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N ORTHWEST M ISSISSIPPI C OMMUNITY C OLLEGE F OUNDATION

Northwest

P.O. Drawer 7015 • 4975 Highway 51 North Senatobia, MS 38668

NORTHWEST MISSISSIPPI COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Now

FALL 2017

Parting

shot

Northwest recognized local veterans at the MACJC Championship Game on Nov. 11, including (l to r) Liesl Mote, intramural coordinator, cheer sponsor, U.S. Air Force, Iraq; Tate County native Dean Hunter, U.S. Army, Vietnam; Michael Parker, campus police, DeSoto Center, U.S. Army, Vietnam; Tate County native James Chapuis, U.S. Navy, World War II and Bill Rines, assistant director of Campus Police, Mississippi Army National Guard, Iraq. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

Alumna of the Year: Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell Longtime educator honored at Homecoming

INSIDE: scholarship ceremony • 2+2 tourney • Legacies • fall sports


Now

Northwest Fall 2017

A publication of Northwest Mississippi Community College

President Dr. Gary Lee Spears Vice President for Finance Gary Mosley Vice President for Student Services/Chief of Staff Dan Smith Vice President for Education Richie Lawson Chairman, Northwest Board of Trustees Mike Moore

Northwest Foundation Associate Vice President of Development & Special Projects/Associate Editor Sybil R. Canon • srcanon@northwestms.edu Director of Alumni Affairs & Development Operations Patti Gordon • pgordon@northwestms.edu Scholarship Coordinator & Foundation Assistant Marla Kennedy • mkennedy@northwestms.edu

Communications Director of Communications/Editor Julie R. Bauer • jrbauer@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Communications/ Graphic Designer LaJuan Tallo • ltallo@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Marketing/ Digital Media KayLeigh McCool • kmccool@northwestms.edu Graphic Designer Jennifer Corbin • jcorbin@northwestms.edu Coordinator for Sports Information Kevin Maloney • kmaloney@northwestms.edu Assistant Coordinator for Sports Information Brian Lentz • blentz@northwestms.edu

For address changes, please contact Alumni Affairs at (662) 560-1112. Northwest Now is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the Northwest Foundation and the Office of Communications.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Please visit the Northwest website at www.northwestms.edu/affirmativeaction to view the College’s Notice of Non-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action.

contents features

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recognizing excellence Northwest celebrates first “Complete to Compete” C2C graduate as part of state initiative.

cover story: forever ranger Longtime educator Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell reflects on her great start at Northwest.

finding her place Actress/author remembers her time at Northwest.

celebrating family Family and community come together at Homecoming celebration.

reaching a milestone Foundation endowment surpasses $10 million mark.

departments 1 2 3 18 25 33

student snapshot/tyler mitchell president’s reflections/dr. gary lee spears alumni president’s notes/mike boren around campus the legacy continues the sporting life from the heart of northwest/sybil canon alumni news/patti gordon

On the cover: Longtime educator, Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell (class of 1968) was honored as Alumna of the Year. Photo by Julie Bauer

from the

heart of Northwest

Sybil R. Canon The online Urban Dictionary cites that the term, “Dream Team,” originates with the 1992 basketball team that represented the United States in the Olympics. The team had such notables as Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, and Magic Johnson, just to name a few. This website further provides this definition of the term: “It is a team, which doesn't necessarily consist of the best players, but the best team players with enough talent that the team itself is a juggernaut against opponents.” Dictionary.com seems to concur with this definition, as it includes the following: “a group of people regarded as having the perfect combination of talents.” So what does this have to do with the Northwest Foundation? Well, I have to admit that when my longtime colleague, Dolores Wooten, retired, I was somewhat apprehensive. We are a three-person office, and, to accomplish what we need to accomplish, we have to work as a team, with each person working as many hours as it takes to get the job done. After five months, I truly believe that I am part of a new “dream team,” not because I am on the team, but because of the new ideas, new energy, and new passion brought to our office by Patti Gordon and Marla Kennedy. Patti has assumed Dolores’ duties, and, thankfully, Dolores had the opportunity of working with Patti before retirement. Thus, with that experience and training of what we have done in the past and with the confidence to try new methods, new ideas, and new processes, Patti has soared! She is the consummate professional who is able to communicate comfortably and effectively with everyone, and she has the heartfelt compassion for the students who walk through our doors needing help. She rarely gets “ruffled” and is a calm, steady force in our office. Marla sits at the front desk, making her the first face our guests see when they walk through our doors. And what do they see? They see a smiling face, and they experience the utmost in kindness, courtesy, and respect. She is our scholarship coordinator, which means that she has a great deal of personal interaction with students, whom she affectionately calls our “little darlings.” She is extremely adept with technology and she is able to teach an old dog (that would be “me”) some new tricks. She works fast, and she works with precision. Thus, while I hope that I am not sounding boastful, I really do feel that I am a member of a “dream team,” and while I don’t feel that I am the best member of the team, I do feel that because of our genuine desire to help our students and our willingness to work hard, we have a synergy, a compassion, and a zeal that puts us at the very heart of Northwest with the best yet to come!

alumni news Patti Gordon “We are Northwest”… That is the title of the recruitment event for high school seniors in the fall of each year here on campus. If you are reading this article, then “You are Northwest!” Whether an alum, a contributor, staff, or faculty member, you have some connection to Northwest and therefore, have the opportunity to put Northwest in a positive light in the public’s eye. I recently had the opportunity to hear The Beach Boys in concert, and the song “Be True to Your School” brought those feelings of school spirit, pride, excitement, fun and loyalty to your school. First call to action: search it on Youtube, Spotify, etc. and see if it doesn’t give you some pep! Second call to action: let us hear from YOU! Please give us the pleasure of checking our system for your information. We want to verify if you are identified as a Northwest alum, the years you were here, your interests while at Northwest, and most importantly, your contact information. We are able to communicate more efficiently when our records are up to date! I am excited to be your alumni director and am here for you. When you call to update your record, please share with the alumni office if you are interested in planning a class or sports reunion. Until then, “rah, rah, rah, be true to your school!” Conatct me at pgordon@northwestms.edu or call me at 662-560-1112.

The Sports Hall of Fame and Alumna of the Year Homecoming Celebration was hosted by the Northwest Alumni Association. Please make plans to attend next year’s event!


student snapshot Tyler Mitchell Stewart • Freshman Program: Agricultural Technology/ John Deere Tech Scholarship: The Raiford Lindsey Fancher Endowment What does it mean to you to have this scholarship? It meant a lot to me to get this scholarship. I was glad to get it, and I know it will help me a lot through college here. Are there any instructors or people who have been particularly helpful to you during your time at Northwest so far? I would have to say Jeremy Massey. Just since the time I have been here, he has taught me so much. He is just a great teacher, and he is good at helping us learn all of this. What made you want to get into this program? I grew up on a cattle farm, and we were always working on tractors. When I was 15, I went to work on a farm in Stewart, and they used all John Deere equipment and I just got used to working on it. The story goes that you started managing people older than you at a young age. How did that come about? On the farm I worked at, they grow produce. I have managed the watermelon crew and most of the produce crews since I was a teenager. John Deere students have to have a sponsorship from a qualified dealership. Who is your sponsor, and what do you plan to do once you earn your degree? I signed a three-year contract with Wade, Inc. in Greenwood. I plan on working there and making a career out of this.

Photo by Julie Bauer

What would you like people to know about Northwest and your experience here? It’s a great school and this is a good campus. The cafeteria is pretty good, too. I have never had any problems here. It is a good community college, and it is great that this program is so close to home.

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president’s reflections It has been a great semester! Our faculty, staff, and students have demonstrated the excellence that we have come to expect at Northwest. • This semester, almost five percent of our students who are taking nonremedial courses and who have maintained a 3.5 grade point average have been invited to join Phi Theta Kappa, the prestigious honor society for two-year college students. If that number were higher, that might be cause for concern because it could indicate a low level of expectations by our faculty. However, this level demonstrates challenging courses and studious students. • The new Health Sciences Building, located next to the Nursing Building, will be completed by the end of the semester and is set to be occupied in the spring semester 2018. • The Ranger Football Complex opened to rave reviews by our current players and coaches, by former players and coaches, and by a large crowd of guests who attended the dedication ceremonies. It is a remarkable facility! We have enjoyed a tremendous season, with the Rangers participating in the state playoffs and earning a bid to play in the Graphic Edge Bowl in Cedar Falls, Iowa, on Dec. 3. • Programs such as MI-BEST and Complete 2 Compete, which are highlighted in this issue of Northwest Now, are new and innovative programs throughout our state, and our faculty and staff are making tremendous strides in implementing these programs. • The Northwest Foundation Endowment surpassed $10 million. Added to the almost $5 million that has been awarded in scholarships and other monies raised for special projects to include a grand piano in the Fine Arts Division, championship rings for our athletes, and a trip to Carnegie Hall for the Northwest Singers, the Foundation has generated almost $16 million. In every career pathway that our students choose, whether it is academic or career-technical, there is excellence. Many of our programs have achieved state, regional, and national recognition. However, it is not these recognitions that determine our effectiveness. Instead, it is the evaluations we receive from our students, it is the performance of our students on licensure examinations, it is the graduation rates when they transfer to a four-year college, it is the employment rates when they enter the workforce. Those are the numbers that matter, and it is in those areas that Northwest excels. That is why it is always a great day to be a Ranger!

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Northwest Now

Dr. Gary Lee Spears

alumni president’s notes Mike Boren What does it mean to be an alum of Northwest Mississippi Community (or Junior) College? When I attended the Homecoming Alumni Celebration, I listened to the speeches given by the Alumna of the Year and by the inductees in the Sports Hall of Fame. One theme was predominant in all of the speeches—the times these honorees spent at Northwest changed their lives and set them on a path to a promising future. I know this is true in my own life, and that is why I am honored to serve as the NWCC Alumni Association president and on the Foundation Board of Directors. It is why I give to the Northwest Foundation. It is why I play in the golf tournaments. It is why I encourage all Northwest alums to join the Alumni Association and “give back” to our “first” college. We are pleased to have Patti Gordon as the new director of Alumni Affairs at Northwest. She is full of energy and wants to not only continue the good work with the Northwest Alumni Association that was begun by Dolores Wooten but also to increase membership and to adopt some new projects that will be fun for the alums and help us to relive some of the best years of our lives. Before we conclude 2017, I hope you will please consider joining the Alumni Association. Lifetime membership is only $30 and provides you with passes to regular-season games held on the Senatobia campus. I also hope you will please include the Northwest Foundation in your year-end giving. For assistance in doing either or both of these, please contact Ms. Gordon at pgordon@northwestms.edu or 662-560-1112. Merry Christmas! And, of course, go Rangers!


around campus Northwest celebrates first C2C graduate Franchesca Ramsey of Horn Lake you begin the process of reviewing past has become the first Northwest student credits and connecting with a C2C to earn her Associate of Arts degree coach. You may be one of more than through the state’s new “Complete 2 30,000 Mississippians who have Compete” (C2C) program, according to already earned enough credits for an college officials. associate or bachelor’s degree. If you According to their website, C2C is a are short of a degree, your C2C coach statewide program sponsored by the will help you maximize your previous Mississippi Institutions of Higher experiences and earned credits and Learning and the Mississippi realized I owed some tuition, so I paid determine how close you now are to a Community College Board. Its mission that off, but missed the deadline to degree,” according to the C2C website. is to help Mississippi adults who enroll in the class. I was looking around Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee attended college but don't have a online when I discovered the C2C, so I Spears was on hand to congratulate degree get their degree and create a submitted my information and here I Ramsey on her achievement. “I am so am,” Ramsey said. brighter future. pleased with the work our administraPersons who are interested in pursu- tive staff people have done to facilitate Ramsey, who is originally from Coldwater, graduated from Coldwater ing the C2C program should visit the completion of graduation under the High School in 2004. She attended www.msc2c.org to access the C2C C2C program. Congratulations to Northwest from 20042006 on the Senatobia campus, studying journalism and communications, but did not complete her degree at that time. “I took some time off to help my mom, who is a single mother and my hero. I decided to return to school after being out for many years,” Ramsey said. Ramsey’s mother, Quince Ramsey Gordon was also proud of her daughter’s success. “I am so proud of her, and she has been such an inspiration to me,” Gordon said. Ramsey attended Franchesca Ramsey of Horn Lake (center) was the first Northwest student to receive her degree through Northwest part time at the state’s new “Complete 2 Compete” (C2C) program. Congratulating Ramsey are (l-r) Aime Anderson, the DeSoto Center from registrar; Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears; Jere Herrington, director of Recruiting and C2C 2013-2016. She had coach and Richie Lawson, vice president for Education. Photo by LaJuan Tallo changed her pathway to computer information systems at that time. “I was still working Pathfinder, an easy-to-use, interactive Franchesca Ramsey for her commitfull time and trying to take some class- tool developed exclusively for the state ment to seeing the process got fines to finally finish,” Ramsey said. She of Mississippi. “It will help you under- ished,” Dr. Spears said. tried to re-enroll in the summer, but stand how close you are to a degree “I am very excited to be the first one was told by an adviser that she needed and provide the best pathway for you to at Northwest to do it. I am just ecstatic get that degree. It can be accessed on about it and I thank God for it,” Ramsey one last class. “I started looking into my records your home computer, laptop, or smart- said. — LaJuan Tallo and checking on what I might owe. I phone. By answering a few questions,

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around campus Northwest librarian chosen for Dartmouth Institute Northwest Instructional Librarian Courtney Hicks was one of 15 librarians nationwide selected to participate in Dartmouth College’s Librarians Active Learning Institute (LALI). Hicks attended the institute Aug. 9-11 in Hanover, New Hampshire. “It was a wonderful experience overall. It was truly a rewarding experience for me,” Hicks said. The purpose of the institute was to help librarians become better teachers, according to Hicks. “Many people don’t realize that librarians also teach and we are trying to get better at it. The whole point of the institute was to help me become a better teacher through active learning. It was a different way of thinking about teaching and library instruction and how we can do it better,” Hicks said.

“Courtney is a wonderful instructor who creates innovative and interactive classroom lessons. She is always looking for new methods and tools to make

Hicks

learning fun and informative. When I saw the brochure for the Librarians Active Learning Institute, which provided instruction on creating and developing class sessions, assessing students’ research and information literacy skills, and using tools to support active learning, I thought that it would be perfect for her. Admission to the program was very competitive and we were very excited and proud that she was chosen. Courtney was so invested in attending the Institute that she used her own resources to do so,” said Dr. Melissa Wright, director of Learning Resources. In her position at Northwest, Hicks not only teaches students one on one in her capacity as a reference librarian, but is also responsible for teaching classes who come into the library for information. —LaJuan Tallo

Foundation receives $10,000 grant from north Mississippi consortium

Dr. Gary Lee Spears (right) recently accepted a grant in the amount of $10,000 from Dr. C.L. Stevenson, co-director of the North Mississippi Education Consortium (NMEC). Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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Northwest Now

Dr. Gary Lee Spears recently accepted a grant in the amount of $10,000 from Dr. C.L. Stevenson, co-director of the North Mississippi Education Consortium (NMEC). This grant will be added to the NMEC Scholarship Endowment which has already been established with the Northwest Foundation. “NMEC has been providing annual grants to Northwest since 2007, all of which have been used to provide scholarships to prospective Mississippi teachers. Our college and Foundation are extremely grateful for this support of our students who have chosen education as their career pathway,” Spears said. The North Mississippi Education Consortium is a partnership among 44 north Mississippi public school districts, three community colleges, and the University of Mississippi School of Education whose purpose is to provide a means whereby participating members can assure quality educational programs through cooperative efforts and shared resources, for the benefit of students and communities being served. —LaJuan Tallo


around campus Calloway captures Grisham Excellence in Teaching award Jarrod Calloway, a psychology instructor at Northwest, was presented the Sandy Grisham Excellence in Teaching Award at the college’s opening faculty meeting on Aug. 7. This award is given to an academic faculty member on the Senatobia campus in honor of Sandy Grisham, a retired instructor in the Social Science Division. The selection is made by the Academic Division directors on the Senatobia campus. The award winner receives a check in the amount of $1,000 from the Northwest Foundation, which represents earnings on the endowment established by faculty and staff. “Jarrod excitedly incorporates our changing world into lectures that maintain a crisp edge and some might say, a cutting edge in his classroom. He never cowers in the face of changing technology, but embraces and celebrates change, especially if the change is going to enhance the classroom environment,” said Dr. Chuck Strong, division director of Social Science. —LaJuan Tallo

Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (left) presents Jarrod Calloway, psychology instructor (center) with the Sandy Grisham Excellence in Teaching award. Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects joined Dr. Spears for the presentation at the college’s faculty meeting on Aug. 7. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

In Memoriam: Kenneth Murphree Former Northwest Foundation Board President Kenneth Morgan Murphree passed away on Aug. 7, 2017. Murphree was a member of the Northwest Foundation Board from 1997-2006 and served as president of the board for 1997 and 1998. Murphree was born on March 31, 1946 to Bradford and Hazel Coleman Murphree of Tunica. He grew up in Tunica working in his father’s grocery store. He graduated from Tunica County High School. Murphree earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Mississippi, where he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. He served two years of active duty in Vietnam. Afterwards, he returned to Ole Miss, earning a master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning.

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Connie Monteith, moved to Hernando. Murphree served as county administrator of DeSoto County for 22 years. In 1996, he became county administrator of Tunica County, where he served until 2012. Murphree served as president of the I-69 Coalition and on the board of directors of First Security Bank. He was also a former president of the Delta Council. Murphree was preceeded in death by his parents and a brother, Coleman Murphree. He is survived by his wife Connie, his sister, Melanie Lucado, a son, Andrew and two grandchildren, Carter and Nicolas. Visitation and services were held on Aug. 10 at Tunica Presbyterian Church with burial in Oakwood Cemetery. After earning his master’s, Murphree and his wife, the former

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around campus DC faculty award presented to Aaron Northwest psychology instructor Charlie Aaron was presented the DeSoto Center Excellence in Teaching Award at the college’s opening faculty meeting on Aug. 7. The DeSoto Center Excellence in Teaching Award was established to recognize one DeSoto Center faculty member each year. Both academic and career-technical faculty are eligible for the award. The award was voted on by the DeSoto Center faculty, and the recipient receives a plaque and a cash award, which is part of a growing endowment through the Northwest Foundation, according to Jeremy Isome, dean of the DeSoto Center. Aaron began his association with Northwest over 25 years ago as an intern. In 2003, Aaron was hired as a full-time instructor at DeSoto Center. He currently also serves as division coordinator for Education. In his remarks at the ceremony, Isome described Aaron as a teacher “who has shown that teaching is his life’s calling and that the passion he has for his subject is contagious.” Isome said that Aaron was one of the first instructors at DeSoto Center to embrace the “smart classroom” technology and incorporate it into his lectures. —LaJuan Tallo

Cooper, Greenlee receive 2017 Faculty, Staff Customer Service awards Dr. Gary Lee Spears (left) presented the 2017 Faculty and Staff Customer Service Awards at the Aug. 7 opening day faculty meeting. Calvin Cooper (top photo, center), aviation maintenance technology program director/instructor at DeSoto Center-Olive Branch received the faculty award, and Darlene Greenlee, counselor at Lafayette-Yalobusha Technical Center in Oxford (bottom photo, center) received the staff award. Congratulating Cooper and Greenlee is Richie Lawson, vice president for Education. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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Northwest Now

Charlie Aaron, psychology instructor (second from right) was the 2017 recipient of the DeSoto Center Excellence in Teaching Award. Presenting the award were Northwest President Dr. Gary Lee Spears (second from left), Jeremy Isome, dean of DeSoto Center (far left) and Richie Lawson, vice president for Education (far right). Photo by LaJuan Tallo


around campus President recognizes BOT member, MCCB visitor

Dr. Gary Lee Spears recognized Northwest Board of Trustees member Sammy Higdon of Yalobusha County for his 10 years of service to the board at the August meeting. Higdon was honored at the MACJC Board of Trustees one-day conference, held in July at the Clyde Muse Center in Pearl. Photo by Julie Bauer

Dr. Spears welcomed Cheryl Thurmond, a member of the Mississippi Community College Board (MCCB), to the October Board of Trustees meeting. Thurmond gave a brief report on the work community colleges are doing around the state, and praised Northwest for its leadership in various projects. Photo by Julie Bauer

Officials on hand for DeSoto Center Writing Center ribbon cutting

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A ribbon cutting for the Writing Center at DeSoto Center was held on Thursday, Oct. 5. The Writing Center, established as part of the Quality Enhancement Plan, serves students from Northwest and The University of Mississippi. It is free to students who need help with any type of writing. College administrators, faculty and staff and community members were on hand to celebrate the opening. Left to right are Carmen Kyle, executive director, Southaven Chamber of Commerce; Josh Green, writing center coordinator, Northwest DeSoto Center; Jeanine Rauch, director of University of Mississippi-DeSoto Writing Center; LeeLee Haraway, QEP co-director, Northwest; Jason Jones, director, Northwest Writing Center; Dr. Rick Gregory, executive director, Ole MissDeSoto Center; Dr. Gary Lee Spears, president of Northwest; Jeremy Isome, dean of Northwest DeSoto Center; Amy Shaw, division coordinator of Languages and Communications, Northwest DeSoto Center. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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2017 Foundation Scholarship Ceremony Donors, students celebrate giving at annual ceremony

Erica King of Lambert (right), one of this year’s 20 Gateway Tire Endowment recipients, takes a moment to thank Bobby Dunlap, CEO of Dunlap and Kyle in Batesville for her scholarship. Mr. Dunlap has given more than $400,000 to help Northwest students. Photo by Julie Bauer Attending the Annual Scholarship Ceremony has become a tradition for many of those who have established endowments and annual scholarships. The event has become much like a reunion, and this year's event attracted more than 700 scholarship sponsors and students. The two-day event, held Oct. 3 and 4, also recognizes newly established scholarships. This included 15 new endowments that were established between October, 2016 and September, 2017. The Foundation awarded over 500 scholarships for the 2017-18 academic year for a total of over $500,000. The current Northwest Foundation Endowment Fund is valued at approximately $10.3 million, and Northwest has awarded $4 million in scholarships since 1997. All students, regardless of income, are encouraged to apply. Applications are available at www.northwestms.edu under “Financial Aid,” and applications are due April 1.

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Retired biology instructor Dr. Jerry Hollis (left) visited with Eli Inman of Senatobia, the recipient of the Dr. Jerry Hollis Endowment, established by the Division of Natural Sciences and other friends and colleagues. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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The student panel (top photo) is ready for the question and answer session. Photo by Julie Bauer

Senatobia Rotary Club President Addison Lawrence (left) and Rotary Club Endowment recipient Abby Thompson Ho Ching of Senatobia wait for the ceremony to begin. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

The Northwest Singers, under the direction of Susanne Spencer VanDyke, director of Choral Activities (bottom photo) sang a beautiful rendition of “Amazing Grace” for the ceremony this year. Music instructor Dr. Saundra Bishop is the accompanist for the group. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

New Endowments The Joe Beckum Endowment The Jim Blackwood Endowment The James and Dorothy Dunn Endowment The Dr. Marshall E. Hollis Endowment The Joe Johnson Endowment The Renasant Bank Two Plus Two Endowment The Dolores Beckum Wooten Endowment The Women’s Foundation of Mississippi Endowment The Dr. Dolores W. (“Dr. B”) Barnett Endowment The Dr. Michael Butts Endowment The Earline Cocke Endowment The Jo Ellen Logan Endowment The First Security Bank/ Larry Joe Pratt, Sr. Endowment The Paper Packers Endowment The Gail Wilborn Endowment

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2017 Foundation Scholarship Ceremony

Northwest freshman nursing student Blake Rooker (second from right) of Olive Branch is the recipient of the DeSoto Shrine Club Endowment. Members of the club visit with Rooker before the ceremony. (above) Recipients from Lafayette-Yalobusha Technical Center pose with their dean, Dr. Jack Butts (second from right).

Photos by LaJuan Tallo

Former Ole Miss-DeSoto Director, Dr. Bonnie Buntin (left) and former Northwest DeSoto Center Assistant Dean Elizabeth Burns (center) are joined by Northwest DeSoto Center Dean Jeremy Isome (second from right) and Richie Lawson, vice president for Education (right) in welcoming Alex Norris of Southaven (second from left), recipient of the Dr. Bonnie Patridge Buntin 2+2 Endowment and Kori Breen of Southaven (second from right), recipient of the Elizabeth Hilliard Burns Endowment. Photo by Julie Bauer

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cover story

Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell was honored as Northwest’s Alumna of the Year during Homecoming festivities. Presenting the traditional proclamation to Mitchell is Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

Longtime educator named Alumna of the Year By LaJuan Tallo

Longtime educator Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell has been named Northwest’s 2017 Alumna of the Year. Mitchell was honored on Sept. 21 during Homecoming festivities on the Senatobia campus. “I am honored to be here today and very appreciative of this recognition, although I know there are many other deserving alumni, many who are here in this room. Thank you for the opportunity to connect with so many people, old friends and now some new ones, all here today because of Northwest and what it has meant to us,” Mitchell said in her acceptance speech. Mitchell grew up in Webster County,

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Mississippi, the daughter of Clifford and Edna Avery. Her parents encouraged her to continue her education past high school and she became the first in her family to graduate from college. After graduating from Eupora High School in 1966, she came to Northwest on the recommendation of family friend Howard Carpenter, who was then chair of the Division of Education. Mitchell attended Northwest from 1966-1968, graduating with an Associate of Arts in Business. While she was at Northwest, she was a member of the Student Education Association, a Leadership Honors student, Outstanding General Business student, a member of

the Northwest Misses, a Sophomore Favorite, a member of Phi Beta Lambda (Future Business Leaders of America) and Who’s Who Among American Junior College Students honoree. She went on to receive her Bachelor of Science in Education and her Master of Education from Delta State University. She earned a Doctor of Education in Special Education Administration from the University of Alabama. She completed post-doctoral work in Educational Leadership and in Emotionally Handicapped/Behavior Disorders at the University of South Florida. At Delta continued on next page

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State, she was a member of Pi Omega Pi National Business Education Honor Society and at the University of Alabama, the Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society in Education. “Northwest is where I grew up, where I became a serious student, where I learned how to study, how to seek resources and develop mentors. There were so many supportive faculty and staff who were willing to guide and support me. I can’t thank them enough. Northwest, my first college, gave me a foundation that carried through in all my further educational pursuits and in my life,” Mitchell said. Mitchell has over 30 years of experience in education as a teacher, district supervisor, school administrator and university instructor. Even though her career began in the business world, she develDuring Homecoming, Mitchell (second from left) visited Bobo Hall with her dormoped a love for teaching special educamates (l to r) Ann Smith Darby, Joy Loftin Henderson, Sue Grimes Davis, Vicki tion, and she has been an advocate for Cunningham Robison, Betty Poore Holland, and Debby West Rutledge. The group students with disabilities for many years. has remained friends and stayed in touch for more than 50 years. In 2000, she received the Landis M. Photo submitted Stetler award from the Florida Council of Exceptional Children (CEC), the highest She retired from education in 2006, after having worked honor awarded to a special educator in the state of Florida. throughout her career in Mississippi, Alabama, Florida and Among her many professional memberships she served as Ohio. She and her husband, Dr. Jerrel Mitchell split their time governor of the International CEC from 1998-2000, and pres- between Florida, Colorado and their home in Starkville. ident of the Florida Federation of CEC and Florida Association In May 2014, Mitchell, along with a group of Northwest Student CEC Advisor from 1991-1994. She has volunteered alumni, started organizing reunions for the classes of 1965for Special Olympics and Very Special Arts and at the 1969. The group has grown to 243 members, and they Episcopal Camp for Individuals with Disabilities, Diocese of encourage those who attended Northwest during that time to Mississippi among others. join their Facebook page, which Mitchell administers. Anyone Susan Avery was featured in the 1968 Rocketeer yearbook as the Outstanding Student in General Business. Photo from Rocketeer archives

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who attended Northwest is welcome to attend the reunions. “Our Facebook page and the reunions for our classes have been really successful. I’d encourage other classes to start Facebook pages and start having reunions,” Mitchell said. “I have never met anyone who attended Northwest who wasn’t positive about their experience. I think this is because just like in my time here, there is still the supportive faculty and staff. What’s even better is the broad range of educational programs and technical career opportunities, the branch campuses, the leadership, and the team work that abounds. I will be forever grateful for this recognition and forever a Ranger,” Mitchell said.

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Three inducted into 17th class of NW Sports Hall of Fame Northwest inducted two former student-athletes and one coach into its Sports Hall of Fame on Sept. 21 during Homecoming festivities. Dr. Gerald J. Hasselman, a former AllMACJC center, Don Edwards, the winningest women's basketball coach in school history, and two-time all-conference third baseman Marcus Van Every were inducted into the 17th Northwest Sports Hall of Fame class. As a member of the Ranger men's basketball team from 1964-66, Hasselman finished with eight 30-point games, good for second all-time in program history, and concluded his Northwest basketball career by being named All-MACJC in the spring of 1966. Off the court, he was also selected to both the President's and Dean's Lists. Edwards enters his 31st season as Northwest's head women's basketball

coach entering the 2017-18 season and has been a part of the staff for the last 34 years, starting in 1983 as an assistant under the late Harry Adair. During his tenure as head coach, Edwards has led the Lady Rangers to 17 NJCAA Region XXIII and three NJCAA National Tournament appearances, as well as a pair of MACJC championships in 1995 and 1996. His career record at Northwest stands at 447-310 (.590), posting 22 winning seasons overall and four seasons with 20 or more wins. With all his success, Edwards has received numerous Coach of the Year recognitions. He was named Region XXIII and District 16 Coach of the Year in 1990, 1996, 1998 and 2005, MACJC Coach of the Year in 1989 and 1990 and was MAC Women's Basketball Coach of the Year in 1990, 1995 and 1996.

The Northwest baseball team experienced the best offensive season in team history in 1999, and Senatobia native Marcus Van Every was a big reason why. After originally signing with Gulf Coast (Fla.), Van Every returned to Senatobia after one semester and was a primary contributor during his two seasons with the Rangers. The catcher/third baseman finished his career with a .432 batting average (third all-time), an on-base percentage of .508 (second) and 24 home runs (third). In 1999, Van Every hit .453 in his sophomore campaign, and alongside teammate Eduardo Pena, the duo led the NJCAA with 17 homers, which remains the Rangers' single-season record. A twotime All-MACJC selection, Van Every also holds the single-season record for total bases at 132. —Kevin Maloney

Northwest inducted two former athletes and one coach into the Northwest Sports Hall of Fame during Homecoming ceremonies on Sept. 21. Inducted into the 17th class were (l-r) Don Edwards, women’s head basketball coach, 1982-present; Dr. Gerald Hasselman, basketball, 1964-66 and Marcus Van Every, baseball, 1998-1999. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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2+2 Scholarship Golf Tourney winners announced Winners have been determined for the annual BancorpSouth/Northcentral Electric Power Association (NCEPA) 2+2 Scholarship Golf Tournament, benefitting students from Northwest and the University of Mississippi at DeSoto Center. The event was held on Thursday, Sept. 14 at Cherokee Valley Golf Course in Olive Branch. A total of 33 teams competed. Taking first place in the contest were (top photo) Link Eaves of Memphis, Steve Cunningham of Olive Branch, Adam Trask of Horn Lake, and Landon DeStefano of Olive Branch. Second place winners were (middle photo) Jimmy Hill of Hernando, Greg Courts of Memphis and Matt Sellers and Mark Rowan, both of Senatobia. The third place winners were (bottom photo) Bobby Shipp and Will Wortham, both of Batesville, Grant Goforth of Oxford and George Cossar of Senatobia. Closest to the pin were Greg Graves of Senatobia and Daniel Watkins of Germantown. They each received a free round of golf at Cherokee Valley Golf Course. Winner of the longest drive was DeStefano, who also received a free round of golf at Cherokee Valley. The money raised from the tournament will go to the 2+2 Scholarship Initiative for scholarships to both colleges. Since its beginning, the tournament has generated over $200,000 toward scholarships. For more information visit northwestms.edu/desoto. —LaJuan Tallo

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finding her If you follow the stories of Northwest alumni, they will take you down all kinds of paths. You’ll find doctors, nurses, lawyers, business people, professional athletes and musicians, former governors and award-winning novelists. And then there’s Germany Kent. It’s really hard to fit her into any category, due to the variety of her work. While she’s authored 10 nonfiction books (The Hope Handbook Series) and the award-winning “You are What You Tweet,” a work about social media ethics, she has also appeared in several nationally-broadcast television commercials for companies such as AT&T, Disney, eHarmony, Coors Light, Verizon and Nike. She starred in a reality TV series for the Food Network, and has appeared on the series “Graceland” and on “Let’s Make a Deal Christmas Edition.” She was also in the movie “Star Trek: Into Darkness.” She can be seen in music videos with Mary J. Blige and Take 6, in which Stevie Wonder made an appearance. In addition to her on-screen work, she has written extensively on issues central to social media etiquette in several magazines and served as a freelance reporter in Los Angeles, where she interviewed celebrities, sports moguls and business executives. Born Evelyn Palmer, her “stage” name “Germany Kent” came to her in a dream. “People were telling me I should put my kids into commercials and I should go out and try acting. I

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was asking God for a sign and one night in the middle of the night, I saw the words ‘Germany Kent.’ I went on the internet and searched it and noth-

ing came up. I saw it as a platform on which to build everything,” Kent said. Kent attended Northwest from 1993-1994 as Evelyn Palmer, studying journalism with Dr. Ann Whitten. “I was so impressed with her as a person– her poise and her fire. To me she was the epitome of class. She just had a lot of ‘umph.’ She had a lot of influence on me and a big impact on her students’ lives,” Kent said. While at Northwest, she was voted on the Homecoming Court and participated in student government, being the first AfricanAmerican to be voted president of the freshman Student Senate. She was a reporter for the Ranger Rocket, of which Whitten was the adviser. “Dr. Whitten was a great teacher. She believed in me. She was tough on us, though,” Kent said. Kent says that when she came to Northwest, she was a commuter stu-

dent, but still managed to make a lot of friends and meet a lot of people. “I was on the campus all day, walking around and meeting people. It was a great first college experience. I was the editor of my high school newspaper, so being on the Ranger Rocket was natural. I just did not know that these experiences would propel me to be a writer later in life,” Kent said. “I could say that it all started for me at Northwest,” she added. A native of Greenville, she moved to Sardis at a young age. Kent graduated from North Panola High School, but spent time between Greenville, where her father Charles Palmer and grandmother Evelyn Palmer (for whom she was named) lived, and Sardis, where she lived with her mother, Lula Palmer, the current mayor of Sardis. At North Panola, she participated in everything she could. She was a member of Future Business Leaders of America in DECA, cheerleading, and was on the homecoming court all four years of high school. “My DECA teacher Martha Brown taught me public speaking and marketing. It ignited something in me,” Kent said, adding that she won the speaking competitions in the state in both her junior and senior years of high school, which was a first for an African-American girl in Mississippi. As a teenager, Kent participated in beauty pageants and was named Miss Congeniality her senior year in the Miss Teen Mississippi pageant. She was asked to represent the state of continued on next page

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Tennessee in the recently, she was honTalented Teens ored with a Legacy competition, Award from the Les b e c a u s e Modernettes in Mississippi did not Greenville (that was participate in that founded by her grandpageant. She commother), a Lifetime peted and won Achievement Award Miss Tennessee. from her sorority and She and her mom the City of Greenville went to New York proclaimed June 20, City for a week 2017 as “Germany when she was a Kent Day.” senior in high “That was a pretty school. humbling experience, “I think that set because the mayor the tone for me to told me he’d never want bigger things seen a day named in life. I had never after a person there,” been exposed to a Kent said. metropolitan area If you asked Kent and it was a lifewhat her life’s philosochanging experiphy is, she would probKent poses with the portrait of the late Dr. Ann Yates Whitten, longtime public ence for me. Even ably tell you it is servrelations director and journalism instructor. Kent studied journalism at going to pageants ice. “For everything I Northwest in the 1993-94 school year and gives credit to Whitten for putting in Oxford and attempt I ask myself her on the path to success. Photo by LaJuan Tallo Jackson affected how I can be of service me because I was and show others what is degree. They moved to Starkville, and exposed to people who were not from possible,” Kent said. later to northern California and southern my area. Being around other people For more information visit her California with her husband’s jobs. opens you up to diversity,” Kent said. Wikipedia page, “Germany Kent” or her She and her husband are the parents After a year at Northwest, Kent transwebsite, germanykent.com. of EShun, age 15, Eden, age 13 and ferred to Mississippi State University, —LaJuan Tallo Raven, age 11. All three of the children where she was a member of Alpha are also involved in acting and modeling. Kappa Alpha sorority, was the first black Throughout her education and woman to serve as Attorney General and career, the one conwas a staff writer for The Reflector, stant in Kent’s life is MSU’s student newspaper and worked her love of community as a reporter for the campus-based and public service. She news station. She earned a bachelor’s has been an active voldegree in marketing and journalism. unteer in many charitaAfter MSU, Kent attended the ble organizations, but University of Alabama on a full scholarone of her true pasship studying public relations and earnsions is being a posiing a master’s degree. During her time tive role model for girls at UA, she led the marketing team for and young women. She campus residential life, and volunteered is known for her tirefor Habitat for Humanity, Meals on less efforts for social Wheels and the Junior League of media ethics, empowTuscaloosa. ering youth and speakAfter graduating from UA, she took a ing out against bullying job at the University of Houston where and cyberbullying. she worked in residential housing manKent has received agement. It was during that time she many honors since she Kent and her family were featured in advertisments for met her husband, Reggie Melvin. They started her career but Disney. Left to right, EShun, Eden, Reggie and Raven Melvin were married after he finished his and Kent. Photo submitted

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Celebrating N O RT H W E Dear Frien ds of Nort hwest,

ST

MISSISSIP

Senatobia ,

Giving

PI COM MUNITY Mississipp i 38668

COLLEGE

Because I have had th graduates e pleasure as adults of working with familie at Northwe as teache s, good job st for a nu rs, adminis s, and hap mber of ye trative sta py lives. M ars, it is m ff, support y joy to se any of our staff --- an e Northwe g ra d d uates have I can reme st My two so returned to mber whe ns attende n work here th ey were he d Northwe it was the st. My wif re as stud very best p e, Marilyn, ents. lace for th tiful familie and I wante em to beg s, and we in d th th e e ir college ye m to atten are sure th d Northwe ars. Now, w at Northwe st because e see them st was the we felt right choic as succes All of the c sful adults e for all of omponents w u it s . h beaustudents b of a great y name, th beginning e highest le are here a and learnin t Northwes vel of tech g, a profes t --- the ve nology and sional and ry best ins phase of a facilities th c o m tructors w p pplication a a t s s p io ro n vide an exc a ho know th te support for admiss four-year c e ll eir s e ta io n t n ff e , who are e nvironmen the search ollege, and ager to gu t for financia for teachin the couns ide and co g l aid, the c eling to ch unsel thro oose just ourses to ugh every the right c take for a While we h areer, eith seamless elp our stu er academ transfer to dents app to the Nort ic or caree a ly for federa hwest Fou rte c h nical. ndation Off l, state, an donations d ic in e s fo titutional a to help pro r additiona id, we go a l funds. Th vide schola step furthe ose funds rships, text r and direc are made book assis t them possible b tance, and Thus, I ho e c a e u m se our frie pe that yo ergency as n u will plea d s needed as s give is ta nce in cris se include sistance to is situation the Northw students w s graduates . est Found ho are wo enjoy toda ation in yo rking very y. For you ur year-en hard to en r support a d giving. Yo joy the su nd encoura u will provi c c e ss that so gement, w de many of o e will be e ur Northwe xtremely g st rateful. Sincerely yo urs,

Dr. Gary L ee Spears President

To make y our tax-de ductible g Foundatio ift, please n, 4975 H make you wy. 51 N, click on “ r chec Sen Donate� to make an o atobia, MS 38668 k payable to NWCC . Or you m nline contr F ay go to w oundation and mail ibution. ww.northw to: NWCC estms.edu /alumni a nd


The Legacy Continues

Legacy

the

It is, indeed, both a pleasure and an honor to announce new scholarship endowments, the beginning of a new legacy for those being honored by these scholarships and for the students who will be assisted for generations to come. The beauty of an endowment is that it will continue to help students for as long as this college exists. It is also wonderful to think of how these students will use their education to make better lives for themselves, for their families and for the communities in which they will live. Thus, it is appropriate to name these pages, “The Legacy Continues,” because the effects of these extraordinary acts of generosity will last forever.

continues

The Northwest Foundation was fortunate to have a matching gifts program from 1997 through 2013. While the program is no longer in place, we want to continue to express appreciation to those who provided these funds to help our scholarship endowment grow at such a rapid pace. At the end of October, the value of the endowment was $10 million. Morgan Freeman, the acclaimed actor and producer of national and international fame, was the largest benefactor of the matching gifts program, providing $515,000. In addition, we received a generous gift from the Estate of Clarence Thomas Hill, Jr., in the amount of

The James and Dorothy Dunn Endowment The James and Dorothy Dunn Endowment was established by Mr. and Mrs. Dunn in appreciation for the wonderful beginning they received at Northwest on their educational journey. After attending high school in Tunica and beginning their college education with two years at Northwest, both James and Dorothy graduated from Delta State University, Mr. Dunn earning a degree in Education and Mrs. Dunn earning a degree in Business Education. They both later earned master’s degrees. Mr. Dunn received his master’s degree and his Education Specialist degree from Delta State, and Mrs. Dunn received her master’s in Educational Leadership from The University of Mississippi School of Leadership. Mrs. Dunn has a rich history in Tunica County education. Devoting 39 years of her life to helping young people, she taught high school English for 10 years and then taught related studies in the Remedial Center. She was teacher and director of Youth Opportunities and completed her educational career serving for 16 years as director of the Tunica

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James and Dorothy Dunn Vocational Center. In addition, she has been secretary to her church for 25 years, has taught Sunday school, has been a lifelong member of the NAACP, and attends college football games whenever she can because, in her words, she is a “sports fanatic.” Mr. Dunn’s higher education emphasis was in special education, and he taught in Tunica and DeSoto counties after college. Mr. Dunn is also Captain Dunn. He began as a member of the ROTC at Delta State, graduating as a second lieutenant in the Army Reserve. From there, he

$180,000. Other matching gifts sponsors included Horseshoe Casino and Hotel, the Youth Progress Association, Sycamore Bank, Gateway Tire, Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Williams-Sonoma, Inc., Sam’s Town Hotel and Gambling Hall, ThyssenKrupp Elevator, and Schulz Xtruded Products. Through the generosity of so many, the endowment continues to grow. As it grows, so does the realization of the hopes and dreams of our students as well as the legacy of the special people who are honored by these endowments. —Sybil Canon

joined the Tennessee National Guard, serving for nine years, and earning the rank of captain. Mr. Dunn grew up in Tunica County on a 40-acre farm owned by his parents. He is one of 13 children and was the first (but not the last) in his family to graduate from high school and college. In 2014, Mr. Dunn was named Alumnus of the Year at Northwest in recognition of his public service as a Tunica County supervisor and as executive director of the Tunica County Community Development Coalition, a non-profit housing organization, developing single and multi-family housing to low income families. Mr. Dunn was the first AfricanAmerican to be elected to the Tunica County Board of Supervisors and the first to serve as board president. He is also the first African-American to be elected president of the Mississippi Association of Supervisors. He was inducted into the Tunica County Hall of Fame in 2013. For their entire lives, James and Dorothy have lived in Tunica. In the lean years, before the gaming industry arrived, and to this day, they have worked steadfastly to improve the lives of the people of Tunica County. They have enjoyed 39 years of mar-

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The Legacy Continues

Baptist Church, riage, and they have Senatobia, which one daughter, Tiffany include being a part of Dunn-Cook, a son-inthe Pat Williams law, Kraven Cook, and Missions Group, Faith two beautiful grandchilSunday School Class, dren, Kaisleigh and Boots for Sam’s Kids, Kraven, Jr., known as Prayer Group for Out-of“KJ.” Country Missionaries, James is a member and Global Outreach. and past president of Sybil Canon is the Northwest Foundation Board of The Dunns were honored at the Scholarship Ceremony and a plaque of appreci- pleased that this scholDirectors. Sybil Canon, ation was presented by Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (far left) to arship has been estabassociate vice presiJames and Dorothy Dunn for the establishment of the endowment that bears lished. “We are hontheir names. Pictured (l-r) are Dr. Spears, Rechelle Siggers, Marilyn Young, Donna ored that Dr. Marshall dent of Development, Dunn, Louise Dunn, James Dunn, Dorothy Dunn and Shawonda Dunn. Hollis and his brothers describes the Dunns Photo by Julie Bauer have honored Linda. as “quiet and compasSince her marriage to sionate servants, who do not sit on the sidelines to wait for master’s-level courses during her teach- Jerry, she has loved each of the Hollis something to happen. Rather, they get in ing career, which began in Strayhorn. As brothers as if they were her own broththe game and make things happen. the first certified kindergarten teacher in ers. Her life of quiet service to her They have shown by their example that the Tate County schools, Linda also church, her family, and her former stuadversity can be overcome. They have taught at East Tate and Coldwater dents are a testament to the sweet digshown by their service that everyone can Elementary Schools. She retired in 1998 nity of this special lady,” she said. The scholarship will be awarded to a succeed if given a helping hand. They after 20 years as an educator. Linda and Jerry are the proud parents sophomore pursuing a Natural Sciences have shown by their generosity that they career pathway. stand ready to help, not only their own families, but all families, whether it is to The J. Gary and Annette secure affordable housing, to promote Kornegay Endowment industries that will bring high-paying jobs The J. Gary and Annette Kornegay to their part of the world, or to emphaScholarship Endowment has been estabsize the importance of education.” lished at Northwest by Mr. and Mrs. The scholarship will be awarded to Kornegay in appreciation for the educagraduates of Rosa Fort High School in tion each received at Northwest and for Tunica. their desire to help students with a finanThe Linda McGonagill cial need. Hollis Endowment When Gary Kornegay attended Northwest from 1968-70, he learned of The Linda McGonagill Hollis an internship program with the Federal Endowment was established by Dr. Bureau of Investigation. After his sophoMarshall Hollis and his brothers, Dr. Jerry more year, he spent a year as an intern Hollis, Freddy Hollis, and Phillip Hollis, in with the FBI in Washington, DC. appreciation of her love and devotion to Linda McGonagill Hollis He returned to Mississippi to attend the Hollis family and in honor of her life The University of Mississippi and of service as a stellar educator in Tate of three children, Bridget, Jonathan, and received his Bachelor of Arts in Business County. Administration, after which he was Born in 1948 in the small community Angela. Bridget, married to Dr. Bob Wineman, licensed as a Certified Public of Hollis, Linda attended the Calhoun County schools of Derma and Vardaman is also a medical doctor. The Wineman’s Accountant. In 1980, he opened his own before graduating from Oxford High four sons, Parker, Graham, Colter, and accounting practice in Batesville, which School in 1966. She married her high Bennett, are a special delight to Linda has successfully continued until the school sweetheart in 1965, and she and and Jerry. Jonathan is a nutritionist in present time. Annette Kornegay was a partner in Dr. Jerry Hollis have enjoyed 53 years of the Pontotoc County Health Department, and Angela, married to Patrick Benton, is the McMahan Distributing Company with marriage. Linda earned her bachelor’s degree a medical microbiologist at the University her late husband, Rick McMahan. She in Early Childhood Education from The Medical Center in Jackson. Since retire- now enjoys attending athletic events with University of Mississippi and also took ment, Linda enjoys her activities at First Gary and volunteering her time with


The Legacy Continues

which was one of the larger dairy farms in the area. He diversified his farm to include such crops as cotton, sweet potatoes, soyThe Dr. William D. and and beans, Catherine Taylor Longest corn. Mr. and and Mrs. Longest were strong proJoe W. Longest, Jr. ponents of eduEndowments cation and Gary and Annette Kornegay encouraged their Dr. William D. Longest of Oxford children to purhas recently established two scholarship endowments. One scholarship, he earned his Ph.D. in Zoology from sue college degrees. Four out of the The Dr. William D. and Catherine Taylor Louisiana State University in 1966. Dr. seven children earned higher education Longest Endowment, honors the memory Longest taught at Blue Mountain degrees, with three becoming teachers of his wife of 57 years, Catherine Taylor College, Northwest Mississippi Junior and one becoming a chemist. Mr. Longest, who died in September of this College, Memphis State University, and Longest and his family were active memyear, and the second, The Joe W. Louisiana State University. He ended his bers of First Baptist Church in Bruce. Dr. Gary Lee Spears, Northwest presiLongest, Jr. Endowment, honors the teaching career as a professor at The University of Mississippi where he taught dent, expressed his thanks to Dr. memory of his father. Longest for his “generous investment Born in Raleigh, Tennessee, to the late biology for 24 years. Mr. Joe Longest was a lifelong farmer into the lives of students at Northwest John and Thelma Coleman Taylor, Catherine Longest spent most of her in Bruce. He and his wife, Bertha, were and for honoring those who have made younger years in Glenville, a community the parents of seven children. After notable contributions in Dr. Longest’s life. It is obvious that near Como. She worked Dr. Longest is a pasas a teller at the Bank of sionate advocate for Como and took the bank education, a passion president’s position for an he is continuing with interim period of time. this wonderful gift to Mrs. Longest was noted Northwest.” for her extraordinary flower The Dr. William D. and vegetable gardening and Catherine Taylor skills, and she provided Longest Endowment countless floral arrangewill be awarded to ments for their church, students enrolled in College Hill Presbyterian academic and/or Church in Oxford. career-technical eduA native of Bruce, Dr. cation who have Longest began his higher exhibited potential educational journey at and financial need. what was then Northwest Mississippi Accepting the donation from Dr. William D. Longest (center) for the Longest Preference for the Endowments are Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (right) and Sybil recipients of The Joe Junior College in 1946 Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects at W. Longest, Jr. and then enlisted in the Northwest. Photo by LaJuan Tallo Endowment will be U.S. Air Force, where he given to descendants served for four years. of Mr. Longest. He continued his education at Baylor University where he earned completing high school, Mr. Longest both an undergraduate and a graduate attended Mississippi State University. He degree in Plant Physiology, after which and his family operated Longest Dairy, Batesville and Panola County events. She attended Northwest from 197173. The scholarship will be awarded either to academic or career-technical students from Panola County who exhibit potential and who have a demonstrated financial need.

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New Ranger Football Complex opens in time for fall ‘17 season A dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Ranger Football Complex at Northwest was held on Aug.

24. About 200 people attended the dedication, which was followed by an open house and tour of the facility. The welcome was given by Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears and remarks were made by Mike Moore, chairman of the Northwest Board of Trustees, Don Skelton, Northwest athletic director and Head Football Coach Benjy Parker. Northwest Ranger quarterback Jack Abraham, a red shirt freshman from Oxford, gave the invocation, and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by linebacker D.J. Reed, a freshman from Horn Lake. The complex, designed for the intercollegiate Ranger football program, is a 24,500-square foot building which includes coaches’ offices, team meeting rooms, weightlifting facility, home and visitor dressing rooms, equipment storage and laundry facilities and an expanded training clinic that will serve all Northwest athletes. Artwork and graphics throughout

the facility, designed by the Northwest Communications staff, feature former players who have played at universities and in the professional leagues. The locker stations in the facility were built by the Northwest Physical Plant staff. In his welcoming remarks, Dr. Spears noted that while the facility was excellent, having that alone would not win state titles or national championships or send players to compete at the next level or on professional teams. “Indeed, through the years, the Rangers have consistently proven their excellence by winning football games through the very best coaches and dedicated players, many of whom have gone on to play at major universities and with professional teams. So it doesn’t take a building. We have proven that. However, at long last, we now have a complex that matches the legacy of the past and the promise of the future for Ranger football,” Spears said. —LaJuan Tallo

Participants in the ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Ranger Football Complex were (left to right) Northwest cheerleaders Kelsey Taylor, Alexis Redd and Tori Beth Jenkins; Senatobia Mayor Alan Callicott; John Lamar, Jr., board attorney; Tate County Supervisors President, Mike Campbell; Phyllis Powell, Mainline Office; Gale Cushman, president, Northwest Foundation Board of Directors; Jay Tindall, CEO, Sycamore Bank; Bobby Dunlap, CEO, Dunlap and Kyle; Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects; former Ranger Head Coach Bobby Franklin; Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears; Mike Moore, chairman, Board of Trustees; Athletic Director Don Skelton; Head Football Coach Benjy Parker; Bill Dawson, chairman of Building Committee, Board of Trustees; Calla Basil, cheerleader; Mary Ayers, director of Physical Plant; Doug Thornton, AERC pllc, architect; Mike Moore, C&M Builders, Inc. and Sarah Ewing, cheerleader. Photo by Brian Lentz

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Homecoming 2017 Homecoming celebration brings fun for all This year, Northwest’s Homecoming celebration was held on Thursday, Sept. 21 and featured a carnival and dinner prior to the game. The Rangers defeated the Mississippi Delta Trojans 41-0 in front of a capacity crowd. Mia Mays of Independence, a sophomore studying social work on the Sentaobia campus, was crowned 2017 Homecoming Queen during halftime festivities.

2017 Homecoming Queen Mia Mays shares a smile moments after being crowned. (above) DeSoto Center students enjoyed a Homecoming barbecue on Sept. 20. (top right) DeSoto Center Dean Jeremy Isome (second from left) presents the first place trophy in the door decorating contest to Bookstore Manager DeLane Mabry (center). Congratulating Mabry is (l-r) Pearl McGlothian, receptionist, Tonyalle Rush, evening school director and Angel Campbell, recruiter. (middle right) The Ranger Bookstore won the Homecoming Door Decorating Contest at DeSoto Center. (bottom right) Photos by LaJuan Tallo

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Homecoming 2017

Students enjoy a Homecoming Picnic Luncheon served by staff members at the Lafayette-Yalobusha Technical Center in Oxford.

The family of redshirt freshman running back Kevin Perkins (fourth from left) was ready to cheer him and the Rangers on for the Homecoming game.

The Ranger Band and Rangerettes entertain alumni with the Ranger fight song on the portico of the Haraway Center.

Mastering the “Meltdown� at the Homecoming Carnival proved to be a momentous task. The snow cone machine provided welcome relief for the warm weather on Homecoming Day.

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2017 Homecoming Court

The 2017 Homecoming Court at Northwest were (l-r) from the Senatobia campus, Homecoming Queen Mia Mays of Independence, sophomore; Wisdom King of Southaven, freshman; Kallie Adair of Senatobia, sophomore and Cari Wiley of Olive Branch, freshman. From the DeSoto Center were Tori Bounds of Horn Lake, sophomore; Brittany Shoffner of Hickory Flat, freshman; Mariah Wallace of Hernando, sophomore and Jessica Mendoza of Memphis, freshman. From the Lafayette -Yalobusha Technical Center were Katelyn Love of Oxford, sophomore; Cortlin Craft of Florence, freshman, Cassidy Louwerens of Senatobia, sophomore; Claire Carter of Bruce, freshman and Kaitlyn Moore of Oxford, sophomore. Escorts were Jordan Volner of Nettleton, Arkansas (far left), a sophomore Ranger baseball player and Alec Rayburn of Senatobia (far right), a sophomore Ranger basketball player.

The court relaxes in the north end zone before they are presented to the crowd at Bobby Franklin Field. Photos by Julie Bauer

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the sporting life

Rangers fall to EMCC in double OT in title game Will play in Graphic Edge Bowl Dec. 3 In an instant classic Nov. 11 at Bobby Franklin Field that featured plenty of offense and hard-hitting, game-changing plays all over the field from both teams, No. 1 East Mississippi rallied from a touchdown deficit with eight seconds left in regulation and connected on a 2-point conversion in double overtime to beat No. 4 Northwest 67-66 in the MACJC Championship game. Northwest and EMCC showcased their revived rivalry in front of another capacity crowd and proved that they are the two best junior college teams in the state of Mississippi. The Rangers still lead the alltime series 41-24-1. EMCC improved to 10-1 and has all but solidified its spot in the NJCAA national championship game next month, while Northwest fell to 8-2 and had a 16-game home winning streak snapped. The Rangers finished at No. 5 in the final NJCAA poll. The Rangers have accepted an invitation to play in the 2017 Graphic Edge Bowl, marking the school's 12th all-time bowl appearance and fourth in the last six years. The Rangers will face No. 3 Iowa Western in the Feature Game on Sunday, Dec. 3. Iowa Western enters the game after finishing with a record of 10-1 and on a seven-game win streak. The Rangers are 5-5-1 all-time in bowl games, with recent wins in the 2012 Brazos Valley Bowl and 2015 Mississippi Bowl. What was a 23-17 EMCC lead at the half turned into an absolute shootout in the second. Tyrell Price's third rushing touchdown of the day matched the Lions' largest lead, 3724, with 40 seconds left in the third quarter before the Rangers came storming back in the fourth. A six-play, 89-yard scoring drive, capped by an 18-yard strike from Jack Abraham to Quarderman Sloan, cut the deficit to 37-31, and minutes later, a Marlon Character Jr. blocked field goal would setup another Ranger score. A high snap on a 36-yard Taylor Crabtree field goal attempt led to the block and was returned by Chris Stamps into Lion territory. Five plays later, Abraham hit Jerrick Orr for a 12-yard touchdown to put Northwest on top 38-37 with 10:11 to play.

www.northwestms.edu

With all the momentum on the Rangers' side, Turner Rotenberry stepped in front of a Lindsey Scott Jr. pass on EMCC's ensuing drive and returned it 51 yards for a touchdown to cap 21 unanswered points and send the Northwest crowd into a frenzy. It was Rotenberry's third pick six of the season and fourth of his Ranger career, a new school record. Leading 45-37 with 8:03 to play and Quarterback Jack Abraham completed 34-of-52 attempts for a trying to salt away the career-high 487 yards and five touchdowns. Photo by Dillon Day clock while moving the chains, a Monta A 14-yard completion from Abraham to Thomas fumble on the Rangers' own 49-yard Demarcus Jones down to the 11-yard line line gave the Lions new life. EMCC would capitalize just 38 seconds setup Kevin Perkins' third rushing score of later, with Scott finding Price on the the day to tie the game again at 59-59 to Northwest sideline and taking it the distance force double overtime. The Rangers only needed one play, a 2544 yards for a touchdown. The 2-point conversion from Scott to Mike Williams was yard strike from Abraham to Orr, to go ahead good to tie the game at 45-45 with 4:27 66-59 in the second overtime. With EMCC facing third-and-five at the left. Northwest calmly put together a six-play, Northwest 20-yard line, Scott found 75-yard scoring drive to push back ahead Drummond again for the touchdown and the 52-45, with Abraham finding JaVonta Payton Lions elected to go for two. A perfect play for a 7-yard touchown. Abraham was 4-for-5 call then allowed Scott to find a wide-open Crowell in the left side of the end zone for on the drive for 56 yards. Northwest had it first-and-goal at the the 67-66 win. The teams combined for 1,302 yards EMCC 7-yard line with the chance to run more clock, possibly scoring too early to give and 18 touchdowns on 175 plays, but it all the ball back to the nation's second-ranked came down to the two-point conversion in double overtime to decide a winner. offense with 2:06 left. Abraham was 34-of-52 for 487 yards, Scott and EMCC went to work from their own 33-yard line and proceeded to drive 67 five touchdowns and one interception, conyards in 1:55, finding the game-tying touch- necting with Orr a team-high 10 times for down to make it 52-52 with eight seconds 122 yards and two scores. Perkins finished left when Scott found Dontario Drummond with 116 yards and three touchdowns on the ground. from nine yards out. Northwest sacked Scott six times on the Northwest won the toss in overtime and day, two apiece from Hal Northern, Brown elected to go on defense first. EMCC only needed two plays to find the and Tariqious Tisdale. —Kevin Maloney go-ahead score, with Scott finding Daniel Crowell Jr. from 19 yards to make it 59-52.

Fall 2017

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the sporting life

Basketball teams hungry for post-season action 7-5 in north division play a year ago, with three of their losses coming by four points or less. Northwest clinched a berth in the Coming off a fifth consecutive winning MACJC Tournament for the fifth time in six season in head coach Bubba Skelton's sec- seasons and barely missed out on a return ond stint at Northwest, the Rangers are trip to the NJCAA Region 23 Tournament. Northwest is without its top three scorpoised for a return trip to the postseason in 2017-18 with a nice mixture of sopho- ers from a year ago in Dante Sterling (Alcorn State), Dakota Dailey and Keelin mores and freshmen. Northwest picked up a pair of transfers Jackson (Arkansas-Monticello) but return sixth man Therrell Gosier II (10.6 ppg/5.3 rpg), Alex Shepard (5.4 ppg/2.9 rpg) and Cameron Walker (4.0 ppg/3.8 rpg) who will serve as the Rangers' tri-captains. Among other returners for Northwest are redshirt freshman guards Clinton Moses (MRA), Justin Flakes (DeSoto Central) and Alec Rayburn (Magnolia Heights). Mississippi State sophomore transfer Miles Washington (68/205) is one of eight newcomers to the program, providing valuable SEC experience. Washington averaged a double-double his senior year at New Albany and was named 2-4A Region MVP and selected to participate in the 2016 NEMBCA All-Star Game. Copiah-Lincoln transfer Trae Thompson, who averaged 7.4 points in Tremont Robinson finished with 18 points, nine assists, eight 23 games, two-time allsteals and six rebounds in his Ranger debut. state guard Tremont Photo by Dillon Day Robinson (Maumelle, Ark.), two-time MAIS AA Player of the Year Mike from within the MACJC (Co-Lin/SMCC) and Robinson (Greenville Christian), versatile one from the SEC ranks and added big-time forward Radarius "Pig" Washington prospects from Memphis, Arkansas and the (Memphis East) and prolific scorer Jitaurious Gordon (Horn Lake) should all be nearby Mississippi Delta region. Skelton and the Rangers could go 10- solid additions to the program as well. Offensively, Northwest likes to get up 11 players deep this season, with several talented freshmen fighting to come in and and down the floor and could speed things up even more this season. The Rangers start right away. The Rangers finished 14-9 overall and averaged 86.8 points per game last year,

Rangers optimistic with addition of transfers

26

Northwest Now

with four scorers in double figures. Northwest was second in the country last season in free throws made (21.7) and attempted per game (32.8). Defensively, the Rangers put a lot of focus on pressuring the ball and turning defense into offense and easy baskets. The biggest challenge is to get 10-11 guys on the same page and playing together. Northwest opened the season on Nov. 2 with a 106-73 win over Faith Prep Academy. The division schedule begins Dec. 4 against East Mississippi. —Kevin Maloney

Sophomores will be key for Lady Rangers Last season didn't end the way the Northwest Lady Rangers had hoped. After finishing as the MACJC North Division runners-up the previous two seasons, Northwest finished 11-10 overall and failed to make the MACJC Tournament with a 5-7 division record. Now entering his 31st season at the helm, women's head coach Don Edwards will be looking for this year's team to make a return to the MACJC Tournament, which would be his 20th career tournament appearance. With a total of eight returning sophomores and a Division I transfer, the Lady Rangers could have a good shot to compete for a postseason spot. Northwest will need its large returning sophomore class to fill in the holes left by the departure of four of the Lady Rangers' top five scorers. Chrissah Shaw is the top returning scorer. A Horn Lake native, Shaw got the start in 14 of the team's 21 contests last year and averaged 8.4 points and 4.4 rebounds per game. Joining Shaw are returning sophomores Shelbi Buford, Astraea Moore, Tamaria Thomas and Brooke Walker, and all four of those players saw valuable minutes in nearly all games last season. Rounding out the sophomore class this season is Destiny Gaylor, Danielle Ratliff and Emily Bush. Joining the Lady Rangers will be Tennessee State transfer Ciara Pettis. The Memphis native saw action in 20 games during her freshman season and averaged 6.7 minutes per game. The addition of Pettis will certainly help to add experience continued on next page

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the sporting life to the sizeable sophomore class. Northwest also signed five freshmen to this year's squad, including Horn Lake product Mercades Ward. Independence duo Nakia Walker and Abby Miller also join the Lady Rangers this season. Sydney Liddell (Carroll Academy) and Kayla Bradley (White Station HS) round out this year's freshmen. Northwest will once again have a challenging slate ahead for this season. In addition to the always tough north division, the Lady Rangers will also face programs such as Mineral Area College, ASU Mid-South and Lawson State in the first half of the season before opening MACJC competition with East Mississippi on Dec. 4. While Northwest has the goal of getting back to the postseason fresh on its mind, navigating through a tough schedule is never an easy task, regardless of how much experience is returning. For Edwards, the key will be taking everything one step at a time. Northwest opened its season on Nov. 2 with a 88-52 win over Blue Mountain College JV and a late game loss to East Central, 87-83. —Brian Lentz

Abby Miller had a team-high 14 points and five rebounds in her Lady Ranger debut. Photo by Dillon Day

Women’s soccer rebounds for MACJC semifinal appearance After winning just five combined matches and missing out on the playoffs in each of the previous two years, the Northwest women’s soccer program turned the tables this season to finish 11-6 overall and third place in the MACJC North Division. This season’s win total marked the fourth 10-win season in program history and the most single-season wins in head coach Levi Nunnally’s five-year tenure at Northwest. For his efforts, Nunnally has been named the MACJC Women's Soccer Coach of the Year. "I'm extremely humbled and honored to be voted coach of the year by my peers in the MACJC," Nunnally said. "It's a big honor, but all the credit goes to my team. They are deserving of this award for all their hard work, sacrifice and determination this season. I'm happy to share it with them." Northwest started the season at 22 overall before a three-game win streak against East Central, Hinds and Mississippi Gulf Coast bumped the Lady Rangers to a 5-2 record. Despite suffering a pair of overtime losses to Itawamba and East Central and a close road loss at Holmes, the Lady Rangers managed to finish at third place in the North Division with a 4-4 record. In addition, Northwest also finished 5-1 in non-division play, outscoring its opponents 17-2 in that stretch. One of the biggest wins in program history came in the MACJC Quarterfinals at Pearl River in late October. Despite being outshot 28-3 by the previously-unbeaten Lady Wildcats, freshman Carolyn

Rials connected with sophomore Lauren Snyder for the golden goal in a thrilling 1-0 overtime victory. Freshman goalkeeper Angel Hailey also finished the match with a career-best 17 saves. Northwest had its postseason run cut short in the MACJC Semifinals, however, with a 3-1 loss to No. 16 Holmes. The Lady Rangers took a 1-0 lead into halftime before the eventual runnerup Lady Bulldogs rallied back for three second half goals. On the men’s side, the Rangers fought to remain competitive through an injury-riddled season and finished 2-8-2 on the year. The injuries forced Northwest to start a young, freshman-heavy lineup throughout most of the season under fifth-year head coach Charlie Baldwin. Northwest opened the year with a 6-2 win against Meridian and a 2-2 tie against Jones County. From there, the Rangers dropped four in a row before a hard-fought 2-1 overtime victory on the road at north division rival Holmes, avenging a close 6-5 loss to the Bulldogs earlier in the season. A close 3-2 loss to East Central, a scoreless tie at Hinds and a 4-0 loss to Andrew College in the home finale concluded the 2017 season. In all, a total of four Northwest soccer athletes were chosen to play in the MACJC All-Star games. Sophomores Mary Catherine Hutchens, Madison Thrasher and Tempest Shepherd represented the Lady Rangers, while Cayman Blount was the lone representative from the men’s team. —Brian Lentz

27


Northwest Civil Engineering Technology program looks to future These days it seems that drones are everywhere. While they have become inexpensive enough for recreational use, they are also used in a variety of ways, including in commerce, agriculture and surveying. In Tommy Watson’s Civil Engineering Technology program at Northwest, learning to use drones will help keep his students up to date with the latest technology. A drone is defined as “an unmanned aircraft or ship guided by remote control or onboard computers.” According to Watson, he discovered drone technology a few years ago, and through studying about them, learned about how drones were being used in mapping, construction and inspection. “We try to keep up with industry. To do that, we have to make our students marketable, by making sure they know the latest technology,” Watson said. He emphasized that Northwest is not starting its own drone program, but is using drones to help students in the classroom. He explained that before information for mapping, construction inspection and biometrics could be obtained through satellite imagery, which by the time it was obtained, was already old and was very expensive. Using drones would afford the opportunity to fly the drone on the site and bring real-time information to a project manager. “I decided it was the next big step and decided to look into it and see what we Watson instructs his could do to get it on board here at Northwest,” Watson said. He requested money through the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins IV), which is a principal source of federal funding to states and discretionary grantees for the improvement of secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs across the nation. He did not find it hard to convince the administration that it was a necessity. “Our dean, David Campbell is a visionary, so it was not a hard pitch to him,” Watson said, adding that the administration understands the need for Northwest’s students to keep up with industry standards and new technology. He explained that the drones are used for doing real-time imagery that can be used in the Mapping and Topography classes. “We take the imagery and tie it into a GIS (geographic information systems) solution. The most important thing is that is a real-time, up-to-date image.” One of the challenges Watson faced was being able to legally justify that they could fly the drones, which ended up with him being certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). “Last year the FAA separated recreational from commercial use of drones. For example, a recreational pilot cannot fly

28

Northwest Now

within five miles of an airport without written permission to fly in that airspace. So, if you are in Oxford, you really cannot fly a drone anywhere. I thought it was easiest to go ahead and get my commercial license,” Watson said. He feels comfortable with the idea of his students flying the drones, as they are GPS stabilized and are very safe. “I just have to make sure that they get everything set up correctly, know the ranges they can fly in and what the home point setting is. I am supervising them closely as I am the pilot in command,” Watson said.

Civil Engineering Technology students on how to fly a drone. Photo by Julie Bauer One of the things he sees for future success in the working world for graduates of his program who are familiar with and have worked with drones is cell tower and construction inspection. “As the industry grows, you are not going to have to fly in the line of sight and jobs are going to become available for people who log flying hours and get certifications. Our strategy is to get our students familiar with drones and what jobs there might be out there. We are not a drone program, but you can learn some fundamentals and all of our curricula fits with using drones,” he said. The Civil Engineering Technology Program at Northwest prepares a person for entry-level positions in civil engineering, surveying and similar technical fields. The curriculum includes boundary and construction surveying, principles of road construction, construction materials testing, mapping, GPS and GIS, computer aided drafting (CAD), building information modeling (BIM), project management and construction practices. The program is located on the Senatobia campus. —LaJuan Tallo

www.northwestms.edu


Foundation

News

Members of the Northwest Foundation Board of Directors celebrated with Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears and members of the Northwest Foundation staff the reaching of a milestone in the history of the Foundation. As of July 31, the value of the Northwest Endowment had surpassed $10 million. “In 1996, the endowment stood at $250,000. Through the extraordinary support of the Northwest administration, especially, Dr. Spears, the faithful and dedicated leadership of this Foundation board, the prudent management of Cook and Bolton Consulting Group with Merrill Lynch, and the generosity of hundreds of donors, we have reached this significant milestone. In addition to this, we have awarded an additional $4.5 million in scholarships over these years,� said Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects. Pictured are top row (l-r) Barry Bouchillon and Dr. Stephen Joe, both of Southaven; Sterling Withers, Tunica; Judge Jimmy McClure, Sardis; Tommy Woods, Byhalia; Marty Allison, Sarah and Harold Nichols, Kevin Doddridge and Barry Bridgforth, all of Olive Branch. Bottom row (l-r) are Don Clanton, Senatobia; Charles Veazey, Oxford; Judge Gerald Chatham, Hernando; Jerry Barrett, Senatobia; Dr. Spears; Patricia Dhority, Hernando; Canon, Dr. Patsy Sledge, Roberta Mayfield, Cindy Hale, Patti Gordon, Gale Cushman and Marla Kennedy, all of Senatobia; Perrin Hunter, Eads, Tenn.; Fred Carlisle, Holly Springs; Julie Bauer, Southaven; Drew DePriest, Olive Branch; Gary Kornegay, Batesville and Chuck Jackson, Senatobia. Board members not pictured are Gary Anderson, Byhalia; Dot Smith, Batesville; James Dunn, Tunica; Jim Beckett, Bruce; Mike Herrington, Olive Branch; Mike Boren, Tunica, Perrin Caldwell, Jr., Batesville and Curtis Greer, Myrtle. New Northwest Foundation staff members Patti Gordon (left) and Marla Kennedy (right) are welcomed by Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects (center). Gordon, who came to Northwest in 2015, is assuming the responsibilities of director of Alumni Affairs and Foundation Operations. Kennedy is the new scholarship coordinator and Foundation assistant.

Photos by LaJuan Tallo

www.northwestms.edu

Fall 2017

29


honorariums/memorials

The Legacy of Memorial and Honorarium Gifts A great many of the gifts that are received by the Northwest Foundation are given to pay tribute to the men and women who have profoundly impacted the lives of others—parents, siblings, teachers, sons and daughters. Some gifts are designated for permanently endowed scholarship funds, which means the gift “keeps on giving” forever. The memorial and honorarium gifts listed were given between June 1, 2017 and Oct. 31, 2017, in appreciation both to those who gave the gifts and to those who have lived extraordinary and inspirational lives. If you wish to make a memorial or honorarium gift, please contact the Foundation Office at (662) 560-1103. MEMORIALS Sam Allison Mr. Marty Allison Jimmy Neal Andrews Mr. and Mrs. Keith Allen Dolores "Dr. B" W. Barnett Dr. David C. Cole Joe Beckum Mrs. Jean Beckum Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Paul Wooten Diane Biffle Mrs. Pam Briscoe Mrs. Julie Bauer

Ms. Melissa Johnson Mr. and Mrs. John W. King Members of the Locopolis Lodge Ms. Pam P. Malone Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Nash Mr. Steven Oelke Mrs. Kristy Pugh Dr. and Mrs. James W. Rayner Ms. Carol Tatum Ms. Jean E. Tatum Mr. and Mrs. William F. Turner James, Billie Jean, Blair and Blake Webb Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Webb Robbie H. Butts Mr. Joe Elliott

A.W. and LaNelle Bouchillon Mr. and Mrs. Barry Bouchillon

Howard and Edna Carpenter Mr. and Mrs. Herman Coats

Lee Branan Mr. and Mrs. John McCrary

Bela J. and Ruby Black Chain Dr. and Mrs. Buddy Chain, Jr.

Pauline Red Branan Mr. and Mrs. William Correro Steve Branan Mr. and Mrs. John McCrary Paula Tatum Brown Ms. Lara Archer Mr. Phil Bailey Mr. Michael Blackburn Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Brown, III Ms. Susanne Whorton Campbell Mrs. Sybil Canon Mr. and Mrs. Donny Castle Mr. and Mrs. William Correro

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Northwest Now

Rita C. Chance Ann S. Byrd Tony Chance Ann S. Byrd Regina Clark Dr. Darrell Barnes Mr. Richie E. Lawson Mr. John David Randall Dr. Larry Sylvester Jo Cochran Mr. Whit Perry

Deputy Joe K. Cosby Mississippi Assembly of Gang Investigators Phillip Cruzen Ms. Frances H. Seale Jane Davis Mrs. Sybil Canon Mr. and Mrs. John Champion Mr. Jerry Davis Mr. and Mrs. Marion James Mrs. Genie B. Lantrip Ms. Lisa B. Martin Mr. and Mrs. Gerald D. McLemore Praise Sunday School Class of First Baptist Church Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vick Holli Pond Day Mr. Zabron A. Davis, IV Larry E. Dhority Mrs. Patricia B. Dhority Ms. Rachel Dhority Elzy Thomas Dowdle Mr. and Mrs. William Correro

Jessica Gresham Ms. Linda S. Laine David Randall Grimes Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Wallis Dodson Grimes Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Dale Hadskey Ms. Elizabeth Hadskey High Russell Hadskey Ms. Elizabeth Hadskey High Mr. and Mrs. Todd Latham Joyce Halfacre Dr. Larry Sylvester William Bowen Harris Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr. Tim B. Heaton Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Young Tommy Hogan Mr. and Mrs. Ken Harris Lucille T. Hollister Dr. Denise Bynum

Kathryn "Ann" Peyton Dunlap Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

James Jackson Mr. Dennis Cobb

N.C. and Charlotte Ferguson Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Bert Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bacon Ms. Trudy Hall

Jerry Scott Goodnight Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Charles R. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Donald Amorosi Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bacon Mr. and Mrs. Dick Davenport Ms. Trudy Hall Ms. Laurie Stanton

Matt Gregory Mr. and Mrs. Steve McClellan

www.northwestms.edu


honorariums/memorials Jody Ross Johnson Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Alex S. Perry Mr. Whit Perry

Margaret Sowell Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Charlotte Johnston Mr. Wayne Ferguson Mr. Marcus Perkins Mr. and Mrs. Greg Steinman Dr. Amy Stewart

Michael Clyde Perry Mr. Whit Perry

Ted Conger Spencer Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Martha Phelps Ms. Frances H. Seale

Hudson Still Mr. and Mrs. William Correro

Khalid Khouri Mr. Bud Donahou Ms. Kholoud Khoury

Scott Potts Mr. and Mrs. Ken Harris Mr. and Mrs. Todd Latham

Tommy Wayne Swindoll Mr. Whit Perry

Holly Hale Koonce Mr. and Mrs. John McCrary

Larry Joe Pratt Mrs. Brenda Pratt

Kathryn Anne Kreunen Mrs. Krista Schauffler

Stephen Purdy Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

Paul Lawrence Mrs. Barbara Lawrence

Marie Ann Ray Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

Theron E. Long Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Dr. Augustinus Rinaldy Dr. Darrell Barnes

Catherine Taylor Longest Dr. William Longest

Robert Sanders Mr. and Mrs. Paul Brown Mr. Jerry Clark

Joe W. Longest, Jr. Dr. William Longest Kathryn McCracken Mr. Whit Perry Pennie Pullen McKinney Ms. Toni Barden Jonathan Mills Ms. Lynn Kirkpatrick Mr. Scott Mills Chief Bill Moore Mrs. Becky Moore Kenneth M. Murphree Mr. and Mrs. Mike Boren Mr. and Mrs. Richie Burnette Mrs. Sybil Canon Ms. Roberta Mayfield Jeffrey Nichols Mrs. Elizabeth Dickerson

C.L. Shaddock, Jr. Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr. Michael Shaheen Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Shaheen Billy Ray Shipp Ms. Frances H. Seale Tim Shorter Ms. Kathy Buchanan Mr. Joe Elliott Mr. Matthew Johnson Ms. Suzette Logan Ms. Lisa Russell W.P. (Bill) and Nannette Sissell Ms. Frances H. Seale Albert C. "Butch" Sojourner Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

James L. (Trey) Sylvester Dr. Darrell Barnes Dr. Larry Sylvester Lauren Elizabeth Tallo Ms. Sondra Holliday Mr. and Mrs. Austin Smith

Gail Wilborn Ms. Lacey Gentry Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Gill C. Chad Williams Mr. and Mrs. Brett Curtis Mr. and Mrs. Steve Sturgeon Drew Young Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Young Calvin Grover Youngblood Mrs. Peggy Youngblood HONORARIUMS Ruth Ann Allison Mr. Marty Allison

Charles D. Taylor Mrs. Ella Wilson

Dr. Marilyn Bateman Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Walter T. Scott

Verna Lee Taylor Todd Mr. N.C. (Tom) Ferguson, Jr.

Dr. Bonnie Buntin Mr. Robert Kelly

Gary Veazey Ms. Roberta Mayfield Tate County Economic Development Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Veazey

Dr. Jack Butts Mr. Joe Elliott

John Garrett (Spec) and Elise Cocke Veazey Ms. Roberta Mayfield Tate County Economic Development Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Veazey C.B. and Marjorie Walker Mr. and Mrs. Ken Dossett Olivia Halle Mitchell Walker Mr. and Mrs. William Correro W.L. & Lula Brooks Wallace Mr. and Mrs. Harry Starnes

Dr. Michael Butts Mr. Gerald Beard Mrs. Sybil Canon Ms. Darlene Greenlee Mrs. Elizabeth Harvey Ms. Frances H. Seale Earline Cocke Mr. and Mrs. Perry Arrington Ms. Glynda Hall Mike Dottorey Mr. Charles B. Adams Dr. Denise Bynum Dr. Matthew Domas Mrs. Jere Herrington Mr. Richie E. Lawson Mrs. Betty Spence Dr. Chuck Strong Marc Dukes Dr. Don A. Skelton, Sr.

Garnett B. West Ms. Debby Rutledge

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Fall 2017

31


honorariums/memorials Bobby Dunlap Mrs. Sybil Canon Ms. Frances H. Seale Keith Godbold Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Johnson Mrs. Dawn Stevens Anita Stratton Wilborn Graham Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Gill Sandy Grisham Mr. Bud Donahou Ms. Susanne VanDyke Dr. Jerry Hollis Dr. Darrell Barnes Mr. Bud Donahou Linda McGonagill Hollis Dr. Marshall E. Hollis

Brenda Gentry Holmes Mr. Joe Elliott

Patricia Miller Dr. Carol Cleveland

Joe Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Donald Amorosi Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bacon Mr. and Mrs. Dick Davenport Ms. Trudy Hall Ms. Laurie Stanton

Jodie Moore Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

J. Gary Kornegay Ms. Frances H. Seale Richie E. Lawson Dr. Darrell Barnes Jo Ellen Logan Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy McLain Mrs. Frances C. Perkins Mariglyn N. Meacham Ms. Audrey C. Breeding

Jonathan Nichols Mrs. Elizabeth Dickerson Jayne River Mr. Joe Elliott

Laura Dilatush Triplett, Madison, Aubrey, Elisabeth and Meg Triplett Mr. Jeff Triplett Dolores Wooten Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Ms. Patti Gordon Mr. and Mrs. John McCrary Mr. and Mrs. Tommie Neal

Harvey Seale Ms. Frances H. Seale Dr. Gary Lee Spears Dr. Darrell Barnes Marilyn Spears Mrs. Carol Peterson MaryLee Sturgeon Mr. and Mrs. Brett Curtis

Did you go to college in Mississippi, but not get a degree? Now you can make your credits count.

See how. www.MSC2C.org 1-833-C2C-4EDU ( 1-833-2 22-4338)

32

Northwest Now

Complete 2 Compete (C2C) is a state program designed to help Mississippi adults complete their college degrees and create a brighter future.

www.northwestms.edu


Now

Northwest Fall 2017

A publication of Northwest Mississippi Community College

President Dr. Gary Lee Spears Vice President for Finance Gary Mosley Vice President for Student Services/Chief of Staff Dan Smith Vice President for Education Richie Lawson Chairman, Northwest Board of Trustees Mike Moore

Northwest Foundation Associate Vice President of Development & Special Projects/Associate Editor Sybil R. Canon • srcanon@northwestms.edu Director of Alumni Affairs & Development Operations Patti Gordon • pgordon@northwestms.edu Scholarship Coordinator & Foundation Assistant Marla Kennedy • mkennedy@northwestms.edu

Communications Director of Communications/Editor Julie R. Bauer • jrbauer@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Communications/ Graphic Designer LaJuan Tallo • ltallo@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Marketing/ Digital Media KayLeigh McCool • kmccool@northwestms.edu Graphic Designer Jennifer Corbin • jcorbin@northwestms.edu Coordinator for Sports Information Kevin Maloney • kmaloney@northwestms.edu Assistant Coordinator for Sports Information Brian Lentz • blentz@northwestms.edu

For address changes, please contact Alumni Affairs at (662) 560-1112. Northwest Now is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the Northwest Foundation and the Office of Communications.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Please visit the Northwest website at www.northwestms.edu/affirmativeaction to view the College’s Notice of Non-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action.

contents features

3 11 15 22 29

recognizing excellence Northwest celebrates first “Complete to Compete” C2C graduate as part of state initiative.

cover story: forever ranger Longtime educator Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell reflects on her great start at Northwest.

finding her place Actress/author remembers her time at Northwest.

celebrating family Family and community come together at Homecoming celebration.

reaching a milestone Foundation endowment surpasses $10 million mark.

departments 1 2 3 18 25 33

student snapshot/tyler mitchell president’s reflections/dr. gary lee spears alumni president’s notes/mike boren around campus the legacy continues the sporting life from the heart of northwest/sybil canon alumni news/patti gordon

On the cover: Longtime educator, Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell (class of 1968) was honored as Alumna of the Year. Photo by Julie Bauer

from the

heart of Northwest

Sybil R. Canon The online Urban Dictionary cites that the term, “Dream Team,” originates with the 1992 basketball team that represented the United States in the Olympics. The team had such notables as Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, and Magic Johnson, just to name a few. This website further provides this definition of the term: “It is a team, which doesn't necessarily consist of the best players, but the best team players with enough talent that the team itself is a juggernaut against opponents.” Dictionary.com seems to concur with this definition, as it includes the following: “a group of people regarded as having the perfect combination of talents.” So what does this have to do with the Northwest Foundation? Well, I have to admit that when my longtime colleague, Dolores Wooten, retired, I was somewhat apprehensive. We are a three-person office, and, to accomplish what we need to accomplish, we have to work as a team, with each person working as many hours as it takes to get the job done. After five months, I truly believe that I am part of a new “dream team,” not because I am on the team, but because of the new ideas, new energy, and new passion brought to our office by Patti Gordon and Marla Kennedy. Patti has assumed Dolores’ duties, and, thankfully, Dolores had the opportunity of working with Patti before retirement. Thus, with that experience and training of what we have done in the past and with the confidence to try new methods, new ideas, and new processes, Patti has soared! She is the consummate professional who is able to communicate comfortably and effectively with everyone, and she has the heartfelt compassion for the students who walk through our doors needing help. She rarely gets “ruffled” and is a calm, steady force in our office. Marla sits at the front desk, making her the first face our guests see when they walk through our doors. And what do they see? They see a smiling face, and they experience the utmost in kindness, courtesy, and respect. She is our scholarship coordinator, which means that she has a great deal of personal interaction with students, whom she affectionately calls our “little darlings.” She is extremely adept with technology and she is able to teach an old dog (that would be “me”) some new tricks. She works fast, and she works with precision. Thus, while I hope that I am not sounding boastful, I really do feel that I am a member of a “dream team,” and while I don’t feel that I am the best member of the team, I do feel that because of our genuine desire to help our students and our willingness to work hard, we have a synergy, a compassion, and a zeal that puts us at the very heart of Northwest with the best yet to come!

alumni news Patti Gordon “We are Northwest”… That is the title of the recruitment event for high school seniors in the fall of each year here on campus. If you are reading this article, then “You are Northwest!” Whether an alum, a contributor, staff, or faculty member, you have some connection to Northwest and therefore, have the opportunity to put Northwest in a positive light in the public’s eye. I recently had the opportunity to hear The Beach Boys in concert, and the song “Be True to Your School” brought those feelings of school spirit, pride, excitement, fun and loyalty to your school. First call to action: search it on Youtube, Spotify, etc. and see if it doesn’t give you some pep! Second call to action: let us hear from YOU! Please give us the pleasure of checking our system for your information. We want to verify if you are identified as a Northwest alum, the years you were here, your interests while at Northwest, and most importantly, your contact information. We are able to communicate more efficiently when our records are up to date! I am excited to be your alumni director and am here for you. When you call to update your record, please share with the alumni office if you are interested in planning a class or sports reunion. Until then, “rah, rah, rah, be true to your school!” Conatct me at pgordon@northwestms.edu or call me at 662-560-1112.

The Sports Hall of Fame and Alumna of the Year Homecoming Celebration was hosted by the Northwest Alumni Association. Please make plans to attend next year’s event!


N ORTHWEST M ISSISSIPPI C OMMUNITY C OLLEGE F OUNDATION

Northwest

P.O. Drawer 7015 • 4975 Highway 51 North Senatobia, MS 38668

NORTHWEST MISSISSIPPI COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Now

FALL 2017

Parting

shot

Northwest recognized local veterans at the MACJC Championship Game on Nov. 11, including (l to r) Liesl Mote, intramural coordinator, cheer sponsor, U.S. Air Force, Iraq; Tate County native Dean Hunter, U.S. Army, Vietnam; Michael Parker, campus police, DeSoto Center, U.S. Army, Vietnam; Tate County native James Chapuis, U.S. Navy, World War II and Bill Rines, assistant director of Campus Police, Mississippi Army National Guard, Iraq. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

Alumna of the Year: Dr. Susan Avery Mitchell Longtime educator honored at Homecoming

INSIDE: scholarship ceremony • 2+2 tourney • Legacies • fall sports

Northwest Now fall 2017 issue  

Northwest Mississippi Community College's magazine for alumni and friends of the college is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the N...

Northwest Now fall 2017 issue  

Northwest Mississippi Community College's magazine for alumni and friends of the college is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the N...

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