Issuu on Google+

Volume 28 No. 6

June 2012

Deutschtown cigar business causes community uproar By Kelsey Shea

Photo by Kelsey Shea

Students from Pressley Ridge placed flags in Highwood Cemetery to commemorate veterans for Memorial day.

Perry and Oliver prepare for next year’s merger By Kelsey Shea By 3 p.m. on June 13, Oliver High School will officially be closed, sending its 300 students to Perry Traditional Academy. At a meeting on May 30, Pittsburgh Public Schools administrators, faculty members and students from both schools attended a community meeting to discuss what has been done to ease the transition and what administrators still need to do. “We believe that when groups like these come together, we get really great results,” said PPS Superintendent Linda Lane. About 60 people attended the meeting, seven of which were parents. The meeting was moderated

by professionals from New York University who Perry hired to help with the transition. The Perry and Oliver student transition team gave a presentation on their work throughout the past few months which included helping organize over 30 visits to Perry for Oliver students, a unity chain, a mural and joint extracurricular activities. After the student presentation, NYU moderators led a brief conversation with community members in attendance, during which the community expressed concern about the school board, parent communication, Oliver faculty and how Oliver students would be incorporated into

See Transition, page 27

Andrew Lee wants a second chance to run his shop, Executive Cigars, in Historic Deutschtown, but after eight months of problematic late-night parties, neighborhood residents aren’t keen to give him another shot. A community meeting on April 30 sparked a month-long conflict this month in the Northside centering on Lee and involving angry neighbors, fire code violations, a December shooting and allegations against Commander 1 Police Commander Rashall Brackney. While Executive Cigars has been in business for three years on Suismon Street, in August of last year late-night parties on the second floor of the building began creating disturbances that had neighbors and the East Allegheny Community Council concerned. “For eight months, our lives were hell from Friday at 2 a.m. to Saturday at 6 a.m.,” said Deutschtown resident Scott Parker. “I don’t even support him having a cigar shop in my neighborhood. Fights and a December 2011 shooting where over 20 bullets were fired with a Mac11 by individuals leaving the building added additional concern for public safety to neighbors’ complaints of noise disturbances and parking problems. Lee said that he was renting the second floor of the shop to a young man who was running an illegal afterhours club, but has since terminated the lease and believes the problems are over. Though he is the owner, Lee said he had no involvement with the afterhours party and that patrons of his shop are professionals all over

the age of 48 and of the “highest caliber.” “Our customers are not your enemies,” said Lee. “I would love to move on from this with this community…We can be good neighbors.” In April, Lee applied to the zoning board to extend his shop hours until 2 a.m. and permit members of his club to bring alcohol onto the premise for parties or events. At his zoning hearing on April 19, 30 Deutschtown residents showed up for the hearing as well as Lee. Residents feared that the extended hours and permitting members and private parties to bring to alcoholic in the shop would recreate the noise and safety problems. Lee plans to extend his shop’s hours to accommodate patrons who finish work late and permit them to bring and drink alcohol on the premise. He also plans to rent out the second floor private parties such as showers, fundraisers and birthday parties that will not be ongoing. He does not anticipate any noise or safety problems. The zoning board hearing was delayed until May 10 in the hopes that the two parties could come to an agreement outside of court, which prompted Lee to arrange the community meeting. Lee and City Council President Darlene Harris hosted the community meeting in Bistro-To-Go’s annex, though little compromise was met between the opposing parties after two hours of discussion moderated by Harris. At the rescheduled zoning hearing on May 10, roughly 50 Deutschtown residents showed up

See Cigars, page 10


The Northside Chronicle

Page 2

THE NORTHSIDE CHRONICLE 922 Middle St. • Pittsburgh, PA 15212

June 2012

Community Meetings To have your community meeting included, email editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com Allegheny West Civic Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7:30 p.m. Calvary United Methodist Church 412.323.8884

Manchester Citizens Corporation Quarterly meetings, call for times MCC Center, 1319 Allegheny Ave. 412.323.1743

Brighton Heights Citizens Federation 2nd Thursday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Morrow Elementary School 412.734.0233

Manchester Public Safety Meeting Quarterly meetings, call for times Northside Leadership Conference 412.323.1743

Managing Editor Kelsey Shea E-mail: editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com

Brightwood Civic Group 3rd Tuesday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Pressley Ridge, 2611 Stayton St. 412.732.8152

Northside Rotary Club Every Friday, noon Cardello Building, 2nd Floor

Advertising Manager Kaitlin Balmert E-mail: advertising@thenorthsidechronicle.com

Brightwood Community Emergency Response Shelter 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6 p.m. 3219 Central Ave.

www.thenorthsidechronicle.com Phone 412-321-3919 • Fax 412-321-1447 Mail Subscriptions are available at a rate of $30 per year.

California-Kirkbride Blockwatch 3rd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor California-Kirkbride Neighbors 2nd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor 412.758.3898 Central Northside Neighborhood Council

2012 Advertising rates: SIZE Black & White Color 1/8 page $56 $68 1/4 page $118 $157 1/2 page $229 $295 Full page $452 $585 Back Page $616 Center Spread $965 Discounts of up to 20% off rate card price for multiple-insertion contracts

DISCLAIMER: The viewpoints and opinions of the writers and contributors that appear in The Northside Chronicle do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints, opinions, beliefs or positions of The Northside Chronicle’s publishers, editors, staff and/or affiliates. The Northside Chronicle is not affiliated with any formal political, social, religious, educational or philosophical organization or party of any kind. The materials comprising The Northside Chronicle are provided by various organizations, community groups, advertisers, entities, writers and contributors and are provided as a service to the readers of The Northside Chronicle on an “as-is” basis for informational purposes only. The Northside Chronicle assumes no responsibility for any copyright infringement, errors or omissions in these materials and expressly disclaims any representations or warranties, express or implied, including, without limitation, any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose regarding the correctness, accuracy, completeness, timeliness and reliability of the information provided. The Northside Chronicle is not responsible for damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance upon such information. Reference herein to any commercial product, process or service does not constitute or imply endorsement or favoring by The Northside Chronicle. © The Northside Chronicle 2011

2nd Monday, monthly, 7 p.m. Allegheny Traditional Academy 412.231.7742

Charles Street Area Council 1st Monday, monthly, call for times Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St. 412.321.5567 Community Alliance of Spring Garden/ East Deutschtown 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Fuhrer Building of St. Michael’s Church 412.977.1979 Deutschtown New Hope Council 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Community Center, 623 Suismon St. East Allegheny Community Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Pressley High Rise 412.321.1204 Ex-offender Aftercare Support Group Saturdays, 4-5:30 p.m. Allegheny Center Alliance Church 801 Union Place Fineview Citizens Council 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m.

Upper Rooms at Reformed Presbyterian Home

Perrysville Ave. 412.231.0330

Mexican War Streets Society 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. AUU Church, Resaca Pl. and North Ave. 412.323.9030

Northside Coalition for Fair Housing Board 2nd Monday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5527 Northside Coalition for Fair Housing Membership Monthly, call for times 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5521 Northside Leadership Conference Call for times 4 Allegheny Center, Suite 601 412.330.2559 North Side Lions Club 2nd and 4th Tuesday, monthly, noon Max’s Allegheny Tavern North Side Public Safety Council 1st Thursday, monthly, 5:30 p.m. Northside Leadership Conference 412.330.2559 Observatory Hill, Inc. 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Byzantine Seminary, 3605 Perrysville Ave. 412.231.2887 Perry Hilltop Citizens’ Council 4th Monday, monthly, 7:30 p.m. Angel’s Place, 2605 Norwood St. 412.321.4632 The Promise Group Every other Tuesday, 6 p.m. Western Pa. Humane Society 412.321.1019 Troy Hill Citizens Council March 16, June 16, Sept. 15, Dec. 15 North Catholic High School 412-321-2852 Spring Hill Civic League May 7, Sept. 10, Oct. 1. Nov. 5 7 p.m., Spring Hill Elementary School contact@shcl.org Summer Hill Citizens Committee 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. WPXI Television Station community room


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 3

News Briefs Local students raise awareness about Northside air quality

In a city once known for having poor air quality, a group of local high school students raised awareness and encouraged healthy transportation options at a walk May 5 in Allegheny Commons Park. The walk, called A Healthy MOVEment, was more than a track to be followed. Participants were sent on a scavenger hunt throughout the Northside, hitting local businesses, historic sites and attractions. Each stop featured information on air quality and alternative transportation. The initiative, which is run by students throughout Pittsburgh, is part of the Student Conservation Association. The national organization features the Leadership in the Environment Advancement Program, in which the group that four students running the walk participate. Second-year participants in the organization focus on a community action project. Brainstorming for the project began in the fall and led the students to two key decisions: air quality and the Northside. “They focused on the Northside because of the need and the strength of local businesses,” she said. “It’s something that really impacted their lives and everyone’s lives.”

Neighborhood clean up

Volunteers will come together on June 2 to spruce up East Ohio Street and improve one of the Northside’s largest and most visible business districts. Deutschtown Merchants Association and Deutschtown neighbors are hosting a clean-up and revitalization of East Ohio Street on Saturday, June 2, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Grant funding for the project came from Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s Love Your Block program. Love Your Block is a partnership of Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and

The Home Depot Foundation to revitalize Pittsburgh – block by block. Funds will be used to powerwash the sidewalks, pick up trash, landscape the Historic Deutschtown gateway sign, regravel tree pits and more. Gloves, garbage bags and other clean-up materials will be provided, as well as refreshments. In case of a very rainy day, the clean-up will be moved to Saturday, June 9.

Chamber of Commerce annual awards event

On May 2, The Northside North Shore Chamber of Commerce hosted a Northside business awards luncheon to honor local businesses who contribute to their communities. The lunchon was held at PNC Park, and Pennsylvania Department of Revenue Secretary Dan Meuser addressed the audience about the state budget as the guest speaker. The 2011 winners were… MVP (Most Visible Professional) – Pete Konczakowski, First National Bank Chamber Community Champion (nonprofit) – Light of LifeChamber Community Champion (corporation) – Trib Total Media Hidden Treasure – Pittsburgh Furniture Rental Favorite New Member of 2011 – Business Records Management Members’ Choice Best Restaurant ­– Max’s Allegheny Tavern Members’ Choice Best Bank ­– First National Bank Members’ Choice Best Cultural Attraction – Pittsburgh Steelers


Page 4

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012

New writers residency program comes to NS By Kelsey Shea A new writers residency program is moving to the Central Northside called Cyberpunk Apocalypse. Cyberpunk Apocalypse is a nonprofit “literary lab” founded by Daniel McCloskey that houses and harbors the talents of resident and visiting writers and cartoonists. Cyberpunk Apocalypse will be the second writers’ residency program to find a home in the Central Northside, where City of Asylum hosts exiled writers from abroad. The literary lab has been located in a house in Upper Lawrenceville since its inception three years ago, but McCloskey said there are several advantages to the new location on Boyle Street in the Central Northside that include being close to other arts organizations. “There’s a lot of arts organizations and potential for collaboration,” said McCloskey who said they’ve found a welcoming

Photo courtesy Daniel McCloskey

Cyberpunk Apocalypse writers move in on Boyle Street. community in the Northside. Even while boxes were still being unpacked on Boyle Street, Cyberpunk Apocalypse began working with City of Asylum and the New Hazlett Theater on grants

for which the two nonprofits are acting as fiscal sponsors. McCloskey said that while Cyberpunk Apocalypse is growing into a larger physical location, the organization is also evolving into a

more mature nonprofit and hopes to become a 501c organization. Cyberpunk Apocalypse has benefited from its older and wiser neighbors at City of Asylum who have been ready and willing to help McCloskey and the writers get settled. “City of Asylum is an amazing organization, and they’ve been great to have,” said McCloskey. The six-bedroom Boyle Street house also offers more space and an additional bedroom for visiting writers as well as a performance space on the first floor that once served as the punk music venue, The Mousetrap. Going forward, Cyberpunk Apocalypse hopes to continue its Northside collaborations and grow to be a unique part of the Central Northside community. “We really like it here. There’s more of an East Coast feel here” said McCloskey who noted the appeal of the classic brick buildings and the fast-walking Central Northsiders.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 5


Page 6

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012

Music program gets NS performance space By Kelsey Shea Rather than a song, workers who transformed the unused third floor room in the Elks Club into a performance space for ROX Performance Academy compared the project to a math equation. “What we had was a growing music program that needed a little more space and the Elks Club had all kinds of space, but needed a little help,” said Northside Leadership Conference Executive Director Mark Fatla, noting that community intervention got thrown into the mix. “All that adds up to a space for kids on the Northside.” About 25 volunteers from Rivers Casino, five from ROX and a few from Sherwin-Williams, worked through the sweltering heat on May 23 morning to repaint and fix up a room in the Elks Lounge on Cedar Avenue that will be used for weekly performances and group lessons for ROX Academy. The ROX Performance Academy is a nonprofit organization that provides performance lessons and instruments to kids who can’t

Photo by Kelsey Shea

Volunteers painted the third floor of the Elks Lounge a sunny yellow. otherwise afford them. The young musicians are divided into bands and play popular rock, R&B and hip-hop music. ROX is sponsored by the Northside Leadership Conference and aims to assist students by developing their musical, social and communicative abilities through teaching and performance training in a professional learning environment.

The new Northside performance space will help grow the program, which came to the Northside six months ago and has been growing rapidly. ROX hopes to have 501c status by the end of 2012. “It’s amazing to see what this has all grown into,” said ROX founder Stefan Rodriguez. Currently 12 Northside kids are enrolled in the program and

take vocal, guitar, drum or wind instrument lessons free of charge. The program started in Monroeville where 60 students are enrolled, but Rodriguez expanded the program to the Northside because he felt there was a need for a program like his and because it reminded him of where he grew up in Chicago. Rodriguez and ROX President Joe Lawrence said they also hope to hold events in the new space to raise money to provide more kids with loaned instruments. “That’s our plan, but for right now changing the lives of 12 kids is pretty great,” said Lawrence, who noted that raising funds was ROX biggest challenge. ROX Performance Academy continually accepts new students and volunteer instructors. At Wednesday’s event, Rodriguez said one of the Rivers Casino workers volunteered his musical skills to the program. Rodriguez and Lawrence thanked the painters for their time and Sherwin-Williams for supplying the paint and supplies for the project.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 7

NS beer history discovered under Penn Brewery By Karin Baker Penn Brewery owners knew there was more to their building that meets the eye, but they didn’t know that some lost beer history was hidden in underground “beer caves” underneath the Northside brewery. “We had known all along that there were a series of tunnels and caves underneath the building,” said Lynda Nyman, co-owner of the Brewery. “What was surprising was the beer barrels.” While stonemasons repaired a stone wall in Penn Brewery’s beer garden, the owners asked if they could remove a few sections of the opening to the tunnel. Flashlights in tow, the owners crawled through the opening to see just what the tunnels were all about. Fairly deep into the caves, they stumbled upon something that they weren’t expecting. The caves, connected directly to the beer house, served as the original method of refrigeration when the building was the E &O Brewery,

Courtesy Penn Brewery

Giant beer barrels were found in beer caves underneath Troy Hill’s Penn Brewery. which was was established in 1848 in the Northside. An outdated method since modern day refrigeration, the giant

barrels and their caves were once a functional part of the brewery. “We aren’t sure how old they are, but one thing we are confident

of is that they were built inside the caves. They’re too large to fit through the opening.” The tunnels, Nyman said, extend far beneath the brewery, underneath the parking garage of the building. Originally sealed off due to trespassers, the caves have once again been temporarily sealed off. The owners hope to reopen the area, however this time not for storage. “We want to open them up as useable space, as a dining or bar area,” said Nyman. The challenge, however, is removing years of debris and making the area functional. The damp and dark area would need to be dried and lit, and then there are the giant barrels. “We’re going to be historically conscious while cleaning up.” Another option for the caves could be putting them back to their original use. However don’t be surprised if one of your seating options at Penn Brewery becomes cave in a few years.


The Northside Chronicle

Page 8

June 2012

May NSC Blog Highlights For full stories go to www.thenorthsidechronicle.com/blog

The Northside Chonicle Blog is updated daily with photos, event previews, interviews, videos and more. Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

May 7- Little Shop of Horrors at Perry High School- For those who missed Perry High School’s spring musical, “Little Shop of Horrors,” check out some photos from the show.

May 16- Cinema in the Park schedule- As the days get longer and the weather gets warmer, Northsiders can look forward to an outdoor Pittsburgh tradition of Dollar Bank Cinema in the Park at Riverview Park. In addition to movies on the big screen, Citiparks will also incorporate live music into some of this year’s events. Check out the schedule Riverview Park on our blog. May 23- Flags placed Highwood Cemetary- On May 23,members of the Elks, students from Pressley Ridge and Oliver’s JROTC program spent the afternoon placing about 3,000 American flags on the graves of veterans and fallen soldiers in Highwood Cemetery for Memorial Day.

Did you know you can receive the weekly online edition right in your e-mail inbox each Thursday? To sign up, email editor@thenorthsidechronicle. com, or go to www.thenorthsidechroncicle.com.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 9

North Shore bike museum expands after one year By Emily Riley As Craig Morrow and his bike museum, Bicycle Heaven, approach their one year anniversary, they’ll mark the event with a 5,000 square foot expansion that will open to the public on June 3. Morrow, said the new space will further display the bike collection and serve as an area where the museum can hold special events. The upper level of the warehouse provides the new space with hardwood floors, bright windows and plenty of bike hooks waiting to be filled. The bicycle collection fills the warehouse from floor to ceiling with pieces dating as far back as 1860. Morrow says the museum is home to over 2,000 bikes, 98 percent of which he bought in the Pittsburgh area. Morrow says this percentage stems from the city’s history of steel production. “Bikes were produced right in the city with steel from its

Photo by Kaitlin Balmert

The newly renovated space in Bicycle Heaven will be used for events. own steel mills,” said Morrow, “it is no surprise that I found so many vintage bikes in the area.” The bikes on display range from the famous Schwinn Stingrays to

miniature tricycles from the early 1900s. In addition, several of the pieces have made it to big screen films such “A Beautiful Mind” and “Super 8.”

With a collection that began years ago before the museum space opened last summer, Morrow continues expanding despite only accepting donations from visitors rather than a flat admission price. As Pittsburgh and the Northside become increasingly bike friendly, the museum gains more attention. Morrow says the museum’s popularity over the past year exceeded his expectations. Morrow and other staff members give personal tours to many local organizations including cycling groups, Boy Scout troops, outdoor enthusiast clubs and individuals looking to check out the biggest collection of vintage bikes in the area. Despite the obscure location in Chateau’s RJ Casey Industrial Park, Museum Manager Matt Rind said, “Strategic placement of signs on the bike trail and word of mouth has really spread the word.” Rind focuses attention on Bicycle Heaven’s eBay account since the museum also serves as a full

See Bicycle Heaven, page 24


Page 10

The Northside Chronicle

Multiple hearings addres Executive Cigars From Cigars, page 1 to the continuance to oppose the extended hours and alcohol policy. Lee presented a slideshow to the zoning board with 126 photos featuring what kind of people are members and patrons of his cigar shop, which included doctors, politicians and businessmen. The city zoning board is currently deliberating on whether or not to allow Lee to extend his hours and allow alcohol on site. At the community meeting, Commander RaShall Brackney then spoke to police’s response and involvement with the problem and stated that she believed Lee was more involved with the club than he led the audience to believe. “I believe that he has a great amount of knowledge of what happens there and that it will continue,” said Brackney who noted that Lee was on site one of the times authorities were called. Brackney noted that there have been over 50 311 calls made regarding ongoing, problematic activities in the building and they were issued nine citations over the eight months the afterhours club occurred. She

added that when the fire department took a headcount one night, there were roughly 200 individuals in the upstairs space. Lee denied this, stating that 200 people would not fit upstairs and that the citations amounted to harassment. He accused Commander Brackney of having a personal grudge against him and abusing her power and authority. On May 8, two days before Lee’s zoning board hearing, he filed a protection-from-abuse order against Brackney, which was later dismissed. Lee accused Cmdr. Brackney of threatening him and targeting his business after they ended a romantic relationship. According to the PFA, Brackney told Lee’s attorney that she would “do whatever it takes to get [Lee].” “This PFA was filed without merit,” Cmdr. Brackney wrote in a statement. “Mr. Lee and I have never had a personal relationship… As a police officer who has walked the streets for over 28 years, I can say how vital PFAs are in protecting innocent victims from abusive tormentors. To see the PFA statute utilized in this way is no less than an abomination of our system and is

disrespectful to victims of abuse of which it is intended to protect.” Ed Graf, East Allegheny Community Council Treasurer, said he does not believe the charges against Brackney were veritable. “Her actions were driven by the neighborhood,” said Graf, who noted Historic Deutschtown neighbors’ many complaints about Lee’s store. The PFA was dismissed in court by Judge Kelly Bigley on May 17. The judge dismissed the order because Lee failed to produce evidence of any romantic relationship between him Cmdr. Brackney and his testimony was inconsistent with evidence. She called the charges against “offensive” and an abuse of the justice system. On May 17, Lee was scheduled in court to appeal the nine fire code violations that were filed against him. Though he plead not guilty, Lee and his attorney did not appear in court. Lee told the Tribune Review that he forgot the hearing was today. Judge Kevin Cooper found Lee guilty on four fire code violations and fined him $800 plus court costs. Five of the violations have been continued.

June 2012


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 11

Memorial Day program held in Legion Park By Kelsey Shea The last weekend in May, about 100 Brightwood and Brighton Heights neighbors came out to celebrate its 64th annual Memorial Day program in Legion Park. Monday’s program included speeches by local veterans, remembrance of others, songs, the pledge of allegiance, a formal flag raising and a flyover by a C-130 jet. The Wednesday before Memorial Day, members of the Elks, students from Pressley Ridge and Oliver’s JROTC program spent this afternoon placing about 3,000 American flags on the graves of veterans and fallen soldiers in Highwood Cemetery. “These heroes of yesterday are at times forgotten,” said program coordinator Joe Brown. “At times like Memorial Day, we take the opportunity to show them the respect they rightfully deserve.” For others in attendance, it was

Photo by Kelsey Shea

City Council President Darlene Harris read a poem at the Memorial Day program at Legion Park on May 28, 2012. a way to remember Northsiders who had served our country in combat. Brighton Heights resident Donna Weaver comes each year to remember her Uncle, whose name is listed on the Legion Park WWII

monument, but also to honor her father. “It means a lot to us to come out here each year,” said Weaver, whose father would bring her to the park to leave a flower and say a prayer for

his brother. “My father is no longer with us, so I do it in memory of him now too.” This year’s ceremony specifically honored Northside WWII veteran John Pugliano. Pugliano died last year at age 90. He was a member of the American Legion and was known for adamantly insisting and ardently working to put flags on the graves of veterans in the Northside every year for Memorial Day. His nephew Peter Payne spoke at the program on behalf of his uncle who fought in Italy and Germany during WWII. As well as telling stories from his uncle’s days in combat, he also reflected on his dedication to honoring veterans. “I would like to thank everyone at the American Legion for having this service for Uncle Johnny,” he said. “He took it personally when a vet didn’t have a flag on his grave, and he made a point to do something about it.”


Page 12

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 13

• Walking Map • Outside on the Northside • Outdoor concerts • & More!


Page 14

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012

Cloud installation tested for new Northside park

Photo by Kelsey Shea

On the morning of May 18, workers at the Children’s Museum tested a new art exhibit that filled what will soon be the Buhl Community Park at Allegheny Square with fluffy white clouds. “Cloud Arbor,” an art installation by Ned Kahn, is a series of 32-foot-tall poles that creates a cloud 9 feet above the ground. Though not all the poles were up today, the test runs certainly gave those in attendance an idea of what to expect from the full installation. Each of the steel poles releases a a cool, fine mist that simulates a cloud hovering close to the ground and moving with the wind. The piece was funded by the Charity Randall Foundation and will operate year round. Buhl Community Park at Allegheny Square will be a revitalized community space on the Northside once it’s completed this summer. The park being redone by the Children’s Museum and the Charm Bracelet Project. In addition to “Cloud Arbor,” the park will feature solar lamps, a rain garden, blue stone benches and other amenities. The park is scheduled to open to the public on June 23 with a dedication, activities, circus performers and free admission to the Children’s Museum all day.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 15

GTECH volunteers restore historic garden Avenue between Reedsdale Street and Ridge Avenue is now a road median near the entrance ramp to I-279 and I-376. But in recent years, due to hard work on the part of the Allegheny City Society, and more recently PennDOT, GTECH, the City’s Forestry Division, Tree Tenders and a group of volunteers from Alcoa, the site is now the Mary Cassatt Garden, which volunteers refurbished on Tuesday. “It means so much to the Allegheny City Society. We call her ‘Pittsburgh’s Steel Rose,’” said Dr. Jean Binstock who organized the Photo by Kelsey Shea project. “She was an extraordinary Volunteers fix up the Mary Cassatt garden in Allegheny West. person.” went on to become the first AmeriIn addition to cleaning up the By Kelsey Shea can woman to paint in the French garden and mulching the ground, The Allegheny West birthplace impressionist style. Some of her volunteers also planted a new paintings are currently on display of famous Allegheny City-born hybrid of Canna flowers that were in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s artist Mary Cassatt got a makeover hybridized by Alice Harris at the “Impressionism from a New Light” this month. Harris-Karchesky Canna Farm in exhibit. Cassatt was the daughter of Washington County and named Over 150 years later, the former Allegheny City’s fifth mayor Robert Mary Cassatts. site of her house along Allegheny Simpson Cassatt before she later Binstock organized the project

as part of GTECH’s green ambassador program on the Northside. This year Binstock, an Allegheny West resident and Allegheny City Society member, was chosen as a Green Ambassador and Apprentice for her neighborhood as part of GTECH’s green ambassador program. GTECH Strategies, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit, recruited community leaders from 13 Northside neighborhoods to act as organizers in a green leadership development program they kicked off early this year. Neighborhood leaders are paid a small stipend to continue GTECH’s green initiatives and create some of their own in areas they identify as needing improvements. GTECH provides four months of leadership training to give the apprentices like Binstock the skills and preparation they need to engage the neighborhood and complete relevant projects.

See Garden page 22


Page 16

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012

Getting around the Northside on foot Left: Each neighborhood of the Northside has two scores, one for walkability and one for transit accessibility. (Graphic by Kelsey Shea/Data courtesy Walk Score)

By Kelsey Shea How walker friendly is your Northside neighborhood? It’s easy to find out with Walk Score, an website that quantifies the walkability of neighborhoods. Overall the Northside was on par with Pittsburgh’s general scores, but neighborhood by neighborhood,

we have some of the most and least walkable neighborhoods int he city. Walk Score measures how walker friendly and public transit oriented neighborhoods across the country are by giving them scores between 1 and 100 based on proximity to amenities such as schools, stores and transit lines. Across the Northside, the numbers are pretty

varied, but neighborhoods in the lower Northside like the Central Northside, Allegheny West, Deutschtown and Allegheny Center were rated well on both walking and transit scores. The transit scores in the upper neighborhoods were consistently in the 40s, while the walkability scores ranged from 17 in Summer Hill up to 49 in Brighton Heights. Recent transit cuts and additions haven’t been calculated into the score, but the addition of the North Shore Connector would drive the transit score of lower neighborhoods up, and new bus cuts would decrease the transit scores of the upper Northside neighborhoods. The entire City of Pittsburgh’s walking score was 64, which is slightly higher than the average Northside score of 62.1. The average Northside transit score of 50.8 is also lower than the City’s average of 55 according to Walk Score. For better or for worse, walk on Northsiders!


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 17


The Northside Chronicle

Page 18

June 2012

Outside on the Northside

Living in urban communities doens’t mean Northsiders can’t enjoy some of the best parts of summer. Check out a few of these fun ways to get outside and get moving.

Iceballs at Gus and Stella’s Visiting the classic orange cart in Allegheny Commons Park for a sweet frozen treat isn’t just a Northside tradition, but a city-wide summertime favorite. Gus and Stella’s Iceball Cart has been on the Northside for over 78 years. With a variety of flavors and a convenient park-side location, it’s not surprising Gus’ family business has been around since “your dad was a lad.”

Bike trails and the Bike Museum Though the Bicycle Heaven bike museum is new (see page 9 for the full story) the bike trails on the Northside have been around for a while. The North Shore trail takes riders along the Allegheny River near the stadiums and shows off Pittsburgh’s sprawling skyline. Riverview Park also has bike paths. Additionally, the Northside has the

New Northside Park

first on-stree bike infrastructure in the city with bike lanes, signs reminding drives to share the road and other conveniences for Northside bike riders.

Early this summer, the Northside will get a brand new park in Allegheny Center called the Buhl Community Park at Allegheny Square. Allegheny Square is a project of the Children’s Mueseum of Pittsburgh and was funded with a grant from the Buhl Foundation. The park will feature seating, over 70 newly planted trees, a cloud-creating art installation, a rain garden and even live music and performances later in the summer. It is scheduled to open June 23. “I think throughout the park, you’re going to find little details that will really make you smile,” said Bill Schlageter of the Children’s Museum. The space, once a concrete ampitheater style public space, is undergoing a complete transformation into a modern, green and unique Northside assett said Schlageter.

Community Gardens Does your neighborhood have a community garden? Most Northside neighborhoods do! Whether it’s growing vegetables, herbs or flowers, community gardens give city residents a taste of a more suburban lifestyle, sometimes literally. They’re a great way to meet neighbors, spruce up the neighborhood, get involved with your community and try out your green thumb.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 19

Casino hosts summer concert series

Rivers Casino will hold nine concerts throughout the summer in its outdoor amphitheater for its “Live on the River” summer concert series. Shows begin this Friday, May 25, and end Labor Day weekend. Guests are invited to enjoy cool summer nights on the river while listening to some of their favorite bands including: -May 25, 7 p.m.: Billy Joel tribute (52nd Street) and Elton John tribute (Captain Fantastic) -May 26, 7 p.m.: Shania Twain tribute (Shania’s Twin) and Garth Brooks tribute (Fresh Horses) -June 9, 8 p.m.: Mark Chesnutt -July 2, 7 p.m.: Beatles tribute (Beatlemania Magic) -July 3, 7 p.m.: Jimmy Buffet tribute (Parrot Beach) and Bruce Springsteen tribute (Asbury Fever) -July 4, 8 p.m.: America -Aug. 4, 8 p.m.: Billy Ocean -Sept. 1, 7 p.m.: Temptations tribute (Get Ready) and Earth, Wind and Fire tribute (Shining Star) -Sept. 2, 7 p.m.: Eagles tribute (7 Bridges) and Styx tribute (Rockin’ the Paradise) “The outdoor amphitheater is the best place in Pittsburgh to enjoy a concert on a summer night,” said Matt Stewart, Vice President of marketing at Rivers Casino. “We’re looking forward to an entertaining line-up of performances set against a great waterfront backdrop.” Guests will be able to purchase hot-off-the-grill favorites including hot dogs, hamburgers and grilled kielbasa, along with a variety of drinks to enjoy while listening to the live music. For more information and a schedule of live entertainment, visit www.theriverscasino.com.


Page 20

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 21


The Northside Chronicle

Page 22

John Canning

An icy Northside ‘Blennd’ Summertime in most Northside neighborhoods in the ’50s was filled with frequent visits to the local drugstore. Though many homes had refrigerators, most of these “ice boxes” had little room to keep anything frozen. In those years big-box pharmacy chains did not exist here on the Northside. Every neighborhood had a couple of mom and pop drug stores with a section for buying various prescriptions and over-thecounter medications. Most of the space in these stores, however, was set aside for ice cream products, sodas, cones, hand packed pints and quarts and sundaes. Some even served classic banana splits. These edible treats were the prepared at the soda fountain with its iconic Coke sign, along with soda water dispensers. Many folks walked to the drug store or grocer and therefore patronized the store closest to home. In those years my friends and I went to Ochsenhirt’s at the corner of Davis Avenue and Brighton Road. In fact we were there almost every afternoon as we, the paperboys, waited for our stack of Pittsburgh Presses and Sun-Telegraphs to be delivered at the stone WPA-built shelter in Legion Park, across the street from “Oxies,” as we called it. During those hot summer afternoons we would usually buy a glass of Lemon Blennd for a nickle. Blennd was the beverage of choice because it was kept in a gallon bottle deep in the ice cream freezer compartment. When poured into the glass– real glass glasses – it had the consistency of slush –freezing cold, super sweet, lemon-flavored slush. Within seconds after that first gulp the brain freeze began. We never learned to avoid the 2 or 3 second excruciating pain in the back of the head. In 2010, David Grinnell, a good friend, local historian, and super archivist, as well as a resident of

Observatory Hill, wrote a brief history of “Blennd” in the Allegheny City Society’s “Recorder Dispatch: Journal of Old Allegheny History and Lore.” The entire article can be found on the Society’s website -- AlleghenyCitySociety.org. It seems the secret recipe for Blennd was developed in the late 1940s by William Keagy at his drug store. The Keagy Pharmacy was located in present-day Perry Hilltop at the corner of Perrysville and Kennedy Avenues. Keagy sold his recipe to the Reymer’s candy makers in 1949. Since then Blennd and Blennd concentrate have been marketed by Reymers, Heinz, and presently Byrnes and Kiefer, all firms with Northside roots. It’s no small wonder why a tall cold glass of “Blennd” remains a summertime favorite for many Northsiders. Some of us have even found ways to dilute it with a bit more water than called for, to mix it with iced tea, or to supplement it with other stronger elixirs of choice. Regardless of how we choose to prepare it, time has taught many of us how to enjoy our Blennd without the accompanying brain freeze.

June 2012

GTECH helps restore historic Cassatt garden

Binstock said, as well as the recent clean up and planting project, her job with GTECH is to tackle the ELike many of Cassatt’s imchallenge pressionist of ongopaintings, the Northside picked this proj ing garden maintegarden was to be seen from ect out months and nance, and she hopes a distance as to install a gateway enmonths ago before some sort trance from the of sigNorth Shore to knew we d get all nage that three historic identifies communities of this beautiful the spot on the Northas both a side ­– the Cenhistorical tral Northside, help landmark Manchester -J ean B instock , and a and Allegheny GTECH gateway to West, which is the historic why GTECH Ambassador neighborrecently tarhoods. geted the spot “I picked this project out months as a viable neighborhood project. Since 2007, when the garden was and months ago, before I knew we’d be getting all of this beautiful help,” originally planted, it’s faced maintesaid Binstock. nance problems and fallen into poor condition.

From Garden, page 15

“I

I

-

,


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 23


Page 24

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012

June Northside house tours AGH Hearts in the Park walk raises heart health awareness

Photo by Laura Smith

This month is a great time for outsiders to check out the residential areas of the Northside with three neighborhoods hosting their annual house tours in June. Observatory Hill will kick off the Northside hour tour run on June 3. It will feature 10 houses and two churches with beautiful views. Tickets are $10 through May 1 and $15 on the day of the tour. Read more at observatoryhill.net. Brighton Heights will have its annual house tour the following week on June 10. In addition to Brighton Heights houses, the tour will also feature chocolate tasting as an added attraction. Tickets are $10 through May 1 and $15 on the day of the tour and can be bought at brightonheights.org. On June 15 and 16, Allegheny West will host a wine tasting house and garden tour. The tour will include a wine and hors d’oeuvres course followed by tours of six victorian homes. Tickets are $60 per guest.

Bicycle Heaven expands From Bicycle Heaven, page 9

The ninth annual Hearts in the Park Walk took place this past Saturday in Allegheny Commons Park to support healthy lifestyles, cardiovascular research and the park itself. The walk was through Allegheny Commons Park, the “heart” of Pittsburgh’s historic Northside, and proceeds benefited the Gerald McGinnis Cardiovascular Institute’s Center for Research and Innovation at Allegheny General Hospital. This research may lead to new treatments and medical devices that will help heart patients have more productive lives after surgery. A portion of the money raised also goes to the Allegheny Commons Steering Committee of the Northside Leadership Conference to support the restoration and rehabilitation efforts of Allegheny Commons. “It was very successful,” said Laura Smith, Northside Leadership Conference AGH Partnership coordinator. “There were no injuries, a lot of people showed up and everyone had a great time.” Those in attendance learned about a heart-healthy lifestyle with the Prescription for a Healthy Heart Expo, which provided education on achieving a heart-healthy lifestyle, including diet, weight control and exercise. The importance of blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol management with medications was also featured.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 25


The Northside Chronicle

Page 26

From the office of State Sen. Wayne Fontana

Budget update As I write this, the budget process is underway and the 2012-13 state budget is beginning to take shape. I have stood with my colleagues in the Senate Democratic Caucus and demanded restoration of funding in many of the state’s essential programs that saw drastic cuts in last year’s budget. We have made it clear what our priorities are and have stood up to the Administration to make it known that these deep cuts will not be tolerated. Our voices have made a difference. On May 9, the Senate passed a revised version of the state’s fiscal 2012-13 spending plan that was first introduced by the Governor in February. While not the final budget, Senate Bill 1466 (SB 1466) is a step in the right direction as it represents a positive shift in the priorities. In the weeks to come, many negotiations will take place and SB 1466 will be used as a base to shape what the final budget will look like in the end. This bill is simply a starting point that all members can work with to reach a compromise. Many of the key areas that I have demanded restoration for are addressed in SB 1466. This legislation provides $50 million for Accountability Block Grants which were zeroed out in the Governor’s proposal. These block grants are used by school districts for kindergarten and pre-school programs, as well as after school tutoring programs. SB 1466 provides $50 million for basic education and restores funding to PreK Counts Program and Head Start Supplemental Assistance at

2011-12 levels. This legislation also restores some major funding to human services programs, including hospitals and nursing homes and adds $10 million for persons with disabilities. Almost a complete restoration of funding for state institutions of higher education will take place under the revision as well as an additional $8 million was allocated for Pennsylvania Higher Education Agency Assistance (PHEAA) grants for students. As the General Assembly moves forward in the process, I will continue to fight for basic education, financial assistance through grants for students seeking higher education, job creation, as well as nonprofits that desperately need funding. I also hope the final budget agreement will address the issues raised when combining the seven human services programs into a single block grant. SB1466 now heads to the House of Representatives, where further negotiations will take place between Representatives and the Governor. I encourage you to continue to reach out to the Governor and House members about your priorities. The fight is not over and much work remains but this revised budget shows that our voices have been heard and reflects a positive shift in priorities that citizens across our state have demanded. Senator Wayne D. Fontana 42nd Senatorial District www.senatorfontana.com

June 2012


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Page 27

High school transition work

From Transition, page 1 the school. Parent communication was identified as an area where improvement was needed, which was further discussed in smaller groups after the presentation. “I can’t say whether the transition is going well or not. It’s too soon to tell,” said Maryann Dean, a Perry parent who questioned the lack of parental communication

during the meeting. “We don’t know anything as parents.” Perry Principle Nina Sacco explained that Oliver teachers who applied for vacant positions at Perry would be given preference and that there will be vacancies for the 20122012 school year. Finally, moderators noted that as of June 14, there would be no Oliver and that they would all be a part of the Perry family.


Page 28

Allegheny West Robert Keller to Edward and Rebecca Stephan at 934 W. North Ave. for $350,000. Pittsburgh Board Public Education School to Light Life Ministries Inc. at Bank St. for $1,100,000. Alexander Watson Jr. to S James Wallace at 845 N. Lincoln Ave. for $400,000. Brighton Heights Realty Choice Investments LLC to Lia Bemporad at 1619 Antrim St. for $53,000. US Bank NA trustee to ARN Properties LLC at 1548 Cooper Ave. for $51,199. Pittsburgh City to Darrel Morris at 3507 McClure Ave. for $2,900. Veterans Administration to Realty Choice Investments LLC at 3228 California Ave. for $25,000. G & S Holdings 2003 LLC to JBN Investments LLC at 3441 Fleming Ave. for $60,000. Estate of Elizabeth Lofink to Kathryn Dolores Tipton and Nathan Russell LaValla at 3607 Fleming Ave. for $140,000.

The Northside Chronicle

Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Dana Scotti at 3701 Parviss St. for $18,500. Margaret Fullerton to Federal National Mortgage Assn. at 1912 Termon Ave. for $1,602 by sheriff ’s deed. Thomas Pennington to Tony Louis Mieglitz at 3306 Brighton Road for $3,000. Joseph Ujhazy Jr. to Martin Edward Mueller Jr. at 943 Davis Ave. for $71,577. Rita Stone et al. to Sheila Brown at 1419 Orchlee St. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $38,600). Brian Priest to Daniel and Ruth Moody at 3741 Wapello St. for $64,000. Brightwood James Geiger to Federal National Mortgage Assn. at 1452 Geyer Ave. for $1,750 by sheriff ’s deed. William Vogel to Bank America NA at 2349 Atmore St. for $1,602 by sheriff ’s deed. Robert Nocine to Veterans Administration at 1211 Dickson St.

June 2012

for $3,255 by sheriff ’s deed. Edward Countryman to Richard Russell at 1529 Forsythe St. for $1,587. Estate of Ronald Ramsey to Randy Schnarrenberger at 1322 Marshall Ave. for $15,000. Fidelity Bank PASB to Realty Choice Investments LLC at 2825 Stayton St. for $7,000. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Bencho Aurora Contracting Services LLC at 2469 Toner St. for $5,000. Bencho Aurora Contracting Services LLC to Raymond Acosta at 2469 Toner St. for $5,000.

Estate of Floyd Greer Jr. to Tyler Perrine at 504 N. Taylor Ave. for $282,000. Matthew Edward Misja to Samantha Colalillo at 318 North Ave. W Unit F for $110,000. Sean Madden to Pinnacle Redevelopment Group LLC at Reddour St. for $48,000.

California-Kirkbride Byron Weaver to Janitorial Resources Inc. at 1912 Brighton Road for $50,000. Condon Brothers Co. Inc. to Janitorial Resources Inc. at Flocker Way for $25,000.

Fineview Housing & Urban Development to Terra Ferderber at 425 Catoma St. for $62,500.

Central Northside Estate of Rose Marie Peterson to Joseph Hilary Noll II at 915 Morrison St. for $9,000.

East Deutschtown Maryann Barnes to Brian and Carmella Weismantle at 820-822 Phineas St. for $23,350. William Hesidence to Chad Minton and Thomas Martin at 838 Tripoli St. for $6,000.

Historic Deutschtown Bullychild Redevelopment LLC to Alfred DePasquale at 1402 James St. for $10,000. Braden Walter to Michael Flor and Alison Hilary Domencic at 418 Pressley St. for $269,900.


June 2012

The Northside Chronicle

Richard Ashley Webb to Chad Crissman at 606 Pressley St. for $164,900. Theodore Rohm Jr. to Dunn Development L.P. at 814 Cedar Ave. for $175,000.

Mellon Trust Co. NA trustee at 1244 W. North Ave. for $1,659 by sheriff ’s deed. Kristoffer Bennett to Michael Zerega at 1007 Allegheny Ave. for $233,500.

Manchester G8 1-12 Fund LLC to Megan King at 1215 Juniata St. for $37,000. First National Bank Pennsylvania to Equity Trust Co. Cust FBO Donald Craig Tu at 1256 Decatur St. for $16,000. Manchester Housing Development LLC to Deborah Blackwell Battle at 1240 Liverpool St. for $225,000. Lauren Salvati Smith to Lonnie and Melissa Hoey at 1415 Page St. for $160,000. Manchester Housing Development LLC to Bridget Little at 1113 Sheffield St. for $100,000. Joerge Winterhoff to Adrienne John and Tyler Bergholz at 14171419 Page St. for $215,000. Owen Brown to Gretchen Morgenstern and Paul Carlson at 1003 Sheffield St. for $155,900. Alicia Roebuck to Bank New York

Perry Hilltop Linda Shorey to Robert Main at 709 Chautauqua Court for $11,750. Richard Minsterman to Shoebox Homes LLC at 300 Langley Ave. for $25,920. Vincent Graziani to Richard Lewis at 863 Marshall Ave. for $101,500. Deborah Harry Cumpston to Anthony Garland and Michael Myrick Jr. at 2345 Osgood St. for $8,400. Mary Gallagher to Open Door Inc. at 2949 N. Charles St. for $280,000. George Pefanis to John Gibson at 240 Seabright St. for $60,000. Irene Tower to Melissa Brozeski and Christopher Lucci at 248 Seabright St. for $77,500. Spring Garden Jennifer Hulboy to Kathleen Sweeney and Gary Striker at 1842

Spring Garden Ave. for $2,000. Metal Foundations Acquisition LLC to NSP Assoc. LLC at 2200 Spring Garden Ave. for $150,000. Spring Hill Realty Choice Investments LLC to Dina Morris at 2149 Harbor St. for $49,000. Steven Hnatow to Jeffrey Woynar at 827 Vista St. for $5,000. Summer Hill Richard Ford to Frank O’Leary at 4226 Evergreen Road for $1,600. Lawrence Guzel Jr. to Taylor Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp. at 4172 Evergreen Road for $1,761 by sheriff ’s deed. Troy Hill Theresa Warnaby to Rodger and Saundra Neurohr at 2015 Veronica St. for $32,000. Samir Kherat to Paragon Relocation Services Inc. at 31 Waterfront Drive for $310,500. Paragon Relocation Services Inc. to Ryan Brown at 31 Waterfront Drive for $285,000. James Schutzman to Daniel and

Page 29

Lorna Beth Albanese at 2107 Straubs Lane for $12,500. James Hopton et al. to Carol Rigdon at 37 Waterfront Drive for $375,000. Livnate LLC to Chibueze Okorie at 1145 Goettman St. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $51,363). George Yakopcic to Weichert Relocation Resources Inc. at 46 Waterfront Drive for $368,000. Weichert Relocation Resources Inc. to George Garrison and Judith Focareta at 46 Waterfront Drive for $368,000. Ben Roethlisberger to Chad Grahovac at 7 Waterside Place for $360,500. Joseph Pelle to Sungkyu Jung and Seo Young Park at 18 Waterfront Drive for $375,500. Joseph Benkovitz to Robert and Phyllis Johnson at 74 Waterfront Drive for $500,000. Real Estate Transactions provided by <RealSTATs>. Contact <RealSTATs> at 412-381-3880 or visit www.RealSTATs.net.


Page 30

The Northside Chronicle

June 2012


The Northside Chronicle

June 2012

Page 31

Sudoku

The Game Page

Hard

Hard

Last Month’s Puzzle Solutions 6

5

8

9

7

zzle #1 for September 22, 2010 4 8 3 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

L A D L E S 14 7 I C E A G E 17

15

O T

27

J O

38

43

E T A

49

L3 A

54

29

34 1 Y S

33

T A 44

50

P S

51

55

35

39

P P

P A

30

M O

L

C U

I

16

E

45

A

R L 1 56

64

A M O R E T T A

V

E N

E

70

e

68

65

T O

57

40

53

58

7 A U N 5T

R O

S N

I

71

2 3 Down

6 5 1. Supple 2. Companion 4 9 of Aeneas 8 3 3. Traders 4. Wash 5 7 1 2 5. Discharge

6. Simmons rival 7. Trojan War 6 1 hero 2 9 8. Piece of work 9. Atmosphere 9 4 5 6 10. Hit back, perhaps 11. Worn 12.7Cure-all 8 3 1 13. Without affect 19. Specks 1 5 7 4 21. Direct a gun 25. Hoist 2 Athens 4 8 26.3A, as in 28. Back muscle, briefly 30.8Bendable 6 twig, 9 usually 7 of a willow tree 33. Mouth, slangily

l use only. Not for publication.

66

P

59

C H

I

C A

L

R E L

E N

T

A

P

E C

E

N

E E D

69 www.sudoku-puzzles.net

D U

72

I

34. Room 8 36. ___ 4 Rosenkavalier 9 1 39. In addition to Peeples 1 40. Actress 7 6 5 41. Lift up 42. London cabbie 9 43. Find 6 acceptable 3 4

46. Prosper 4 47. Improve 8 5 7 48. Pompous 50. Fly 7 52. Chat 3 room8 chuckle 2 55. Snow conveyances 2 57. Aired 5 again 4 6 58. Classy pancake 61. Poultry enclosure 3 9 2 8 62. Netman Nastase 64. Large cask 6 65. Part 1 of TNT 7 9

5

E

E N 8 46 47 48 R I S E S

E X P O S E S O R C 65 1 8 9 2 1 62 V I R A L C L E R I

63

L

S E E S 36 4 37 9 P D D A S

T H 52

19

60

67

13

31

L

S F I

E

12

W P A T

E S S A 42

11

R

R

28

I

10

E A

32

41

9

J A

V 2E R A B 8R A D A N 21 22 E S T A X C O R A 24 25 26 5T A I E L A T8 T I C

M E R L

2

2

8

18

S6 H A 20 S A L 23

A

2

www.sudoku-puzzles.net

1

3

E D 7 2 8 3 1

7 3

First published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku caught on in Japan in 1986, and became internationally famous in 2005.

3

9

6

2

1

8

3

6

The aim of Sudoku is to enter a number from 1 through 9 in each space on a 9×9 grid made up of 3×3 subgrids (called “regions”). Some of the numbers have already been given. You may not use the same number twice in a single row, column, or region of the grid. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability.

2

1

4

5 5

9 6

1

9 6

8

7

3

4

5

5

6

6

9

4

4

www.sudoku-puzzles.net BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #2 for September 22, 2010

Crossword puzzles provided by www. bestcrosswords.com / Used with permission.

Across

Chronicle Crossword 1. Gulf War missile 5. Medicinal ointment Across 10. Elderly, matured 1- Gulf War missile; 5- Medicinal ointment; 10- Elderly, matured; 14- Bang-up; 14.18Bang-up 15- AKA; 16- Commotion; 17- Take ___ from me; Shouts; 19- Small combo; 20- Put a new price on; 22- Sycophant; 24- Sturdy 15.wool AKAfiber; 27- Match up; 28Capital of Connecticut; 32- In front; 36- Actress Merkel; 37- Navy, e.g.; 39- Old 16. Commotion finnish money; 40- Fragments; 42- Crusoe’s creator; 44- Puts on; 45- Run in the from me wash; 47- Earth; 49- Director Jean-___ Godard;17. 50-Take Kind of___ question; 51- Venomous snake; 53- Toll rds.; 56- Golfer Aoki; 57- Lack sternness; 61- Pertaining to 18.ofShouts a sovereign; 65- Dies ___; 66- Mountain nymph;19. 69-Small Karatecombo school; 70- Indication; 71- Like some eyes; 72- Mild oath; 73- Annoyance; 74- Have a feeling about; 7520. Put a new price on Challenge; 22. Sycophant Down 24. Sturdy wool fiber 1- River to the Moselle; 2- Pigeon coop; 3- Single entity; 4- Leave; 5- Express; Match up10- Connected; 6- Bass, e.g.; 7- Bell-shaped flower; 8- Valleys; 9-27. Composition; 11- Bloody; 12- Actress McClurg; 13- Entrance;28. 21-Capital Iron hook a handle; ofwith Connecticut 23- Break, card game; 25- Yellow metallic element; 26Welcome; 28Husband; 32. In front 29- Old-womanish; 30- Gives a 9.8, say; 31- Postpone; 33- ___ Gay; 34- Invali36. 41Actress Merkel date; 35- Flat circular plates; 38- Japanese gateway; Conscious; 43- Sea eagles; 46- Narcotic; 48- Culture medium; 52- Like a parka; 54- Door handles; 55- Rocky 37. Navy, e.g. debris; 57- Speech issue; 58- Ashtabula’s lake; 5960- Bring forth young; 39.Badgers; Old finnish money 62- Indian exercise method; 63- Cracked; 64- Veinlike deposit; 67- Commercials; 40. Fragments 68- Coloring material; 42. Crusoe's creator 44. Puts on

1

2

3

4

5

14 17 20

36 40 45

4

2

1

7

5

3

6 29

18

21

8

8

6

7

2

4

7

42

94 6

10

9

1 58

59

3

53

5

54

4

4

26

7

2

2

3 11

5

2

747

3

455 6

5

8

6

71 74

12

13

6

23

6

3

2

1

8

27

6

3 38

9

32 39

43

1

48

4 1

3 37 3 4

44

3

4

49

8

355

5

6

9

2

52 56

60

8

66

1

11

91 9

51

65

73

9

5

22

9

37

41

8

25

3 09

3

70

8

16

50

57

7

15

24 28

6

8 7

67

7 61

62

5

68

2

63

64

1

69

3

5

4

67 2

1

9

2

3

75

8

9

4

7



2012 June