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Volume 30 No. 6

June 2014

Buhl Foundation set to revitalize NS By Cristina Holtzer

Photo by Alyse Horn

Gus Kalaris and his bright orange cart have been serving iceballs to Pittsburgher’s for 63 years. His father opened it in 1934.

Distillery finds second home in Spring Garden non-profit and start-up organizations that will be able to use the If Northsider’s are lacking space for whatever its needs are, and spirit, look no further – Wigle a portion of the Barrelhouse revWhiskey is opening a location enue from that night will be given at 1055 Spring Garden Ave. to the organizations, Grelli said. The hours of operation for On Fridays there will be a the Whiskey Garden and Bar- rotating list of programs. Grelrelhouse will be Thursday and li said one of her favorites will Friday from 5 to 9 p.m., Satur- happen on June 20, where there day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and will be a bluegrass whiskey tastSunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. ing accompanied by the blueThursdays will be set aside for See Wigle, page 25

By Alyse Horn

The Northside may have better schools and landlords in its future if all goes to plan. Over the next 10 to 20 years Pittsburgh’s Buhl Foundation plans to spend $40 to $60 million dollars revitalizing the Northside, hoping to make it a place where residents feel proud. The Buhl Foundation, started in 1927 according to foundation president Frederick Thieman, is the oldest foundation in Pittsburgh and plans to spend $3 to $5 million each year in the Northside during the 20-year time frame. Thieman said the foundation has been searching for ways to be “more impactful with its spending” and after considering many areas, the Northside appeared to be the most pressing. “A lot of people would say that Pittsburgh was at a tipping point five or 10 years ago, and that we tipped in the right direction,” Thieman said. “But that’s not necessarily true for the Northside.” The Northside if full of valuable assets, Thieman said, but will also present the foundation with challenges such as finding more desirable landlords and dealing with declining vacant properties.

Diana Bucco, Buhl Foundation vice president, said the goals of funding are to improve “quality of education, quality of place and quality of employment” in the Northside. In the closing months of 2013 Bucco and the Buhl Foundation interviewed 400 people including Northside community leaders and more than 200 people who live and work in the area. “We began to hear consistent themes around dealing with the abandoned structures and the vacant lots, developing more affordable home ownership and the quality of education,” Thieman said. Scott Brooks, 33, works in marketing and said he visits the Northside at least once per week. He is not affiliated with the Buhl Foundation, but said he thinks Buhl should focus on bringing middle class families there by improving the public schools. “The proximity to Downtown is better than any neighborhood in the city and plenty of young professionals would flock there if their kids could get good public schooling,” Brooks said. The number of people living in poverty in the Northside is close to 20 percent, Thieman See Buhl, page 11


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THE NORTHSIDE CHRONICLE 922 Middle St. • Pittsburgh, PA 15212

June 2014

Community Meetings To have your community meeting included, email editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com Allegheny West Civic Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7:30 p.m. Calvary United Methodist Church 412.323.8884

Manchester Citizens Corporation Quarterly meetings, call for times MCC Center, 1319 Allegheny Ave. 412.323.1743

Brighton Heights Citizens Federation 2nd Thursday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Morrow Elementary School 412.734.0233

Manchester Public Safety Meeting Quarterly meetings, call for times Northside Leadership Conference 412.323.1743

Managing Editor Alyse Horn E-mail: editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com

Brightwood Civic Group 3rd Tuesday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Pressley Ridge, 2611 Stayton St. 412.732.8152

Northside Rotary Club Every Friday, noon Cardello Building, 2nd Floor

Advertising Manager Jena Ruszkiewicz E-mail: advertising@thenorthsidechronicle.com

Brightwood Community Emergency Response Shelter 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6 p.m. 3219 Central Ave.

www.thenorthsidechronicle.com Phone 412-321-3919 • Fax 412-321-1447 Mail Subscriptions are available at a rate of $30 per year.

California-Kirkbride Blockwatch 3rd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor California-Kirkbride Neighbors 2nd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor 412.758.3898 Central Northside Neighborhood Council

2013 Advertising rates: SIZE Black & White Color 1/8 page $56 $68 1/4 page $118 $157 1/2 page $229 $295 Full page $452 $585 Back Page $616 Center Spread $965 Discounts of up to 20% off rate card price for multiple-insertion contracts

DISCLAIMER: The viewpoints and opinions of the writers and contributors that appear in The Northside Chronicle do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints, opinions, beliefs or positions of The Northside Chronicle’s publishers, editors, staff and/or affiliates. The Northside Chronicle is not affiliated with any formal political, social, religious, educational or philosophical organization or party of any kind. The materials comprising The Northside Chronicle are provided by various organizations, community groups, advertisers, entities, writers and contributors and are provided as a service to the readers of The Northside Chronicle on an “as-is” basis for informational purposes only. The Northside Chronicle assumes no responsibility for any copyright infringement, errors or omissions in these materials and expressly disclaims any representations or warranties, express or implied, including, without limitation, any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose regarding the correctness, accuracy, completeness, timeliness and reliability of the information provided. The Northside Chronicle is not responsible for damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance upon such information. Reference herein to any commercial product, process or service does not constitute or imply endorsement or favoring by The Northside Chronicle. © The Northside Chronicle 2011

2nd Monday, monthly, 7 p.m. Allegheny Traditional Academy 412.231.7742

Charles Street Area Council 1st Monday, monthly, call for times Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St. 412.321.5567 Community Alliance of Spring Garden/ East Deutschtown 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Fuhrer Building of St. Michael’s Church 412.977.1979 Deutschtown New Hope Council 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Community Center, 623 Suismon St. East Allegheny Community Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Bistro to Go 412.321.1204 Ex-offender Aftercare Support Group Mondays, 6-7:15 p.m. Allegheny Center Alliance Church 801 Union Place Fineview Citizens Council 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 7 p.m. 21 Lanark St.

412.231.0330 Mexican War Streets Society 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. AUU Church, Resaca Pl. and North Ave. 412.323.9030

Northside Coalition for Fair Housing Board 2nd Monday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5527 Northside Coalition for Fair Housing Membership Monthly, call for times 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5521 Northside Leadership Conference Call for times 4 Allegheny Center, Suite 601 412.330.2559 North Side Lions Club 2nd and 4th Tuesday, monthly, noon Max’s Allegheny Tavern North Side Public Safety Council 1st Thursday, monthly, 5:30 p.m. Northside Leadership Conference zone1psc@gmail.com Observatory Hill, Inc. 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Byzantine Seminary, 3605 Perrysville Ave. 412.231.2887 Perry Hilltop Citizens’ Council 4th Monday, monthly, 7:30 p.m. Angel’s Place, 2605 Norwood St. 412.321.4632 The Promise Group Every other Tuesday, 6 p.m. Western Pa. Humane Society 412.321.1019 Troy Hill Citizens Council Sept. 13, Dec. 13, 7 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church 412-321-2852 Spring Hill Civic League May 5, Sept. 8, Oct. 6. Nov. 3 7 p.m., Spring Hill Elementary School contact@shcl.org Summer Hill Citizens Committee 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. WPXI Television Station community room


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Ayeshah Bulls

Don’t take shortcuts, do the work Greetings! Winter is finally officially over. During this extended period of spending more time indoors, I have found the hibernation has been a great time to be more introspective. Being outdoors brings our attention to more outward things as we embrace the sun, listen to the singing of the birds, visit our parks and greet people we haven’t seen in months. However, the low temperatures of the preceding months forced us inside, and forced us inward. Did you learn anything new about yourself during the winter season that you can take into this season? I did learn something new about myself over the long winter months. I wrote a devotional for the Lenten season that challenged my previous immaturities of wanting to take shortcuts. I wrote about my expe-

“A dream doesn’t become reality through magic; it takes sweat, determination and hard work.” – Colin Powell

rience of painting my front porch. When I decided to take on this task I went out and purchased supplies, tied up my hair, and rolled up my sleeves to go to work. I noticed there was a professional painter painting a house across the street. I asked him to advise me on the best way to paint the porch. He proceeded to tell me how I needed to scrape the old paint, sand the porch, and clean it before I could paint it. I looked down at my cans of paint and paint rollers I had purchased and began to pout. “But why!?” I asked, “Can’t I just paint over this?”

I whined like a 2-year-old. He calmly told me you can, but if you want it done right and if you want it to last, you have to do the work. As the bells went off in my head, I decided to head back to the hardware store to get the rest of what I needed. I began to check myself on any other areas of my life that I may be taking shortcuts. Are you? Are you attempting to start a new way of eating without cleansing your system of the old stuff first? Are you attempting to start a new relationship without sorting

through your part in the failure of your old one? Are you looking to land a top position in a company without ever even working an entry level job? Are you purchasing new things without purging and getting rid of items you no longer use? Are you taking shortcuts? There are important skills we acquire and lessons we learn during the process that we will miss by taking shortcuts. If you want lasting results, you must do the work. As we enter the summer season of growth and renewal, let’s challenge ourselves to evaluate the areas of our lives that we are taking shortcuts in and yet wondering why we are not getting the best results. If we want true lasting change in our lives, communities and world we must do the work.


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Northside Public Safety Recently, individuals have been disguising themselves as contractors, electricians, or other agencies to get inside residents homes. T h e s e individuals show up without any notice and are targeting senior citizens. Northside Public Safety Council President David Stacy asks Northsider’s to be aware of whom they are letting onto their property and into their home. On the Northside in April, there were approximately 495 incidents were reported, which led to approximately 202 arrests. The Northside Public Safety Council is a nonprofit corporation composed of community leaders, businesses,

government officials the Housing Authority, property owners and the Zone 1 Pittsburgh Police. The Northside Public Safety Committee meets the first Thursday of each month at 5:30 p.m. on the mezzanine level of The Northside Leadership C o n f e r e n c e ’s offices at 4 Allegheny Center. All are welcome. A useful resource for the community is the Zone 1 website at w w w. c o m m u n i t y s a f e t y. p i t t s b u r g h p a . g o v. Questions or concerns regarding crime or police presence, contact the Zone 1 Community Relations Officer, Forrest Hodges at forrest. h o d g e s @ p i t t s b u r g h p a . g o v.

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June 2014

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June 2014

Peduto attends groundbreaking ceremony on Suismon Street By Alyse Horn Tuesday morning on May 27, Mayor Bill Peduto joined October Development and the Northside Leadership Conference for the groundbreaking ceremony that kicked off the construction of seven new townhomes on the 600 block of Suismon Street. The Mayor provided supportive remarks on the housing development along with Director of Housing at the Urban Redevelopment Authority Tom Cummings. Lisa Kelly of First National bank and representatives from the offices of City Councilwoman Darlene Harris, State Representative Adam Ravenstahl, State Senator Jim Ferlo and State Senator Wayne Fontana were also in attendance to show their support.

and

First National Bank. “The beauty of this project is that we found an intersection between the interests and needs between the neighborhood and the interests and needs of the developer,” Fatla said. Tom and Kara Nolf have already claimed one of the lots for their future home and said they are both very excited to be part of the growth and new housing developments that are taking place on the Northside. October Development has Photo by Alyse Horn sold four of the seven lots so far, Seven new homes are being built on the 600 block of Suismon Street and there are still two for sale. with a historic style to match the character of the neighborhood. The seventh will be built at a later stage. The homes were designed torical surrounding area. The starting price for a home by architect Bob Baumbach and Executive Director of the is $319,000 with a base packconstructed by Senko Inc. Cum- NSLC Mark Fatla also added age that includes three bedmings noted how the hous- that the project couldn’t have rooms and 2 ½ baths. Upgrades ing project will be built in a happened without the sup- include decks, hardwood floorway that compliments the his- port of the public, the URA ing, parking pads and garages.


June 2014

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Priory Hotel joins independent rewards program By Alyse Horn The Priory Hotel invited patrons to dash over to its Stash Bash, the launch party for joining the Stash Hotel Rewards program. The Stash Hotel Rewards is the largest point-based loyalty program for independent, spirited hotels in America. Alex Zesch, a Stash engineer and marketing coordinator, said the Stash Hotel Rewards is an internet start-up company that began in 2010 with 65 hotels. The program now boasts about 170 hotels across the country in 100 different locations. By joining Stash, participants are able to rack up five points for every $1 spent at participating hotels and points never expire. The Priory, which joined

Stash in January 2014, takes about 10,000 points to cover one overnight stay. Based on the season, the amount of points needed for a room fluctuates. Zesch said that Stash is “definitely the first of its kind in a way a person redeems rewards,” because the points for each hotel have the same value across the board. Priory Director of Operations John Graf opened the evening by saying the hotel is “very excited to be a part of [the] program.” Graf said he takes pride in the character and uniqueness the Priory radiates in being one of the boutique hotels that is now part of the Stash Hotel Rewards program. The Priory Hotel has been family owned and operated since 1986, and consists of 42 European-style rooms.

Courtesy of BrandMill

Priory Director of Operations John Graf welcomes guests to the Stash Bash held on May 17. According to a press release, “This is the first time an independent Pittsburgh hotel has joined a national network of privatelyowned lodging properties and

puts it on par with rewards programs of national hotel chains.” For more information on the Stash Rewards Program, visit www.stashrewards.com.


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The Northside Chronicle

June 2014

Free martial arts lessons teach world class skills By Abbey Reighard Two young men have been selected to put their martial arts skills to the test at a world competition – skills they mastered while attending free lessons on the Northside. Gregory Young, a senior at Central Catholic High School, and 15-year-old Matt Mascellino will travel to Lisbon, Portugal for the 13th bi-annual Tang Soo Do Federation World Championship on July 26. According to the Northside Child Safety Program website, Tang Soo Do translates to “way of striking defense with the worthy hand.” The Tang Soo Do program aims to teach young people discipline and respect. Young said he started attending the Tang Soo Do sessions about two years ago. He said he enjoys the lessons and that Tang Soo Do is “a nice break from school and work.” “I feel [Tang Soo Do] helps me to better myself,” Young said. “It teaches me selfcontrol, and it’s fun.” Matt, who has been taking Tang Soo Do lessons since the program started four years ago, said he thinks “it’s a good program,” with a “good instructor.” Matt added that he is nervous and excited for the world competition. Grand Master Chun Sik

Kim to lead the class. Allensworth will accompany Young and Matt to Portugal in July. Allensworth said he is dedicated to the program because he said part of becoming a martial arts master is being able to help students succeed in martial arts. “My belief is that to become a master you have to be able to instruct someone from a white belt to a black belt,” Allensworth said. Allensworth comes to the Youth Places twice a week to teach classes. There are currently ten students participating in the proPhoto by Abbey Reighard gram ranging in ages six to 18. Of the 10 students, three Of the 10 students in the Tang Soo Do program, three have achieved have achieved green belts, three green belts, three are red belts and four are blue belts. are red belts and four are blue Kim came to class on Friday, Grand Master Kim come to class. belts. All ten students have surMay 9 at the Youth Places, 711 Matt and Young were picked to passed the beginner stages and West Commons, to person- represent the class and compete in are either intermediate or highally congratulate the two boys the international tournament in July er in their martial arts skills. in their success in the program. for their “good spirits” and the enMascellino said two students, Grand Master Kim opened his thusiasm the two boys show in class. his son Matt and his 11-yearfirst karate school in Pittsburgh in 1974. He now operates Tang Soo Do programs in thirteen locations in the Pittsburgh area. In 2010 Grand Master Kim helped to create the Child Safety Program with C.S Kim, a -Gregory Young, senior at Central Catholic High School program in which young people can come learn martial arts skills for free. Mike Mascellino, the direcGrand Master Kim present- old son Masen, have recently tor of the Northside Child Safe- ed two checks during his visit. passed their black belt tests. ty Program and father of Matt, The money Grand Master Kim Mascellino said he hopes to said it was a great honor to have presented had come from dif- expand free Tang Soo Do lesferent grants and fundraising. sons in urban public schools Grand Master Kim presented across the nation. Mascellino a check for $1,000 to Mascellino. said he thinks the program helps “He’s not looking for any young people to improve their money,” Grand Master Kim focus and to keep out of trouble. said. “He has a good heart.” Mascellino added that he Grand Master Kim also pre- wants to stress to parents that sented a check for $3,500 to he is available to help with the Dustin Allensworth, Tang Soo cost of uniforms and belt tests. Do instructor and third“Do not let money be an isdegree black belt. sue,” Mascellino said. “If I have to Allensworth has been in- pay out of my own pockets, I will.” volved in the program since 2010 Mascellino can be conand was personally selected by tacted at (412) 999-1777.

“I feel [Tang Soo Do] helps me to better myself. It teaches me self-control, and it’s fun.”


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Riverview Park installs long awaited flagpole

Photo by Alyse Horn

Pittsburgh Public School’s only JROTC program from Perry High School raised the flag at the ceremony. By Alyse Horn On Monday, May 5, Riverview Park welcomed a longawaited addition to the park. A new flagpole was installed and at 10 a.m. on Monday, ROTC students from Perry High School raised the American flag for the first time. Riverview Park Foreman Bob Lacki said he is “very proud and happy there will finally be a flagpole in the park.” Lacki said the flag will fly every day, and a solar powered light was installed at the top of the flagpole so it can be seen at night. Councilwoman Darlene Harris helped secure funding for the flagpole, and thanked others who helped make the flagpole possible. Former Public Works Director Rob Kaczorowski, Public Works First Division Supervisor Steve Bolar and Chuck O’Neil from Public Works were among those thanked

by

Harris and Lacki. The four ROTC students from Perry High School who raised the flag for the ceremony were Javon Owens (sophomore), Andre Miller (sophomore), Mia Shields (senior), and Kaleb Wilkins (senior). Owens said he and his peers thought they would be watching the ceremony and did not know they would be raising the flag until they got to the park. Needless to say, the students were surprised. After graduation, Shields will go on to join the U.S. Navy and Wilkins the U.S. Army. Major Christopher Augustine (Ret.) of the United State Army Special Forces, who manages the ROTC program for Pittsburgh Public Schools, said the program helps make the students better citizens and leaders. He said the program can also help their future careers despite if students choose to join the military after graduation.

June 2014


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June 2014

Celebrate Flag Day with the Elks Lodge

By Abbey Reighard

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The Allegheny Elks Lodge No. 339 will host its annual Flag Day celebration on June 14 at 400 Cedar Ave. The ceremony will begin at 2 p.m. and will be followed by food and entertainment. Keith Olash, Allegheny Elks Lodge Exalted Ruler, said the ceremony will include readings by members of the Elks Lodge from an official book from the Grand Lodge of the Order of the Elks. Olash added that those in attendance are welcome to read during the ceremony as well, and everyone in attendance will receive a small American flag to take home. After the ceremony, refresh-

ments will be provided by the Elks Lodge and the Pittsburgh Banjo Club will play at approximately 3 p.m. Olash said the refreshments will include “picnictype” foods such as baked beans and other homemade foods. Olash said he is not yet sure how many people will be attending the event this year, but said the number of people attending the event has gone up significantly in the past few years. Over 100 people attended last year’s event. Olash said he believes attendance has gone up since other groups – such as boy scouts, veterans and the Banjo Club – have attended and become involved with the celebration.

Annual NS Community Night at PNC Park, June 18 By Abbey Reighard The Northside/Northshore Chamber of Commerce will host its 26th Annual Northside Community Night on Wednesday, June 18. The event consist of a tailgate party in the parking lot outside of PNC Park and will include a DJ and games. Tickets for the event are $35 per person and can be purchased through the Northside Chamber of Commerce. The ticket price includes tailgate food, beverages, Penn Brewery and Rivertowne Beer, an event T-shirt and a game ticket. The Pittsburgh Pirates will play the Cincinnati Reds at 7:05 p.m. on the evening of the

Community Night tailgate. Tickets will be on sale until June 4 and can be purchased by check or credit card orders and sent to the Chamber of Commerce office, 809 Middle St. Tailgate goers can pick up their tickets, T-shirts and event instructions at the Chamber of Commerce office on Monday, June 16. Companies that purchase over 25 tickets will have their company name appear on the scoreboard during the game. The company name will also be displayed on the event T-shirts. For additional information contact the North Side Chamber of Commerce at 412-231-6500 or visit the Chamber of Commerce website, www.northsidechamberofcommerce.com.


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June 2014

Foundation to spend millions on NS over next few decades From Buhl, page 1 said, but nearly 40 percent of Northside children live in poverty, a rate much higher than the city average. Thieman said the foundation hopes to direct funding to elementary schools to get younger children reading and ready for later schooling. Northside residents recently worked with the Foundation to create strategies. During March, April, May and for the rest of June, teams of 20 to 35 Northside residents are working together to “build consensus for a unified plan to move the Northside forward,” Thieman said. Bucco said the strategy teams will then meet in July to reveal all their findings and build a cohesive plan to tackle all their issues raised. “Each day we learn a lit-

tle bit more and are trying to get a little bit smarter about it,” Bucco said of the plan. The foundation asked residents what they’d like to see for their communities and families, and Bucco said many responded with concrete goals such as a trail that connects all 18 neighborhoods of the Northside. Other goals listed by community members included cleaning up the entranceway to Manchester, beautifying the exit ramp from Route 28 to Spring Garden

and Deutschtown and a rest stop for bicycles near Woods Run. Though the efforts will take many years to make lasting changes, Thieman said, Buhl plans to make some “early wins” such as granting funding to smaller neighborhoods to build momentum. He said the foundation anticipates spending about 80 percent of its resources on the Northside project. “The choice to improve the Northside was an easy one,” Brooks said. “The location is fan-

tastic, they already have great old houses that are ready to be improved, and they even have a grocery store so you wouldn’t have to go far for anything.” At the end of this project, Northsider’s interviewed by the Buhl Foundation want the Northside to be a garbage free community, an area with better childcare and a place with “zero tolerance for bad landlords,” Bucco said. “I have always said the greatest assets in the Northside are the people,” Bucco added.


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The Northside Chronicle

June 2014

Birds display uniqueness during Aviary’s aerial adventure

The show runs twice a day at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. and is included for free with the admission fee to the Aviary. Summer rates are $14 for adults, $12 for children and $13 for seniors who are 60-yearsold and over. Children under 2-years-old are free. The National Aviary is the only independent nonprofit indoor and outdoor zoo dedicated exclusively to birds in the country.

By Ed Skirtich A global garden for the birds has arrived, said Don Fallon, producer of “Taking Flight: An Aerial Adventure,” which will debut at The National Aviary on Saturday, March 24 and kickoff its summer season. During the show, the bird’s unique flight patterns are showcased as they are released into the outdoor Rose Garden. The Aviary, 700 Arch St., has created a natural environment for the birds, which they thrive in. “Nature provided them with their own niche,” Cathy Schlott said. Schlott has been with the Aviary for 11 years and is the curator of behavioral man-

Photo by Alyse Horn

A Blue-fronted Amazon Parrot sits perched on a tree after flying into the Rose Garden. agement and education. The birds included in the show are a Eurasian Eagle Owl, Augur

Buzzard, Blue-fronted Amazon parrot, Yellow-naped Amazon parrot, a Kookaburra and more.

Aviary Hours:

Open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.aviary.org.

Gwen’s Girls commemorates founder’s life By Alyse Horn Gwen’s Girls, an organization that has dedicated its time to help at-risk adolescent girls, will hold an event on June 12 to celebrate what would have been the founder’s 70th birthday. The free event will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Gwen’s Girls headquarters, 711 West Commons. Gwendolyn Elliot, a retired Pittsburgh Police commander, founded the organization in 2002 because of the difficulties she saw young girls facing during her years of service. Elliot passed away in 2007. Nakia Beasley, the development and communications coordinator for Gwen’s Girls, said in an email that Elliot “had such a profound impact on the community, and we wanted to host an event where we could bring Gwen’s Girls clients (past and present),

Courtesy of Nakia Beasley

Gwen Elliot passed away in 2007 at the age of 62. donors, community members and those whose lives have been impacted by Gwen’s life and legacy all together in one place.” Girls between the ages of 8 to 18 can seek assistance with tutoring and childcare to help finish school, and the program gives the girls a safe place to live and of-

fers them personal mentoring at Gwen’s Girls and career services. Lynn Knezevich, executive director of Gwen’s Girls, has been with the program since it began 12 years ago. Knezevich said Elliot was the type of person who could talk to anybody and “if there was a problem, she always thought of the solutions.” Knezevich said there are currently 15 girls in the residential program on the Northside, and up to 50 girls come to the facility for care management and after school programs. McKharia Kennedy, 19, became a Gwen’s Girl when she was 12. Kennedy said through the program she gained the ability to control her anger and found a real family within the staff who are “respectful and really easy to talk to.” “[The staff] makes you feel comfortable when you’re here, and all of the girls [in the pro-

gram] get along,” Kennedy said. Kennedy said she now volunteers at Gwen’s Girls and helps the staff when she can. Since opening their doors, Knezevich said about 2,000 girls have passed through the program and it is normal for past participants to keep in touch with staff members. “One of the things we do here is establish really positive and strong relationships,” Knezevich said. “[Girls] will come back in good and bad times, and see support with the staff.” Knezevich said the organization would like the public to come and pay tribute to the legacy of Elliot, and to see how her vision has lived on even though she has departed the Earth. “Every day we are still trying to do her work and we have impacted so many girls in the community,” Knezevich said.


June 2014

The Northside Chronicle - Outside Guide

Special Section Page 13


Special Section Page 14

The Northside Chronicle - Outside Guide

June 2014

Music festival coming Brighton Farm Stand back for a second year begins on June 17

Photo by Kelsey Shea Last year, an estimated 2,500 from all over Pittsburgh came to the Northside to enjoy the festival. By Alyse Horn After a great success last summer, the Deutschtown Music Festival will be coming back for a second year on Saturday, July 12. Event Organizer Ben Soltesz said last year about 2,500 people attended the event throughout the day and night, and this year at least 10 more bands will be added to the lineup, bringing the band total to over 70 performers. Due to the growth of the event, there will be a second stage this year located in Allegheny Commons Park along Cedar and North Avenues that will have bands beginning to play at 10 a.m. Soltesz said the daytime portion of the event is designed to be family friendly, and there will be a number of food trucks, the Spring Garden Flea Market and other activities throughout the day. Foreland Street will be closed off again this year for a stage that will provide music from 4 to 8 p.m. After that time, the bands will move into different venues in the surrounding

area and play until about 2 a.m. Participating venues include James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, Max’s Allegheny Tavern, Artists Image Resource, Bistro & Company, Park House, Penn Brewery, Verdettos, Allegheny Elks Lodge #339, Peanutz and Key West. Throughout the day and night, a free shuttle with several stops in the Northside and Northshore will be available to festival goers. In a press release, neighborhood advocate and festival cofounder Cody Walters said, “2,500 people discovered new music and our awesome neighborhood at last year’s festival. This year, we’re expecting double that number. We have more bands, more venues, more buzz. It’ll be a great time, guaranteed.” Bands and other acts interested in performing at the festival can contact Walters at cody. f i s h e r. w a l t e r s @ g m a i l . c o m . More information can also be found online at www. deutschtownmusicfestival. org or www.facebook.com/ deutschtownmusicfestival.

The Brighton Farm Stand will be held on Tuesdays from 12 to 4 p.m. at the Lecky Avenue lot, 3237 Brighton Rd., which is the same location as last year. The farm stand will begin on June 17 and run through August 26. This year, the farm stand is asking neighborhood vendors to submit applications to create an expanded market. Vendors are required to bring their own tables, chairs and asked to make

a $10 donation towards farm stand operation at each market. Potential vendors must RSVP their space each week by phone (412) 732-8152 or emailing bhcfpgh@gmail.com. An informational meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, May 27 at 6 p.m. in the Brighton Heights Citizens Federation office, 3629 California Ave., for those interested in creating a tentative volunteer schedule and vendor sign-up.

Neighborhood garden grows organic produce By Alyse Horn Northsider’s looking to grow their own produce can find a sanctuary within Ballfield Farm, located near the corner of Danbury and Crispen Streets. Joanna Deming, the development associate at The Pittsburgh Project, said in an email that Ballfield Farm is a neighborhood project that collectively grows organic food in Pittsburgh’s Perry South neighborhood and the garden was created in 2008 by two staff members, Mark and Courtney Williams, at The Pittsburgh Project. “[They] led an effort to transform an abandoned, overgrown baseball field into a small urban farm that produces fruit, vegetables, and herbs,” Deming said. “They still lead [the garden], along with with volunteer team today.” Deming said some of the produce includes chard, kale, spinach, potatoes, tomatoes and other organic crops. The farm is open every Wednesday from 5:30 p.m. until

dusk, and every Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Deming said the produce grown is only available to members and those who are involved in gardening during the entire growing season. A minimum of an hour and a half per week is required to be involved. To become involved, Ballfield Farm asks that potential participants fill out an online membership form or show up during gardening hours to register. There is a $15 fee for individuals or $30 for a family.


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The Northside Chronicle - Outside Guide

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Riverview Park seen as ‘hidden gem’ to patrons By Abbey Reighard Rain or shine, Janet Pazzynski can be spotted in Riverview Park most days of the week, walking her dog Molly or weeding one of the many garden beds in the park. Pazzynski maintains the flower beds located at the entrance of the park during the growing season. She comes to the park once a week to work on the flower beds, but said she often stops to pull a few weeds if she’s sees any during her daily walks in the park with Molly. “I love it,” Pazzynski said. “Every Tuesday, this is my day.” Pazzynski said she started working in the park three years ago, but her love for the park developed at an early age when her and her family would come to the park.

Members of The Pittsburgh Park Conservancy referred to Pazzynski on the PPC blog as “Janet of All Trades.” After working for Verizon Communication for almost 30 years Pazzynski retired. However, Pazzynski work in the park was just beginning. “The park just kept calling me,” said Pazzynski. Pazzynski started out weeding one or two beds, but now she makes her weekly rounds to 13 flower beds. “[The weeding] becomes an addiction,” Pazzynski said. Among other things, Pazzynski is a gardener, photographer and graphic designer. Pazzynski uses her graphic design skills she acquired from classes at the Community College of Allegheny College to create posters for park features and

events. Pazzynski designed the poster for the new English Knot Garden in the park and for the Riverview Park Planting Day. On Tuesday, May 20 between 20 and 30 people came out to Riverview Park Planting Day from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. According to Angela Yuele, PPC horticulturist, the conservancy ordered 9,000 plants to be planted in the park by volunteers, city workers and park workers. Beth Chmura, who lives nearby Riverview Park, volunteered for the first time in the park on the planting day this year. “[The Park] is one of the reasons we moved here,” said Chmura who lives down the street from Riverview Park. Chmura said she enjoys the park for its flowers and wildlife. “Where else in the city are you going to run into a deer in the

middle of the day?” Chmura said. Yuele said a lot of people who live nearby the park come out to plant every year. “People from the neighborhood just kind of show up,” Yuele said. “[The planting] kind of takes on a life of its own.” According to Jake Baechle, PPC volunteer coordinator, in 2013 the Conservancy recorded 146 volunteers, totaling 527 hours of volunteer labor spent in Riverview Park. Yuele, who has worked in the park for over four years, describes Riverview as a kind of “hidden gem.” Riverview Park was established in 1894 and currently spans 287 acres, according to the PPC website. “I just love this park,” Pazzynski said. “It’s really just a wonderful place.”


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The Northside Chronicle - Outside Guide

Urban chicken farmers highlighted on tour By Abbey Reighard Urban chicken farming may be the next big trend to take root – or coop – on the Northside. Three chicken coops located on the Northside will be part of the 4th annual “Chicks in the Hood” Tour on Sunday, June 8. The tour highlights local Pittsburgh chicken farmers and educates people on how to raise chickens in the city. The three coops, in Manchester, Fineview and Mexican War Streets, are three of 15 coops throughout the Pittsburgh area that will be featured in the tour. The tour – which is hosted by the Pittsburgh Pro-Poultry People, or P4 – will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 3 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adult and free for children 14 and younger. The urban chicken farmers featured on the tour will be available to answer questions and give helpful tips to anyone on the tour who wants to start raising their own urban chickens. Anne George, an urban chicken owner and P4 advocate, said the tour is self-guided. Those attending the tours can start and finish at any of the chicken coop locations and do not have to follow a specific order. Tour-goers should have transportation since the coops are located in different areas around the city. “The tour is very fun but also helps to educate people on the best ways to keep their hens in an urban environment, especially during the winter months,” George said. There will also be a guided bike-tour, which George said she recommends the bike tour for seasoned bicyclists.

Tickets for the tour will be sold at coffee shops, stores and homesteads throughout the city, and will be listed on the P4 website. George said once people purchase their tickets, they will be given a map with the chicken coop locations and descriptions of each of the coops. The proceeds from the “Chicks in the Hood” tours are donated to a different community partner every year. This year the proceeds will go to the American Rescue League. Last year the tour brought in $2,500 and over 230 people were in attendance. The proceeds were donated to Just Harvest, an organization that aims to end hunger and poverty through education and mobilization, according to its official website. The number of coops featured in the tours has increased since the first tour in 2011. The number of coops included in this year’s tour increased by three compared to lasts years total. George said she expects 400 people to attend this year’s tour. P4 was formed in 2010 in response to the growing number of “new-wave urban chicken keeps” in Pittsburgh, according to George. According to its official website, P4 is a “loosely organized group of urban-poultry keepers” who seek to “promote the joy of chickens within the city without permit requirements.” Along with Chicks-inthe-Hood tours, P4 also hosts events throughout the year such as Chicken-Keeping Classes and Stray Bird Re-Homing. George said the tours are great learning experiences but, also added that the tours are “interesting and fun for the whole family!”

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John Canning

Jane’s Tree While wandering through the Northside during this crazy spring of 2014 it was interesting to see how the sporadic weather shifts effected when trees and bulbs would transform the landscape from winter’s last grey days to scenes of green leaves and pastel blossoms. The one tree, which is a sure sign of springtime, is the magnificent pink dogwood in the midst of the 800 block of Western Avenue. I know it as “Jane’s Tree” and it speaks to me of community revitalization. Every year Jane’s tree is more beautiful than ever. It certainly was this year, and it made me think how fortunate it was for that skinny sapling that it came into the hands of Jane Johnson in the summer of 1963. That Dogwood and Jane Johnson are both symbols of survivors in an urban setting that, for many years, was not too friendly to trees at all nor to urbanists that were committed to city living. Jane Ford Johnson, presently a resident of The Allegheny apartment complex on the west side of Allegheny Center, has a terrific story to tell about saving trees, helping kids, raising a family, and preserving a congregation and a community. Jane was a tree tender long before it was fashionable. She was a community activist when many of her neighbors in the 1960s were heading out of town. She and a few compatriots managed to hold the Calvary Methodist church together when other Northside congregations were closing up shop. A few weeks ago I enjoyed an enlightening and long overdue

visit with Jane. She described her many residences in different sections of the Northside. In her lifetime Jane has lived in Brighton Heights, Calbride, Central Northside, and Manchester. As a youngster her family lived in the community we now call Perry Hilltop, where she played in and about the windowless remnant of Brashear’s original observatory. In 1936, one of the lowest points of the Great Depression, Jane graduated from Allegheny High School, attended the Pittsburgh Academy, where she met and, shortly thereafter, married Ross Johnson. By the early 1950s Jane and Ross and their growing family settled in the community that is now called Allegheny West. With urban redevelopment plans to level large sections of the Northside, Jane played a pivotal role in organizing the community, property owners and tenants alike, to block such stupid initiatives. Jane has always been an activist --- a doer.I first met Jane in the late 60s as she was overseeing the hanging of a memorial lamp in the alter area of Calvary Methodist church to honor Cora Allison, a great soul of that congregation. A year or so later Jane and I were neighbors and coworkers in the process of community restoration. Jane was the Jane Jacobs of Allegheny West.Looking back on those decades in Allegheny West I recall Jane as the tree tender, the keeper of the neighborhood story, the advocate for historic preservation and the stalwart of a congregation who kept singing as well as flipping pancakes and mashing potatoes. And so, every spring, when that Dogwood at 833 Western Avenue is in full bloom, it is, to me, a wonderful reminder of a great Northside champion.


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The Northside Chronicle - Outside Guide

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The Northside Chronicle

Sign-up to take the Northside Community Census The Northside Community Census team wants to hear from residents across the Northside about their vision for the future of the Northside, and what they need in their homes and neighborhoods today. Information gathered by the Census team will guide the work of local community organizations and help the Buhl Foundation decide how to make a $50 million, multi-generational investment in Northside communities. The Northside Community Census is supported by the Buhl Foundation and is part of the Northside Conversation initiative, an open community process where residents, community leaders,nonprofits, neigh-

borhood organizations and businesses build a shared vision for a better Northside. The Community Census team hopes that residents from all eighteen neighborhoods will participate. Residents can sign up today at www.northsideconversation.com or by leaving a message at 412-515-0989. Participants will answer questions about neighborhood needs, employment, schools and youth, parks and recreation, safety, and other important community issues. Look for the Northside Community census team at the neighborhood events listed on The Northside Chronicle’s website or find them as they go door to door talking to Northsiders.

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Wigle Whiskey opens shop in new Northside location From Wigle, page 1 grass band Smokestack Lighting. “We will be serving spirits while [the band] plays songs that correspond to that time in history and the flavor of the spirit,” Grelli said. “It will be a really fun way to learn the history of whiskey in America.” Saturdays will be dedicated for tours of the Barrelhouse at 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., and Sundays there will be garden parties in the Whiskey Garden that is attached to the Barrelhouse. Grelli said customers can come in, get their hands dirty planting flowers and help transform the vacant lot, which is attached to the building, into a garden. Wigle will provide cocktails and snacks. When Wigle was looking for a space to expand from the distillery in the Strip District the team researched a lot of different neighborhoods, but Grelli said what “sealed the deal was the lot that came next to it and [we] wanted to do something with reenergizing vacant lots.” Grelli said this past fall Wigle knew they would need to take on another location when they were “literally jumping over barrels” at the distillery in the Strip District, 2401 Smallman St. It took the team about six months to find the Spring Garden Avenue location and then a couple of months “building it into a barrelhouse and Wiglfying it,” Grelli said. Currently there are 535 whiskey barrels at the Strip District location, and Grelli said they hope to fit another 500 at the Barrelhouse here on the Northside. Grelli said one of the reasons the company is excited about the move is due to the great relationships the distillery has created with other Northside locations such as The Priory Hotel, The Children’s

Museum and the Mattress Factory. “We strive first and foremost to be a community distillery, and this is the Northside’s distillery,” Grelli said. Friday, May 30 was opening night for the Pittsburgh Distilling Co. Before the party began, about 70 participants helped Wigle roll whiskey barrels over the McCullough Bridge and into Historic Deutschtown to the Whiskey Garden and Barrelhouse. Meredith Grelli, co-owner of Wigle Whiskey, said volunteers were split into teams of 15 to 20 people. Each team was given different barrel transportation options, such as a children’s wagon, a wheelbarrow and a 16 person bike. Councilwoman Darlene Harris was on the team that used the 16 person bike to transport their whiskey barrel. “[Wigle] asked if I’d help roll a barrel and I thought it would be a historic event,” Harris said. “I’m glad that we’re getting another business in the community that is happy to work with the community.” Once teams arrived at the Barrelhouse, they were greeted by the rest of the party where bands, food and interactive whiskey history stations were set up to keep attendees entertained until 9 p.m. when the party moved to Penn Brewery and James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy. Grelli said the distillery chose to end the festivities at 9 p.m. to respect their new neighbors.


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The Northside Chronicle

AGH program helps mold student futures By Alyse Horn For more than 10 years Allegheny General Hospital has taken Pittsburgh Public School students under its wing through the Start On Success program, and on May 27 the hospital held an end of the year celebration for participants. Start On Success is an transition program that provides a coordinated, progressive series of activities and experiences over three years of high school to prepare youth with learning disabilities for successful careers, postsecondary education or training. For 2013, SOS Program Coordinator Ashley McFall said in an email that the students in the program spent a total of 3,343 hours “onsite at AGH either working as an intern or being mentored through the Project MOVE program.” MOVE stands for Men-

Photo by Alyse Horn

toring Opportunities for Vocational Exploration. The programs targets students their sophomore year of high school who begin taking classes centered on the SOS transition. They then accelerate with the Project MOVE Mentorship junior year and an SOS internship senior year. On Tuesday at AGH students, instructors and mentors were recognized for their guidance and accomplishments. Katrina Thompson from Carrick High School, Koren Walker from Perry High

School and Dennis Miller from Brashear High School completed the SOS program and spoke during the ceremony and share their experiences with the crowd. McFall said the celebration was a great representation of the partnership that exists between AGH, PPS and the NSLC. “This long time relationship is built on the dedication that the hospital, administration and staff has to helping students in the Start On Success program,” McFall said.

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Brighton Heights Patricia Mastele estate et al. to Federal National Mortgage Assn. at 1027 Benton Ave. for $3,115 by sheriff’s deed. Shana Marcinik to Mary and Lyle Graber at 3733 California Ave. for $125,000. David Andre to Joshue Bertram and Chloe Ellise Kuhns MacCarty at 3565 Gerber Ave. for $129,500. Synergy Capital Inc. to Peter and Angeline Allen at 1836 Kleber St. for $164,000. Michael Hyjurick to David Kavic and Laurel Kentzel at 1240 San Pedro St. for $116,500. JA Home Investors LLC to Eugene Walker at 1408 Termon Ave. for $105,000. Michael Hoffman to Nicholas Chan at 3722-3724 McClure Ave.

The Northside Chronicle

for $250,000. Kenneth Harms Jr. to Michael Cuccaro and Jessica Manack at 1122 Davis Ave. for $138,000. Valerie Wheatley to Timothy and Stephanie Murphy at 1125 Davis Ave. for $113,500. Jason Jaffurs to Matthew and Alison Sniezek at 3936 Kleber St. for $149,350. Gennaro Greco to Stephen Kumanchik at 3444 McClure Ave. for $6,000. Brittany Nicole Bayer Repko to Ashley Fernandez and Preston Comfort at 3450 Shadeland Ave. for $109,900. Brightwood Robert Kramer to Gerald Marshman at 2820 Shadeland Ave. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps

indicate a value of $14,500). Gayle Bair Varre to Federico Siegert and Deborah Wilkinson at 1318 Ingham St. for $64,000. Brightwood Civic Group to Jermaine Younger at 3234 McClure Ave. for $6,533. Maxine Garrett Lewis to Yvonne Campbell at 1142 Marshall Ave. for $99,000. Enterprise Bank to 1027 Uvilla St. LLC at 2827 Stayton St. for $2,900. Barbara Walton to Wesbanco Bank Inc. at 1512 Woodland Ave. for $2,070 by sheriff’s deed. Bradley Caddell trustee to Jason and Anthony Durler at 1351 Woods Run Ave. for $2,800. California-Kirkbride EH Pooled 1112 L.P. to Paul

June 2014

Bell at 1312 Stranmore St. for $12,000. Central Northside October Real Estate Holdings LLC to Macy Lucy LLC at 100 Jacksonia St. for $344,000. Brusue Assoc. Inc. to SPP OHPA RAD Fund LLC at 802 Brighton Road for $872,594. October Real Estate Holdings LLC to Venkateshwar Rao at 29 Jacksonia St. for $309,000. Christopher Phillips to Robert J and Heather R Fletcher at 1209 Palo Alto St. for $402,000. Mark Daniels to Edward and Allyson Slayden at 1721 Buena Vista St. for $196,000. Jeffrey Stasko to Stonehendge Partn. LLC at 1534 Buena Vista St. and Armandale St. for


June 2014

$130,000. Robert Farrell to David H and Michele Buzard at 112 Carrington St. for $180,500. October Real Estate Holdings LLC to Michael Schilling and Julianna Khan at 27 Jacksonia St. for $294,000. East Deutschtown Big Heart Pet Brands to River Rod L.P. at 1075 Progress St. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $1,000,000). Pittsburgh City to Alfred and Josephine DePasquale at 843 Phineas St. for $1,500. William Butler to Ruth Ann and Parker Dailey at 820 Suismon St. for $8,000. Alfred DePasquale to Kristi Lynn Mineweaser at Suismon St. for

The Northside Chronicle

$9,005. Alfred DePasquale to Kristi Lynn Senko and Kristopher Gregory Mineweaser at Suisom St. for $9,005. Mary Ferrence estate et al. to Federal National Mortgage Assn. at 850 Tripoli St. for $1,937 by sheriff’s deed. Pittsburgh Landmark Group LLC to Shlomit Talisman Zyskind at 827 Vista St. for $47,000.

Margaret Eichner to Peter Barner at 604 Middle St. for $15,000. Helen Strater estate et al. to Heather Johnson and Camden Leeds at 1214 James St. for $40,000.

Fineview Estate of William Buggey to ESB Bank at 1633 Compromise St. for $1,942 by sheriff’s deed.

Manchester Elnedia Barrow to Chaton Turner and Andre Smith at 1104 Bidwell St. for $285,000. Patricia Ann Lewis to Mary Dopler at 1120 Pennsylvania Ave. for $121,500. Georgia Carroll Marovic to Jason Yablinsky at 1110 Pennsylvania Ave. for $123,000.

Historic Deutschtown Bryan Jeffers to RRK LLC at 718 Cedar Ave. and 719 Moravian Way for $160,000.

Observatory Hill Craig Laurenson to Mark Ray at 57 DeFoe St. for $157,000. Stacey Lynn Zearott to Erica

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Sumpter at 4041 Grizella St. for $113,000. James Hollock to Autumn Ayers at 25 Semicir St. for $66,600. Duke Britton to Raheem and Tammy VanLamoen at 3259 Orleans St. for $82,725. Perry Hilltop Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Christopher Grayson at 617 Danbury St. for $21,519. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Triple A Investment LLC at 242 Langley Ave. for $9,019. Eric Patterson to Perry North Asset Recovery Trust 1 at 512 McClintock Ave. for $2,000. Eric Patterson to Perry North Asset Recovery Trust 2 at 521 McClintock Ave. for $2,000.


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Northside Education Page Project showcases children’s King K-8 students beautify area surrounding school technological advances In part with Serve Pittsburgh, one local Northside school helped to “Beautify the Burgh” on Friday, May 9, 2014. Roughly 250 students at Pittsburgh King K-8 volunteered to help clean up the areas around our school. Staff and students had a great time and enjoyed cleaning up the Northside!

By Cristina Holtzer The kids at Pittsburgh Allegheny K-5 aren’t just learning English and math; they can also use integrated circuit boards. On Wednesday, May 21, children at Pittsburgh Allegheny elementary school demonstrated the command of technology that they’d spent school year learning. The Northside school implemented the children’s innovation project in 2010, a technology education program for elementary school students started by two Pittsburgh tech enthusiasts. Melissa Butler, a kindergarten teacher with a Master’s degree from Penn State and Jeremy Boyle, resident artist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment Lab, “began by having children look at toys.” They asked children to take toys apart and draw what they saw. Boyle said he was amazed at how easily the children were able to grasp the concept.

“They ended up making schematically correct drawings,” Boyle said. The evening began with a musical show of fourth and fifth grade students, followed by a ceremony honoring each child who had completed 100 percent of his or her “innovation homework.” After Butler spoke briefly, students from all grades took their “posts” within the school—stations where they exhibited their knowledge of electricity, circuits and technology. Northside resident Cheré LeVinen sat with her granddaughter, kindergartener Kaydence Brown, and waited in the auditorium for Brown’s turn to show off her skills. “She could come home and talk to us about circuit boards,” LeVinen said. “I think it’s really crazy to have kindergarteners learning about that.” Ella and Christina, two third graders in Ms. Pantilla’s class, worked with breadboards, thin plastic boards with metal sheets underneath that can be wired together to create a circuit.

About

The Northside Chronicle Education page will be a reoccuring addition to our paper. Through it, we aim to better inform Northside residents about education news and options available in our neighborhoods. The Page is sponsored by Community College of Allegheny County, though sponsors have no weight or input on stories or events. The articles and events on the page are purely editorial content developed by the Northside Chronicle and Pittsburgh Public School staff.


The Northside Chronicle

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Sudoku Hard

The Game Page Last Month’s Puzzle Solutions Hard

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The aim of Sudoku is to enter a number from 1 through 9 in each space on a 9×9 grid made up of 3×3 subgrids (called “regions”). Some of the numbers have already been given. You may not use the same number twice in a single row, column, or region of the grid. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability.

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Crossword puzzles provided by www. bestcrosswords.com / Used with permission.

Across

Chronicle Crossword

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