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ABOUT the pilot SECTION

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he beginning of any new journey can feel unsettling. Whether rooted in tragedy or triumph—those first few steps feel unsteady. But with each new, small step comes the reassurance that we have the ability to take another. And eventually, what once seemed brave becomes quite ordinary. When The Pilot was first published on November 17, 1920, it was simply a student initiative to promote interest in school activities. It was four pages filled with class updates, missionary stories, poetry, and devotional literature. It bore the title: “Wanted—a name!” It was a new, and dare we say brave, undertaking. Just in the same way, the publication in front of you feels brave. It’s our brave new thing—acknowledging the beautiful, storied history behind us and forging into a new generation of The Pilot. Our vision is simple: to tell real, honest stories. The hard ones, the beautiful ones, the ones of the people that make up the tapestry of our Northwestern community. As Lindsay (Mork ’08) Ostrom shares about her beloved Afton, or Kat Albee ’19 tells about her “invisible” disability, or Peter Wohler ’87 gives you a glimpse of his gumption and grit in leading a ministry during cancer treatments—we pray you are moved by their bravery. And may you leave inspired to step out into any brave, new thing the Lord calls you into. CAYLA (YUND ’14) BLUCKER Managing Editor

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


SECTION CONTENTS

In Issue No 433... is published by the Office of Advancement Communications University of Northwestern – St. Paul 3003 Snelling Avenue North St. Paul, MN 55113-1598 651-631-5100 | unwsp.edu/pilot Letters and comments may be sent to advancementcommunications@unwsp.edu PILOT STAFF

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Jim Johnson ’94 Editor-in-Chief

Chelsea (Benson ’11) Ordway Production Manager

Cayla (Yund ’14) Blucker Managing Editor

Drew Elrick ’12 Creative Director Contributors

Aliyah Basuil ’19, Lauren (Bernhagen ’12) Elrick, Lindsay (Mork ’08) Ostrom, Noelle Reynolds ’21 Photography

Guytano Magno ’08 Proofreading

Zach Knighton ’17 INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D.

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT:

E THE DREADED PASTOR

Peter Wohler ’87 and the work of Source MN during Super Bowl LII

K A SPECTRUM OF OPPORTUNITY Overcoming obstacles as a student with autism

S BRAVE NEW THINGS Loving and losing Afton

President, University and Media

Janet B. Sommers, Ph.D. Sr. V.P., Academic Affairs

Nina Barnes ’03, M.A. V.P., Student Life

Jim K. Johnson ’94, M.A.

V.P., Institutional Advancement

Mike Moroney

V.P., Enrollment Management

Bryon Krueger ’96, M.B.A. V.P., Business/CFO

Timothy A. Rich, PHR V.P., Human Resources

8 THE LEGACY

Behind UNW's most decorated athlete

e HE’S HOME

Honoring the life and legacy of Billy Graham

k 2016—17 ANNUAL REPORT

Financials, enrollment, and the state of Northwestern

Jason Sharp M’13, M.O.L. Sr. V.P., Media

Matt Hill ’89, Ed.D.

G UNIVERSITY NEWS

NORTHWESTERN MEDIA STATIONS

O ATHLETICS

Director, Athletics

FM 98.5/AM 900 KTIS Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN FM 101.9/AM 1090 KNWS Waterloo, IA FM 97.9/AM 1200 KFNW Fargo, ND FM 96.5/AM 1270 KNWC Sioux Falls, SD FM 102.5/AM 1190 WNWC Madison, WI FM 97.3 KDNW/FM 90.5 KDNI Duluth, MN FM 107.1 KNWI Des Moines, IA FM 88.5 KJNW Kansas City, MO AM 1290 WNWW Hartford, CT © 2018 University of Northwestern

Q STUDENT LIFE Y MEDIA NEWS < ALUMNI UPDATES 3


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here are some dark spaces in this world.

Yet, amid the unlit corners of the city where evil runs rampant, there are others who hold lights to the window, signaling safety, beckoning the forgotten passersby to come take refuge. Peter Wohler ’87 is one of them—holding a proverbial torch and making way for the urban poor, homeless youth, and victims of prostitution and drug abuse through his work leading Source MN, a Minneapolis organization.

W H E R E I T A LL B EG A N Wohler grew up in Brooklyn Park, just north of Minneapolis. His parents attended Northwestern in the early 1950s, when Billy Graham was president of the college, and in the fall of 1984, Wohler also started school at Northwestern. He graduated with a Bible certificate and a bachelor’s degree in math. Wohler vividly remembers a mission trip he took with the Northwestern soccer team to Guatemala and Kenya—it was his first time experiencing a developing nation, and the trip influenced his worldview dramatically. “There’s something about Northwestern,” says Wohler. “There were opportunities to connect with people from other cultures and with unreached people groups.” Wohler saw the forgotten and the marginalized on his trip, and he wanted to play a part in letting them know they were seen and loved.

Sporting a head of 20-year-old dreadlocks, Wohler says his street name is “The Dreaded Pastor,” and it’s on the streets of Minneapolis that he’s found his calling. In February of 2018, Wohler and his team played a major role in aiding sex-trafficking victims and assisting law enforcement during Super Bowl LII, an event that brought more than 125,000 people to the Twin Cities. Wohler started working with the organization in 1995, but his story begins a couple decades before.

THE DREADED PASTOR by

LAUREN (BERNHAGEN ’12) ELRICK

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


SECTION ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

A S OU L ST I R R E D During the late 1980s, shortly after graduation, Wohler started volunteering with at-risk youth in Minneapolis. His calling began to stir within him. In 1992, Wohler joined Youth With a Mission (YWAM) and traveled to India, Amsterdam, and other European cities, where he was exposed to the red-light districts in many of the urban areas. He observed the brothels and the teens in prostitution, and something again was kindled in his soul.

Leading up to the Super Bowl, Source was able to contact victims directly through their online texting outreach program, as well as create a drop-in center and emergency shelter at Hope Community Church, open 24/7 for victims who needed a place to stay or someone to talk to. Volunteers turned nurseries and Sunday school rooms into beautiful, dignified bedrooms, and over the course of the event, 13 women stopped by this safe haven.

“In some ways, the Super Bowl is the worst time to do outreach since women are paid three to ten times more than usual,” explains Wohler. “They’re focused on working instead of making life-changing decisions.” Wohler remembers the moment he felt a distinct “In some ways, the middle of a large-scale event isn’t an ideal call from the Lord to pursue the marginalized the Super Bowl Since time for women to reshape their choices, Wohler’s and the forgotten. It was 1993, and he was is the worst time team connected the women with resources that traveling overseas. While praying, Wohler had would help them take healthy next steps once the a supernatural vision of the city of Jerusalem to do outreach Super Bowl was over. spoken of in Acts 1:8; however, it was clear that since women are his “Jerusalem” wasn’t the city in Israel. His also explained that amid their planning Jerusalem was Minneapolis. paid three to ten Wohler leading up to the event and throughout the week, times more than relationships with the FBI and police departments “ M Y J E R US A LE M ” were furthered, more awareness was created, and usual...They’re fundraising has allowed the organization to triple After returning to Minneapolis in 1994, Wohler its budget and hire staff. Not only that, but during focused on started working with Source MN, helping meet the 11 days around the Feb. 4 game at U.S. Bank the needs of homeless youth and at-risk youth working instead Stadium, officers arrested 94 men in sex trafficking stuck in prostitution. He soon realized the need stings, according to Minneapolis Police Chief for Source to create transitional housing—a safe of making Medaria Arradondo. place where survival and spiritual growth could

life-changing

be cultivated for victims. Over the years, Wohler A LI G H T I N T H E DA R K N ES S has spearheaded the opening of several different decisions.” transitional, community homes. During some Little by little, the light is pushing back the darkness. Moving seasons, Wohler and his wife even took women into their own forward, Wohler explains that the desire of his heart and home when the need presented itself. Source MN is that they would be a significant light in the darkness for at-risk populations. They want to continue As the only faith-based organization that works directly with being a conduit for the church and to persist in growing their women in trafficking in Minnesota, Source plays a significant resources and volunteers. The dream is this: that the antirole in showing the love of Christ to the overlooked. Part of their outreach involves working with local law enforcement in order to trafficking movement would change culture and that victims would know they can get out. be a victim resource center to those at risk.

T H E DA R K S I D E O F T H E S U P E R BOW L As with many large-scale events, Super Bowl LII marked an increase in human trafficking for the Twin Cities. Wohler explains that police don’t want to arrest the women they find in prostitution, so they rely on community partners like Source to help them care for victims.

If you’re interested in getting involved with Source MN, visit their website at sourcemn.org. STAGE IV COLON CANCER In August 2017, Peter Wohler was given a Stage IV Colon Cancer diagnosis with a 20% chance to live after a year. A later prognosis gave him just 30–60 days to live. Scans at the end of January miraculously showed that his tumor had decreased in size, and Peter is gaining weight again. As of April 2018, Peter's health has continued to improve, despite his initial diagnosis. The Wohler family trusts that God can heal him, but even if He doesn’t, He is still good. To read more, visit Peter’s CaringBridge website at caringbridge.org/public/peterwohler

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NEWS

U N W ACA D E M I CS EX PA N D TO S I OUX FA LL S , S D

Meet

DAWN CORDTS ADMISSIONS COUNSELOR

“As a mom of three boys, I really love when I get the opportunity to share with other parents the possibility of free college credits. It is extremely important to me to help high school students realize their potential to be successful with dual enrollment. Sometimes the student just needs that extra nudge from someone other than their parent. I encourage you to contact me if you are interested in knowing more about our PSEO or Early College programs.”

unwsp.edu/pseo CONTACT DAWN DACORDTS@UNWSP.EDU 651-628-3340

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

Northwestern is growing with the addition of academic offerings in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Northwestern Media’s Faith 1270 in Sioux Falls has long needed a new building for their growing radio network. Capitalizing on their latest building initiative, University of Northwestern will soon offer remote,

Christ-centered education within the newly built Sioux Falls facility. The expansion, initiated in 2016, will include Bachelor of Science in Business Management (BSM), Master of Organizational Leadership (MOL), and Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs—beginning in the fall of 2018.

H I STO RY D E PA RT M E N T O F F E R S N EW P O LI T I CS , H I STO RY & ECO N O M I CS MAJOR Beginning in the fall of 2018, Northwestern will offer a new major— Politics, History & Economics—for students interested in political involvement. The program, overseen by the history department, combines classes from different departments and will include two new course offerings, Political Thought and International Relations. This major’s key distinctive is that it requires a semester-long internship with the American Studies Program in Washington, D.C. The American Studies Program works to connect students’ faith to the institutions and leaders who are impacting issues in public policy and strategic communication.

Dr. Janet B. Sommers, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, said, “As Northwestern seeks to expand God’s kingdom for His glory, we are grateful for our partnership with Northwestern Media in Sioux Falls. It is a vibrant, rapidly growing area with an expanding economy and strong faith-based community.”

N O RT H W EST E R N STU D E N TS A DVA N C E I N N ATS CO M P ET I T I O N Nine music students from University of Northwestern advanced to the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) student auditions held at St. John’s University in Nov. 2017. Northwestern students comprised 12 percent of all singers in their divisions, and comprised 22 percent of all finalists. Finalists included Josey Poppin, first place; Ann Tillotson, second place; Jordan Brown, third place; Nathan Rouse, third place; and alumna Maegan Benham ’16, second place. Semi-finalists were Harper Atchison, Corrin Lee, Emily Schrag, and Katherine Streckert.


SECTION NEWS

LOVING GOD with your MIND On February 20, 2018, the Northwestern community gathered to hear from three inspired, Northwestern thinkers and scholars. Each gave a brief, 15-minute talk that demonstrated how they are loving God with their mind through Christian scholarship and pursuing academic excellence in their respective fields of study.

R EV. LI S A N N E W I N S LOW, P h . D.

P RO F ES S O R O F B I O LO G Y

Have you ever wondered why nature brings such peace, joy, and beauty to the human heart? Lisanne Winslow, Ph.D., inspired listeners with a talk entitled “A Great and Remarkable Analogy: A Trinitarian Theology of Nature.” Dr. Winslow’s research spanned biology and theology, expounding on Jonathan Edwards’ view of what nature actually is in reference to God’s creative act and humankind’s engagement with the natural world and scientific discovery. She shared, “Nature is God’s way in the natural world to make inferior things conform to the superior things of the heavenly realm, to make an image of them.”

BOY D S E EV E R S , P h . D.

P RO F ES S O R O F O LD T ESTA M E N T STU D I ES J . E DW I N H A RT I LL E N D OW E D P RO F ES S O R 2 0 1 6 – 17

Boyd Seevers, Ph.D., gave an in-depth depiction of his search to find the ancient city of Ai. The Bible records the Israelite conquest of Ai under Joshua (Joshua 7–8), but mainstream academia has rejected the account’s historicity because the accepted site of Ai lacks archaeological remains from the time of Joshua. Twenty-five years ago, Dr. Seevers, his students, and an excavation group set out to find Ai. In his talk, Dr. Seevers remarked, “If the conquest at Ai is historical, the data is there to support [its existence] and the connection between [the discovered site] and the Biblical story.”

R I C K LOV E , M . F. A .

C H A I R , D E PT. O F A RT & D ES I G N , A S S O C . P RO F ES S O R

Professor Rick Love gave listeners an entertaining and creative talk called “Bring Back the Sacred.” Questioning if aesthetic pleasure was a byproduct, not the purpose, of Renaissance art, he proposed that beauty is the result of pursuing something deeper, and that because of our technological and scientific prowess, the sacred and the beautiful have been and are being drastically changed. Our ancestors’ notion of the sacred and the beautiful was much different than ours. In this time of drastic technological and scientific progress, art history, and the creative process can be a guide back to the sacred. Love conveyed, “Most of the arts were made to honor God and challenge the viewers in their relationship to God.”

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CO M M U N I CAT I O N STU D E N TS W I N B I G AT i N R B CO N V E N T I O N

STU D E N TS E M BA R K O N I M M E R S I V E C I V I L R I G H TS P I LG R I M AG E S PA N N I N G 12 STAT ES In Jan. 2018, five students from Northwestern’s School of Education joined Dr. Ronald Ginn, chair of Interdisciplinary Studies and associate professor of education, on an immersive Civil Rights Pilgrimage. The 11-day trip, hosted by University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, spanned 12 different states and covered cultural and historical events. The group toured American cities which played pivotal roles in events during the Civil Rights Movement, such as Birmingham, New Orleans, Little Rock, and Selma. Northwestern students visited historical monuments, museums, and churches, and talked to people connected to significant events from the Civil Rights era. Learning was focused on pre-Civil Rights, the Civil Rights Movement, 8

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

and current Civil Rights trends in the 21st century. The experiences were used as catalysts to advance the group’s cultural awareness. Caitlyn Wilbur, a student who went on the trip, reflected,

“The trip immersed me in our country’s history, gave me a vast amount of knowledge, and opened my eyes to see how prevalent racial issues are today.” “It is important for the School of Education to prepare its students to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population of students,” said Dr. Ginn. “The experiences on our trip transformed our perspectives.”

In Feb. 2018, media students and professors from the Department of Communication attended the annual International Christian Media Convention in Nashville, Tennessee, hosted by the iNRB (Intercollegiate National Religious Broadcasters). Slate and Main, a Minnesota media company, sponsored the group’s trip. Northwestern teams were awarded 15 iNRB prizes in news, audio, film, and video categories, including seven first-place honors and five second-place honors. Northwestern’s news team (L to R below: Vanshay Murdock, Bella Stillone, Brennen Scarborough) took home a $1,000 prize for their first-place win.


SECTION NEWS

STEM SUCCESS AT NORTHWESTERN

EXCELLENCE IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATH With a combination of outstanding excellence in the sciences, high acceptance rates into graduate programs, in addition to our Christ-centered worldview, Northwestern is able to boast in the successes of our students in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Our faculty work hard to train up Northwestern students to infuse the STEM workforce with individuals who exemplify Christ-like character, implement Biblical principles, and demonstrate God-honoring leadership. STEM CAREERS OF NORTHWESTERN GRADUATES MEDICAL DOCTOR

FAMILY PRACTICE, ANESTHESIOLOGY, INTERNAL MEDICINE, SURGICAL RESIDENCY

100%

30%

DENTIST PRIVATE PRACTICE

VETERINARIAN BUSCH GARDENS TAMPA, FL

CHIROPRACTOR PRIVATE PRACTICE

STEM employment has increased by more than 30% from 2000 to 2013.

REGISTERED NURSE CARDIOLOGY

In 2016, our School of Nursing tied for first in the MN Board of Nursing results for the NCLEX (National Council Licensure Examination). Our passing rate of 100% surpasses the national average of 87.48% for all RN candidates.

PHYSICIAN'S ASSISTANT FAMILY PRACTICE, NEUROLOGY

PHYSICAL SCIENCE EDITOR UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

WILDLIFE MANAGER WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH TECHNICIAN UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

LAB INSTRUCTOR

1/10

1/5

STEM occupations comprise greater than 10% of jobs in the U.S. In Minnesota, STEM jobs account for 1 in every 5 jobs.

Our nursing program enrollment has increased by 267% since 2014—from 64 to 171 as of spring 2017.

95% 99%

99%

NORMANDALE COLLEGE

NORTHWESTERN STEM GRADUATES STUDYING IN PROGRAMS AT: HARVARD UNIVERSITY JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY YALE UNIVERSITY ROCKEFELLER INSTITUTE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY BOSTON COLLEGE

267%

FORENSIC SPECIALIST STATE OF MINNESOTA

UNW biology graduates have a 95% job placement rate after college. Of those who are interested in medical and graduate school, we have a 99% acceptance rate.

of the students who completed the UNW & U of M engineering dual degree program were employed within six months of graduation.

“I’m excited for incoming students to be trained as scientists and engineers at an institution that upholds a Christian worldview. I'm thrilled to watch our programs grow, with increased research initiatives, more opportunities for students in internships, as well as seeing students accepted to top nationally-ranked programs in their fields.” LI S A N N E W I N S LOW

P RO F ES S O R O F B I O LO G Y A N D B I O C H E M I ST RY

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


SECTIONSPOTLIGHT CAMPUS

by

ALIYAH BASUIL ’19

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he first time I met Katherine Albee ’19, known as Kat to most, she was kindly helping me with homework for a class we were in together. She was warm, friendly, and unwaveringly outgoing. Kat didn’t seem different from any of the other students I typically meet day-to-day. But her next statement took me by surprise: “My learning style is a little different because I have autism.” I was caught off guard. Not entirely by the boldness of the statement itself, but by the fact that I couldn’t tell from the outside that autism was a facet of this new acquaintance of mine. So, it got me thinking: what is it like to live with an “invisible disability” within the context of a Christian college community? Kat Albee gave me a glimpse into her life as a student, sister, and advocate. Kat is a second-year psychology major who came to Northwestern to be close to her older sister, Elizabeth. “All three of my siblings have cystic fibrosis,” she told me. Knowing there is a chance that she will outlive them, Kat explained to me that she is increasingly intentional about the time she spends with her family, and describes them as the most important thing in her life. “I see my family as an extension of God’s presence in my life,” said Kat. But her sister wasn’t the only reason she chose Northwestern. After high school, Kat received a sizable scholarship to a small school in Wisconsin for her high academic achievements. Soon after starting classes, the once straight-A student struggled to pass just one class. Kat soon realized that her academic struggles had nothing to do with academics itself, but a greater problem—it was the first time that she was living on her own and having to

balance school with independent life skills. “No one around me seemed to be struggling like I was,” she remarked. So, she set out to find out why she was struggling more than others. At the age of 19, she was given an answer: Autism Spectrum Disorder.

U N D E R STA N D I N G THE DISORDER Autism Spectrum Disorder, also known as ASD, is defined as a spectrum of various neurological disorders that can influence communication, learning, and behavioral functions. It affects about two percent of college students, according to 2017 research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.1 Autism’s pervasive and varying effects can present complications in social and academic settings. For Kat, autism often affects the social aspect of college. Because ASD complicates how people process sensory information, she has difficulty identifying people’s faces, even the ones she has met before. She must constantly try to study people, and memorize their faces and expressions. Due to sensory processing issues, Kat also has difficulty concentrating in noisy environments, like student study spaces and the dining hall. Although she is naturally outgoing, too much noise sometimes prevents her from attending certain social events on campus. Avoidance of social settings is common for a number of autistic individuals who pursue post-secondary education, which isn’t many. Studies show that only 34 percent of people with autism go to college within six years of leaving

high school. When not given adequate support and accommodations, college students on the spectrum exhibit poor attendance patterns and outcomes.2 What Kat found at Northwestern was a community who supports her and gives her the resources to succeed, through the Disability Office for Support Services, or DOSS. The disability office focuses its services on getting students to develop life skills—like living independently and self-advocacy.

"...as an individual with an invisible disability, there is power in simply being seen." For students with ASD, consistent support makes all the difference, and the role of DOSS in Kat’s life is evidence of this. “The disability office staff is very personable, and they really have my back,” she said. “Being able to meet with them if something was wrong, or if I was struggling in an area where I didn’t anticipate, has been very helpful.” However, having an invisible disability in college still has its disadvantages, despite academic adjustments and a loving community.

(1) Rowe, Janine M. “AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS ON THE RISE.” National Association of Colleges and Employers, www.naceweb.org/career-development/special-populations/autism-spectrum-disorders-on-the-rise/. (2) Cox, Bradley E., et al. Academic experiences for college students with autism: Identity, disclosure, and accommodations.

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“People think that to have autism, you have to have stilted language or be minimally verbal, or they think you must have some kind of savant ability...I think something that people often overlook is that everyone on the spectrum has the same range of feelings that everyone else has.”

AC K N OW LE D G I N G T H E ST I G M A & G A I N I N G AWA R E N ES S Since its inception in 1943, ASD has struggled with a lack of public awareness. The disorder has a long-standing stigma surrounding it, such as the misconception that those on the spectrum lack social skills or are emotionless. “People think that to have autism, you have to have stilted language or be minimally verbal, or they think you must have some kind of savant ability,” she said. “I think something that people often overlook is that everyone on the spectrum has the same range of feelings that everyone else has.” With her quirky humor and outgoing demeanor, Kat seems to break stereotypical views of autism. When explaining autism to her peers, she is patient and understanding—encouraging people to consult the internet and intentionally listen to the experiences of autistic people. “Don’t force anything or try to be someone’s friend just because they’re autistic,” she warns. “But learn from those relationships when they come up.” Awareness about ASD and other disabilities is growing, thanks to increased representation in media and resources 12

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

on the internet, but there’s still more work to be done. Kat desires to use her education and her experience with autism to make a positive impact on others with disabilities, and Northwestern’s Christ-centered professors serve as a source of support and encouragement for her goals. One of Kat’s most impactful moments at Northwestern was when she shared about autism in a class discussion and the professor affirmed her comments, encouraging her to continue helping other people understand the condition. Kat knows that as an individual with an invisible disability, there is power in simply being seen. “We are here, and we are thriving,” she declares for herself and others with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Through her positive words and actions, and her presence on campus, Kat is a strong representation and advocate of people with disabilities. Her presence and voice make a difference in the Northwestern community—as she models Christ through her love and empathy for people.


SECTIONSPOTLIGHT CAMPUS

DISABILITY SUPPORT AT NORTHWESTERN DISABILITY OFFICE OF SUPPORT SERVICES (DOSS)

S E R V I C E S AVA I L A B LE TO N O RT H W E ST E R N S TU D E N TS

DAVID GOLIAS

Director Disability Services CLASSROOM ACCOMMODATIONS Instruction in class, note-taking, and other individualized assistance

PEER TUTORING

“As God has worked in my life, I learn in diverse ways. Some synchronize with typical teaching styles, and some are contrary to what is expected. Understanding my own uniqueness and the way I learn helps me to focus on the students as individuals. ASSISTANCE WITH AUDIO OR ALTERNATIVELY-FORMATTED TEXTBOOKS

EARLY REGISTRATION OPTIONS

Each person is unique, so it is a joy to problem-solve with students to find a strategy that moves them toward success. It is also a privilege to work with a team that holds this same perspective.” HOW MANY STUDENTS USE THE DOSS OFFICE? SPRING 2018

127

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

HOUSING ACCOMMODATIONS

99%

INVISIBLE DISABILITIES

(Cannot be seen outwardly)

FALL 2017

126

SPRING 2017

146

43% 15% 10% MENTAL HEALTH RELATED

PHYSICAL HEALTH RELATED

ADD OR

ADHD

THE MOST COMMON ACCOMMODATION IS EXTENDED TEST TIME

ALTERNATIVE TEST ENVIRONMENTS Extended time, reader, or low-distraction environment

ADVOCACY WITH STAFF & FACULTY

DOSS operates under the biblical belief that we all reflect God’s glory, and we best magnify Him by working to serve, support, and highlight the best of who He has made all of us to be on this earth. Thereby, our goal is to provide the most relevant personal support for academic coaching, tutoring, skill building, and advocacy in order to engage the students in ways that lead to academic success.

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NUMBERS

EAGLE ATHLETICS

BY THE

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7

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

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M U

1000 400 400 350 AMY BERGLUND

DAVE HIEB

scored her 1000th point

won his 400th game as head coach

BASKETBALL

127

athletes named to UMAC Academic All-Conference list

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student athletes suited up for the Eagles this year

BASEBALL

62

20

athletes named to UMAC All-Conference lists

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varsity athletic programs

H

L

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BETH WILMETH VOLLEYBALL

won her 350th game as head coach

3

consecutive trips to the NCAA Sweet 16 for the Volleyball program

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B E H I N D T H E LE N S What does one accountant and one household engineer have in common with UNW Eagle Athletics? Well, seemingly not much until you meet Russ and Kathy Nelson. Since 2013, the pair have donated their time and talent to be the official photographers for the Eagles. Throughout the school year, Russ and Kathy attend and photograph over 35 events, spend time editing each photo, and deliver high-quality images to the Sports Information office for use on unweagles.com, social media, and print publications like this one. It all started with a simple desire and passion to get into sports photography and has now developed into ministry that continually blesses Northwestern.

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NATIONAL HONORS

CONFERENCE HONORS LINDSEY PETERSON

VOLLEYBALL PLAYER OF THE YEAR

MAC SABY

GOLF CONFERENCE MEDALIST

ANNA WELCH

SOCCER ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

JOSIAH DONAT

SOCCER OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR

KAREN MOE

TENNIS PLAYER OF THE YEAR

NICK SWORE

LINDSEY PETERSON

BETH WILMETH

FOOTBALL NCCAA DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR D3FOOTBALL.COM SECOND TEAM ALL-AMERICAN

VOLLEYBALL AVCA FIRST TEAM ALL-AMERICAN AVCA ALL-CENTRAL REGION

VOLLEYBALL COACH OF THE YEAR

LEESA MALONE

MATT SWIGART

VOLLEYBALL AVCA HON. MENTION ALL-AMERICAN AVCA HON. MENTION ALL-CENTRAL REGION

WOMEN'S TENNIS COACH OF THE YEAR

KAREN MOE

JACKIE DOERING

GREG WHEATON

VOLLEYBALL AVCA HON. MENTION ALL-CENTRAL REGION CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-DISTRICT

MEN'S SOCCER COACH OF THE YEAR

BEN LYONS

FOOTBALL CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICAN CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-DISTRICT

TENNIS CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICAN CoSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-DISTRICT NCCAA GAME PLAN 4 LIFE CHARACTER AWARD

BILLY AUNE

WOMEN'S GOLF COACH OF THE YEAR

JOSH PETTIT

WOMEN'S SOCCER COACH OF THE YEAR

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CONFERENCE CHAMPS

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E For scores, schedules, stories, and more, visit unweagles.com and follow along on social media:

@UNWEAGLES UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN ATHLETICS WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL

WOMEN'S SOCCER

WOMEN'S TENNIS

_UNWEAGLES 15


SECTION STUDENT LIFE

$63,000 grant cares for students in financial crises

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ith a campus culture of holistic care, Northwestern is continually seeking ways to support students outside of the classroom. In June 2017, Northwestern expanded its efforts with a $63,000 Dash Emergency Grant from Great Lakes Higher Education Corporation & Affiliates. The purpose of this grant is to serve students who are in the midst of financial crises— providing for their needs in order to keep students on track to graduate. This grant was secured by the Office of Grants, Corporate & Foundation Relations—who work to create and sustain relationships with entities that support institutional priorities. Each year, the office raises approximately $700,000 through cultivating relationships with corporations, foundations, and individuals in order to sustain and expand the mission of Northwestern. The Grants, Corporate & Foundation Relations Office, led by Grants Specialist, Meagan (Kemp ’16) Struck, is continually researching new opportunities for partnership, which led to the discovery of this new program established by Great Lakes. Northwestern is one of the first four-year colleges to receive a Dash Emergency Grant from Great Lakes. A combined $7.2 million in grants was awarded to 32 colleges in Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. To qualify for the grant, students must be classified as low-income. These students have an expected tuition payment amount of $7,000 or less each year. This qualification, known as the Expected Family Contribution, allows students to stay enrolled in classes. Nearly one-third of our undergraduate students meet this requirement.

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“My work at Northwestern is entirely focused on students experiencing hardships in life,” said Jeff Snyder, associate dean of Student Life. “The Dash grant has put a tool in my hands that is proving to be invaluable. Northwestern has been able to help several students whose financial needs would have been left unmet.”

“My car being stolen was an unforeseen incident that left my family and me in a tight place...Without the grant, I would most likely have had to get a third job. This would not have been good for my academics.” Students first meet with a Student Life dean to discuss the challenges they are facing. Then they are asked to complete an application detailing their need, which is then reviewed by a committee. The requested assistance, up to $1,000 per applicant, is given within two business days after committee approval. By removing the financial distractions, students can refocus on their studies. The Dash grant will end August 2019. Afterwards, Northwestern’s Student Relief Fund will continue to provide for the emergency needs of students. This fund is sustained through donor gifts, rather than a grant. If you are interested in contributing to the Student Relief Fund, please contact Meagan Struck at mpstruck@unwsp.edu.

“I was able to receive financial assistance this past fall through the Dash grant. I am fortunate to be at a place like Northwestern, where students are assisted in times of need. My car being stolen was an unforeseen incident that left my family and me in a tight place, as I’m the only one who carries a license [in my family]. For this reason, it was important that I replaced my vehicle as soon as possible. Without the grant, I would have most likely needed to get a third job. This would not have been good for my academics.” –Shania C., 2017 grant recipient

“Last fall was a really difficult semester for me. Over the summer, I got into a car accident that really hit my budget for school. I had planned my finances around the money I needed for the school year, and an extra $1,000 to fix my car was something I couldn’t swing. I was already working full-time to pay my way through college while also being enrolled fulltime, so working more wasn’t an option. Because of that, I put the money onto an emergency credit card that I could barely make the minimum payments. I graduate this May and truly thought I would have to drop to part-time, delay my graduation, and work more to get this paid off. Thankfully, I heard about the Dash grant! I am so extremely grateful for this blessing and am still set to graduate on time. I really do not know if I would have been able to continue into this spring semester without it.” –Hailey C., 2018 grant recipient


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Have you ever wondered what Northwestern students are passionate about besides academics, athletics, and the arts? These clubs are formed “by students, for students” and give a glimpse into the varied interests of our community. UNW student clubs have six areas of focus: recreational, relational, educational, spiritual, vocational, and opportunities for witness/service.

U N I V E R S I TY S USTA I N A B I LI TY I N I T I AT I V E

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Students are working towards a more sustainable community through the University Sustainability Initiative, a new club encouraging students to think about how their actions affect the planet and its resources. The club is increasing composting, recycling, and sustainable food options. These positive changes have been in partnership with Bon Appétit, Northwestern’s food service provider. Charles Kosek, operations manager for Bon Appétit, said, “[The club] has a long-term vision with ideas that would benefit the college financially, and help us be a good steward of the planet.” Brianna Silvers ’21, who started the club with fellow student Ben Taylor ’19 in spring 2018, said, “As mandated stewards of God’s creation, it is up to us to protect the earth and work towards a better future for us, our children, and future generations.”

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Josh Stokes

2 0 1 7 — 1 8 S T U D E N T - L E D C L U B S A M E R I CA N E N T E R P R I S E I N ST I TUT I O N ⋅ R EV I V E M I N I ST R I ES A S I A N STU D E N T F E LLOWS H I P ⋅ C H E E R C L U B ⋅ DA N C E T EA M B L AC K STU D E N T U N I O N ⋅ C H I N ES E C U LTU R E C L U B ⋅ L AT I N X WO M E N I N LEA D E R S H I P ⋅ G LO BA L N O M A D S ⋅ SW I N G DA N C E M A I D E N S & M OV I ES ⋅ N O R D I C S K I I N G ⋅ P RO - LI F E OUT R EAC H C L U B S O DA ⋅ S PA N I S H B I B LE STU DY ⋅ S P EC U L AT I V E F I C T I O N S USTA I N A B I LI TY I N I T I AT I V E ⋅ ACCOU N T I N G ⋅ C L U B H O C K E Y S O C I ETY O F E N G I N E E R I N G ⋅ D E LI G H T M I N I ST R I ES ⋅ A I G A U LT I M AT E F R I S B E E ⋅ I N I T TO K N I T I T

S T E K TIC

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SECTION

brave

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new

things


SECTION FEATURE

by

LINDSAY (MORK ’08) OSTROM

ne of the things I’ve heard most often from people is this: you’re so brave to share your story. I mean, now when I scroll back through those first few Instagram posts after Bjork and I lost Afton, I guess it makes sense. If I look at it from the perspective of a normal person, my status updates right after his birth were raw, intense, and unpolished—maybe that seems brave. But here’s a little secret: I am, in fact, not exceptionally brave. From the outside, I might just seem brave because from the moment Afton was born, I desperately wanted people to love him. That’s all. I continue to share his story not out of bravery but out of desperation for my son to be known and loved. It’s what any mom wants for her baby. It does not feel brave to share our messy, painful story of life and loss—it just feels like a different type of mothering. It’s a way to keep his life going, to keep him here with me, and maybe with other people too.

···

19


The mark of tragedy is that there is absolutely no way to know it’s coming. Tragedy finds you in the most normal times. It does not yield to your dinner plans or the fact that you won’t get to pack a bag and say goodbye. You will leave the house one day in 2016 with a spring in your step, not knowing that the next time you walk through your own front door it will actually be 2017, and you’ll be carrying a hospital memory box instead of a baby. It is tragedy, and it is shocking, and it is cruel. I had sensed that things weren’t right for a few days. After repeatedly convincing myself it was fine—as all pregnant moms do—I decided to go in to the clinic “just in case.” When the Urgent Care doctor had completed her exam, she paused for a long moment and asked me if I had come to this appointment by myself. My heart started racing. I knew this line. This was the opening line to the wrong story—not the one where you get to go home filled with relief, as I had hoped. This was the start of the story that you don’t want to happen to you. And, of course, this was the one single appointment I had insisted to my husband, Bjork, I would be fine going to on my own. Bjork picked me up and brought me to the hospital. We waited for the doctor in the triage room, eating graham crackers, drinking apple juice, and watching the Hallmark Christmas movie that the nurse had put on the TV. Everyone was casual—"they probably just got it wrong at Urgent Care," they all said. You are young and healthy. Everything seems normal. And suddenly—wait, wait—she’s four centimeters dilated and her water is about to break and it’s three months too early. Lay the bed flat, lay the bed flat! The nurse rushed to lay the bed flat—inverse, actually, with my head reclined lower than my feet, where I stayed, with Bjork right by my side, for the next four days. And I can think of no more painfully perfect metaphor for our lives in that moment—the tipping of the bed signaling the tipping of our world. Completely and utterly flipped, crashing, inverse, upside down, all wrong. During our time in the hospital, we learned bits and pieces about what was happening: for reasons no one knew, I was in early labor. If our son was born now, even if he survived, his early birth could cause him to be blind, to have significant brain and 20

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

lung damage, to be in a wheelchair. He was completely healthy, but this was happening too soon. We needed every possible second of his development. We needed him to stay put. So why, then, do some babies stay put while others come early? Why do some people get healed from cancer while others don’t live to see their next birthday? Why does one person’s car narrowly miss the oncoming truck while another is just an inch too far to the left? I firmly believe that one of the most significant challenges and spiritual callings in my life after losing Afton is to sit with this struggle. To feel it and to wrestle with it. To be at peace with never fully having peace, on behalf of myself and others like me who landed on the wrong side of statistics. And to find God in the love and redemption that can exist in even the worst of circumstances. Within four days of arriving at the hospital, it was determined that we would not be the “lucky” ones. We would not get that extra time. Some babies do—ours did not. Afton needed to be born, right now, via emergency C-section. Our first baby, our sweet son, Afton Bjork Ostrom, was born on December 31, 2016. His delivery was beautiful and terrifying. His entire perfect little self—brain, heart, soul—was packed into a fragile, wriggling 1 lb. 3 oz. body. He was given a 9/10 on the Apgar score and, like any new parents, we were thrilled. Within seconds of being born, he squirmed, he let out a little cry, and he took a few breaths on his own. But because of his extreme prematurity, he was immediately rushed to the NICU where an army of doctors and nurses began major medical interventions to save his life. We knew that the odds were tough. We knew that babies born at 23 weeks have, at best, about a 50/50 chance of survival. Survival is possible, but it’s tough. We knew this in our heads, but you cannot know those percentages in their actual, ugly truth until you get the call at two in the morning that your son—not someone else’s son, but yours—is not okay. You cannot know until you turn the corner of the NICU in the middle of the night and see that army of medical professionals spilling out of the room that belongs to your son. You cannot know until someone in medical scrubs is crouching down in front of your wheelchair explaining that your son, your precious and irreplaceable baby, is not going to live. We went into his room, knowing we would be holding him for the first time and the last time. They laid him on me—my warm, tiny baby—and in that moment I became a new person. I became his mom. I could feel his heart beating so fast against


my chest where he was curled up, and I loved him so instantly, so deeply. During those hello and goodbye moments, the veil between the physical and spiritual realm was paper-thin. The trauma and terror cannot be unwoven from the threads that make up Afton’s story. They just can’t. But those threads exist only because he was loved and wanted beyond measure.

··· Taking that first shower after Afton was born is one of my most vividly painful and brave memories of January 1, 2017: me, sitting on a chair in the shower, weak from surgery, and Bjork sitting just outside the shower because I was so terrified to do this alone. We breathed in the steam and wept as we took that first step towards our new normal—towards life after Afton. I started easy: my feet. Then my legs. My arms, my belly, my face. As I got closer to my chest, that sacred place right over my heart where Afton had taken his last breath, the knot in my stomach tightened. “He’s deeper than my skin,” I cried over and over and over, willing myself to believe it. We both nodded, pretending to be brave as I sprayed hot water over the spot where Afton had been snuggled in so close, washing away my first and last physical touch point with my living baby boy.

One month after Afton was born, my brave thing was getting on a plane and going to Hawaii. Dreamy, right? And under different circumstances, it would have been. But I was living a new life by then—one where following through on an empty should-havebeen babymoon to Hawaii fell under the category of “very brave things.” As we checked in for the flight, we realized that Bjork and I hadn’t been organized enough to get seats together. Row 5 and Row 15—not even close. We got on the plane hoping for a flexible seatmate, and even though it was not the most desirable seat (hello, bathroom), the man sitting next to me—Brian— agreed to switch with us so that Bjork and I could sit together. Being the super nice person that he is, Bjork took a few minutes during the flight to write Brian a thank you note. He explained Afton’s story and why it was so meaningful for us to be able to sit together on this especially tender flight. I woke up just as he was walking up to Row 5 to deliver it.

During those hello and goodbye After we landed, we stepped into the gate and saw Brian there waiting for us. He moments, the area introduced himself and thanked us for the veil between the note. And then, quietly, Brian told us that he and physical and his wife had lost their first son at a premature old—almost exactly the same as spiritual realm was 26us.weeks “It’ll be 6 years this month,” he said, and tears sprang to his eyes. “It’s still hard. It paper-thin. never completely goes away. But you’ll make it

After I showered, a grief counselor knocked on the door. She sat on the edge of my bed and cried with us. Then she suggested something awesome: picking a smell for Afton. She told us to choose a scent that we could put on his tiny body and clothes that we would remember as “his smell,” even after ten thousand more showers.

The day before he was buried, our sweet Afton was surrounded in lavender—candles, soap, lotion, oil, the works. He was tucked into his casket smelling like peaceful lavender, mom and dad’s kisses, and grandma’s blanket, complete with a few stray hairs woven between the threads from our dog, Sage.

··· And now, every day, we face brave, new things. Going to the grocery store for milk. Walking Sage around the block. Seeing babies. All of this feels brave.

through. With time, you’ll make it through.” Even (or maybe especially) as a Christian, I’ve always been really hesitant to use cliché faith words. For example, “God blessed me,” “That was a blessing,” “Hashtag blessed.” But Afton’s life has given me so many instances where using those cliché words is so very justified. For example, finding someone like Brian on a plane to Hawaii. That was a blessing. I believe there is always redemption to be found. That’s where God is—He’s the love, the presence, and the hope of eternity we can find even in loss. But even with that hope, there is so much pain. There is lament. One night, deep in my grief, I laid on the couch, in the dark, by myself except for a box of Kleenex, and I thought back to seeing Afton for the last time on the ultrasound just before he 21


FEATURE

was born. It was the exact definition of bittersweet: we were watching his lively feet kick, showing us that he was happy and healthy, but we could see based on his position that he needed to come out before it was time. It was the last time I saw or felt him move. Over and over I thought about it—he was perfect, but my own body was flawed. How could I, as his mother, not be able to do this natural, life-giving thing for him? There is so much pride around the powerful nature of motherhood and the body’s ability for natural, fullterm childbirth—and rightfully so. But then what did that mean for me? That I was not powerful? That my body was broken? That I was not created for what is often held up as the ultimate virtue of womanhood?

Bravery is staying in the game.

I cried hard that night as I sat alone in the dark. Why? WHY? He was beautifully and intricately formed, more than any living thing I’d ever seen. He was loved so fiercely. And then, without missing a beat, I heard—“You are, too.” Or maybe I more like felt it, right there in the intense darkness. “Lindsay, you are, too. You are not broken. You are not weak. You are not lesser than. You are beautifully and intricately formed, and you are loved so fiercely.” I am convinced that God looks at me the way I look at Afton, except better: as perfectly made, beautiful, and so loved. I don’t believe God caused this trauma in our lives. But I know God is with us always, even in the dark night of tragedy, and that He made us beautifully the same way He made Afton beautifully. I believe He is weeping with us—all of us—for our tragedies and the loss of even just one tiny, precious life.

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


basic + awesome creamy potato soup Prep Time: 15 mins | Cook Time: 1 hour | Yield: 4–6 servings Creamy Potato Soup—so simple and all-homemade, with carrots, celery, potatoes, milk, butter, flour, and bacon. Perfect comfort food with no canned cream-of-anything soups.

Being brave is forced on a lot of us. I think most of us have realized by now that graduating from a Christian college doesn’t exempt us from struggle. Our marriages fall apart, we get a diagnosis, our long-standing faith wavers, we are deeply lonely, someone we love dies, and in all of it we are forced to be brave. In my life, and maybe in yours, too, bravery looks less like a flashy Captain America moment and more like finishing that work assignment, leaning into a meaningful conversation with a friend, laughing at YouTube cat videos again, and going to counseling for the first time. Bravery is staying in the game. It’s engaging with your life and relentlessly seeking and accepting love even though life has just run you ragged. That pure love I will always have for Afton, and the deep love I feel from other people around me, and the perfect love I know that God has for each of us—that is what keeps me in the game. It’s what makes me brave. Where can I go from your Spirit? Where can I flee from your presence? If I go up to the heavens, you are there; if I make my bed in the depths, you are there. If I rise on the wings of the dawn, if I settle on the far side of the sea, even there your hand will guide me, your right hand will hold me fast.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

6 slices bacon 4 tablespoons butter 2 cups mirepoix (celery, carrots, and onions, all minced) 3 cloves garlic, minced ½ teaspoon salt and/or seasoning (to taste, see notes) ¼ cup all purpose flour 3 cups whole milk 1–2 cups chicken broth 2 russet potatoes, peeled and cubed

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Bacon Prep: Bake the bacon on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper at 400° for 20 minutes. Crumble or cut into pieces. 2. Soup Base: Melt the butter in a soup pot. Add the mirepoix, garlic, salt, and seasoning and sauté until nice and soft. Add flour and stir with the vegetables for a few minutes to cook off any floury taste. Add milk, just a little bit at a time, stirring after each addition until smooth and creamy. The soup should start out very thick and eventually thin out as you add milk. Add the potatoes, and add chicken broth as needed to achieve the right consistency. For a thicker soup, you may not need as much of the broth. 3. Simmer Time: Let the soup simmer for 30–40 minutes. The potato soup will thicken as it simmers, and even more as it cools down. I like to wait until the potatoes are almost melty, with their edges softened just a bit, before removing from heat. When ready to serve, crumble the bacon and stir it into the soup. Read more recipes and stories from this series by searching #feedingabrokenheart on Instagram.

Psalm 139:7–10 Lindsay (Mork ’08) Ostrom & her husband Bjork live in St. Paul, MN with their sweet pup Sage. Together, they turned their “side-hustle,” known as Pinch of Yum food blog, into a full-time career that now garners an audience of more than three million each month. Lindsay was an elementary education major at University of Northwestern and went on to teach 4th grade in the Roseville Area School District. After the loss of their sweet Afton, Lindsay and Bjork found themselves with a broken heart and lack of appetite—a seemingly ironic situation for two food bloggers. Drawing inspiration from the friends and family who dropped off meals or invited them for dinner, they started a mini movement: Feeding a Broken Heart. The idea was simple: make a recipe for someone who has a broken heart, and share the story by using #feedingabrokenheart. Together, these acts of love put warm, comforting food in front of many.

Here’s a recipe from that series »

Get more recipes on Instagram @pinchofyum Follow Lindsay's personal journey @lindsaymostrom 23


DULUTH, MN During Feb. 2018, LIFE 97.3 invited listeners to send encouraging cards to children in local hospitals. LIFE 97.3 listeners made enough cards to send to hospitals in Duluth, Cloquet, Two Harbors, MN, and Grand Rapids, MI.

FARGO,ND In Nov. 2017, LIFE 97.9 supporters donated over 200 eyeglasses at the Matthew West concert held in the First Assembly Church in Fargo. The collected glasses went to Lions Recycle for Sight, an international outreach program.

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SIOUX FALLS, SD In Dec. 2017, LIFE 96.5 partnered with Avera Behavioral Health to fill stockings with gifts for children, teenagers, adults, and seniors spending Christmas in a hospital. LIFE 96.5 listeners sent a record-breaking 400 stuffed stockings to hospital patients.

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WAT E R LO O, I A DES MOINES, IA LIFE 107.1 wrapped up their Fall Share fundraiser in Sept. 2017. For every gift of $30/month, supporters donated a Bible to Freedom for Youth Ministries, a Des Moines ministry which offers after-school and summer programs for students and employment training for young adults. NSAS CITY KA

In Nov. 2017, LIFE 101.9 partnered with various HyVee stores in eastern Iowa to collect food donations for local food banks. Listeners donated 1,429 pounds of food and $580 in cash contributions to food banks in Waterloo, Cedar Rapids, and Dubuque.

KANSAS CITY LIFE 88.5 listeners shopped to fill Christmas wish-lists for local foster children during the Holiday Heroes program. As a result of the promotion, all 4,700 kids in the program received the items on their list. In four years, Life 88.5 listeners have provided gifts for 7,000 area foster children.

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

1,000,000+ listeners over the air and online


MEDIA NEWS

NEWS NETWORK FROM THE

S T. PA U L , M N When the Twin Cities hosted Super Bowl LII in Feb. 2018, KTIS was involved in key outreach ministry. For 33 days leading up to the event, KTIS listeners heard uplifting daily prayers based on Jeremiah 33:3. KTIS supported the distribution of 250,000 Sports Spectrum magazines, featuring faith stories of many NFL stars. KTIS also hosted major donors at the Super Bowl Breakfast where over 1,700 people involved in the sports industry began the event in prayer for God’s protection and transformation in the community. In July 2017, Faith Radio hosted the Northwestern Christian Writers Conference in St. Paul. The conference was comprised of 675 attendees—making it the largest Christian writers conference in the nation. The conference faculty consisted of 32 authors, acquisitions editors, literary agents, UNW professors, and keynote speaker Liz Curtis Higgs. This year’s conference will take place July 13–14, 2018.

HA

RTFORD, CT

MADISON, WI For Valentine’s Day, LIFE 102.5 invited listeners to donate cans of Play-Doh for children to play with during a hospital stay. Listeners donated 25,000 cans, enough to deliver to the American Family Children’s Hospital, seven other hospitals and clinics in Wisconsin and Illinois, and several Ronald McDonald Houses in the area.

830,000

172,000

requests posted on PrayerWorks

acts of kindness through the Hands & Feet app

90,000

16

concert attendees in 2017

Listen online or find a station near you: myfaithradio.com

stations broadcasting Christian music and Biblical teaching 25


THE

LEGACY

behind UNW's most decorated athlete

A

s she steps onto the court in her fresh, new UNW jersey, the greatness of the moment seizes her. It’s a moment she will remember for a lifetime: her sister and teammate beside her, filled with the memories of watching her mom coach at this very school—all while being led by a coach whom she’s known since she was little. It’s a narrative that has been more than 53 years in the making, starting with her grandparents. “It meant so much to wear the jersey [for the first time] and be an Eagle. It was a special moment to start the journey.” It’s a moment that ignited the athletic career of UNW’s most decorated athlete, Lindsey Peterson ’17. Interwoven into the success story of Lindsey Peterson is a foundation of generational faithfulness to Northwestern. Through a long legacy of family members who came before her, Lindsey’s volleyball success story isn’t just about awards but rather how a deeply-rooted family history gave her the opportunity to develop as a woman in Christ, on and off the court.

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

RO OT E D I N LEG ACY Lindsey comes from a long line of relatives who came to Northwestern. Her grandparents, Doug ’63 and Delores (Arndt ’62) Sprague, both attended Northwestern when the school was still located in Loring Park. Years later, Doug returned to be an associate professor of education and assisted the women’s volleyball team. The family connections continued when Lindsey’s aunt, Heidi (Sprague ’91) Claar, became a star volleyball player during her time as a student. Eventually, Lindsey’s mother, Jill Peterson, served as the head volleyball coach for the Northwestern Eagles. Lindsey fondly remembers taking trips through the tunnels and running around volleyball practices while her mom coached. During that time, Jill coached many young Northwestern women—one of whom is Northwestern’s current head volleyball coach, Beth (Lambright ’02) Wilmeth.


SECTION FEATURE

BET H (LA

Family

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Volleyball Player 2013–14

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LI N

(

TER

H A LLIE

(S

)

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Y P ET E R S O ’17

J I LL

IGHT ’02

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PE

T H ’1 5

Volleyball Coach 1993–98, 2000–03

BR

Volleyball Player 2000–02 NCCAA/NAIA Academic All-American 2001 Head Volleyball Coach 2004–present

AG U E ) P ET

SON

Varsity Basketball Player

M

T ILME H

HEID

Coaching

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PR

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(A

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DEE

RAG U E ’91

Volleyball Player 1987–90 NCCAA All-American 1990

DT ’ 6 2 ) S P

RA

RN

SP

CL

3

Professor of Education 1989–2006 Assistant Volleyball Coach Varsity Basketball Player

I(

SP RAGUE

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’6

DO

T H E LI N EAG E

Volleyball Player 2013–17

“Who we become is so much more important than what we achieve.” Coach Wilmeth fondly remembers Lindsey and her sister Hallie (Peterson) Mueth ’15 from her college volleyball days. “The memories I have of them are special,” remarked Coach Wilmeth. “My own kids are that age now, running around the gym and looking up to players like Hallie and Lindsey as role models.” With her strong family connections, it was clear to Lindsey that Northwestern was not just the right choice for a college—it was her destiny. “When I came to visit, I knew this was the place I wanted to be,” she shared. “I had so many good memories. Northwestern always felt a little bit like home.”

F O C US E D O N J OY Lindsey’s love for the game was ignited long before she came to Northwestern. “When I was little, I loved watching the older Northwestern players,” remarked Lindsey. With aspirations to be like them someday, Lindsey set out to start her volleyball career at the young age of seven. Soon, she realized she had a natural talent for the game. This, coupled with her driven personality, gave way to a successful high school volleyball career.

Once at Northwestern, she devoted herself to not only improving skills, but developing her character—a style of coaching that is integral to Beth Wilmeth’s success. Beth’s coaching style, influenced by Lindsey’s mother, Jill Peterson, is focused on character development, high expectations, and integrity. Because of these traits, Beth Wilmeth was instrumental in Lindsey’s growth and success as an athlete. Before every game, Lindsey, along with her teammates, would write a word on their wrists to give them perspective and encouragement. “Most consistently, I would write the word joy,” remarked Lindsey. This word became her central focus on the court. “It got me out of my head, helped me to not be selfish, and helped me refocus my perspective.” It was in these moments Lindsey knew she was developing into the athlete and person she had set out to become.

B E YO N D ACCO L A D ES

given. “Who we become is so much more important than what we achieve,” is Wilmeth’s favorite thing to tell her team. Through hard work, Beth Wilmeth’s leadership, and a love for Northwestern rooted in legacy, Lindsey Peterson’s time as a collegiate volleyball player made a lasting impact on Northwestern Athletics. Among many awards, Lindsey was named NCAA/AVCA Division III National Player of the Year in 2016, NCAA/AVCA All-American Player twice, Central Region Player of the Year, and UMAC Player of the Year three times. Although Lindsey graduated the school’s most decorated athlete, she also recognizes that awards aren’t everything. “It’s been such an honor to be able to figure out who I am as a woman in Christ as well as grow and learn from Coach Wilmeth and other leaders in my life,” said Lindsey. “I will take so much of what I’ve learned at Northwestern—not just from volleyball—but the character qualities, and apply them to my future career and throughout my life.”

Coach Wilmeth always reminds her players that Northwestern Athletics is not only about the accolades; it’s about stewarding the platform they have been 27


ALUMNI GIVING BY C L A S S

Think back to your time at Northwestern. Perhaps you remember eating in Café Naz with your group of friends, sitting near the fountain outside the Totino Fine Arts Center, or maybe your experience at Northwestern took place in Loring Park. Whatever your memories—it’s these pieces of nostalgia that inspire our alumni to give back to their alma mater. We are grateful for every alum who stands behind our university in prayer, in service, and in giving. Your donations directly impact students and make it possible for them to make their own lasting memories.

THERE ARE MORE THAN

31,500

NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI

13,603 ALUMNI HAVE GIVEN TO NORTHWESTERN

NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI HAVE GIVEN MORE THAN

$26.76M THE AVERAGE ALUMNI DONOR HAS GIVEN

$1,967 $1.24M

HAS BEEN GIVEN BY THE CLASS OF 1951, LEADING ALL CLASSES

90%

OF THE CLASS OF 1961 HAS GIVEN GIFTS TO NORTHWESTERN

364

CLASS OF 2001 ALUMNI HAVE GIVEN GIFTS TO NORTHWESTERN, LEADING ALL CLASSES

unwsp.edu/give 28

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


P L A N N I N G FO R TO DAY I N V EST I N G I N T H E F UT U R E Planned Giving at University of Northwestern

G I F T

A N N U I T I E S

Although Bob Hanson ’56 already had a B.A. and was operating a thriving accounting practice, he decided to enroll at Northwestern for Bible training. Over the years, as Bob has continued to build his practice, he’s always made space for dialogue about spiritual matters with his clients. Due to his tax knowledge, Bob knows the benefit of gift annuities, and he and his wife Helen have supported Northwestern through more than one, as well as monthly giving, for over three decades now.

D O N O R

A D V I S E D

F U N D S

The Langmades have a long history at Northwestern with several generations of family attending the university. As a rental property owner, Mark ’78 has made a custom of selling houses and using the sales from the house as a gift to Northwestern. He’s spreading the word about philanthropy to his clients, and his donor advised funds have allowed him to make charitable contributions, receive an immediate tax benefit, and then recommend grants from the fund over time.

L E G A C Y

G I F T S

Ruth Dyer’s sister, Luverne Gustavson ’39, worked as secretary to Billy Graham when he was president of Northwestern from 1948 to 1952. After Luverne passed away, Ruth settled her sister’s estate. She realized the deep love they both had for Northwestern and decided to honor her sister’s wishes by leaving a generous gift for the university. Ruth has since passed away, but both sisters decided to leave Northwestern in their will and estate-planning documents and leave a legacy in their stead.

To discuss the advantages of making a planned gift to Northwestern, contact Kirby Stoll ’95 M'17 in the office of Advancement at 651-631-5378 or email him at plannedgiving@unwsp.edu. Kirby will be able to guide you on your next

unwlegacy.org 29


ALUMNI UPDATES 1 9 4 0s A

Pastor Irwin “Wyn” Olson ’43 passed away

on May 26, 2017.

Hettie (Begley ’49) Loriot passed away on July 19, 2017.

1 9 5 0s

Eugene ’52 and Edith (Baltensperger ’52) Soderberg celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Aug. 24, 2017.

Edwin Heppner ‘53 passed away in 2016. B

Bob Pangburn ’53 authored a second daily

devotion entitled Assurance of His Grace - Beyond a Shadow of a Doubt, which includes notes from Bob’s early morning visits with the Lord, reading God’s Word, and listening to the voice of the Holy Spirit. Although Bob passed away in 2012, his legacy lives on.

Rev. Wayne Lehsten ’55 is an active elder at Scottsdale Bible Church. He also mentors young pastors and serves as a marriage coach. He has taken five trips to Slovakia to help develop a country-wide marriage ministry. Former Dean of Admissions & Alumni Director Ralph Anderson ’55 passed away on May 20, 2017. Ralph, along with his wife Eleanor ’50, led the alumni department before Ralph eventually became the Dean of Admissions. Ralph was known for his quick wit, infectious smile, love for Northwestern, but most importantly a love for his Lord and Savior. C

Robert Taylor ’56 passed away on Aug. 11, 2017. Sympathy to his wife, Shirley ’56. Rev. Reginald Dunlap ’57 is in full-time ministry. He spends the fall and winter months in the southern part of the United States holding Bible conferences and the winter months are spent in New England preaching and teaching God’s Word. He praises God for Church Centered Ministries and the fruitful ministry that this organization provides. D

Sally (Clark ’58) Pickard authored Forgiveness

from the Heart of Africa (Acorn Publishing, 2015)

Beverly Feiker ’59 relocated to California after her husband’s death (James ’60) in 2012. She now lives closer to one of her daughters and works part time on the Legacy staff with Barnabas International.

1960s

Edward Norman ’88 started a new job as Assistant Principal at Havre High School. He is thankful that God directs our path as we follow His direction to where He leads us.

Rev. Vernon Anderson ’62 celebrated his 70th

Rev. Scott Nelson ’89 is in his 24th year

wedding anniversary with his wife, Louise in Mar. 2015. She then passed away Dec. 1, 2015.

Norman Anderson ’62 authored How To Be A Confident Christian In A Crumbling World!: The Message of the Prophet Daniel for our Times (Self-Published, 2017) E

Timothy Lindstrom ’62 authored 100,000 BMW Prayer Miles (Self-Published, 2014) F

pastoring First Baptist of Two Harbors. His wife, Julie (Pettman ’89), is in her seventh year teaching at Kickstart Preschool. Their children Elizabeth ’13 and Joshua ’16 are both UNW graduates and Linnea was just accepted into UNW’s nursing program.

1990s

ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES

1970s

Brian Gilbert ’90, Jodi (Hacquebord ’92) Richert, Greg Sandvig ’92, Julia (Jacobson ’96) Glanzer, Jon Gustafson ’99

Stephen Schoenwald ’76, Terry Esau ’78

I

ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES

Terry Esau ’78 created a nonprofit called Free Bikes 4 Kidz. The organization’s mission is to provide bicycle rehab and recycling. On Oct. 6, 2017, Terry and his organization set out to break their own Guinness World Record set in 2015 by collecting 5,513 used bikes. The bikes were fixed and distributed to 75 schools and nonprofits. An article was written about Free Bikes 4 Kidz by StarTribune in Oct. 2017. G

1980s

ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES Kenny King ’85, Ken Faffler ’84, Gracia (Shindo ’86) Reed

Nate Bostrom ’81 is currently serving as the Chairman of the Board of Directors for the CAP (Community Action Partnership) Agency of Scott, Carver, and Dakota Counties in Minnesota. The CAP Agency services clients in the areas of affordable housing, food shelves, Head Start, home heating assistance, etc.

Stacy Strout ’83 and her husband, Michael, recently celebrated their 16th wedding anniversary.

R. Peter Reid ’84 began serving in a double role as the director of the Torchbearer Conference Center/Bible School in Friedrichshafen, Germany, and general director of Torchbearers International in June 2017. He is pictured with his wife, Gaby. UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

UNW and made so many great memories. He has had two strokes in the last few years and believes that he has grown closer to God through those experiences.

Steven Sheldon ’61, Dick Schirmacher ’64, Mavis Jansma ’65, Bob Hosman ’66

ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES

H

30

Blake Anderson ’87 is thankful to have gone to

Brian Lohse ’91 recently returned from a mission trip to Port-au-Prince, Haiti where he helped build a church. Heidi Zwart ’92 authored It Began in the Garden: Understanding Your Past for a Healthier Future (Beaver’s Pond Press, 2017) J

Susan (Bly ’93) Richman married her husband, Terry, in Capon Bridge, W.V. in Nov. of 2016. Susan currently works as a Financial Aid Counselor at a local community college. After serving both University of Northwestern and Northwestern Media for many years, Jim Johnson ‘94 will be leaving UNW and taking on a new and unique lead development role at Eagle Brook Church. Jim has been a key, campus leader and has held several roles within the Advancement Department—all of which have helped further Northwestern’s mission. Jim also assisted with the transition of campus ministries during his tenure. He will be greatly missed by the Northwestern community.

Rev. David Cross, Jr. ’94 has taken a new role as president of Global Intent. This organization works to mobilize, train, and mentor tentmakers. By partnering with mission agencies, G.I. equips many people overseas to enter the workforce, and use the integration of their faith and work to share Jesus among unreached people groups. Rev. Cross is also in the process of publishing another book.


O

ne sign of a thriving college or university is an active alumni base. Our office strives to keep you engaged and informed about your alma mater, and we find so much joy in seeing how God has used thousands of our alumni to make a kingdom impact in this world. As you read through these alumni updates, I hope you'll note the alumni council members who represent your decade. These individuals work alongside my team to ensure you, our alumni, are being served to the best of our ability. We would love to hear how God is working in your life. Stop by our office or update your profile online at unwsp.edu/alumni In Him,

Scott Anderson ’84

Director for Alumni, Parent, and Church Relations

A

Meet

D

ANITA CLINE-COLE ’03

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS,

GRADUATE, ONLINE, AND ADULT LEARNING

B

C

F

E

I

G

“I was an older student when I started college, and I remember the feelings of excitement—and anxiety of how I was going to make this work with my already busy life. The staff and faculty at Northwestern were very supportive, and they provided the help that I needed to be successful and to graduate with my bachelor’s degree in business marketing. If you are considering going back to school to finish a degree, earn a second one, or if you are exploring graduate programs or certificates, I invite you to check out Northwestern’s College of Graduate, Online, and Adult Learning.”

unwsp.edu/become-a-student CONTACT ANITA AJCLINECOLE@UNWSP.EDU 651.631.5364 H

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K

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Equipping students to grow intellectually and spiritually, to serve

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effectively in their professions

M

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SECTIONUPDATES ALUMNI

Jennifer (Williamson ’95) Karr and her husband

Jason and Laura (Westrum ’01) Hobbs

Brad and Takara (Spaulding ’05) Henegar are

are beginning a new adventure that the Lord has set before them by relocating to Italy. Jennifer’s husband was offered a position in June 2017 with the United Nations World Food Programme, which is headquartered in Rome, Italy.

welcomed baby Simon on Mar. 30, 2017.

excited to announce the arrival of baby Zola on Apr. 13, 2017. Zola was welcomed home by big brother Logan (4).

Lonnie ’00 and Michelle (Quigley ’95) Chapman are missionaries with United World Missions (UWM) and will be moving to Cork, Ireland in the near future to work in a long-term capacity with Grace Christian Church, a national partner with UWM.

Anne (Colehour ’98) Mullen married Don on May 13, 2017 in Minneapolis. Anne is currently the Meeting & Event Manager for the Minnesota Golf Association.

Jaimie (Olsen ’99) Cogua was promoted to Coordinator of ESL, Migrant, and Refugee Education for the Omaha Public Schools in Omaha, Nebraska. There are 8,000+ current ELLs in our District of 52,000 students.

Richard Gimpel ’99 graduated in Dec. 2016 from Reformed Theological Seminary with a Masters of Arts in Theological Studies.

2000s

ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES Molly Stenson ’05, Jake Mulvihill ’02, Betty (Krause ’07, M’09) Mertens

Andrew and Heather (Davie ’00) Kipp welcomed to the world baby boy, Isaiah Thomas, on July 22, 2016. Isaiah joined big sister Angela and brothers Micaiah and Josiah at home. K

Timothy ’00 and Sarah (Berg ’98) Jahnke

work together on design-build construction projects. Timothy operates Jahnke Contruction and is a certified NanaWall door system installer for a four-state region. Sarah homeschools their four children, Gabe (15), Selma (13), Caleb (11), and Seth (9), while also working in interior design.

Jeremy Swigart ’01 has been doing amazing work in the field of peacemaking. Swigart and Jon Huckins founded the Immigrants Journey, a learning lab that is part of The Global Immersion Project. In Oct. 2017, UNW students and employees participated in the Immigrants Journey. On Sept. 25 and 26, 2017 Swigart was a guest speaker in chapel at UNW. Jeremy is married to Jaclyn (Werner ’02). He also authored Mending the Divide: Created Love in a Conflicted World (InterVarsity Press, 2017) M

Samuel and Sarah (Porter ’02) Chesnutt welcomed baby Selah into the world on June 30, 2017. Proud big siblings are Caleb, Gabrielle, and Elijah. N

Darrin and Alison (Baden ’03) Geier

welcomed new baby Ethan on Feb. 2, 2017. Older siblings are Brenna (9), Molly (7), and Jonah (4). Proud grandparents are Dr. Mark Baden (Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Art & Design) and Karen Baden.

Benjamin Hemmila ’03 and his wife Amanda are excited to announce the birth of their first child, Solomon Gabriel, on Feb. 1, 2017.

Dr. Lucas Kavlie ’03 received a promotion to Vice President of Compliance and Accreditation at Western Governors University. He is married to

Kerry (Heyde ’04). Chad and Carmen (Rodriguez ’03) Sieleni celebrated the birth of their child, Ezra Joseph, on Feb. 9, 2017. Renae (Isakson ’03) Selvig married her husband Brian on Feb. 14, 2017.

Thad and Nicole (Taylor ’03) Weber celebrated the arrival of their baby girl, Kylie Hope, on May 19, 2017. Kylie joined big sister Kaliah (3) at home.

Greg and Christine (Wysocki ’00 ) Luc

Adam (’04) and Catherine (Padden ’04) Witter

welcomed new baby Penelope in July of 2017. Penelope joined big sister Anastasia at home.

welcomed the arrival of new baby Kenna Rose on Mar. 17, 2017. Big siblings are Shawn (5) and Miles (3).

L

Ryan Bair ’01 was hired as an operations manager for 89Q, 89.5 FM WCLQ Christian Life Communications in Schofield/Wausau, Wisconsin (formerly of The Family Radio Network in Appleton, WI).

Jonathan Papik ’04 was named the next justice to join the Nebraska Supreme Court. Papik has practiced law in Nebraska for the past eight years. Papik and his wife, Rachel (Hibbard ’03), have three kids. He is a fan of the Nebraska-Omaha men’s basketball team and coaches his son’s youth basketball team.

OP

Daniel and Courtney (Tarter ’06) Reissig

had their fourth son on June 11, 2017. Ben joins big brothers, twins Luke (5) and Zach (5), and Seth (3). Courtney recently authored Glory in the Ordinary: Why Your Work in the Home Matters to God (Crossway Publishers, 2017)

Elizabeth Shafto ’06 recently relocated to Columbus, Ohio.

Emily (Osterbauer ’06) Marks, pastry chef at The Bachelor Farmer in Minneapolis, was honored with a 2018 Charlie Award for most Outstanding Baker/Pastry Chef in the Twin Cities

Nathan Bird ’06 and his “NorrSound Tenors” tenor trio returned to Chanhassen Dinner Theatres to perform for the third year in a row during Christmas of 2017! Also, he and his wife, Naomi, are praising God that they were able to purchase their first home in Apr. 2017. Joshua and Rachel (Tyree ’06) Young are excited to announce the newest addition to their family on Aug. 21, 2017. New baby, Eve, was welcomed home by big sisters Abigail (6), Hannah (4), and Deborah (2).

Timothy Ferret ’06 took a job in Mar. 2017 as camp director for the high school and middle school ages at Spring Hill Camps, Indiana. After 10 years of working with college students in the higher education setting, he will now be contributing to the leadership and personal development of college students as they work at the Christian summer camp. They employ 1,200 college students each summer, and served over 26,000 campers this past summer.

Karyn Tomlinson ’07 was named Princess of Porc at whole-hog cookery contest Cochon555 in Minneapolis. Tomlinson will compete at Grand Cochon during the competition’s 10-year anniversary party in Chicago in Sept. 2018.

Andrew ’07 and Anna Olson welcomed the birth of their daughter Emily on Oct. 21, 2016. She joined big sister Aubrey at home.

Tyler and Jessica (Pingree ’07) Sauck welcomed their son to the world on Nov. 24, 2017. He joined big brother Aaron (4) at home.

33


SECTION ALUMNI UPDATES

Derrick and Melissa (Pickar ’07) Ellis celebrated the birth of their son, Timothy Mark (8 pounds and 20 ounces, and 20 ½ inches long) on Aug. 3, 2016. He joined Elijah (7) and Lilliyn (5).

Ryan and Sarah (Kerr ’07) Jacobson welcomed baby Makenzie Leah into the world on Oct. 26, 2017. She joined big brother Dane (3) at home. Ross and Tracy (Beseman ’07) Peters welcomed their new daughter, Karissa on Mar. 3, 2017. She joined proud big sister Kaylee (2). Tracy also completed her MBA from Carlson School of Management in Dec. 2016.

Ryan and Sarah (Hanson ’11) Spiegler welcomed baby Ellis to the world on Apr. 26, 2017.

Thomas ’09 and Allyson (Jordan ’12) Mancuso are excited to announce the birth of their daughter, Elaina Louise, on Oct. 7, 2016. Austin Schmitt ’12 and his wife Hannah welcomed Aspen Elise to their family on Jan. 7, 2017. She is a happy and healthy baby.

Daniel Nuckols ’12 just shot a film with a crew

their new baby girl, Anna, on Apr. 7, 2017. Anna was welcomed home by big brother David.

of 14 people. God brought in an actor from New York and a professional musician who has recorded 26 albums. God’s fingerprints have been everywhere on this project! Premiere showing was June 10, 2017 in Bismarck, ND.

Joel ’09 and Marlys (Allard ’08) Livingston

T

welcomed their daughter Celeste Hope to the world on July 21, 2017.

girl on Apr. 24, 2017 named Zoe.

Jonathan ’08 and Jolene (Bottemiller ’08) Harms would like to announce the arrival of

Matthew and Amber (Fletcher ’09) Busacker are excited to announce the birth of their son, William John, on May 27, 2017.

Jesse ’12 and Kimberly (Weihman ’10) Stewart and their son Tobias (2) welcomed a baby 1 LT John DiMenna ’12 has been to Ft. Benning

the Silence: A Call to the Church to Help Victims of Child Abuse (Self-Published, 2017). She is passionate about helping those affected by child abuse. Learn more at her website at onetear.org.

and learned infantry officer skills in the US Army. He married Sydney (Askildson ’13) at Nazareth Chapel. John and Sydney have 2 beautiful girls, Gloria (3) and Rose (2). John is now working in Eagan for Thomson Reuters, and his family moved into their first home in Bloomington. He recently returned home from a year-long deployment in the Middle East. He is so thankful for the unconditional love, memories, and refuge that UNW created. He thanks Northwestern for all the lessons he learned on how to bring glory to Christ.

2 0 1 0s

Gary Zilavy ’12 married Emily Bruder-Mattson

Jon and Jana (Schumann ’09) Evink welcomed their son, Josiah Reuben to the world on Dec. 5, 2016. Q

Lisha (Stingley) Lender ’09 authored Breaking

ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES Michael Engel ’11, Ryan Gregory ’12, Ryan Dembeck M’14, Carly (Sellberg ’15) Heinsch, Brittane (Turner ’10) Geleske, Simon Hearne M’14, Kristen (Wicklund '15) Paulsen

Jesse ’10 and Merissa (Kittleson ’12) Scheumann started a business to provide illustrated resources for students of Biblical Hebrew. Jesse is studying for his Ph.D. with a specialization in Biblical Hebrew at University of the Free State. For more information, visit picturehebrew.com. R

Garret ’11 and Amy (Rahn ’11) Zaffke

welcomed a second addition to their family with the arrival of Lincoln Swede Zaffke on June 9, 2017. Baby Lincoln was welcomed home by big sister, Zoey (2).

34

Drew ’12 and Lauren (Bernhagen ’12) Elrick welcomed baby Griffin Turner on Jun. 26, 2017. S

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

on Mar. 10, 2018. The Zilavys reside in the north suburbs of Atlanta, GA. Gary is a Marketing Technologist for Morrison Hershfield.

Devereaux Lloyd ’13 received his MOL. He successfully defended his dissertation and graduated on Aug. 13, 2017 from Johnson University in Knoxville, TN. He received a Ph.D. in Leadership Studies, with a concentration in Educational Leadership. Pictured is Devereaux and his wife, Nyree-Dawn. U

Kristopher Heiple ’13 graduated from the University of Mary (Bismarck, ND) on Apr. 29 with a MS in Counseling.

Jordan ’13 and Shelby (Kaihoi ’13) Prins welcomed baby Carson Lee to their family on Aug. 6, 2017. V

Carly (Koeberl ’14) Viland married Marshall Viland (from Fargo, ND) on Dec. 3, 2016, in Hutchinson, MN. She recently accepted a position in Fargo, ND, at LIFE 97.9 as the Listener Engagement Director and an on-air announcer. She is happy to be a part of the Northwestern family again!

Christina (Deyoe ’14) Christenson graduated with honors from Indiana University School of Occupational Therapy (IUOT) with her Masters Degree on May 14, 2017. She was honored as one of the Elite 50 graduates and was additionally recognized as the number four graduate overall (out of all graduates from the IU medical school, law school, all masters programs, and all PhD programs). She was also awarded the William M. Plater Civic Engagement Medallion for excelling in commitment to the community and for academic excellence. This fall, she will be co-teaching at IUOT for the Neuroscience course, continuing research, and working as an occupational therapist PRN. She is married to

Carl Christenson ’14. Emily Robertson ’14 accepted a new role as Marketing and Communications Manager at Southwest Christian High School in Chaska, Minnesota in June of 2017. She is also an assistant coach on the varsity volleyball team.

Hannah (Holm ’14) and Caleb Ginos (attended UNW 2013–14) were married on Dec. 30, 2016 in Charlotte, NC. “We thank God for bringing us together through meeting at Northwestern!” Hannah played basketball at UNW from 2012–14 and is the daughter of UNW Athletics Hall of Famer Sherri (Kremer ’86) and Brian Holm.

Josette Elieff ’14 recently started producing videos for GoMN in Minneapolis full-time. She had been working there since Oct. 2015 writing news and recording radio newscasts, but is now enjoying her specialization in video projects.

Laura (Sweeny ’14) Thapa is living in Sikkim, India with her husband. They are serving with YWAM and working alongside the local church. Laura is using her degree of Kinesiology to lead backpacking and worship teams in the Himalayas.

Alexandra Yauch ’15 was recently promoted after working only seven months at her company. She is now building and closing contracts for the company. She is enjoying her new role!


SECTIONUPDATES ALUMNI

Aubree (Else ’15) Woelber is an adjunct professor at Midland University in Fremont, NE and at Iowa Western Community College in Council Bluffs, IA.

Nathaniel ’15 and Lindsey (Kuhlman ’15) Back both graduated from the dual degree engineering program. They got married on Jan. 10, 2015, graduated in Dec. 2015, and had their first baby boy, Elliot, on Jan. 9, 2017.

Sharayah Bunce ’15 graduated with a theatre degree. After graduating, she has been directing Bunce Backyard Productions, a back-yard theatre show produced by Lori and Greg Bunce. The shows have gained a lot of attention with its own orchestra and professional light and sound system. This summer’s production was Disney’s classic, Peter Pan. The Bunce family resides in Maple Grove, MN but recently moved the theatre location to a backyard in Dayton, MN due to the size of the crowds. Fox 9 News published an article about Bunce Backyard Productions on July 20, 2017.

Q

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Britt Gonyea ’16 received the 2017 Staff of the Year award from ACR Homes. Gonyea was W

selected from a group of 59 nominees—one representative from each ACR home across the Twin Cities.

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Anthony Ohlendorf ’16 began a new job with HCSO as a 911 Dispatcher in Sept. 2017. He and his wife, Sydney welcomed home new baby Elanor on Dec. 4, 2017. Elanor joined big sibling James (2) at home.

Giving God-honoring leadership in the home, church, community, and world

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35


He’s Home. Billy Graham, 1918–2018

The University of Northwestern and Northwestern Media community remembers the Reverend Billy Graham who served as the University’s second president and founded KTIS. We rejoice in knowing that he is now home with the Lord and Savior he loved and served.

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


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W.B.

Riley, Northwestern’s founder, chose Graham as Northwestern’s second president, knowing that Graham had strong convictions and would keep the school true to God and His Word. Graham took on the role at just 29 years of age, making him the youngest college president in history. Students like Kyle Wilson ’51 appreciated Graham’s passion and his approachability. “…the students were fully aware this was an anointing from God and a very special time…. He’d be away when he had a crusade, but then he’d come back,” said Kyle Wilson. “He was a part of the family. He went up and down the halls like one of us.” Early on, Graham observed that despite numerous Bible schools and seminaries, there was a shortage of trained evangelists. Now in the position to do something about it, he was thrilled about the opportunity to ignite among students a fire for sharing the Gospel. “Reverend Graham held a special place in the heart of Northwestern,” said Dr. Cureton, President of University of Northwestern & Northwestern Media. “He will be forever remembered as one of the school’s most influential presidents and a key figure of the college’s history.”

N O RT H W EST E R N RA D I O At a Northwestern chapel service in early 1948, Graham issued a challenge to the student body to give a dollar a week to start a Northwestern radio station. “The challenge really worked,” said Wilson, who remembers that particular chapel, “and the students gave over a thousand dollars a week. Students and staff [who raised $44,000] put Northwestern on the air through that weekly offering.” 38

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN

“I never dreamed back then in 1952 the great things God had in store for Northwestern. We have seen Him expand and bless the college and its outreach. To God be the glory—great things He has done!” Billy Graham On Monday afternoon, February 7, 1949, one year after the challenge was issued, KTIS signed on the air. President Graham was the first to speak, dedicating the station in prayer: “This station stands as a monument to answered prayer and the sacrificial giving of the greatest gang of students, faculty, and staff in all the world.”


The Twin Cities’ response to KTIS was overwhelming, benefiting listeners as well as the college. People were thrilled to hear his voice on the radio and hear his preaching. For students, the radio station become a training ground in media production.

G RA H A M ’ S L A ST I N G LEG ACY Graham’s contributions to Northwestern are still felt today. Although his tenure at Northwestern was brief, Graham’s influence upon the college impacts today’s students and every listener who tunes in to KTIS. At Northwestern’s Diamond Jubilee in 1977, Graham returned to celebrate the college’s 75th anniversary, by that time located at its current Roseville campus. In his remarks, he closed with his personal vision for Northwestern: “Seventy-five years to look back to—glorious, thrilling, hard, challenging, sometimes desperate years. To God be the glory for what has happened. But today we don’t look back. We look forward to generations of students that are yet to come, should Christ tarry. And I want to recommit my support to you and to Northwestern today. I count it a privilege to be a part of your history and I want to be a part of your future.” In 2011, Northwestern dedicated the Billy Graham Community Life Commons building, a central gathering place for students. Graham’s grandson Rev. William Franklin Graham IV was present for the dedication and shared a letter sent by his grandfather to the Northwestern community: “I never dreamed back then in 1952 the great things God had in store for Northwestern. We have seen Him expand and bless the college and its outreach. To God be the glory—great things He has done!” As a community, we will always remember the legacy of Billy Graham and pray God’s comfort to his family and those everywhere who were touched by his wonderful life and ministry.

To read more about Billy Graham's impact at Northwestern, and to view a digital copy of the 2011 commemorative issue of The Pilot, visit unwsp.edu/billy-graham

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Because of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compelling love, we will teach wisdom and understanding to reach all nations for Christ.

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2 0 1 6 – 1 7

A N N U A L R E P O R T UNIVERSITY · MEDIA

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Josh Stokes

ANNUAL SECTION REPORT

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN exists to provide Christ-centered higher education equipping students to grow intellectually and spiritually, to serve effectively in their professions, and to give God-honoring leadership in the home, church, community, and world. NORTHWESTERN MEDIA exists to lead people to Christ and nurture believers in their spiritual growth through Christ-centered media.

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hroughout this issue of The Pilot, you will read how some of our faculty, staff, alumni, and radio stations are making an impact for Christ. These stories and numbers only tell a small tale of the good work God is doing through Northwestern. The Lord has blessed this organization immensely over the years. As we continue to grow and change, our mission has and will remain paramount. Many may not know this, but at the beginning of every board of trustee meeting—after a time of devotions and prayer— we recite our mission statements for both University of Northwestern and Northwestern Media. I believe this sets the tone for the conversations we have and the decisions we make. As an organization, we continue to be a missional, relational, transformational, and caring community that places our faith upon our Savior, Jesus Christ. Whether you attended Northwestern back in the ’40s or you’re a current student, the legacy of our school will always live out through the graduates who have trusted Northwestern to equip them to be God-honoring leaders wherever the Lord takes them. I truly believe the world needs more Northwestern graduates and listeners to spread the Gospel and be a light in their communities. As we forge ahead, I am confident in Northwestern’s ability to grow and thrive while remaining true to who we are. It is an honor to lead this organization, and I hope you take great delight in being connected to this wonderful community. In Christ,

“Now to Him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to His power that is at work within us, to Him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever!” Ephesians 3:20

Alan Cureton

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN


ANNUAL REPORT

FISCAL YEAR 2016–2017 FINANCIAL AND ENROLLMENT REPORT 75 70 65 60

MILLIONS OF DOLL ARS ($)

55 50 45

MEDIA

MEDIA

• LISTENER SUPPORT • FAITH RADIO • SERVICE REVENUE • CONCERT REVENUE

• PROGRAMMING • STATION OPERATIONS • FUNDRAISING

$19,660,000

$19,660,000

GIFTS, GRANTS & AUXILIARY SERVICES

169 192

1,496

$12,568,000

1,659

• ACADEMIC AFFAIRS • STUDENT SERVICES • INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT • AUXILIARY SERVICES • CAMPUS SERVICES

35 30

TUITION & FEES

$40,938,000

$53,506,000

TOTAL STUDENT ENROLLMENT

3,516

UNIVERSITY

40

25

• CAPITAL PURCHASES

FALL 2017 ENROLLMENT BY VENUE

TRADITIONAL UNDERGRADUATE UNDERGRADUATE PATHWAYS

20

FOCUS ADULT UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATE STUDIES

15 10

TOTAL ACTUAL REVENUES & EXPENSES

43


3003 SNELLING AVENUE NORTH ST. PAUL, MN 55113-1500 UNWSP.EDU University of Northwestern @northwesternmn @unweagles #unwnation

Profile for University of Northwestern

Northwestern Pilot | Spring 2018  

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