLP

Student’s Circle - $2,500 + Bill’s Sparkling City Charter  Borden Insurance  Friends of Mary Helen Berlanga Friends of Gloria Hicks  Gignac & Associates, L.L.P.  Gentry Company H-E-B  Rose Sales Company, Inc.  Cissy Reynolds-Perez

Memorial Honorees Three individuals are perpeturally honored as memorial inductees for 2012-2013: Byron E. Dodd (1936-2010)  Lt. Cdr. Rick Mead (1954-2012)  Elizabeth Shoemaker (1951-2010) Your City. Your Students. Your Support. ... Our Future. | www.ccef-ccisd.org N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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the future of home health The important role of homecare in the future of Medicare delivery will reinvent the way we keep people safe, well and in their homes.

By: [Arnie Cisneros] Health care services and delivery for Medicare clients have changed significantly over the last 30 years. Hospitals were where most Medicare patients received care in the ‘80s; patients stayed in hospital beds for an average of 17 days at that time. Medicare reforms focused on discharging patients back to the community faster to complete their care, and patients began to finish their treatment programs in nursing homes and home health. Since that time, the average length of stay in hospitals for these patients decreased to less than four

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days (3.8 days today). This trend is expected to continue under the recently proposed Medicare reforms produced by the health care reform legislation. Accountable care organizations, or ACOs, are the model that will reinvent how patients will be treated in the future. And the role of hospitals will continue to decrease as far as inpatient stays are concerned as Medicare invents new methods of delivering services in less expensive manners. Some propose that eventually, hospitals will

effectively be reduced to intensive care units, as most patients are transitioned rapidly back to the community when their condition stabilizes; this is the goal of the ACO. Because of its role as the most affordable Medicare treatment provider, home health will be used to achieve those goals. Home health will continue to develop programs that allow patients to complete more and more of their care episodes at home. As our understanding of what helps patients get better increases, we understand that patients are more comfortable receiving non-critical care in their homes. They improve faster than they do in the hospital, and this type of care costs Medicare (and ultimately us) less to deliver when the expensive inpatient bed costs are not a factor. But traditional nursing and rehab services, the standard delivery focus of homecare programs, will most certainly be modified from what we have seen in the recent past. In the last quarter century, home health services often provided care for months or years at a time with little of the care and quality controls that hospitals were developing. During that time, Medicare learned what type of care would be required to improve patients even more efficiently in their homes, and the ACOs will financially reward health systems to deliver that care in the home. Changes we can expect to see in the current home health model are focused on keeping people who discharge from the hospital from being re-admitted in the first 30 days after they return home. This expensive procedure, sending patients back to the hospital for care concerns after their initial discharge, must be reduced if we expect to get people better faster in the future. Also, proposals to install financial patient contributions, known as co-payments, will help bring home health in line with all other Medicare services and help patients achieve efficient care. All strategies proposed to achieve this goal outline an increased role for homecare in acute patients. In addition, they rely on rehab to provide the therapy services that help clients function safer in their homes, and this keeps people out of hospitals. Helping patients walk without falling, dress and bathe safely and maintain these skills as long as possible is how ACOs will emphasize wellness in order to improve patient experiences while saving health care dollars at the same time. In the near future, home health will undergo a facelift of sorts while eliminating efficiency concerns in the care model. But the role of homecare in the future of Medicare delivery will be an important one, as we reinvent how we keep people safe and in their homes.

Arnie Cisneros, P.T., president of Home Health Strategic Management, is the most progressive speaker in homecare today. He provides coaching and consulting services to providers on a national basis regarding S.U.R.C.H. and other clinical management protocols for quality outcomes. Visit www.homehealthstrategicmanagement.com for more information.


THE GULF COAST HUMANE SOCIETY ❖ ❖ ❖

presents

❖ ❖ ❖

THE 15TH ANNUAL

Tom Keeler Memorial Golf Tournament CORPUS CHRISTI

COUNTRY CLUB

FRIDAY, MARCH 22ND, 2013 REGISTRATION AND BRUNCH AT 10:30 A.M.

SCRAMBLE AT 12 NOON.

Teams and sponsors will be accepted until March 18th, however entering earlier secures a place in the tournament **Award ceremony to follow the tournament along with distribution of raffle prizes*

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES $5,000 Banner on site, inclusion as a Tournament Partner on radio and TV, recognition on a hole, and entry of two 4 player teams

$1,000 Banner on site, inclusion as a Silver Sponsor on radio and TV,and entry of a four player team-Hole sign

$2,500 Banner on site, inclusion as a Tournament Partner on radio and TV, recognition on a hole, and entry of two 4 player teams

$700

Recognition on a hole and entry of one 4 player team

$500

Recognition on a hole and entry of two players-or one 4 player team

$200

Recognition on a hole

$1,500 Banner on site, inclusion as a Gold Sponsor on radio and TV, recognition on a hole, and entry of a single 4 player team

*Please provide your own business banners* / *Hole Sponsorship Signs will be provided and made to order*

CALL 225-0845 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR EMAIL MS. CODY RICE@ CODY@GCHSCC.ORG TO REGISTER!

THE GULF COAST HUMANE SOCIETY The Gulf Coast Humane Society has been providing Services to homeless animals of the Coastal Bend since it was founded nearly 67 years ago by Francis and Harvey Weil and is the largest True No Kill in South Texas. In April, 1998 Tom and Cora Keeler very generously donated a state of the art facility to the Humane Society for which it will forever be indebted. This shelter presently houses approximately 500 dogs and cats awaiting placement in loving homes. The Humane Society is active in the promotion of responsible pet care. The funds raised in the Tom Keeler Memorial Golf Classic are used to further the goals of the Gulf Coast Humane Society. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE md actively and without expectations values the other. The interaction promotes well-being and autonomy and conveys empathy. There is a mutual engagement and process of self-discovery. And there is a basic and

“Because the soul has such deep roots ... and its values run so contrary to modern concerns, caring for the soul may well turn out to be a radical act - a challenge to accepted norms.” - Thomas More

Spiritual Care in the Clinical Setting While it raises many questions for professionals in a system focused on mental and physical concerns, spiritual care involves several key concepts and serves as an important component of patient care. By: [Dean Campbell] How does one “do” spiritual care? What are the problems to be addressed? What are the goals? How is progress measured? How do we know when someone needs this kind of care? Can I be sure that this kind of care doesn’t conflict with the teachings of my religion? What about people who don’t even believe they have a soul? Who pays for spiritual care? Most people will agree that the idea of spiritual care as a professional undertaking generates a great number of questions. In fact, that seems quite fitting, as many of the hardest questions a person could ever encounter come up time and again in spiritual care. At the core of the practice of spiritual care lie several key concepts. Not everyone will agree on the exact nature or name for these concepts, but in general,

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these or something similar provide the framework for the spiritual counseling professional: • Presence: This is not just “being there” while someone is trying to cope with trauma, suffering, painful transitions, etc. It is difficult to define the practice of sincere, authentic, empathic, therapeutic presence. For a lawyer, it means empathy without getting caught up in a client’s anxiety. For a nurse or a doctor, it may mean just being still and paying attention to someone in distress. What it means to a spiritual care professional is quite different, however. Therapeutic presence is characterized by being wholly, authentically with (or in the presence of) another in a way that is open, without preconceptions, nonjudgmental, caring and accepting. The professional

profound respect for what is sacred in human life. Through this process, both questions and answers emerge that address the spiritual needs, distress and conflicts of both parties. • Autonomy and self-determination: Accompanying others on their journey through some of the most intense experiences in human existence can be more than just difficult. It can be traumatic for both the client and the professional. However, clients must be able to work through the process of spiritual growth in their own way, in the context of their own belief system and in a way which takes into account the clients’ unique strengths and struggles, thereby allowing them to transcend painful circumstances in a deeply meaningful way. • Interdisciplinary care and planning: The spiritual care professional takes part in a process of negotiation with the patient and family, other members of the team and other health care providers to identify, prioritize and plan for problems related to the patient’s current status. In this setting, it is expected that the spiritual care professional will act as a radical advocate for the patient’s rights, mobilize the patient’s existing religious and spiritual supports and facilitate coordination of these resources and aid in short- and long-term planning activities. The specific techniques used by spiritual care professionals can vary widely and may include life review and other “storytelling” techniques, prayer and meditation, religious rituals, linking and referring, the use of individual and family therapy components and many other measures. The provision of spiritual care is difficult in a system that is focused on addressing physical and mental concerns and has only recently and in limited settings (e.g. hospice programs, emergency departments) begun to acknowledge the importance of spiritual care. And yes, even a person who does not believe in a soul has spiritual needs, even if that person believes these needs only exist in relation to other people. Spirituality involves meaning and purpose, selfdetermination and legacy, as well as suffering, forgiveness, redemption and salvation. It takes expertise, practice and study to navigate these often murky and sometimes very dark waters.

To learn more about spiritual counseling, please consult the following resources: Legacy Home Health Agency (www.legacyhhc.com or 361-855-0848); the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (www.acpe.edu); or the Healthcare Chaplains Ministry Association (www. hcmachaplains.org).


Thank you to all of our sponsors! Bay Ltd. | Cardio Thoracic Assoc. | La Palmera | Martin Ulisse Imports Nueces Power Equipment | Meyer FrugĂŠ Group N S I D E C O A S T A L B E N D M D 35


NSIDE health & wellness

Sleep Deprivation and your Health Not getting enough good-quality sleep can have a negative impact on both your physical performance and your overall health and well-being. By: [Michael Barrera] The average person sleeps seven hours a night, while one third of our population averages less than six-and-a-half hours of sleep a night. Do you fall into this category? If so, don’t worry; it’s not too late to get back on track to living a healthier and less sleep-deprived lifestyle. Most people are walking around right now severely sleep deprived and do not realize it. Society as a whole needs a minimum of eight hours of sleep a night to be able to fully function during any and all tasks throughout the day. Sleep to many people is just another task we have to get done at the end of the day to get us to the next day. When we are deprived of sleep, our ability to complete even the simplest of tasks becomes as frustrating as completing a Rubik’s Cube. No matter how you look at it, if you are not getting the minimum amount of sleep, it will affect your physical performance, as well as your health. Individuals who are overweight and physically inactive or contain a high percentage of body fat

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usually sleep more hours per night than those who have a lower body fat percentage. Sleeping more than the recommended eight hours to make up for missed sleep hours during the week or weekend will not balance out. The best way to ensure that you are getting the right kind of sleep that will allow for maximal performance throughout the day is to commit to getting good quality sleep. Also, you need to follow these three simple rules: Rule 1: Dark. Keep your room dark! Even the glowing light from your electric alarm clock will keep you from getting into deep levels of sleep, which will leave you waking up still tired. Rule 2: Cold. Keep your room as cold as possible while still being comfortable to sleep. Rule 3: Quiet. Turn off your TV and the radio, and focus on getting to sleep. Following all of these rules will help improve your overall health and fitness, and you will feel the difference from how you used to sleep.

What does sleep have to do with results from your new diet or workout regimen? If an individual who is on a certain nutrition plan or workout does not obtain enough sleep, all of the work is wasted. During a workout, we think we are building muscle and getting in shape. Well … yes and no. Yes, daily exercise can lead to muscle development and overall better health. At the same time, we are also breaking down muscle fibers and tissue at the exact moment of exercise. So how is it we build muscle and get healthier? The simple answer is recovery. Recovery is what we do after our workout, which will define what kind of results we see. Sleep is a huge part of our recovery; our muscles actually receive the most recovery. During sleep, the body releases different hormones that help muscle rebuild after all the damage we put them through daily. Whether you’re new to exercising or have been working out for years, if you’re not getting the right quality and amount of sleep, your ability to get the maximum results from a workout or nutrition plan could very well be hindered.

If you have any questions or concerns about any other health or fitness issues, feel free to get in contact with me, Michael Barrera (a strength and conditioning coach and certified personal trainer), or any other staff member at Pro Performance Training Center. You may visit us at 3237 S. Padre Island Drive, Corpus Christi, Texas 78415; go to www.properformancetc. com; or call 361-806-2085.


When you think of physical therapy... you most likely think of our ability to

treat the standard musculoskeletal injuries or conditions such as strains, sprains, low back pain, neck, shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, ankle, and foot pain, etc.,

...but did you know Humpal P.T. also has programs for:

• Pregnancy (Pre/Post Natal Care) • Diabetes • Fall Prevention • Neuropathy

• Cardiovascular Therapy • Osteoarthritis • Vertigo (dizziness) • Osteoporosis

• Athletic Rehab (Sport Specific) • Thoracic-Outlet Syndrome • Orthotic Evaluation/Fabrication • Pre-Op/Post-Operative Therapy

We have a program for you if you are unable to perform your activities of daily living due to pain or limited range of motion.

We will put you back in the Game of Life!

4500 sq.ft.Gym - Corpus Christi location

46’x 20’Indoor Pool - Corpus Christi location

All 6 locations offer carefully designed and supervised exercise programs in State of the Art gyms and Large Indoor Heated Pools.

Medicare, Medicaid, Workers Compensation, and most insurances accepted.

If you have a condition that is causing you pain or concern, ask your Doctor for a prescription to Humpal P.T., or stop by any of our locations to request a FREE physical therapy Screening to determine if your condition can benefit from physical therapy.

Humpal Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Centers

w w w. H u m p a l P h y s i c a l T h e r a p y. c o m w w w. F a c e b o o k . c o m / H u m pa l P T

Corpus Christi, 5026 Deepwood Cir., 361-854-2278 Calallen, 4040 Five Points Rd., 361-241-7399 Alice, 1302 E. 5th St., 361-664-9675 Portland, 114 Lang Rd. 361-643-8243 Aransas Pass, 2150 W. Wheeler Ave., 361-758-5199 Rockport, 1811 Broadway (aka Fulton Beach Rd.), 361-729-8777

6 Locations • 120 Employees • One Philosophy- Provide the Best Ncare! S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE health & wellness

An OldSchool Approach Technically our first diet, the Paleo Diet incorporates a natural diet and an active lifestyle, ultimately resulting in an overall improvement in your health. By: [Mandy Ashcraft]

If you’ve ruled out vegetarianism as an option, but love the idea of a natural diet free of refined and processed foods, you may consider a more old-school approach. Really old-school. As in, prehistoric. The Paleo Diet, short for Paleolithic, attempts to mimic the human diet as it would’ve been 2.5 million years ago, spanning until about 10,000 years ago. This concept is based on the original intentions and functions of the human digestive system without human-made factors coming into play. This is also known as “The Caveman Diet,” and it predominately utilizes the proteins derived from lean, grass-fed (or wild) meats, fowl and fish. But before you break out your Fred Flintstone costume and sit down to a 24-oz. porterhouse, consider the lifestyle of a prehistoric hunter-gatherer and compare it to your own. It is best suited for an active to very active individual, as our prehistoric ancestors were not sedentary. No one was throwing back cans of Red Bull, either; their energy and stamina had to be internally derived, meaning the diet had to be appropriate to sustain it. The Paleo Diet is to include fruits, nuts and seeds, lean meats, vegetables, seafood and healthy fats. Eliminated from this diet: dairy, processed foods, refined sugars, legumes, starches, alcohol, caffeine and grains. The items not included in this lifestyle are those that were not available to

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our earliest ancestors, and are thus not considered options. There is, however, no restriction on the cooking or cooking methods of any food item in your modern caveman dining experience. In other words, please don’t eat a raw chicken. A diet rich in monounsaturated fats and Omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to reduce your likelihood of developing heart disease and related

The intention is to use the body as it was designed to be used by consuming what the most primitive humans would’ve had available to them and tying in the high activity level that it is best suited for. The only difference is that you’ll probably be doing your hunting and gathering at H-EB, and you’re unlikely (or at least less likely) to do so in a loincloth. There are a million diet plans out there, but this

The Paleo Diet is best suited for an active individual, as our prehistoric ancestors were not sedentary. cardiovascular issues, infertility, Type 2 diabetes and cancer. Derive these fats from things like grass-fed animals, avocados and fish. A modern “advantage” in this developed Paleo Diet is the addition of olive oil, which is permitted. It is advised to break the diet down to include approximately 44 percent plant-based foods and carbohydrates, and 56 percent meat, fowl and fish. This arrangement, if adhered to properly, is shown to have anti-inflammatory effects, stabilize blood sugar, reduce weight and have overall improvement in bodily functions.

is technically the first one. Before Atkins books, juicing documentaries and weight-loss clinics, there were primitive people who ate things from nature and were unable to create infomercials about it. The Paleo Diet is a tribute to ourselves – and the proof of their success.

For more information, visit www.mandyashcraft. com.


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CM

2008, 2009, 2010, 2011

Skilled Home Health Care Services

Anodyne Therapy, Assessment & Evaluation, Blood Pressure Monitoring, Central Line and PICC Line Management, Certified Diabetes Educator, Certified Nurses Aide, Disease Process Teaching and Management, Enteral Nutrition, Foley Catheter Care, Insulin Administration, IV Therapy, Medical Social Services, Medication Management, Occupational Therapy, Parenteral Nutrition, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Venipuncture/Lab Work, Wound Care Certified Nurses, Wound Care Management, Wound Vac

Coverage Area

Your Home. Your Health. Your Choice. BENAVIDES

119 W. Railroad Ave. Benavides, Texas 78341 Ph: (361) 256-3980 Fax: (361) 256-3981

CORPUS CHRISTI

6262 Weber Rd. Ste. 302 Corpus Christi, Texas 78413 Ph: (361) 853-3971 Fax: (361) 853-4309

N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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style & substance n o jasams ad

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e y n r Ma am pag Ch al n o i t d Na itte e n a mm ner Trai iqu e Cotitor Phys) com pe (NPC

hair and makeup: josh salinas with josh and company wardrobe: and men’s wearhouse S T A L B Eboutique ND MD 42 N S I D E C O Ale’vu photographer: dustin ashcraft


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Mary Champagne As a trainer and an NPC competitor, not only am I training and coaching others on ways to live a healthier lifestyle, but I am living it daily. I know the struggles that one must overcome to be successful in nutrition and in physical activity. To create a healthy lifestyle, you must involve it in your life every day – make it a habit, not a trend. Audrey Hepburn once said that, “nothing is impossible. The word itself says, ‘I’m possible.’” Believe you can, and you’re halfway there.                             In life, we are all just walking up the mountain, and we can sing as we climb, or we can complain about our sore feet. Whichever we choose, we still have to do the hike.

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jason adams I am a 27-year-old who was raised and lived in Sinton, Texas. I graduated in 2003 and went on to play three years of collegiate baseball, where I also advanced on to signing and playing professional baseball. I played two years of minor leagues and one summer of independent league baseball. My girlfriend is Mary Champagne, and we have a little girl puppy named Bayley. I got my first certification my sophomore year of college in 2004 and always worked out during the offseason for baseball. In 2008, I became a full-time trainer, leaving baseball behind due to injury. Yet in 2010, I trained for seven months to get an opportunity to play professional baseball for a minor league affiliate again and did. I played the summer I got released, moved back to Corpus and opened my first personal training studio, Unique Physique, which grew into a bigger idea that is now Pro Performance Training Center.  Dedication is the key to success!

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I am passionately committed to changing people’s lives by helping them adopt a more healthy and fit lifestyle so they look and feel their best. I’m going for a healthier city, one person at a time. My primary focus is to ensure our clients at PPTC achieve the goals they set for themselves. That’s what’s it’s all about for me and my team at Pro Performance. We want to help everyone in our community reach for their best, even if they don’t train directly with me or my trainers at Pro Performance.  Jason Adams: Committed to your health and fitness

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