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Town of Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek

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Comprehensive Plan 2017

Prepared by

The New River Valley Regional Commission for

The Town of Rich Creek


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Town of Rich Creek Comprehensive Plan 2017

Adopted by the

Rich Creek Planning Commission

Date Adopted by the

Rich Creek Town Council Date


Why a Comprehensive Plan? The Comprehensive Plan is a fundamental tool for a locality to guide and nurture growth. It is a plan that takes into account the relative conditions of a locality’s social and economic infrastructure, demographic trends and issues, and natural features. The Comprehensive Plan is an essential tool for citizens to exercise their rights as members of an incorporated municipality to determine its future direction through participation in the planning process. The function of a Comprehensive Plan is not to bind the Town to one course of action, but rather to ensure that the long term effects of individual decisions are considered with respect to the overall development of the Town. Once a plan is adopted by the local governing body, a comprehensive plan has the following legal status: “... it shall control the general or approximate location, character, and extent of each feature shown on the plan. Thereafter no ...(improvement) whether publicly or privately owned shall be established, constructed, or authorized, unless and until...submitted to an approved by the local commission as being substantially in accord with the adopted comprehensive plan or part thereof.”

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-Code of Virginia, §15.2-2232. Legal status of plan, part A Although this plan is legally valid for the Town of Rich Creek, services such as sewer and water which are provided to unincorporated areas outside the corporate limits of the Town make it necessary that the unincorporated, adjacent areas of Giles County are considered in the development of this plan. This plan was developed by the New River Valley Regional Commission and the Town of Rich Creek Planning Commission. Representatives included: Rich Creek Planning Commission Paul Morrison-Chair Joseph Moore Carl Hazelwood Jimmy J. McCrosky McCreery Mann

New River Valley Regional Commission Kevin Byrd-Executive Director Elijah Sharp Zach Swick Michael Gottfredson

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Rich Creek Town Council William Kantsios-Mayor Alice Huffman Mark Clemons Stuart Helm-Vice Mayor Dorsey Bradley Darlene French


Table of Contents Background Data .................................................................................................................. 1 Structure ..................................................................................................... 1

Location and History .................................................................................. 2

Natural Features ......................................................................................... 5

Demographics and Economy ..................................................................... 13

Community Services .................................................................................. 20 Government Structure ............................................................................... 25

Transportation Plan .............................................................................................................. 27 Roads and Streets ....................................................................................... 27 Projects ....................................................................................................... 28 Land Use Plan ....................................................................................................................... 31 Goals and Objectives .................................................................................. 32 Zoning ......................................................................................................... 38

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Future Land Use .........................................................................................

Capital Improvements Plan ....................................................................... 44 Official Map ................................................................................................. 44

40 Implementation .................................................................................................................... 43 Zoning and Subdivision Ordinances ......................................................... 43

Priority Town Policies and Plans ...............................................................

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44 Appendix ............................................................................................................................... 47

List of Tables

Table 1

Soil Symbols, Names, Drainage, and Major Use........................................ 6

Table 2

Population Change for Rich Creek, Pearisburg, and Giles County, 1950 - 2014 .................................................................................................. 13

Table 3

Percent of Population Change of Rich Creek, Pearisburg, and Giles County, 1950 - 2010 ........................................................................... 14 Age Distribution of Rich Creek, 1990 - 2014 ............................................. 14

Table 4 Table 6

Age Distribution by Age Range for Rich Creek, 1990 - 2014 ...................... 15 Housing Data for Rich Creek, 1980 - 2014 ................................................. 15

Table 7

Employment by Industry in Rich Creek ..................................................... 17

Table 5


List of Maps Giles County, Virginia .................................................................................

2

Map 2

Current Map of the Town of Rich Creek, Virginia ......................................

3

Map 3

Geologic Provinces near Rich Creek .......................................................... 5

Map 4

Soils ............................................................................................................

7

Map 5

Floodplain ..................................................................................................

9

Map 6

Topography ................................................................................................

11

Map 7

Slope ........................................................................................................... 12

Map 8

Water Lines in Rich Creek ..........................................................................

Map 9

Sewer Lines in Rich Creek .......................................................................... 20

Map 10

Community Facilities in Rich Creek ..........................................................

22

Map 11

Transportation Plan Map for Rich Creek ...................................................

27

Map 12

Road Hierarchy in Rich Creek ....................................................................

28

Map 13

Zoning Map of Rich Creek ..........................................................................

37

Map 14

Future Land-use Map for Rich Creek .........................................................

39

Map 15

Map of Rich Creek ......................................................................................

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Map 1

19

List of Figures

Figure 2 Figure 3

Illustration of Soils as a Percentage of Land ............................................. 6

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Figure 1

Average Monthly Temperature for Rich Creek, 1981 - 2010 .....................

8

Annual Average Precipitation of Rich Creek, 1920 - 2005 ......................... 10 Topology Profile of Rich Creek, Viewed from the South ..........................

10

Figure 5

Population of Rich Creek, 1950 - 2010 ......................................................

13

Figure 6

Retail Sales, 2016 .......................................................................................

17

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Figure 4


Background Data

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The Comprehensive Plan Structure

Providing for the present while planning for the future are important endeavors for any community. The comprehensive plan serves as a framework by which a locality can identify its needs and rationally allocate its resources to meet those needs.

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The comprehensive plan incorporates several documents into one general plan. First, it contains background information about the community; secondly, it identifies goals about where the community envisions itself in the future and how, through certain objectives, or strategies, it will arrive at those goals; and thirdly, it implements those elements through the Future Land Use Guide, physically identifying future land use plans based on natural and man-made constraints and other considerations.

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The plan may include, but need not be limited to: (1) designating areas for various types of public and private development; (2) designating a comprehensive system of transportation facilities; (3) delineating a system of community service facilities; (4) promoting affordable housing; and (5) designating areas for renovation and other special community programs. The Rich Creek Comprehensive Plan guides the Town Council, the Planning Commission, and any other official bodies of the Town in making decisions affecting the long-term growth and development of the Town. Whenever decisions regarding zoning, new development, water or sewer expansion, or other factors arise, reference to the comprehensive plan should be made as part of the deliberative process.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

GOALS & STRATEGIES

IMPLEMENTATION

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

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Location and History Rich Creek is located in the north central portion of Giles County at the intersection of U.S. Route 460 and U.S. Route 219, along the banks of the New River and Rich Creek. The Town lies in Rich Creek Valley and on the slopes of Wylie and Powell Mountains. The Town lies almost at the junction between the folds of the Valley & Ridge Province and the horizontal rock strata of the Appalachian Plateau. The Town has an incorporated area of 524 acres (.82 square miles) and much of the Town’s area consists of fairly steep slopes. Rich Creek serves as an access point to Route 460 for West Virginians using Route 219. Map 1 illustrates the Town’s location within Giles County, and Map 2 (opposite page) illustrates a current map of the Town. The Rich Creek area was first settled by Daniel Shumate in 1780. The importance of the Rich Creek Valley as a gateway to Monroe County, West Virginia, lead to the Town’s development as from a rail head of the Virginian Railway. Notable events in Rich Creek’s history include the first electric service in 1928; the construction of the highway to Glen Lyn in 1932; the construction of Celco in 1940; and the incorporation of the Town in 1946-47.

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Other Rich Creek milestones include the opening of Elmac in 1974; the opening of Commonwealth Bolt; and construction of the health center in 1978. Another important event occurred in 1978 when Rich Creek was chosen by the Institute of Cultural Affairs for its Town meeting program.

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Map 1: Giles County, Virginia

Glen Lyn

Rich Creek

Pembroke Narrows

Pearisburg

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0

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5

10 miles


Map 2: Current Map of the Town of Rich Creek, Virginia

Town of Rich Creek Current

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1,600 Feet

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Town Boundary

Rail

Buildings

Parcels

Primary Roads

Streams

Secondary Roads

Spring Hollow Rd

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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The Town’s heritage is most clearly seen in the old brick warehouses and store fronts in the Central Business District. Despite being bypassed with the construction of U.S. 460, the downtown area continues to prosper from commercial and passenger traffic on Routes 219 and 460.

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The mid-twentieth century character of the Central Business District has been recognized as a valuable resource, and efforts to preserve the structures were made through the Town’s zoning ordinance. Further efforts to acknowledge the Town’s regional significance could include a historic marker commemorating the first settlement of the area.

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Natural Features Map 3: Geologic Provinces near Rich Creek

Appalachian Plateau Rich Creek

Giles County

Valley and Ridge

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Geology The Town of Rich Creek lies at the very edge of the Appalachian Plateau. The primary difference between the Plateau and the Ridge and Valley Provinces (to the east) is the Ridge and Valley Province rocks are inclined at an angle to the surface of the land because of intense folding and faulting. In the Appalachian Plateau, rocks are nearly parallel to the surface of the land. The bedrock in the Rich Creek area primarily consists of sandstone and shale of the Hinton formation, which date from the Mississippian period of geologic history. The southern part of Town is underlain by limestone, which are also of Mississippian age.

Source: ArcGIS Online Giles County contains an active seismic zone. At least two relatively large earthquakes have occurred in the area since records have been kept. The first, in the 1890’s, resulted in some damage to property. The second occurred in 1969 and also resulted in some damage to property.

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The sandstones in the area are strong rocks, and areas of shale outcrop are more likely to have soils with characteristics making development difficult. The possibility of earthquakes points to the need for careful geologic and soil investigations prior to the construction of large buildings.

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Soils Three major soil associations are found in the Rich Creek area: soils on steep slopes; soils in flood plains; and soils capable of supporting low intensity development. The soils on steep slopes are generally unsuitable for development. The flood plain soils are quite good, but are subject to periodic flooding. Further development on these soils should be limited to thoroughly flood-proofed and elevated structures. The remaining soils are generally capable of supporting light urban development, but they often have severe limitations with respect to septic fields and wells. Runoff from these soils tends to have a high rapidity rate accompanied with a high erosion hazard. The poor quality of soils for septic fields and the difficulty of obtaining potable water point indicate a need for maintaining public water and sewerage systems, and extending the services whenever possible. The increased potential for erosion underscores the need for careful enforcement of the soil erosion control ordinance.

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Map 4 illustrates the different types of soils within the Town. Figure 1 shows what these soils are, and illustration of the area they cover within the Town. Each one of these types of soil have different values when evaluating development of buildings, agriculture, or other uses. The Appendix includes other maps illustrating areas suitable for buildings, prime farmland, and road suitability, all based on the types of soil in the area. Figure 1: Illustration of Soils as a Percentage of Land

10B

4B

17F

4C 30F

30D

10C

17D

7

Table 1: Soil Symbols, Names, Drainage, and Major Use Symbol

Soil Unit Name

Drainage

Major Uses

1B 1C

Allegheny loam

Well

Crops and pasture.

2F 2D

Berks channery silt loam

Well

Woodland, crops, and pasture.

Braddock sandy loam

Well

Forested, crops and pasture.

Carbo silty clay loam, very rocky

Well

Forested, crops and pasture.

Chagrin silt loam

Well

Woodland,pasture, and some crops.

4B 4C 4D 5D 5C 7 10B 10C

Cotaco loam

Moderate

12

Fluvaquents

Poor

Flood plain.

17C 17D 17F

Gilpin silt loam

Well

Woodland, crops, and pasture.

30C 30D 30F

Nolichucky very stony sandy loam

Well

Crops and pasture.

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12

Crops and pasture.

5D

17C

2D 1C

5C 30C

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1B

D

2F

4D


Map 4: Soils

Town of Rich Creek Soils

30D 17F 12

10C

£ ¤

17F

460

£ ¤ 219

17C 30F

1B 17F 1B

30C 30F

4C

17D

17F 17F

7

10C

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17F

10B

10B

1C

4B

1B

Ne

4B

4D

Ri ve r

4C

2F

2D 5D 5C 4B

4C

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10C

4D

4D 12 4C

¯

0

400

800

1,600 Feet

£ ¤ 460

SSURGO Map Unit

Secondary Roads

See table

Rail

Town Boundary

Streams

Buildings Primary Roads

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Esri; U.S. Department of Agriculture; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Hydrology The Town of Rich Creek lies in the New River drainage basin with all streams emptying very quickly into the New River. Much of the lower portion of the Town is potentially subject to flooding as shown in Map 5, which delineates both the 100 year and the 500 year flood plain. The potential for flooding underscores the need to maintain a strong flood plain ordinance, and to insure that buildings at risk are effectively flood-proofed. The flood plain map displayed in this plan serves only as a representation of the actual flood plain. To make an official determination, Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) shall be utilized.

49° F

69° F

56° F

42° F

Spr ing

Summe r

F a ll

W in te r

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Climate Rich Creek generally has a warm summer, and a mild winter in comparison to other areas in Giles County. This is due to its relatively low elevation, which on average is 1,652 feet. The Town is also subject to periodic atmospheric inversions which tend to trap air close to the earth’s surface. The tendencies for inversions make the Rich Creek area most suitable for light industries which do not contribute significant emissions to the atmosphere.

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Figure 2 shows the average monthly temperature of Rich Creek. The average temperature for Rich Creek is 54 degrees Fahrenheit. This is similar to the national average of 55 degrees, but lower than the Virginia average of 58 degrees.

Temperature (F °)

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Figure 2: Average Monthly Temperature for Rich Creek, 1981-2010

Time (months) Source: NOAA Climate Normals Monthly, 1981-2010

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Map 5: Floodplain

Town of Rich Creek Floodplain

£ ¤ 460

£ ¤

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219

¯

0

400

800

1,600 Feet

£ ¤ 460

Town Boundary

Streams

Buildings

Floodway

Roads

100 Year Floodplain

Rail

500 Year Floodplain

Parcels

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Federal Emergency Management Agency; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Precipitation (inches)

Figure 3: Annual Average Precipitation of Rich Creek, 1920 - 2005

Time (years)

Source: NOAA Global Summary of the Year, 1916-2005

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Figure 3 shows annual average precipitation in Rich Creek from 1920 to 2005. This data infers an average 2 percent less precipitation every year since 1920. This follows regional trends, which also show the Appalachian region becoming more dry. Less precipitation over time will affect soil chemistry and stability and result in drier forests during the summer and fall months.

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Topography The majority of Rich Creek covers very steep land. Map 6 is a topographic map of the Town, and Map 7 is shows the slope of the land within the corporate limits and immediately surrounding areas. Much of the land with moderate or low slopes (20 percent or under) is already developed. Development on slopes greater than 25 percent makes maintenance of streets and public services difficult. Steep slopes are also generally more susceptible to geologic hazards. Steep slopes should be avoided for all but the lightest intensity of development, provided the conditions are appropriate.

Figure 4: Topology Profile of Rich Creek, Viewed from the South

2250’

Town of Rich Creek

2000’ 1750’

New River

1500’ Source: NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission 2015, via Google Earth

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Map 6: Topography 2100

Town of 00 Rich Creek 21 Topography

2000 0 18

0

0 190 0 17

£ ¤ 460

0

1800

£ ¤ 219

0 15

0 160

0

0 0 17

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0

1600

0 15

0 16

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1800

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2000

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2100

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17 0

1800

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400

800

1600

1,600 Feet 0 200

£ ¤ 460

2100

100 ft. Contour

Secondary Roads

25 ft. Contour

Rail

Town Boundary

Parcels

Buildings

Streams

Primary Roads

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Map 7: Slope

Town of Rich Creek Slope

£ ¤ 460

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219

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0

400

800

£ ¤ 460

Slope

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1,600 Feet

Town Boundary

Parcels

0% - 15%

Buildings

Streams

16% - 25%

Primary Roads

26% - 30%

Secondary Roads

>30%

Rail

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.


Demographics and Economy Population Rich Creek’s population has increased by 5 percent from 1950 to 2010. The Town’s shifting population is similar to Giles County’s increasing population base through 2010. Table 2 compares Rich Creek’s population with Giles County’s and Pearisburg’s population shifts over the past seven decades. 2014 estimates are also included in Table 2 for illustrative purposes. Figure 5 illustrates the population change of Rich Creek from 1950 to 2010. Table 2: Population Change for Rich Creek, Pearisburg and Giles County, 1950 - 2014 Rich Creek

Pearisburg

Giles County

1950

740

2,005

18,956

1960

748

2,268

17,219

1970

729

2,169

16,741

1980

746

2,128

17,810

1990

670

2,064

16,366

2000 2010 2014

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Year

665

2,729

16,657

774

2,786

17,286

716*

2,750*

17,179**

Source: U.S. Decennial Census; *2014 ACS 5-Year Population Estimates; **2014 Weldon Cooper Center estimates

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Figure 5: Population of Rich Creek, 1950 - 2010

Source: U.S. Decennial Census

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Table 3 illustrates the percent change in population between the decades for the Town of Rich Creek, Pearisburg, and Giles County. Rich Creek has had an average population increase every decade of 0.5% since 1950, while Pearisburg has had an average increase of 5%, and Giles County has had an average decrease of -2% over the same time period. However, population projections for Giles County from 2010-2040 shows population increases of over 8% (Weldon-Cooper Center, 2012). The Weldon-Cooper Center estimates Giles County’s population will increase more than 8% by 2040. Table 3: Percent of Population Change of Rich Creek, Pearisburg, and Giles County, 1950 - 2010 Year

Rich Creek

Pearisburg

Giles County

1950-1960

1%

13%

-9%

1960-1970

-3%

-4%

-1%

1970-1980

2%

-2%

6%

1980-1990

-10%

-3%

-8%

1990-2000

-1%

32%

2%

2000-2010

17%

2%

4%

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Source: U.S. Decennial Census

Table 4 shows population growth among the different age brackets within Rich Creek This suggests the elderly population of the Town are expected to continue to grow during the next twenty years. Further, the largest declines in population are found between the ages of 10 and 29. The younger population shift is likely a result of the school closing and families relocating. The young adult population shift can be attributable to employment opportunities in neighboring communities. Table 4: Age Distribution of Rich Creek, 1990 - 2014 1990

31

5 to 9 10 to 14

2010

2014*

27

41

55

31

34

47

16

45

31

38

34

30

45

50

20 to 24

46

51

27

46

22

25 to 29

56

42

30

5

D

15 to 19

2000

R

Age

Under 5

30 to 34

42

32

34

24

35 to 39

48

34

38

37

40 to 44

47

47

37

46

45 to 49

49

45

46

42

50 to 54

41

53

53

50

55 to 59

37

48

46

64

60 to 64

44

35

42

55

65+

102

180

231

251

Total

670

665

774

751

Source: U.S. Decennial Census; *2014 ACS 5-Year Population Estimates

Table 5 (next page) indicates a large part of the population of Rich Creek are ages 18 to 64. These people indicate a productive population who are in the workforce. The large number of older adults, however, point to an increasing number of senior citizens and the fact that significant numbers of the Town’s citizens will subside on fixed incomes in the future. Page 14


Table 5: Age Distribution by Age Range for Rich Creek, 1990 - 2014 Age

1990 #

2000 %

#

2010 %

#

2014 %

#

%

Under 5

31

5%

27

4%

41

5%

55

7%

5 to 19

127

19%

95

14%

130

17%

100

13%

20 to 64

410

61%

363

55%

372

48%

345

46%

65+

102

15%

180

27%

231

30%

251

33%

Total

670

100%

665

100%

774

100%

751

100%

Source: U.S. Decennial Census; *2014 ACS 5-Year Population Estimates

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Housing From 1980 to 2014, the total number of housing units increased over 20 percent over 34 years. The most significant increase occurred between 1980 and 1990 with a total of 35 new units. From 1990 to 2000 only 5 units were added, and an estimated 10 units added from 2010 to 2014. While the total number of housing units increased, the number of persons per household decreased from 2.76 in 1980 to 2.28 in 2014. This decrease is also evident in Giles County and, the New River Valley. The median value of housing in Rich Creek increased by 37% every decade since 1980, or an average, unadjusted value of $20,025.00. The number of owner occupied housing units is currently the same as it was in 1980, at 196 units. Renter occupied housing units increased by 3 units since 1980, or by 7 percent. The volume of vacant housing units increased by 11 units since 1980. Table 6 contains housing data for Rich Creek. Table 6: Housing Data for Rich Creek, 1980 - 2014 1980

Median Value Owner Occupied Vacant

2010

2014*

279

314

319

326

336

2.23

2.19

2.28

2.28

$33,100.00

$50,300.00

$63,000.00

$98,400.00

$113,200.00

196

182

190

172

196

74

97

92

116

87

9

33

37

38

53

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Renter Occupied

2000

2.76

R

Total Housing Units Person Per Household

1990

Source: Decennial Census; *2014 ACS 5-Year Population Estimates

$98k

172

116

38

Median Value

Own e r Occupie d U n its

R e n te r O c c u p ie d U n its

Va c a n t U n its Source: 2010 Decennial Census

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Photo credit: Alisa Moody

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Economy: Industrial Structure Rich Creek was the site of Giles County’s first economic development efforts. With the help of the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Economic Development Administration and the New River Valley Planning District Commission, the County developed an industrial park in the northern part of Rich Creek. This land is now occupied by Jenmar and United Hydraulics.

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Jenmar provides products to the coal mining industry and is subject to the economic forces which affect the mining industry. United Hydraulics repairs hydraulic cylinders along with electric motors. This company located in Rich Creek after the 1999 Comprehensive Plan Update. Over the years, the local economy has been buffered by the stable employment provided through Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Celco) in Narrows, and American Electric Power’s (AEP) Glen Lyn plant. However, due to the AEP Glen Lyn plant closing in May 2015, and due to other changing economies, continuing efforts must be made toward seeking new industries while encouraging the expansion of existing industries to further diversify the economy.

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While some vacant commercial and industrial buildings could be converted into small industrial structures, additional tracts of land for industrial development are not available in the Town due to the steep slopes and poor soil conditions. Fortunately, developable tracts for potential industrial sites are located in the Midway community. The Town’s desire to renovate a wing of the old school building can serve as an economic development stimulus depending on the future use. This will be a major project for the Town in the coming years. A planning grant application should be submitted to the Department of Housing and Community Development to assist in determining the highest and best future use for the facility. Following a successful planning grant process the Town should submit a request for construction funds to assist in implementing the project. Economy: Employment 2010 figures for employment by industry for Rich Creek show the major industries supporting employment for Town residents is Manufacturing and Education, Health and Social Services, both employing 22 and 23 percent of the participating workforce respectively. Table 7 (next page) compares employment by industry in Rich Creek.

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Table 7: Employment by Industry in Rich Creek Occupation

1990

2000

2010

2014

9

2

0

5

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting, and Mining Construction

22

18

6

9

Manufacturing

108

70

48

26

Wholesale Trade

2

6

9

4

Retail Trade

39

29

22

26

Transportation and Warehousing, and Utilities

29

15

11

22

Information

0

0

0

1

Finance, Insurance, Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

12

10

0

3

Professional, Scientific, Management, Administrative, and Waste Management Services

20

13

32

13

Educational, Health and Social Services

65

70

52

73

Arts, Entertainment, Recreation, Accommodation and Food Services

7

12

40

18

0

6

3

13

10

16

0

10

Total

323

267

223

223

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Other Services Public Administration

Source: Decennial Census; *2014 ACS 5-Year Population Estimates

Economy: Commercial Environment The Town began as a rail access for Monroe County, West Virginia and continues to function as a gateway to southeastern West Virginia. Figure 6 shows retail sales for 2016. Sales have grown steadily emphasizing that Rich Creek continues to intercept traffic on U.S. 460 and 219.

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Some buildings in the downtown section are beginning to show their age, and some empty storefronts can be found. In spite of this, the number of establishments in Rich Creek has grown during the past few years revealing a strong basic economy. The continued revitalization of these buildings should be encouraged. There are, however, few attractive parcels available for new commercial development in the Town. There are also opportunities for the renovation or adaptive reuse of several old downtown buildings. Providing residential living space above retail uses on the ground floor will help provide a “ready market� for downtown businesses and should be encouraged. Figure 6: Retail Sales, 2016 Automotive Dealers Gasoline Stations Grocery Stores Other General Merchandise Stores Health, Personal Care Stores

$34m

Eating Places Jewelry, Luggage, Leather Goods Stores Electronics, Appliance Stores Furniture Stores Building Material, Supplies Dealers Automotive Parts, Accessories, Tire Stores Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers Used Merchandise Stores Source: JobsEQ 2016 Demographic Report: Rich Creek, VA.

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Community Services Water and Sewage Service As of 2014, the Town of Rich Creek provides municipal water service to approximately 268 customers in-town and 145 customers out of the Rich Creek corporate limits. Water is supplied to the Town by the Giles County Public Service Authority (PSA). The PSA operates a well system and is currently investigating creating a back-up stream source on the New River. All water supplies are treated in accordance with state regulations. The Town’s water infrastructure is shown in Map 8. In 1988, the Town replaced the Midway system and drilled two new wells. Although the initial yields from the wells were encouraging, the yields dropped and forced the Town to make improvements to its water system. The Town provides water service for many of the residences and businesses in the Midway area.

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The Town operates a sewerage treatment plant, which provides primary treatment for waste water for approximately 262 in-town customers and 128 out-of-town customers. A secondary sewage treatment plant was constructed in the mid 1990’s to replace the primary system. The Midway sewer project, which was co-sponsored by the Town and the County, provides wastewater collection for the Midway area. The wastewater is processed by the Town’s treatment plant. The Town’s wastewater infrastructure is shown on Map 9 (page 20). The Town provides sewer service for many of the residences and businesses in the Midway area. The poor percolation quality of soils in the area make sewer service a prerequisite for further development both in and outside of the corporate limits.

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Rich Creek entered into an agreement with the Town of Glen Lyn, Virginia, to obtain a low interest United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) – Rural Development loan to construct a jointly owned and operated wastewater treatment facility in 2012. The new plant went in service April, 3, 2013. Its design capacity is 200,000 gallons per day and currently averages treating approximately 90,000 gallons per day. As part of the same project, a new pump station was built to serve the Midway area.

Police Protection The Town employs one policeman with a completely equipped patrol car and back up. The officer works on a random schedule to assure that set schedules do not betray his effectiveness. The officer is dispatched by the Giles County Sheriff’s Department and is frequently dispatched to areas outside the Town limits. The Town provides substantial law enforcement response services to the Midway area. The Sheriff also provides backup to the officer and provides law enforcement services when the Town officer is off-duty. Further support comes from the Town of Glen Lyn whereas their police officer is sworn-in to serve Rich Creek and the Rich Creek officer reciprocates service for Glen Lyn. Conditions do not seem to warrant more extensive police protection at the current time.

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Map 8: Water Lines in Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Water Lines

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Primary Roads Secondary Roads

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Giles County; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Map 9: Sewer Lines in Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Sewer Lines

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Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sewer line locations are approximate. Sources: Giles County; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.


Fire Protection and Emergency Medical Service The Town’s volunteer fire department normally provides service to the Town and to the county one mile beyond the corporate limits. The fire fighting force is housed in the Fire Department and Town Shop property located on Federal Street. The department acquired a new pump truck in November of 2007, and they also have a tanker, and an equipment truck. All vehicles are radio equipped and dispatched by the Sheriff’s Department. Emergency medical services are provided by the County ambulance service located in Pearisburg.

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A potential future project for the Fire Department includes relocating to the Community Center property adjacent to Town Hall. The space previously occupied by the Fire Department would be utilized by expanding the Town Shop in its current location.

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Library Service In 1991, the Town established a library in the new community center, run entirely by volunteers. In 1998, the Town added a part-time employee to work in the library and in the Town office. This gives the library more open time in combination with volunteer support and Town leaders would like for the practice to continue. The Town’s library is the only one in the area and serves numerous Giles County residents living outside town limits. To enhance library services, the Town should work to provide internet access to citizens. In an effort to provide this as a cost-effective service, the Town should contact surrounding institutions such as New River Community College, Radford University, and Virginia Tech for computer equipment donations. These community contacts may also provide technical assistance in establishing the service in the library.

Recreation The Town of Rich Creek’s recreation activities primarily consist of maintaining facilities for residents. The Town currently has three recreational sites: 1) Rich Creek Community Center, which has a baseball field, gym, and a mini-park is currently being considered for the site; 2) Woodland Park offers a picnic shelter, basketball court, tennis court, and a children’s playground; and 3) Gentry’s Landing, which is operated by the Rich Creek Lion’s Club, provides camp sites for recreational vehicles, tents, etc. These facilities are used by both Town and Giles County residents.

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Map 10: Community Facilities in Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Facilities Rich Creek Community Center

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£ ¤ 219

Sunrise Memorial Gardens Heritage Hall Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

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Woodland Park

U.S. Post Office

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Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.


Refuse Collection All of the solid waste is handled by the Giles County Public Service Authority. Collection services to all areas of town are conducted once per week with more frequent pickups to high use commercial customers. The Town offers a collection of lawn debris once annually and should strive to add a second collection period. Further, the Town can reduce the cost of this added service by making public work staff available to assist the Giles County PSA with the debris collection.

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Health Services Rich Creek has two resident doctors and one clinic, which is visited regularly by specialists. Major medical problems are treated at Carilion Hospital in Pearisburg, or other area hospitals. Rich Creek is served by the Riverview Nursing Home, which has been in operation for approximately 20 years at its present location within the Town Limits. The Town receives high quality health service in comparison to many surrounding communities in Giles County.

Photo credit: Alisa Moody

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Government Structure

The Town Council consists of council members and a mayor who are elected to four year terms. The mayor presides at council meetings.

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In addition to the Town Council, the council has appointed two advisory commissions: the Planning Commission and the Board of Zoning Appeals. The Planning Commission administers the zoning ordinance for the Town and considers changes to the zoning ordinance or rezoning requests. In addition, the planning commission provides the planning, which is normally expected of a planning commission. The Board of Zoning Appeals considers appeals to interpretive decisions on the zoning ordinance.

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The Town employs a Town Manager, Superintendent of Public Services, a Town Clerk, three other full time employees and two part-time employees. At this time, staff levels appear to be adequate to effectively serve the citizens of Rich Creek. The Town owns a backhoe, a dump truck, a 4wd pickup and a tractor for weed cutting and other light tasks. The Town also maintains a well equipped shop and does most of its own vehicular maintenance. The Town owns a cemetery, which is operated by a Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees for the cemetery is appointed by the Town Council. The Town has established a long range capital improvements plan which allows for the regular replacement of Town equipment. In addition, the capital improvements plan should include an equipment replacement fund and major projects such as upgrading water and sewer lines. Currently, the Town has an equipment sharing bank with the Town of Glen Lyn. This arrangement doubles the amount of equipment available for projects, and provides labor support when warranted. This strategy provides a cost effective method of service delivery and enhances the capacity of both towns to accomplish projects.

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Transportation Plan

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The purpose of the Transportation Plan is to designate a system of infrastructure needs and to develop recommendations that include the designation of new and expanded transportation facilities. The types of facilities addressed in the this part of the comprehensive plan could include roadways, bicycle accommodations, pedestrian accommodations, railways, bridges, waterways, and public transportation facilities.

Roads and Streets

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Most of the streets in Rich Creek are part of the state or federal system and maintained by the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT). Exceptions are Kirk Lane and the Town’s alleyways. Transportation projects identified by the Town are below and can be found on Map 11.

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Projects Future transportation projects for the Town of Rich Creek are categorized as short-term, mid-term or longterm. Although actual timeframes will vary, short-term projects are estimated to be completed within the next 5 years, mid-term projects within the next 10, and long-term projects within the next 20 years. The project numbers are only provided to correspond with Map 11. Short-term Projects 1. US Route 219 and Old Virginia Avenue Intersection Improvement: Evaluate this intersection to determine appropriate traffic control measures (signal, 3-way stop, etc.). Left turning movements have limited site distance. 2. Reduce Speed Limit Through Town (New Signage): Reduce the speed limit along Old Virginia Avenue to 15 MPH. 3. Complete Downtown Enhancement Project: Improve sidewalks, landscaping, and commercial entrances located along the west side of Old Virginia Avenue.

Mid-term Projects

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4. US Route 460 and US Route 219 Intersection Safety Improvement: Improve site distance for vehicles entering US Route 460. Guardrail limits visibility during daylight hours. 5. Kirk Lane Resurfacing: Improve condition of roadway surface.

6. Old Virginia Avenue Sidewalk: Construct approximately ½ mile of sidewalk along Old Virginia Avenue from downtown up to Community Center Property. 7. Resurface Alleyway between Riverside Avenue and Old Virginia Avenue: Improve condition of roadway surface.

Long-term Projects

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8. Enhance Downtown Parking: Install traditional parallel parking along busy roadways and identify and improve new public parking areas.

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9. Identify Designated Truck Route: Redirect thru traffic away from downtown business core, located along Old Virginia Avenue. Evaluate the installation of a round-a-bout at the intersection of Old Virginia Avenue and Riverside Drive. 10. US Route 460 and Old Virginia Avenue Intersection Safety Improvement: Evaluate and identify safety improvements that reduce total number of annual crash incidents. 11. Provide Bus-Connector to Future NRV Passenger Rail Station: Offer a transit/bus-connector option for Rich Creek residents to Amtrak services.

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Map 11: Transportation Plan Map for Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Transportation Needs

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Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Map 12: Road Hierarchy in Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Road Hierarchy n nd L B u ck la

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Functional Class

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Town Boundary

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Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Department of Transportation; Virginia Geographic Information Network.


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Land-use Plan

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The purpose of the land-use plan is to provide goals and strategies addressing both general development and public health, safety, and welfare issues. It is general in nature, and takes into account long-range planning recommendations for future economic development and population growth. The intent of these goals and strategies are to reflect the citizens of Rich Creek’s best interests and to act as a guide for the Rich Creek Town Council in developing zoning ordinances. These goals and strategies are dynamic, meaning they can be amended at any time by the Town Council.

Photo credit: Alisa Moody

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Goals and Objectives Overall Goal To provide for the orderly and efficient development and redevelopment of the Town while maintaining the small town atmosphere and environmental quality. Component Goal #1 Land Use

Promote the Wise Use of the Land Resources in the Town.

Strategies

1.1

Support the redevelopment of downtown by:

o o o o

Narrowing streets and slowing traffic; Widening sidewalks; Planting trees and adding sidewalk benches; Encouraging 2nd story commercial and residential development.

1.2

Remodel/lease the old Town Office Building for Commercial/office uses.

1.3

Work with VDOT to landscape the shoulders and median on U.S. 460.

1.4

Continue developing the old Rich Creek School as Town Hall and Community Center.

1.5

Pursue walking trails:

o Improve walking trail at Town Park; o Improve parking area at Town Park.

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1.7 1.8

Scenic view signage at the boat landing on U.S. 460. Participate with the County planning processes to assure the planning in the Midway area is coordinated with the Town’s goals.

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1.6

In reviewing proposals for subdivision of land within Town, particular attention should be paid to the coordination of streets between subdivisions.

1.9

Encourage, through appropriate incentives, the preservation and rehabilitation of suitable commercial and historical buildings.

Encourage community groups and individuals to sponsor community service projects.

1.10

1.11

Maintain a future land use plan and assure that zoning and subdivision laws are compatible with the plan.

1.12 Enforce the Town ordinances on the maintenance of property and other related land use conditions.

1.13

Review land use control and other land use ordinances for their continued opportunities.

1.14

The Town Council and Town Staff will work together in enforcing Ordinances.

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Component Goal #1 Land Use (Continued)

Promote the wise use of the land resources in the Town.

Strategies 1.15

Market the shale bank lot as a potential development site.

1.16

Attract and support retail in downtown.

1.17

Attract new industry to retain future workforce.

1.18

Promote entrepreneurship.

1.19

Promote tourism development: o o o o

Motel development; Restaurant development; Maintain Town brochure; Maintain Town’s Web page.

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1.20

Develop a regionalized sewer treatment plant.

1.21

Ensure adequate stormwater management for subdivisions during plan review.

1.22

Promote handicap accessibility throughout the Town.

1.23

Continue to improve the Town’s water and sewer infrastructure system.

1.24

Construct curbs along Routes 219 and 460.

1.25

Evaluate angled parking in Town.

1.26

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Repurpose sewage treatement site for commercial development

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Component Goal #2 Community Facilities

To promote a full range of public services and facilities to meet the needs of Rich Creek’s citizens and to improve the Town’s overall quality of life.

Strategies Seek the upgrading of streets, Riverside Drive, Cherry Avenue, Virginia Avenue, Rt. 219, Giles Avenue spring drainage.

2.2

Continue to support downtown pedestrian improvements by applying to the Transportation Alternatives (TA) Set-aside grant program administered by VDOT.

Expand Senior Services and facilities at the Senior Center:

2.3

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2.1

o Develop a brochure of services; o Senior’s transportation system tied in with the County’s program.

2.5

2.6 2.7

Support educational recycling programs and materials. Continue to cooperate with the Lions Club to provide development and administration of Gentry’s Landing.

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2.4 Upgrade the undersized water distribution system to provide fire protection throughout Town.

Continue the Town’s recreation program. Consider working with all the towns and the county to provide one recreation program for the entire county.

2.8

Maintain a well trained and equipped police, fire and rescue service.

2.9

Consider a regional library in cooperation with Towns and County to serve residents.

2.10

Continue to keep utility mapping up to date.

2.11

Develop and support a recreation program and activities for all age groups. More attention should be placed upon activities for senior citizens.

2.12

Establish a park with a walking path.

2.13

Provide facilities and activities to attract a retirement community.

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Component Goal #2 Community Facilities (Continued)

To promote a full range of public services and facilities to meet the needs of Rich Creek’s citizens and to improve the Town’s overall quality of life.

Strategies 2.14

Seek funding for additional law enforcement support.

2.15

Seek encouragement and financial support from more civic organizations.

2.16

Create a River Walkway connecting Town Hall path as part of the Heritage River designation.

2.17

Build a small park at the Community Center.

2.18

Attract live entertainment, craft shows, and festivals in Town or in the park.

2.19

Increase activity at the baseball and soccer field.

2.20

Establish more recreation facilities for families.

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Work with the County and Towns to build an aqua-center to address recreation needs of families and seniors..

2.22

Place exercise equipment along the community center trail.

2.24

Provide in-town emergency services.

2.25

Move fire station to new facility.

2.26

Ensure downtown access to the New River by way of Rich Creek.

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Component Goal #3 Economic Development

Strategies

3.1

Utilize vacant Town Hall space. Some examples could include:

3.2

3.3

o Small business incubator; o Satellite classroom; o Community space for event rental.

Provide infrastructure support for the industries within the Town.

Seek to identify additional commercial and industrial sites in Town. Coordinate the development and marketing of any sites with the County Industrial Development Authority and the New River Valley Economic Development Alliance.

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To encourage and stimulate economic activities which help to diversify the Town and Giles County’s economy.

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3.4 Encourage the development of medical facilities and services in the Town. Some examples of medical facilities and services could include optical services, dentistry, and urgent care facilities.

3.5

Continue to support and assist the Merchants Association.

3.6

Encourage maintenance and utilization of commercial and industrial structures.

3.7

Apply rental property guidelines to commercial and industrial structures.

3.8

Provide a variety of dining establishments, particularly for nursing home visitors on Sundays.

3.9 Develop a bus stop with a regional, inter-state, or national bus line for improved traveling options.

3.10

Support the location of a movie theater for business and overall community satisfaction.

3.11

Actively pursue tenants for vacant properties downtown.

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Component Goal #4 Housing

To provide for a diversity of housing opportunities in order that these persons wishing to live in Rich Creek may find decent, safe, and sanitary housing which is affordable.

Strategies Encourage rental housing development for low- and moderate-income families, as well as for the elderly. Examples of these rental housing developments could include apartments, condominiums, lofts, and single-family houses.

4.2

Encourage multi-family developments which are not out-of-scale with their neighborhoods. Examples of these multi-family developments could include apartments, condominiums, and lofts.

4.3

Review the vacant properties within the Town for structural integrity. Encourage the demolition of structures which no longer serve the purposes for which they were constructed.

Encourage second-story housing above first floor commercial uses.

4.4

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4.1

Encourage planned unit developments to provide a mix of housing types. A planned unit development is a mixed-use residential development of single-family dwellings in conjuction with rental, condominium, cooperative or town house properties.

4.6

Encourage housing rental agreements to comply with VA Code Ann. ยง 55-217 to 55-248.40.

4.7

Encourage housing development through public-private partnerships.

4.8

Support expansion of the nursing home and assisted living facilities.

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4.5

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Zoning The Town of Rich Creek has eight zoning districts, four of which are for residential (R-1, R-2, R-3, R-5), two for commercial (B-1, B-2), one for industrial (M-1), and one for agriculture (AR-1). Map 8 illustrates the town’s zoning. The downtown district is largely zoned B-1 or B-2. B-1 zoning designates areas that do not require off-street parking be provided for customers. These are typically found along US 460 Business and have on-street parking in front of the businesses. B-2 zones are in areas surrounding the town core and requires off-street parking for customers. The Town should evaluate zoning ordinance amendments to encourage mixed uses in the Downtown area.

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Residential provides four zoning classifications. R-1 represents low-density residential property that typically consists of single-family structures. R-2 allows for an increase in residential density to include town homes. R-3 permits multi-family developments such as apartments. As the permitted zoning densities increase, any lower densities are permitted as well. R-5, Planned Unit Development, is a unique zoning district. This allows for flexibility in site development and is most beneficial zoning district when developing in areas with topographical limitations or other natural features. R-5 allows the town to negotiate with developers on items such as setbacks, road placement, utilities, and amenities to most appropriately develop the site. The town has several acres zoned M-1 for industrial purposes. This area is found along Old Virginia Avenue, north of the community center property. The town also has a limited amount of land zoned AR-1, Agriculture/Residential. This district is intended to address larger parcels in agricultural use with a residential unit or parcels with a conservation purpose. Most of the land in AR-1 zoning is found across US 460 along the New River.

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Map 13 is the current zoning map of Rich Creek.

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Map 13: Zoning Map of Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Zoning

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Secondary Roads

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Giles County; U.S. Geological Survey;Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Future Land Use The Rich Creek land use plan serves as a guide for future public and private land development. All land use ordinances should be designed to implement the land use plan. While there are many theories that attempt to describe desirable land use patterns, all land use designs should consider the unique circumstances affecting each community. The major concerns affecting Rich Creek are summarized below. In Rich Creek, relatively little land remains in an undeveloped state. Much of the vacant land lies on steep slopes and is unsuited for intensive development. This land is probably best left in its present condition to avoid possible problems and to provide green space for the preservation of the environment and aesthetic enrichment of the community. Rich Creek is an important commercial center not only for Giles County, but also for Monroe County, West Virginia.

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The scarcity of large tracts of land that are suitable for commercial or industrial development means that future commercial and industrial development in the area will need to occur in the Midway community. Considering the relative scarcity of land, multi-family housing and utilization of vacant second story commercial buildings may be the only way that the Town can grow significantly in population. Given that the Midway area is Rich Creek’s primary commercial growth area and that the Town already provides many services to Midway residents and businesses, the Town might be well-served to discuss a potential boundary adjustment with the County. Both the Midway area and the Town currently have overlapping commonalities, such as location, road system, and the Town’s existing service areas.

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With this information in mind, the future Land Use Plan shown in Map 14 was developed. The plan is general in nature, identifying five categories of development: Commercial, Industrial, Mixed-Use, Residential, and Conservation.

Commer cial

Res idential

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M ix e d -U se

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Map 14: Future Land Use Map for Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Future Land Use

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Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Giles County; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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In the preparation of Town Zoning Ordinance, each of the five basic land use types may be further divided depending on lot size or other considerations. A description of each of the general land use categories follows: Commercial Areas identified as commercial include those areas which currently support commercial business and those areas the Rich Creek Planning Commission believes could support commercial business activities in the future. The central business district should be protected from overly restricted parking requirements which would require the demolition of some downtown structures or require businesses to locate away from the downtown area. Consideration should be give to the development of a Town parking lot to meet the parking needs of downtown business.

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Industrial Areas identified as industrial include those areas which currently support industrial business activities and those areas the Rich Creek Planning Commission believes could support industrial business activities in the future. When considering zoning ordinances for this future land-use, care should be taken to protect surrounding residential areas while encouraging a variety of types of industrial development. Mixed-Use A mixed-use area includes lands, buildings or structures with two or more different uses. These uses include, but are not limited to, residential, office, retail, public, or entertainment, in a compact forms. Areas identified as mixed-use include those areas which currently support mixed-use activities, and those areas the Rich Creek Planning Commission believes could support mixed-use activities in the future. Zoning ordinances for this future land-use, care should be taken to respect the surrounding residential land-uses. Uses within the mixed-use land-use area are determined by the Town Council.

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Residential The residential land use areas include all of the existing residential areas as well as a portion of the Town which will develop into residential uses in the coming years. The residential areas contain subdivisions and developments which vary in density and housing type. The zoning ordinance should reflect this diversity in its regulation of future development. Residential growth in the Town will include redevelopment of areas as well as infilling of vacant lots. In regulating housing, recognition should be given to the fact that in 2010, twenty-four percent of the households were single person households. The zoning ordinance should make provision for occupancy of single family structures by more than one unrelated family to make better utilization of the scarce housing resource. The infill development could also include structures which provide for multifamily housing in controlled ways. Conservation Areas identified as conservation include those areas which currently support conservation activities and those areas the Rich Creek Planning Commission and the Rich Creek Town Council believe merit conservation in the future. These areas could include future land-use activities such as recreation, agriculture, or other types of conservation land-use.

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Implementation

The Commonwealth’s enabling legislation provides four formal methods for the implementation of the comprehensive plan: 1. Zoning Ordinance

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2. Subdivision Ordinance

3. Capital Improvements Program

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4. Official Map

In addition, Town policies, especially those which affect the extension of water and sewer services, are very important. Each of the above methods are useful in specific spheres of the Town’s activities. The capital improvements program, for example, is useful for implementing Town spending policies but will have less direct influence on land use patterns. The following are specific ways in which implementation can occur.

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Zoning and Subdivision Ordinances 1. Since the Town’s zoning ordinance and future land use plan are now compatible, future changes in either document should be coordinated with the other. 2. The subdivision ordinance is expected to receive little use due to the limited amount of undeveloped land in Rich Creek. Many changes, however, have occurred in the enabling legislation since the development of the ordinance. The ordinance should be carefully reexamined to assure that it is consistent with the Town’s desires. For example, it is now legal for the Town to grant variances to the subdivision ordinance regulations.

Capital Improvement Plan 1. The Town should begin work on a five-year capital improvements plan as soon as possible. 2. Once complete, the plan should be updated every year.

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3. The Town should investigate the use of escrow funds which would soften the blow of major purchases.

Current Map

The official map is appropriate to communities which need to reserve land for long range use prior to purchase or dedication. It is not needed in Rich Creek, but Map 15 shows a current view of the Town.

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Priority Town Policies and Plans

1. Utilize the strategies contained in the Goals and Objectives section to establish and measure the progress toward the desired achievement of the Town’s goals.

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2. The Town should begin the process of planning and implementing a renovation to the current community facility structure wing that remains unimproved. 3. The Town should continue participating with the Giles Public Service Authority to provide adequate water supplies to meet the needs of the Town and support the location of additional business and industry. 4. Complete the upgrade of the undersized water lines in Town.

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Map 15: Map of Rich Creek

Town of Rich Creek Creek Town

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Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Department of Transportation; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

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Appendix

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Appendix A: Soils-Buildings

Town of Rich Creek Soils: Buildings

30D 17F 12

10C

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460

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17C 30F

1B 17F 1B

30C 30F

4C

17D

17F 17F

7

10C

AF T

17F

10B

10B

1C

4B

1B

Ne

4B

4D

Ri ve r

4C

R

w

10C

D

2F

2D 5D 5C 4B

4C

4D

4D 12 4C

¯

0

400

800

1,600 Feet

£ ¤ 460

Suitability w/out basements

Page 46

Buildings

Not limited

Primary Roads

Somewhat limited

Secondary Roads

Very limited

Rail

Town Boundary

Streams

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Esri; U.S. Department of Agriculture; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.


Appendix B: Soils-Farmland

Town of Rich Creek Soils: Farmland

30D 17F 12

10C

£ ¤

17F

460

£ ¤ 219

17C 30F

1B 17F 1B

30C 30F

4C

17D

17F 17F

7

10C

AF T

17F

10B

10B

1C

4B

1B

Ne

4B

4D

Ri ve r

4C

2F

2D 5D 5C 4B

4C

D

R

w

10C

4D

4D 12 4C

¯

0

400

800

1,600 Feet

£ ¤ 460

Farmland Classification

Buildings

Prime

Primary Roads

Of Statewide Importance

Secondary Roads Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Esri;

Not Prime

Rail

Town Boundary

Streams

U.S. Department of Agriculture; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.

Page 47


Appendix C: Soils-Roads

Town of Rich Creek Soils: Roads

30D 17F 12

10C

£ ¤

17F

460

£ ¤ 219

17C 30F

1B 17F 1B

30C 30F

4C

17D

17F 17F

7

10C

AF T

17F

10B

10B

1C

4B

1B

Ne

4B

4D

Ri ve r

4C

R

w

10C

D

2F

2D 5D 5C 4B

4C

4D

4D 12 4C

¯

0

400

800

1,600 Feet

£ ¤ 460

Suitability for roads

Page 48

Buildings

Not limited

Primary Roads

Somewhat limited

Secondary Roads

Very limited

Rail

Town Boundary

Streams

Created by NRVRC, 2016. Sources: Esri; U.S. Department of Agriculture; U.S. Geological Survey; Virginia Geographic Information Network.


AF T R D

Page 49


AF T R D Town of Rich Creek

DRAFT Rich Creek Comprehensive Plan 2017  

This is the draft version of the Comprehensive Plan of the Town of Rich Creek, VA. The document was prepared by the New River Valley Regiona...