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NRV’s Premier Lifestyle Magazine

New River Valley May/June 2019

M A G A Z I N E

Crooked Road Food Trucks Container Gardening Blacksmithing CARS: New vs. Used

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Spring


Search. See. Love.

Find a place to hang your heart. Explore all homes today and leverage the insight of our agent network. Find your agent at LongandFoster.com

Priscilla The

Morris

Team

of Long & Foster Real Estate

Priscilla Morris REALTOR® 540.320.3586 Priscilla@PriscillaMorris.com www.PriscillaMorris.com 2018 #1 Top Team Producer New River Valley Office

of Long & Foster Real Estate

Patti Bass REALTOR® 540.818.3958

TellPatti@gmail.com www.longandfoster.com/PattiBass

of Long & Foster Real Estate

Mike Weber REALTOR®

540.250.6727

MikesYourRealtor@gmail.com www.longandfoster.com/MikeWeber

Visit www.longandfoster.com or download our mobile app today! 3601 Holiday Ln. Blacksburg, VA 24060 | 540.552.1010

Darin Greear REALTOR®

540.320.5859 Darin@RinerVa.com www.RinerVa.com

of Long & Foster Real Estate

Wendy Swanson REALTOR®

540.797.9497

swansonwm@gmail.com www.wendymswanson.com

Brenda Woody REALTOR®

540.257.0281

Brenda.Woody@LongandFoster.com www.longandfoster.com/BrendaWoody

Long & Foster was named “America’s Most Trusted Residential Real Estate Brokerage” by Lifestory Research.


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When it comes to always our best,

we mean business. When you’re passionate about something, you give it your all. Your business is proof. We’re passionate about delivering a great banking experience, supporting your business and elevating our community. So we carefully think through your challenges, come up with creative solutions, and embrace enthusiasm, kindness and inspiration in all that we do. It’s how we give you always our best. Your business will get nothing less. Contact us for your business banking, lending and cash management needs. We look forward to serving you.

SkylineNationalBank.com

Member FDIC

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MOVE BOLDLY At Nest, we believe that buying and selling real estate is the most important decision you will ever make. That belief guides us to make your decision-making process as stress-free and enjoyable as possible. How can we help you Move Boldly in the New River Valley?

Cynthia Ilewicz ASSOCIATE BROKER cynthia.ilewicz@nestrealty.com 540.808.3691 nestrealty.com/cynthiaIlewicz

Rachel Hogan ASSOCIATE BROKER rachel@nestrealty.com 540.599.0880 nestrealty.com/rachelhogan

Nancy Massey ASSOCIATE BROKER, ABR nancy@nestrealty.com 540.250.3222 nestrealty.com/nancymassey

Skip Slocum ASSOCIATE BROKER skip@nestrealty.com 540.392.8891 nestrealty.com/skipslocum

Jeremy Hart PRINCIPAL BROKER jeremy@nestrealty.com 540.998.4731 nestrealty.com/jeremyhart

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CONTENTS

May/June

2019

22 30 Pa sture Tal k

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Cro oked Roa d 1 0 Ron Eaves 1 4 Food Trucks 1 9 Conta i ner G ardeni ng 22

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Ca rs: New vs Used 26 5 0 Yea rs of Love 28

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28 20 18

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Bl ac ksmi t hi n g 3 0 NRV Hom e 3 4 Emergenc y Ca r Ki t 40 66 Ford Mustan g 42 S ummer Even ts 4 4

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Festivals, Fun, May 24 | June 14-15 | June 14-15 | June 21-23 | June 22 | June 21, July 26, & August 23 | July 20 | July 27 | August 9-10 | September 21 |

&

Family

Opening of the Park | Narrows Town Park Henry Reed Memorial Fiddlers Convention Pearisburg Festival in the Park Summer Kickoff at Kairos New River Water Trail Poker Float Dirty Dancing Weekend at Mountain Lake Lodge Down the River Poker Float on the New River Water Trail Night Ride & Bon Fire at Kairos Newport Fair Muddy ACCE Race

www.gilescounty.org

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Pasture Talk

NEW RIVER VALLEY M

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P. O. Box 11816 Blacksburg, VA 24062 o: 540-961-2015 nrvmagazine@msn.com www.nrvmagazine.com

PUBLISHER Country Media, Inc. Phillip Vaught MANAGING EDITOR Joanne Anderson

M

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Sabrina Sexton ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Walsh

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Dennis Shelor WRITERS Joanne Anderson Karl Kazaks Krisha Chachra Emily Alberts Jennifer Cooper Mike Wade Becky Helper Astleigh Hill Nancy Moseley

PHOTOGRAPHERS Kristie Lea Photography Kevin Riley Always and Forever Photography Tom Wallace Silver Pebble Photography Nathan Cooke Photography Š 2019 Country Media, Inc. Country Media, Inc. will not knowingly publish any advertisement that is illegal or misleading to its readers. Neither the advertiser nor Country Media, Inc. will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors. The publisher assumes no financial liability for copy omissions by Country Media, Inc. other than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Corrections or cancellations to be made by an advertiser shall be received no later than 5 p.m. the 20th of each publishing month. No claim shall be allowed for errors not affecting the value of the advertisement. Paid advertising does not represent an endorsement by this publication. Content cannot be reproduced without written consent from Country Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Real Estate advertised in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968.

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Most of us have hopes and dreams of things that we'd like to do and have some day. For me, it was a Jaguar, not a horse. The horses were a total surprise. Maybe that car because my brother has called me Jag most of my life or because it is a very cool car. However, in place of a Jag, I have a 1998 Chevy 3/4-quarter-ton pick-up truck, 2500 Cheyenne with a Stillwater OK dealer sticker on it. That's kind of cool, the sticker anyway. When we took the craigslist ad to our mechanic friend Rob Fain, he said: "Buy it. Even if the guy doesn't come down off the $3,500 asking price (which he did not). I can fix anything on it." A second $3,500 later (in Rob's coffers), we have a truck with which my husband, John, trusts me to haul the horses. My old horse trailer weighs 2,500 pounds before loading two 1/2ton each Thoroughbreds. John hammered out dents, sanded, sprayed primer and new paint in places (on truck and trailer), bought new bumper guards, welded a new back bumper on the trailer, even primed and painted the truck bed. The best part? Manual transmission. Now, that is really driving. Adding a car 'n truck theme to the MayJune issue is my idea. Normally, I am a Ford girl, with an Explorer and Edge next to the truck. My first car was a '67 Ford Fairlane, just a year older than Madison Mar/Apr

Miller's '66 Ford Mustang (see page 42). At 20, she is a cosmetologist, semi-professional photographer, writer, college student and a good friend of mine. My long-time horse friend Bekah will turn 20 in Colorado at a dude ranch where she got a summer job. Riding buddy Rebecca Thompson, R.N., of Eggleston, plans to learn horse training over the summer at Healing Strides before starting her MBA at Radford University. I love sharing in their hopes and dreams. Youth vitality is ever-present all around the New River Valley. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court [1902-1932] said: "Men do not quit playing because they grow old; they grow old because they quit playing." That was back in the day when the male gender pronoun stood for everyone. In this issue, we've profiled an entrepreneurial 70-yearold still working full-time, a much younger blacksmith and Madison and her Mustang [car]. Holmes also said: "A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back to its old dimensions." What a sage, huh? Lucky for us, there are enough adventures and challenges right here in the New River Valley to stretch your mind, your body, your intellect and your skill set for decades. Youth is not a time in life; it is a state of mind.

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Joanne Anderson ManagingEditor jmawriter@aol.com

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Fe at ure

HOME AGAIN, HOME AGAIN JIGGITY JIG VIRGINIA’S CROOKED ROAD PREPARES FOR ANNUAL FESTIVAL

The Floyd Country Store

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Text by Nancy S. Moseley

We’ve all driven by the green and orange signs with the iconic banjo. Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail, designated as such by the Virginia General Assembly, is a 330-mile driving route that winds across 19 counties in the southwest region of the Commonwealth. It connects nine major venues and more than 60 affiliate locations. If you’ve seen the signs, then welcome(!), you’re on the right crooked road. Todd Christensen, a career community developer and the late Joe Wilson, a renowned folklorist and former executive director of the National Council for Traditional Arts, conceived the idea in the early 2000s when the two met at a creative economy conference in Asheville, N.C. They sought to answer the question: What did the communities in southwest Virginia have in common that could unite them in purpose? The answer, something that 10

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tends to unite us all actually: music. Several culturally and historically significant music venues dot the region as well. Christensen’s and Wilson’s concept was to connect the venues via a somewhat arbitrary driving route and give it a recognizable brand. If marketed correctly, the campaign would not only draw people to one venue, but also increase traffic to other nearby places of interest, all while maintaining a foundational commitment to give traditional artists a stage. The nine major venues of The Crooked Road are: • Birthplace of Country Music • Blue Ridge Institute and Museum • Blue Ridge Music Center • Carter Family Fold • Country Cabin II • Floyd Country Store and County Sales May/June 2019


Feat u re

Wayne Henderson & Friends at the Carter Family Fold Photo by Jonathan Romeo for The Crooked Road

• • •

Old Fiddlers Convention and Rex Theater Ralph Stanley Museum Southwest Virginia Cultural Center and Marketplace.

The Crooked Road is regaled for its grassroots way of celebrating the mountain culture and regional heritage of southwest Virginia’s people. “It’s a creature and invention from southwest Virginia. It belongs to the people and communities. Localities feel an ownership of it,” offers Jack Hinshelwood, executive director of The Crooked Road. NRVMAGAZINE.com

Soon the organization started brainstorming a way to showcase the entire Crooked Road region at once. Having disparate festivals throughout the year would be a burdensome undertaking requiring an excessive amount of time and money. Having one annual festival with localized events allowed every community to highlight its own heritage music, culture, legacies and special traditions. And so the Mountains of Music Homecoming Festival was born, now in its fifth year. “There’s a lot to be presented, a lot to celebrate. There’s such a great culture here to experience. Certainly

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not just for first-time visitors, but for residents just as much. The festival is a tool for economic development using the Crooked Road as a footprint,” Hinshelwood states. The word “homecoming” is used to commemorate a time in the 1900s when many people left rural Appalachia for bigger cities and more lucrative opportunities, thus creating a perpetual homecoming for thousands of people. Great care is taken to produce a festival with immersive, authentic experiences, so the feeling of “coming home” for all attendees, local or not, is inevitable. There is an endemic

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The Floyd Country Store

Dale Jett & Hello Stranger at Rex Theater

Photo by Jonathan Romeo for The Crooked Road

familiarity in the air. This year’s Mountains of Music Homecoming will be June 7 through 15. On the docket are several notable musical performances, an array of cultural exhibits, food festivals, outdoor adventures, selfguided tours, educational opportunities and basically anything that helps tell the story of the people. “Think about 19 counties working together! I’ve been so proud of what all the different organizations have been able to accomplish,“ beams Lisa Bleakely, executive director of Montgomery County, Virginia Regional Tourism. This year there are two main concerts in the New River Valley, both at the Moss Arts Center in Blacksburg: “Remembering Doc: T. Michael Coleman, Jack Lawrence, Jeff Little and Wayne Henderson” and “Cube Dance: Square Dance Cubed.” The Hoorah Cloggers of Blacksburg will perform with caller LP Kelly and Happy Hollow String Band using The Cube’s innovative technology. The next closest concert is at the Floyd Country Store where the Stanley Brothers AllStar Band will perform. In addition to the top billed concerts, there is also an array of locally produced cultural experiences that can be anything from a history walk to a Ruritan’s pancake breakfast. “The cultural experiences provide a vetted, sanctioned 12

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opportunity to engage with the local culture,” Bleakely adds. Events in the New River Valley include a farm-totable dinner at Historic Smithfield Plantation, Music on the Lawn at the Christiansburg Library and a guided float down the New River from McCoy Falls to The Palisades, where dinner will be served. Sinkland Farms in Riner will host one of Mountains of Music’s three “Feastivals,” showcasing Appalachia from a culinary perspective. “If The Crooked Road never did anything else but give the people here an enhanced sense of pride about their music and culture in general, that would be been enough,” Hinshelwood states. There’s no question about the power of music. It helps authenticate the stories of our past, manage the realities of our present and may even foretell a bit about our future. To get where you’re going, it’s helpful to understand where you’ve been, forever proving that you can, and should, go home again. And more often than not, the crooked road will lead you straight there. Nancy S. Moseley is a writer who grew up frequently traveling with her family. Every time they pulled in the driveway her mom would announce, “home again, home again, jiggity jig.”

mtnsofmusic.com thecrookedroad.org

May/June 2019


Your RadfoRd journey begins HERE Sin RadfoRd TaY

- Mary Draper Ingles Statue, Outdoor Play & Ingles Farm - Fiddle & Banjo Jam, Monday evenings at Radford Coffee Company - Radford University Planetarium, Performing Arts Series, Athletics & Exhibitions - Glencoe Mansion, Museum & Gallery - Haunted St. Albans Sanatorium - Ride a Rescue Horse at Winterfrost Farms - Wildwood Park & Bisset Park - Tube/Kayak/Bike Rentals in Bisset Park

PL aY in the NRV

- Claytor Lake State Park: Stand Up Paddle Boarding, Boat Rentals, Beach and Cabin Rentals - Pete Dye River Course - Blue Ridge Parkway - Floyd Country Store - The Cascades - White Barrel Winery - Yankees Pulaski Baseball Games - Christiansburg Aquatic Center - Sinkland Farms - Virginia Tech Football

UPcomiNg EVENTS

April 13: Native American Heritage Festival (Pow Wow) 20: Earth Day Festival 27: RU Half Marathon 27: Food Truck Rodeo May 15: Ride of Silence 23: Radford Fine Arts Show through June 21 27: Memorial Day service, Bisset Park Memorial Day thru October: kayak/tube rentals at Shelter 3 in Bisset Park June TBA: Classic Car Show in Bisset Park 13: Summer Nature Series 27: Summer Nature Series July 4: Celebration with Jimmy Fortune, Bisset Park 11: Summer Nature Series 14: Mary Draper Ingles Outdoor Drama Performance 27-28: Mary Draper Ingles Weekend: Ingles Farm open July 27, Outdoor Drama, Performance July 27 & 28 25: Summer Nature Series August 4: Mary Draper Ingles Outdoor Drama 8: Summer Nature Series TBA: Classic Car show in Bisset Park October 12: Highlanders Festival 12: BraveHeart 5K to benefit the American Heart Association Haunted Sanatorium, St. Albans-weekends, ongoing thru October

Plenty of Lodging • Over 30 Restaurants • Miles of the New River

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NRV Entrep reneur

A Clear Business Model

Text by Nancy S. Moseley | Photos by Kevin Riley Somehow the declaration against windows became a joke in the world of cleaning. But what is a man who does do windows allowed to claim he doesn’t do? “I don’t do malls,” Ron Eaves, sole proprietor of Ron’s Window Cleaning, says with a hint of humor underneath a straight face. Eaves, born in 1949, grew up in the Wake Forest area of Blacksburg, went to the Christiansburg Institute until it closed in 1966 and transferred to Blacksburg High School. His father was killed in the McCoy coal mines when Eaves was 6 years old. His mother, who worked at the nearby Radford Arsenal, and his maternal uncle, raised him. Eaves has two grown sons and two grown stepdaughters who live nearby. In his early 20s, Eaves moved 14

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to the D.C. area and was employed as a unionized construction worker for about eight years. When the company went out of business, Eaves followed work arranged by his local lodge. “I got tired of going from job to job. Then a friend of mine said, ‘Ron, do you ever think about cleaning windows?’” With the promise of steady work, Eaves took a job with Virginia Window Cleaners in the Alexandria area which trained him on the trade. He enjoyed a higher salary than the construction work and had benefits. After several years learning the ropes of cleaning windows in Northern Virginia, he moved back to Blacksburg, right back to Wake Forest. He immediately started to run his own business cleaning windows which was successful at first, but it soon became

clear Eaves needed a second income. He went to work for the Montgomery County Public School system as a custodian. “I worked for Montgomery County for 13 years, cleaning schools on second shift and windows in the morning, “ Eaves states. Eventually he was able to officially retire from custodianship and continued to run his business. He smiles and says it keeps his health in good shape. Eaves’ client base is mostly residential, averaging around 100 houses per year in the New River Valley. When he first started he had commercial clients, but that has dwindled to a handful. Currently he works for South Main Auto, Comfort Inn and the last remaining Wade’s grocery store. He’s cleaned the windows at Main Street Inn in Blacksburg ever since it opened and the expansive Montgomery

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Regional Hospital entryway once a month for the last 18 years. “I don’t do jump-offs over the buildings,” Eaves asserts. “Jump-offs” involve repelling, hanging from a rope system and sitting on what’s called a sky genie chair. He motions with his hands how wide the chair is and shakes his head matter-of-factly. Eaves says a lot of local window cleaners actually don’t want to do houses, so there is a preference for businesses. “It’s harder to do houses. And a lot of people are scared of heights.” In a friendly jab at the competition, he laughs: “If I was scared of heights, why would I being doing this?” In addition to residential and commercial window cleaning, Eaves handles stripping and waxing floors, cleaning gutters and pressure washing. He offers free estimates to those within a reasonable distance. When he first started his business he advertised once with The Roanoke Times. The ad offered a discount, so he naturally received a lot of responses. Other than a NRVMAGAZINE.com

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Buffalo and More

shirt and a truck that say “Ron’s Window Cleaning,” he hasn’t advertised since. Eaves does not increase his rates for repeat customers. Once a rate is quoted, it’s locked in, even if the nature of the job changes. He feels it’s more important that people call him back year after year. With no sights on retiring any time soon, Eaves plans to continue working as long as he’s able. He does get away to Dallas over Thanksgiving every year. He always goes to a Cowboys game, a fan since childhood. In fact, every Sunday, he gets together with friends over potluck dishes to watch football. With no major advertising push, Eaves seems to be something of a local best-kept secret. Admittedly, his commendable referral network keeps his plate pretty full. “People come to me and want me to pay them a bunch of money to set up an advertising plan. They say they will guarantee me all of this work. When I say, ‘no,’ they ask, ‘well how are people going find you?’ And I say, ‘well, you found me, other people will to.” Good point. Perhaps the very best marketing tactic is to simply be honest, do a good job, treat customers with respect and the right people will, in fact, find you - unless they work in a mall. Nancy S. Moseley is a freelance writer who, although spent much of her adolescence in a mall, also tries to avoid them now.

Connie Hale says: "If you own a buffalo restaurant, you have to have some buffaloes. They are very majestic and very beautiful." So, a year after purchasing Buffalo and More Restaurant in Riner in 2008, she bought and transported 35 bison from Greenville, Tenn., to leased pastures not too far from the restaurant. "We had cattle trailers and good folks helping and made several trips," she recalls. Today her bison herd of around 20 lives on her own land and are cared for by her and her partner Carla George, who also helps with the restaurant, catering and retail business. The buffalo burgers are amazing and might well be the best seller, but smoked brisket runs a close second. "We have a dry rub for it and use a commercial smoker on our mobile kitchen," she explains. "The mobile catering unit is towed behind another vehicle and is more advanced than a normal food truck." They have participated in the food truck rodeo in Christiansburg, as well as provided food vendor services at the Pumpkin Festival at Sinkland Farms, events at Chantilly Farm in Floyd and other New River Valley events. Retail meat sales are another component of the business, but we can't leave the restaurant discussion without dessert. Connie's mom, Reba Hale, is her pastry chef and homemade desserts include Vanilla Cheesecake - declared the very best by some bona fide New Yorkers - Apricot Nectar Cake, Peanut Butter Brownie Torte and Oh My Pie, named by a 6-year-old. The pie comes in two versions, both with coconut and pecans, one with chocolate chips and the other with butterscotch chips. www.buffaloandmore.com

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Fe at ure

From Truck-to-Table how the food truck trend fuels a sense of community

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Text by Nancy S. Moseley

In the late 1600s, New Amsterdam (now New York City) began regulating pushcart vendors that sold food. In 1866, Charles Goodnight invented the Chuck wagon to feed cattlemen traversing the west. In 1936, Oscar Meyer unveiled the first portable hot dog cart, The Weiner Mobile. It was shaped, of course, like a giant hot dog. Food from a mobile contraption has long been a thing. Maybe it feels a bit indulgent or even a bit renegade to belly up to the open side of a roving restaurant for sustenance, forgoing the commitment of sitting down, ordering and methodically 18

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enjoying a meal. To eat on-the-go from something on-the-go is even a little bit romantic. There’s a mutual adoration and respect for the busyness of life. On the allure of food truck food, Nathaniel Haile of the local Manns Sausage truck offers: “People can see their food being made, so they know it’s fresh. It’s also very fast and convenient.” Haile’s grandfather, Clair Manns and the other Manns brothers had a sausage company in western Pennsylvania. Haile grew up working alongside his grandfather making sausage for family and friends. Haile, a studied landscape

architect, went full time on Manns Sausage about a year ago. “Having a food truck,” as opposed to a brick and mortar restaurant, “is a great way to promote your brand locally,” he states. With ultimate goals of national distribution, Haile cites those summers on the farm making sausage for neighbors for the passion that, literally, drives his business. Running a food truck is an intimate experience, not just because of physical space, but also because of the proximity of cooker to diner. There is a rare opportunity for the chef to share stories and develop a closeness with the

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customer. And vice versa. It’s exactly what Haile started out doing, making quality food for friends and family. It’s a misnomer to think that fast food is the antithesis of good food. Maybe that’s also the thing with food trucks. Truck operators are generally in business because they are passionate about one type of cuisine. Whether that’s a family recipe, in Haile’s case, a cultural specialty or even just a skill honed from the love of a certain food. When you hyper-tailor your product down to just a few specialties, it’s going to be tasty. The trend has been soaring across the United States since the late 2000s, and here in the New River Valley, it’s not hard to spot a food truck or two around town. Tacos El Tio and Tacqueria El Paso are options around the New River Valley Mall. Fat Bean Taco trucks out of Floyd, and Grumpy Pig Barbeque out of Newport, along with Thai This and Creole That are all local sojourners. The Beast Pizza of Blacksburg recently set up shop on Peppers Ferry Road. Dogtown Roadhouse out of Floyd transports a brick oven in its truck [license plate OVEN 2GO], setting up the food assembly right next to it. With the number of food trucks on the road, it was only a matter of time before they started running into each other (figuratively) at festivals and parades. One of the earliest formal gatherings of food trucks occurred in Los Angeles in early 2010 NRVMAGAZINE.com

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at the first LA Food Fest. Today, a quick Google search will pull up food truck rodeos (interchangeable with ‘rally’) happening pretty much everywhere. In March 2014, Tampa, Fla., set a record by hosting a rally with 121 trucks. In Portland, Ore., there’s a permanent Food Truck Village, a hip twist on the average city’s restaurant row. The village has become both place of purpose for locals and a destination hot spot for tourists. The New River Valley hopped on the bandwagon with annual food truck rodeos in downtown Christiansburg and Bisset Park in Radford. And every week from April through October, The Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center hosts Food Truck Thursdays. Deb Cooney of the Radford Visitor Center states: “People like that they can sample a variety of different foods without the commitment of one entree at a restaurant. You can have smaller portions of a couple different kinds of foods.” Last year Bisset Park’s Rollin’ on the River Food Truck Rodeo had around 20 trucks and more than 9,000 attendees. Downtown 20

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Christiansburg’s rodeo has been going strong for six years. “When the weather is nice and people are out, business is going to be great,” Haile says. When you have quality food, some live music and flowing adult beverages, the party vibe follows. The energy is high, especially for the chefs and cooks, who may crank out dishes at a non-stop pace for hours. And when the food runs out, that’s it. There’s a finite amount of space to store back-up. Having a favorite food truck is not unlike having a favorite band. When they move around, you tend to follow them. You check on where they are and where they plan to be; a food truck groupie, so-to-speak. When multiple food trucks gather, folks relish the opportunity to show up and support their pick. It’s the one chance when your first time at the rodeo is actually seen as a good thing. Nancy S. Moseley is a freelance writer who regularly indulged in “street meat” for lunch when she lived in New York City. May/June 2019


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The Thriller, Filler and Spiller of Container Gardening

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Text by Lynn Brammer

Whether for curb appeal, to complement your backyard patio or as a gift for a friend, container gardening is an opportunity to express creativity in a unique, dramatic way. Each container becomes an artistic expression and has the bonus feature of being mobile to be placed where it best accents the surroundings. If you are limited by outdoor space for in-ground gardening or have an aversion to copious weeding, containers are the answer for an eyecatching display of color, texture and style. Pots at garden centers are available for a price, but thinking outside

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A flea market find like a vintage metal watering tub or trough can be repurposed as can a wheelbarrow, old wood box, glazed pot, tin bucket, old rubber boots . . .

the box allows an avenue of creativity potentially for less money. A flea market find like a vintage metal watering tub or trough can be repurposed as can a wheelbarrow, old wood box, glazed pot, tin bucket, old rubber boots, the seat of a rotted-out cane bottom chair [see sidebar], almost anything. Even if you settle for ubiquitous terra cotta pots, it is imperative that every container have drainage holes. Grab a hammer and large nails to create them if necessary. Plant roots that stand in water will rot. If using a pot with a central hole in the bottom, place a mesh screen, coffee filter or pebbles over it so soil and fertilizer do

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not flow out every time you water. Soil Prep ~ Avoid using rich, amended soil from a garden because container gardening is different, and it is worth buying high quality potting soil. There are many recipes to make excellent soil for containers. A sterile mixture with moisture control properties, as well as a slow release fertilizer, is a sound choice. Before planting anything, water the soil mixture to the point of being saturated, but not clumping. It may take a few minutes so be patient and allow absorption. Invest in a slow release fertilizer and follow the instructions, blending thoroughly into the soil. There are water storing polymer products available for additional insurance if the container may not be watered regularly. Plant Choices ~ The most exciting part of putting together a container is choosing the flowers, herbs and plants. Begin by assessing where the container is going to live - a shady deck, full sun or some combination. Evaluate how the container will be viewed - in a deck corner only seen from one angle, on front steps or against a stone wall. This makes a difference in the layout and arrangement of plant material. Reading plant labels is imperative for the success of any container garden. They reveal sun and water needs, height at maturity and blooming season. A cactus and fern will not be happy sharing space. The plants need to have similar water and light requirements. Consider colors that match or contrast with deck furniture, window shutters or the front door. Some containers hold all one plant, which can make a statement grouped with other pots or by itself. Combining plants can create drama and yield a unique creation. Experts recommend the thriller, filler and spiller method. The thriller is a tall dramatic plant in the back or center that catches the eye from a distance. Plant it first in a container filled two-thirds with moistened soil. Gently untangle roots before placing it in the soil to encourage it to grow down. Next, select filler that occupies most of the space. Finally, the spiller is the plant that drapes over the container to lead the eye downward. Creation and Care ~ As plants are put in their places, add more soil incrementally, then gently but firmly tamp down each plant to decrease air pockets. There should be about one inch from the rim of the pot to the soil level. Some want the instant lushness of plants packed together tightly, but they will grow so it NRVMAGAZINE.com

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General rule of thumb: For a 10 to 12-inch pot, use 3 to 5 plants. For a 14 to 16-inch pot use 5 to 7 plants.

Cooperative Extension is a great resource at

https://ext.vt.edu/lawn-garden.html

pays to be patient, start small and watch the plants fill in as the season progresses. Give every new planter a thorough watering that flows out the drainage hole. Top off the soil if it settles after watering. Transport the container to its place on the porch, in the front yard, on the back deck, wherever. Stick a finger in the soil a couple of inches and if it's dry, the plants are probably thirsty. Watering in the early morning or late evening allows plants to better utilize the water with less evaporation. You will begin to “read� the plants and note the limp look of an over-watered plant versus the wilted look of an under-watered one. Throughout 24

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the growing season, pinch back flower heads as they die and be mindful of the soil level as it may continue to settle and need more on top. Planters can hold flowers and so much more. Certain vegetables, shrubs, vines and even trees can thrive in the right container if close attention is paid to their needs. What a delight to create a themed herb garden for a housewarming or birthday gift. And how interesting to cluster containers around a rock or on the ends of porch steps. Container gardening is a wonderful way to design your own flower gardens with much less work than full-fledged in-ground gardening.

One of Lynn Brammer's repurposed, repainted, refurbished, resplendent chair container gardens.

Lynn Brammer is a Master Gardener who recently retired from more than three decades with the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine and can now spend more time creating container gardens for home and for friends, some in old refurbished chairs.

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fe ature

A New Car

r

Text by Joanne M. Anderson

Red or silver. Leather or cloth. Big or little. GPS or not. Car or truck. Blue or white. Sporty or sensible. Hatchback or trunk. New or used. So many decisions on buying a car or pick-up truck, with the biggest one being: New or used. The major argument for buying used is always depreciation, citing that a new car is a used car a mile up the road from the new car lot. This position supports buying a car two or three years old for half or less than the original sticker price. Additionally, with excellent care on your part, it might be worth about what you pay for it a couple more years down the road. The main challenge here, however, is finding the vehicle you want. Likely, one is not going to see the exact used car, SUV, CUV or pickup truck in mind. There may very well have to be compromises on color, year, model, interior and accessories. Hey, you might find something more than expected; or you 26

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New to You?

J u s t

o r

Brand New

might have to settle for something else. So, while value declines instantly with a new purchase, you do get the upfront years or perhaps 75,000 miles with no or minimal repair costs and modest maintenance like oil changes and routine check-ups at specific mileage markers, maybe a set of tires. Not getting checkups recommended in the owner's manual may render a warranty invalid. New car sticker prices sometimes include things like dealer fees, anti-rust protection, pin striping, shipping charges, destination fee, dealer preparation, protective film and such. Current new models have the latest technology in mileage, emissions and gadgetry, and it can be challenging to find replacement parts or electronics diagnostics for cars more than 15 years old. However, new cars also cost more for registration, insurance and some of the local municipality taxes. However, in my driveway, the oldest

vehicle carries the highest insurance premium because it's more powerful than the SUV or CUV. It's the 1998, 3/4-ton pickup truck. According to the big consumer credit reporting company Experian, which analyzes data on more than a billion pieces of information on people, businesses and trends, the average new vehicle loan hit a record high of $31,099 in 2018. The average loan for used vehicles rose to $19,589. In the fourth quarter of last year, the average monthly payment for a new vehicle was $515, and for a used one $371 per month. These are all record-breaking highs. Americans have a serious love affair with their cars and trucks. Trucks and SUVs were the most popular vehicles sold in 2018 with a market share of 68%. Topping the list for some 17 million vehicles sold last year are:

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• • • • • • • • • •

Ford F-series (the best selling vehicle for 42 years!) Chevrolet Silverado Dodge Ram Toyota Rav4 Nissan Rogue Honda CR-V Toyota Camry Chevrolet Equinox Honda Civic Toyota Corolla

If you are thinking of buying new, one of these might hold their value better than other choices, but when searching for a list of cars and trucks which have the best resale value, interestingly, most of these are not on those lists. According to motor1.com, the average new vehicle will retain about a third of its sticker price after five years. However, Kelly Blue Book reports an exception for the Toyota Tacoma full-size pick-up truck which retains just over 60% of its purchase price. Edmunds.com's list of Best Retained Value® Awards for 2019 in many categories include: • Subaru Impreza (compact) • Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class (luxury compact) • Honda Accord (mid-size) • Lexus ES 350 (luxury mid-size) • Dodge Charger (large) • Toyota Tacoma (mid-size truck) • Jeep Wrangler (mid-size SUV) One rule of thumb on a new car buy is if you can't pay it off in three years, you probably can't afford it. This may mean doubling payments and paying extra whenever you can. Of course, the ideal used car is a one owner vehicle garaged nightly, immaculately maintained and driven less than 8,000 miles per year or so, not easy to find. According to motortrend.com, the top five used vehicles selling are: • • • • •

Honda Accord Toyota Camry Nissan Altima Toyota Corolla Honda Civic

With all the online places like carfax.com to check history of a vehicle by VIN number, and truecar.com for new car price comparisons, it's easier than ever to avoid getting a lemon or paying way too much. Judge Judy advises getting a mechanic to look over anything pre-owned, as she hears tons of used car disputes. There are lots of pros and cons for buying new and buying used. It most often comes down to budget, personal preference, miles driven per year and family size. And money alone can drive that decision. NRVMAGAZINE.com

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50 Years of Love

The Virginia is for Lovers slogan launched in 1969 and quickly became an iconic logo across the country and around the world. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of its success in propelling Virginia as a premier tourism destination, Pulaski County received one of the "50 Years of Love" grants. Each grant recipient must have 10 or more partners involved in celebrating the slogan for 50 days. Each partner needs to host an event, and the Pulaski County Chamber of Commerce is holding the kick-off event Day One of the May 24 to July 12 50-day celebration. Chamber executive director Peggy White is thrilled to locally launch 50 Years of Love with a first

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Outdoor Business Expo at Claytor Lake. "It’s the perfect fit to bring businesses and the community together to celebrate one of the most recognized brands in the world," she says. The Expo will provide the unveiling site for Volvo's mobile mural dubbed "Where's the Love Truck?", which will move to a new tourist location each week. The first person to post a selfie in the new spot will receive a $100 gift card. The River Company is planning to introduce its new Pulaski brew label, and Iron Heart Winery has converted an old beer truck into a moving bar. There will be pop up boutiques, boat rides by Mountain 2 Island and a Hodge Podge Show with hosts Keith Welton and Mark Tapp.

"In essence, we are promoting tourism in our area," White continues, "with new events specific to "50 Years of Love" and other activities which are already scheduled." The Marketplace plans to host "Where's the Love Truck?". Pulaski Yankees are staging "Where's the Love?" promotions on game nights, and Iron Heart Winery will offer a "50 Years of Love" dinner on the winery grounds. And much, much more. For a list of all the activities taking place during the 50 days starting May 24 and ending July 12, visit www. pulaskivatourism.org.

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Find Floyd County Chamber of Commerce members listed on MyChamber App

Scan the above QR code to download this free app to your Android or IOS device

We stand for 110 years of community strength

Now we stand with the New River Valley, too.

Your NEW HomeTown Bank amnb.com NRVMAGAZINE.com

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A Colonial Era Man ... Plying A Bronze Age Skill ... in a Digital Age Text by Becky Hepler Photos by Tom Wallace He’s not under a spreading chestnut tree, but Joshua Langfitt IS making a living these days as a blacksmith. He is the lead blacksmith at Smithfield Plantation, which means he has trained apprentices, manages the forge and helps with tours, but that is only a part-time gig. It is at his home forge that he gets to exercise his artistic ability and create the metal things that people ask him to make, whether a blade, blacksmithing tools, signs or a massive set of hinges. It all started when he was 16, and his dad gave him a graphic novel about a guy who forges a sword in a volcano. He told his dad he thought the whole idea was “malarkey,” but his father urged research before snap judgments, and 30

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while Langfitt felt somewhat ultimately vindicated, he found: “…it was entirely possible, but not comfortable and you would probably die, but then, the main character was actually a demi-god, which helped a lot.” More importantly, it sparked the interest that led to his career path. While there was not today’s panoply of YouTube videos (the DIY university of choice), there were enough books and early internet resources to get him started. Finally, about five years in, www.anvilfire. com came online, and it was a little easier after that. Moreover, the blacksmithing world is very interconnected, with local guilds (he’s president of his) and a national organization, Artist-Blacksmith's Association of North America, to provide

support and connections. It’s a very apprentice-oriented structure with more experienced blacksmiths teaching newer ones. Langfitt makes lots of hooks and small ornamental objects to take to fairs, as well as tools for guild meetings where they have tailgates to trade and sell to one another, but his main work comes from custom orders. Need a sign for your home? He does it. A set of handmade kitchen knives as a wedding gift? No problem. If you can explain it, he can construct it. One of his latest projects was a set of strap hinges for a series of arched barn doors that go as high as eight feet and five feet wide. The barn would be featured at the Lewisburg Renaissance

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Fair. There are three hinges per door, and each is as wide as the door. The middle one looks like a dragon, and the outer ones look like flames. The hardest part is that the pieces were so long and heavy, it was hard to hold them while working on them. Moreover, they transmit a lot of heat, so leather gloves and aprons are absolute necessities. Langfitt produces a lot of custom blade work, including knives for outside, like machetes, as well as kitchen knives. He uses a particular process called Damascus steel pattern welding, in which several layers of metal are forged together. The final grinding process brings out a lovely pattern of the various metals on the blade, and he finishes the knife with a handmade wooden handle. While he gets some of his materials new, he is able to recycle almost any non-galvanized steel, so trips to scrap yards, metal shops and car lots can turn up a lot of raw material. Working a forge started as a hobby, but Langfitt says he comes from a family of entrepreneurs, so having NRVMAGAZINE.com

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his own business seemed the normal order of the day. His wife helps with the books. His skill set is old-fashioned, but his marketing is almost purely 21st century. He has presence on Facebook, Instagram, ETSY and YouTube. Googling JJL Forge gets all of this information as well as other links to articles about him. You can even kick it semi-old school and email him at jjlforge244@gmail.com. Word of mouth and repeat customers also keep him busy. Blacksmithing is a dangerous undertaking. There are the obvious burns and heat exhaustion, the smoke can create respiratory issues, the noise of pounding the metal can deafen a person, and retinal burns can result from staring too long at the white hot metal you’re shaping. Still, Langfitt’s hands have the smooth, unburned appearance of a person who is skilled and at peace with his work, enjoying it immensely. “There comes a point," he relates, "where you have to look at it and say, ‘Do I want to be safe or do I want to make something?' That being said, I did quit my day job because I didn’t want to die before I was 40. If you go to work hating your job and yourself, it’s time to reevaluate.” Becky Hepler is a long-time Giles County freelance writer and retired high school librarian. 32

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[ So, You Want To Learn Blacksmithing ] There are many reasons people are drawn to blacksmithing. Most want to make blades and swords. Others are interested in creating tools. While some come through farrier work, that’s not Langfitt’s cup of tea. Whatever brings people, there are others to help, and it’s not as complicated as one might think. “You just have to have a fire, a desire, something to hold the fire, something to hit with, something to hold the thing you are hitting and you’re in,” he says. Teaching is part of Langfitt’s blacksmithing career. He has trained apprentices at Historic Smithfield and spends time in individual instruction. etsy.com/shop/JJLFORGE facebook.com/JJL-Forge-114936549222127/ instagram.com/jjlforge/ youtube.com/channel/UCAu7IqOZxf3KzCRVYfFrnaA jjlforge.com

May/June 2019


Meet the Artist

Spring Open House May 18-19

Saturday, 11 to 5, Sunday, 12 to 4

Nature’s Beauty

Kent Square, 216 S. Main St. Blacksburg, VA 24060 (540) 552-6446

www.pbuckleymoss.com NRVMAGAZINE.com

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NRV Home

Bloom Where You are Planted

McCann loves being able to stroll Blacksburg’s unique local businesses and attractions, including the Huckleberry Trail, Lyric Theatre and Moss Arts Center. Text by Joanne M. Anderson Photos by Kristie Lea Photography It was love at first sight in 1998 for Christine McCann and the charming cottage on Gracelyn Court in Blacksburg. The big-city girl from upstate New York was ready for something different. “The curb appeal captivated me, and the gardens were magnificent. I’d been living in an edgy Capitol Hill neighborhood [in D.C.] with noise, crime and trash. In an instant, I could imagine my then 8-month-old daughter Meredith growing up eye high to day lilies and walking to elementary school,” she recalls. From the front, the small brick house gives no hint of what lies beyond the front door. The traditional 1950’s era 34

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ranch architecture flows seamlessly into bright modern spaces that open to a three-quarter acre sculptured garden. The home’s origin story is steeped in

. . . I could imagine my then 8-month-old daughter Meredith growing up eye high to day lilies and walking to elementary school,” Virginia Tech history. It was built in 1951 by Dr. and Mrs. Landon Fuller when Harry

S. Truman was U.S. President and Walter Stephenson Newman was President of the university. Dr. Fuller was an English professor, and Virginia Tech’s Director of Admissions until he retired. The Fuller name remains on the brass front door knocker. Four decades later, the house was purchased by Dr. Robert Lyons, a horticulture professor and co-founder and director of the Hahn Horticulture Garden at Virginia Tech. He used his expertise and creativity to develop wonderfully unique landscape and hardscape designs throughout the property.

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While McCann enjoyed the house and grounds, there were limitations. “The inside was very wellmaintained and decorated,” McCann continues. “But the kitchen was small, and we needed more living space.”

“The inside was very wellmaintained and decorated,” . . . But the kitchen was small, and we needed more living space.” She brought in award-winning Virginia Tech architect, author and artist, Donald Sunshine, to expand the kitchen and add a family room, play room, master bedroom and bath. Sunshine also created one of the house’s signature features, a fourlevel wood and glass deck that opens the house to abundant sunlight with cascading stairs to the gardens that wind behind the house. Benches and fanciful yard trinkets offer rest and whimsy among maples, magnolias, black-eyed Susans, sedums, peonies and roses. When asked what she loves the most about her house, McCann responds: "The surprise element of walking into a traditional cottage that then flows into a modern, well-lit, open space. It’s not too big to keep up and offers mostly onelevel living with separate wings that accommodate my daughter when she visits and my guests.” Guests visit frequently since McCann opened the house as an Airbnb destination. The original hallway, two bedrooms and bath provide the perfect privacy and atmosphere for Airbnb guests, while

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the spacious master bedroom and bath off the original living room create a separate living space. The kitchen and adjacent family room are warm, hospitable spaces with natural light streaming in through large windows that illuminate McCann’s décor and collection of local art. Her collection of paintings and photographs include works by Ray Kass, Joni Pienkowski, Janet Niewald, Pat West and Reine Sloan (a VT alumna and Meredith’s first babysitter). The home’s balcony is perfectly aligned for watching the colors painted by the setting sun, and the adjacent deck is an ideal venue for dinner parties or a quiet yoga session. The lower garden patio provides a shaded refuge for summer meals or quiet reflection. When not working or entertaining guests, McCann loves being able to stroll Blacksburg’s unique local businesses and attractions, including the Huckleberry Trail, Lyric Theatre and Moss Arts Center. Her Airbnb guests also appreciate being within walking distance of Cassell Coliseum and Lane Stadium on game days. McCann feels fortunate to have the opportunity to make Blacksburg her home. “This is the longest I’ve ever lived in the same zip code," she says. “Just like the trees and bushes in my garden, my roots are planted here. I have great friends and professional acquaintances in a community that is vibrant, supportive and kind. I can’t imagine being anywhere else.”

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Fe at ure

Vehicle Safety and Emergency Kits

License and registration? Check! Spare tire? Check. Flares? Flashlights? Water bottles? MREs? Uh-oh… Text by Emily Kathleen Alberts When I bought my first car many moons ago, a vintage 1991 Mercedes-Benz (on eBay!), one of the first things I noticed was the neat first aid kit that came with it. It was built into the back-seat’s center console, and at the time, I thought of it as merely a novelty, doubting whether I’d ever actually need it. Fast-forward nine years, and there I was, about to give birth in the front seat of that very same car. We made it to the hospital, but I distinctly remember thinking about that first aid kit and being comforted by its presence. Here’s what was 40

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in it: bandages, adhesive pads, gauze, adhesive tape, butterfly closures, scissors, wet wipes, first aid cream, and an instruction booklet explaining how to administer first aid and CPR. After the baby came, the diaper bag became the main arsenal of preparedness -containing everything from diapers to wipes, a bulb syringe and even a thermometer. As the years have passed and the kids have grown, I have since adopted a thru-hikers mentality to my cargo, parsing everything down

to the bare essentials: phone, wallet, keys. Even my purse was carefully chosen based on the lightweight material and ease of access. I have enough to worry about hauling my kids, their friends, book bags, sports gear, art projects, coats, etc. that my own belongings take the back seat. Of course, today’s backseat is a Toyota minivan and I still miss the Benz. So what are the essentials of vehicle safety and emergency kits? We asked the experts and here are the top 10 items no car should be without:

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Jumper Cables: This may seem like a no-brainer, but many motorists are driving around right now sans jumper cables, hoping a good Samaritan will be there when they need it. Increase your chances of rescue by investing in a set for your vehicle. Walmart sells them for $7. Car cell phone charger: These days, we live and breathe by our cell phones. According to Consumer Reports, any good emergency kit needs to contain a car charger, no excuses. A solar charger for backup isn’t a bad idea. Map: If you’re in a dead zone or out of data, nothing beats a good, oldfashioned, paper map. Flashlight (with extra batteries): Because being underneath a car in the dark isn’t an ideal scenario. Food & Water: It never hurts to have extra water on hand, and MREs (meals ready to eat) and granola bars can buy you extra time if you’re stranded for a while. Your car’s manual: Your car probably has a spare tire and jack, but it might be hard to find them without consulting your car’s manual. Pop open the glove NRVMAGAZINE.com

compartment and make sure it’s there. Gloves: Speaking of gloves, a pair of sterile gloves is good to have, in case you need to treat a wound ~ or deliver a baby! Tool kit: Popular Mechanics recommends the RoadTech kit from Aerostich. “It's actually a tool kit for motorcycle trekking but has all the required bits: locking pliers, an adjustable wrench, a 6-in-1 screwdriver, pliers with a wire cutter, a ratchet and sockets, hex keys and more. And the parts roll up into one handy pouch.” (The Ultimate Survival Preparedness Kit for Your Car, Berg, 2012). Emergency Flares: According to a recent article posted by mentalfloss. com: “A blind curve isn’t the ideal place for your car to stall, but such is life.” Even if you manage to pull (or push) your car to the side of the road, other drivers may not see you until the last second. Reflective flares can be placed around your car and before the curve to give other motorists plenty of warning.

to diagnose and clear error codes. According to procarreviews.com, “OBD2 ports have been standardized in the majority of cars since 1998 and are usually located below the steering column.” The Autel Maxisys Pro MS908P has advanced diagnostics and ECU programming, but might be too expensive and complex for the average car owner. The Bluetooth BlueDriver OBD2 automotive diagnostic scanner is a better bargain and easier to use. That completes the top priority items, but during winter, an ice scraper, warm blanket or space blanket and portable shovel are must-haves. A seatbelt-cutting tool and a windowbusting tool are smart additions to your emergency kit, especially if you commute via bridge or tunnel. And if you don’t drive a Mercedes-Benz, remember to buy a first-aid kit! Emily K. Alberts is hoping the cookie crumbs and french fries on the floor of her minivan will sustain her in an emergency.

Scanner: Often referred to as an OBD2 scanner, a car scanner allows you

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NRV Rides

It's Got Style

Text by Karl H. Kazaks Photos by Tom Wallace Age difference can be overcome when it comes to love and attraction – we know that. If you’re in love, it doesn’t matter how much younger one person is. Still, Madison Miller’s situation is unique. She was just 6 when the lightning bolt struck. “This has been my dream car ever since I was six years old and saw one at a car show,” she explains, her hand on the front fender of her burgundy 1966 Ford Mustang. “I started saving to buy one of my own.” When she received cash gifts for Christmas and her birthday, she saved the money, year after year, not squandering it on other things. When she was 14, in 2013, 42

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she found a Mustang for sale on the local craigslist. “I couldn’t even drive yet.” The Mustang was all original, garaged here in the New River Valley. She had just enough money to buy it and showed the listing to her father, Eddie Miller. “He said, ‘Let’s take a look at it, make sure it’s okay,” she recalls. When they got there, her dad observed: "Looks like it’s in great condition." And he let her buy it. The car is almost entirely original and came with 25,000 miles on it. Today it has 26,700 miles. She is the car’s third owner and wants

to keep it as original as possible. The Mustang’s paint is original, as is the interior, and almost the entirety of the mechanical parts. The inline-6 engine, for example, is the original engine. One upgrade the car has had is the addition of brake boosters. Miller has repaired the car herself, with the help of her father. “He’s showed me how to work on it, and we replaced the alternator.” She drove her Mustang for the first time when she got her learner’s permit with her dad in the passenger’s seat. “It was so exciting,” she gushes. “It’s such a classic, sporty car.” Miller takes the Mustang out

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on fun rides such as going out for ice cream or to the car shows hosted by NRV Classic Cruisers in Fairlawn and Bissett Park. “I like to go to the cruiseins with my dad. Often, people will come up to me, and say, ‘Is this your dad’s car?’ And I respond: No, it’s mine." Miller’s daily driver is a 2015 Jeep Renegade. She has just graduated from New River Community College and will begin at Radford University in the fall for a bachelor's degree in visual communications. In her free time, she likes to go antiquing, to yard sales and other sales, looking for things to resell in the antique booth at Charlotte’s Web II, formerly Cambria Emporium, she shares with her father and her boyfriend, Luke Underwood. The original Charlotte's Web is still open in Salem. The Mustang debuted on April 17, 1964, at the New York World's Fair as a reasonably priced 4-seat vehicle, and sales instantly and wildly exceeded expectations. Known as the first of the pony cars, 22,000 were sold on the first NRVMAGAZINE.com

day (MSRP $2,368), and more than a million across the first year and a half. A pony car refers to an affordable, stylish automobile with a sporty image. Soon after the Mustang's impressive popularity and success came Pontiac's Trans Am, the Dodge Challenger and Chevrolet Camaro. The pony cars are smaller than muscle cars and characteristically sport a long hood and short rear deck. According to Ford, the Mustang was conceived as a "working man's Thunderbird." Several stories emerge for its name. The original suggestion was naming the vehicle for the World War II fighter plane, P-51 Mustang, which sounded too airplaney-y, so the alphanumeric part was removed. Another story relates that cars were being named for animals, so a list of animals was submitted, and Mustang was selected. In any event, the Mustang has always evoked something a little wild and free, a little rebellious with charm to spare.

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The earliest version, just two years younger than Miller's, measured 180 inches long and featured a floor mounted shifter. Weighing in at under 2,500 pounds, it also cost less than $2,500. This pony stayed in the race, crossing a finish line when, in 2002, its top two competitors, the Camaro and the Firebird, ceased production. Camaros came back seven years later, and in 2014, Mustang once again galloped into the lead in sales for pony cars. Miller has friends who have asked: “Why do you have such an old car?” Her answer to them: “Even though it’s older, it’s got style.” She is not alone in recognizing car style. As of August, 2018, more than 10 million Mustangs have been built in the U.S., and production and demand are still trotting along nicely. Miller is also in good company with Mustang owners like former president Bill Clinton, Jay Leno, Tim Allen, Patrick Dempsey and Charlie Sheen. Oh yeah, it's got style.

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NRV Summer EVENTS 2019

2019

EVENTS

NRV Summer EVENTS Farmer Markets

May 24 & 25 [also June 29, Aug. 31, Sept. 21] New River Valley Horse Show All breeds show, free admission NRV Fairgrounds, Dublin www.nrvfair.com

Radford Saturday, 8 a.m. – 1 p.m., 1122 E. Main St. Pulaski Tuesday, 4 – 7 p.m., 20 S. Washington Ave. Pearisburg Thursday, 5 – 7:30 p.m., 1410 Wenonah Ave. Narrows Friday, 8 - 5 p.m.; Sat. and Sun., 8 - 3 p.m. Monroe Street Christiansburg Thursday, 3 – 7 p.m., Hickok Street Blacksburg April-October, Wed. noon - 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Corner Draper and Roanoke St. Floyd May-November - Saturday 9x.m. - 1 p.m. 203 S. Locust Street

JUNE June 1 & 2 Pulaski County Lions Club Flea Market 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission & Parking FREE NRV Fairgrounds, Dublin June 7 3rd Annual Cheese Festival 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Farm to Table 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Historic Smithfield Plantation, Blacksburg June 7 “Murder! at The Merc” New River Valley Regional Theatre Draper Mercantile, Draper www.nrvregionaltheatre.org June 7 Robert Randolph and the Family Band 8:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg

MAY Starting in May – Each Saturday Starlite Drive-in Flea Market Lots of vendors and fun shopping 275 Starlight Drive, Christiansburg

June 7-15 Mountains of Music Homecoming www.mtnsofmusic.com

May 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12 "Forever Plaid" - Tickets: $25 New River Valley Regional Theatre, Pulaski www.nrvregionaltheatre.com May 11 16th Annual Kids Fishing Day Fun for all ages Narrows Town Park, Narrows

June 8 & 9 17th Annual Henry Reed Memorial Fiddlers Convention Competitions, shows, workshops, kids tent Newport Rec Center, Newport

May 12 13th Annual Brewridge Music Festival Mountain Lake Lodge, Pembroke May 17, 18, 19 Chasing SS Cars & Vintage Steel Show NRV Fairgrounds, Dublin May 24 & 25 9th Annual Chantilly Farm Bluegrass & BBQ Festival 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com

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June 8 Claytor Lake Festival Claytor Lake State Park 10 a.m. – 11 p.m. Live music, car show, art & craft vendors, food, fishing tournament, fireworks & more 540-643-2500

June 9 Remembering Doc: T. Michael Coleman, Jack Lawrence, Jeff Little, Wayne Henderson 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg www.artscenter.vt.edu June 15 Annual Gospel Jubilee Chantilly Farm, 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com

June 15 Eastern Divide Ultra Race 7:30 a.m. Mountain Lake Lodge, Pembroke June 15 12th Annual Summer Solstice Festival 1 – 11p.m. Music, midway games, children activities, food, beer garden, street performers & dog parade Downtown Blacksburg June 17 & 18 35th Annual Festival in the Park Pearisburg Community Center 6 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. Saturday Concerts, car show, children rides, arts & crafts vendors, live entertainment www.gilescounty.org / 540-921-1222 June 20 and 22 Summer Chamber Music Concerts 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg June 21-23 "Dirty Dancing" Theme Weekend Dance lessons, dance parties and more (540) 626-7121 | www.mtnlakelodge.com June 22 Giles County Relay for Life 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Giles County High School, Pearisburg www.gilescounty.org June 22 & 23 Lavender Festival Noon - 6 p.m. Enjoy music, wine, explore items made with lavender – foods, lemonade and more. “Learn about Lavender” lectures throughout the day Beliveau Farm Estate, 5415 Gallion Ridge Rd., Blacksburg June 29 House & Garden Tour of Floyd County $30 includes tours, lunch - rain or shine www.floydartcenter.org

JULY July 6 New River Valley Garden Tour 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tickets $12 in advance at any MontgomeryFloyd Regional Library, $15 day of tour

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NRV Summer EVENTS 2019 July 13 3rd Annual Floyd Energy Fest 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Chantilly Farm, 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com July 14 Historic Flag Day Celebration with Gaolhouse Jams (music) Wilderness Road Regional Museum www.wildernessroadregionalmuseum.com July 19 Floyd Auto Fair & Vintage Swap Meet 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chantilly Farm, 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com July 22-26 History Summer Camp for Kids: American Civil War Wilderness Road Regional Museum, Newbern www.wildernessroadregionalmuseum.com July 22-27 New River Valley Fair Live entertainment, grandstand concerts, live stock shows, fair fun food and more NRV Fairgrounds, Dublin 540-674-1548 or www.nrvfair.com July 24–28 Floyd Fest Celebration of music and art, workshops, demonstrations, more than 100 artisans 894 Rock Gorge Road, Floyd www.floydfest.com July 26-28 "Dirty Dancing" Theme Weekend Dance lessons, dance parties and more (540) 626-7121 | www.mtnlakelodge.com July 27 Ingles Ferry to Newbern Mary Draper Ingles Weekend Activities Ricky Cox performing Traveling Songs, 1 p.m. Wilderness Road Regional Museum, Newbernwww.wildernessroadregionalmuseum. com

AUGUST August 2 & 3 39th Annual Steppin’ Out Festival 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. More than 150 crafters, downtown merchants sidewalk sales, food, 3 stages of live entertainment. Downtown Blacksburg www.blacksburgsteppinout.com August 9 & 10 Pulaski County Humane Society Yard Sale NRV Fairgrounds, Rte 100, Dublin August 9-11 Preston Family Reunion 2019 The Preston Women - Legacies of Leadership Commemoration of 245th anniversary of Historic Smithfield and lasting legacy of Preston family. www.historicsmithfield.org August 10 & 11 Newport Agricultural Fair Celebrating 83rd Birthday – the oldest agricultural fair in VA. Kid rides, food, games, horse show, horse pull, live music. Saturday night fireworks. www.newportagriculturalfair.com NRVMAGAZINE.com

August 16 3rd Annual Cirque du Floyd 5 - 11:30 p.m. Showcasing great names in regional circus arts, workshops Chantilly Farm, 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com August 17 & 18 Civil War Living History Weekend, 24th VA and 83rd PA Infantry Wilderness Road Regional Museum, Newbern www.wildernessroadregionalmuseum.com August 23-25 "Dirty Dancing" Theme Weekend Dance lessons, dance parties and more (540) 626-7121 | www.mtnlakelodge.com August 25 www.renewthenew.org Fall into the New 2019 Volunteers welcome Giles County 540-921-2525 Radford 540-639-9313 (x205)

OCTOBER October Weekends Sinkland Farms Pumpkin Fest Live music, family activities, art & craft vendors, corn maze & hay rides Rte. 8, Riner

Oct. 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13 "Deathtrap" - Tickets $25 New River Valley Regional Theatre, Pulaski www.nrvregionaltheatre.org

Sept. 13 Dance Theatre of Harlem 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg Sept. 14 Floyd Livestock & County Fair 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Celebrate Floyd's rich agricultural heritage Chantilly Farm, 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com September 14 & 15 Pulaski County Lions Club Flea Market 7 a.m. – 5 .p.m. Lots and lots of vendors, free admission and parking NRV Fairgrounds, Rt. 100, Dublin Sept. 14 46th Anniversary Wilderness Trail Festival 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Arts & crafts, antique autos, live music, kids activities, food and more Kiwanis Club of Christiansburg Downtown Christiansburg www.wildernesstrailfestival.com Sept. 17 National Geographic Live 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg

October 12 & 13 Newbern Fall Festival All Main Street hosted by the Newbern Vol. Fire Dept. Vendors, music, food, family fun, Scottish Kirking Ceremony Sunday evening October 12 Radford Highlander Festival Heavyweight games, Celtic music, familyfriendly entertainment Bisset Park, Radford October 12 Pearisburg Merchants Associates Scarecrow Festival 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Family fun with vendors, food, scarecrow contest and more Pearisburg October 16 Camille A. Brown & Dancers 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg October 25 The Kingdom Choir 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg

Sept. 20 Wild Up 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center Sept. 21 4th Annual Muddy ACCE Race 5K obstacle course mud run along the New River Water Trail; provides scholarships and community service opportunities for Giles Access to Community Education program (ACCE) www.muddyaccerace.com Sept. 26-28 Biodynamic Principles & Practices in Farming Spikenard Farm, 401 Hideaway Lane SE, Floyd 540-745-2153 May- June

Sept. 27-29 StakeOut Events Blue Ridge Bike Rally First East Coast motorcycle campout/ride out event Chantilly Farm, 2697 Franklin Pike SE, Floyd www.chantillyfarm.com

October 3 Sirius Quartet 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg

SEPTEMBER

Sept. 27 Nobuntu 7:30 p.m. Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg

October 26 Narrows Fall Festival Art & crafts, kid activities, food, late evening street dance Main Street, Narrows October 26 11th Annual Blacksburg Brew Do Noon – 5 p.m. Craft beer, food, live music and more 1600 Innovation Drive, Blacksburg www.blacksburgbrewdo.com Dec. 7 Roanoke Symphony Orchestra 4 p.m. Holiday Pops Moss Arts Center, Blacksburg

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Advertisers Index

46

NRV MAGAZINE

American National Bank & Trust . . . . . . . .

26

Beliveau Farm Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

Bonomo's Floral & Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

Celco Community Credit Union . . . . . . . .

17

Claytor Lake Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

Collision Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Curtis Motor Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

27

DeHart Tile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

Dogtown Roadhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

Downtown Blacksburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Drs. Jacobs & Diaz Optometrists . . . . . . .

33

Energy Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Floyd Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . .

29

Friendly Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19

Giles County Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Interiors Unlimited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19

Kesler Contracting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

Long and Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

Macado's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Matrix Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

Moss Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48

Mountain 2 Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

Nest Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

NRV Intellectual Property Law PC . . . . . .

33

P Buckley Moss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

Pearis Mercantile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

Powerzone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35

Progress Street Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

Pulaski Va Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47

Richard Anthony, DDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

Robinson, Farmer, Cox Associates . . . . . .

29

Shelter Alternatives, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Skyline National Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

SVSL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Swim U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

The Adventure Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

The Ewing Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

The Mitchell Law Firm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

The Shaheen Firm, P.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

The Weigh Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35

VA Shoreline Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

May/June 2019


NRVMAGAZINE.com

May- June

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9 1 0 2 r e m m Su Thursday, June 20, and Saturday, June 22, 2019, 7:30 PM SUMMER CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS

Friday, June 7, 2019, 8:30 PM ROBERT RANDOLPH AND THE FAMILY BAND Our second annual reunion weekend concert features Robert Randolph and the Family Band as we welcome our friends, neighbors, and VT alumni who are home for the weekend. Street and Davis Performance Hall Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre $25 general admission $10 students with ID and youth 18 and under

Sunday, June 9, 2019, 7:30 PM REMEMBERING DOC: T. MICHAEL COLEMAN, JACK LAWRENCE, JEFF LITTLE, AND WAYNE HENDERSON In partnership with the Crooked Road, we celebrate the life and legacy of iconic American musician Doc Watson, with other related free events at 5:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. Street and Davis Performance Hall Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre $15 advance general admission $20 after May 31 $10 students with ID and youth 18 and under

PERFORMANCES l EXHIBITIONS l EXPERIENCES 190 Alumni Mall, Blacksburg | artscenter.vt.edu | 540-231-5300

Our free summer concerts return, featuring works by Fauré, Shostakovich, Schubert, Mozart, Mendelssohn, and Turina. Street and Davis Performance Hall Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre Free

Profile for New River Valley Magazine

NRV Magazine May-June 2019  

Blacksburg, Christiansburg, Radford, Giles County, Floyd, Montgomery County and Pulaski County.

NRV Magazine May-June 2019  

Blacksburg, Christiansburg, Radford, Giles County, Floyd, Montgomery County and Pulaski County.

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