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UNIVERSIT Y OF NORTHWESTERN – ST. PAUL

Life Online Can genuine community thrive in a high-tech world?

FALL 2013


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Cover Illustration: Eric Hanson

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PILOT STAFF Managing Editor Marita Meinerts, M.A. Editor Shelly Barsuhn Graphic Design BARSUHN, Inc. Production Manager Colleen Bemis ’05, CPPM Contributing Writers Janelle (Hamre ’11) Higdon, Amy Ritter, Amanda Thompson '15, Nancy Zugschwert Contributing Graphic Designers Drew Elrick ’12, Tess O’Connor Contributing Production Manager Tammy Worrell ’04 Online Production Eric Olson, Amy Ritter, Josh Wielgus ’06 Production Assistant Joan Ayotte Student Assistants Becky Sharkey ’14, Jacki Smith ’15, Ashton Wirrenga ’14 Photography Josh Stokes Contributing Photographers Drew Elrick ’12, Marita Meinerts

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DEPARTMENTS 4 FROM THE PRESIDENT 4 NORTHWESTERN NEWS 18 FACULTY HIGHLIGHTS 28 ALUMNI NEWS & FEATURES

Don’t Shout! Don’t Shout!22

4 Homecoming 2013 Even Minnesota weather couldn't dampen that signature Northwestern spirit as alumni and students gathered for fun and football. Catch the highlights of the missions-focused weekend.

7 Soar Campaign Update The future of Northwestern athletes and spectators looks like a win as the Soar Campaign

for Eagle Excellence builds momentum. Where are we in this effort to raise funds for outstanding sports facilities on campus?

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Beyond Superficial Connections Online communication has transformed the way people interact with others.

Can people of faith extend Christ’s focus on relationships into the virtual world—and how?

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Online Classes, Real Relationships As the university continues to expand online opportunities for students,

COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION President Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D. Sr. V.P. for Academic Affairs Janet B. Sommers, Ph.D. Sr. V.P. for Media Paul H. Virts, Ph.D. V.P. for Institutional Advancement Amy Bragg Carey, Ed.D. V.P. for Student Life & Athletics Matt Hill ’89, Ed.D. V.P. for Business/CFO Douglas R. Schroeder, CPA Director of Human Resources Timothy A. Rich, PHR

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Northwestern faculty and staff share their perspectives—and their desire to stay focused on building relationships.

20 Don’t Shout! Check out ten handy tips for minding our manners in the digital age. 22 Community in Chapel It’s worshipful, thought-provoking and transformative. Chapel is a unique feature of the Northwestern experience that is shaped by three aims.

Like Me

24 Like Me Northwestern students have a few things to say about their experiences with social media.

Like Me Like Me

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PILOT FALL 2013 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN – ST. PAUL

PILOT is published by the Office of Marketing & Communications University of Northwestern – St. Paul 3003 Snelling Avenue North St. Paul, MN 55113-1598 651-631-5166, unwsp.edu/pilot Letters and comments may be sent to pilot@unwsp.edu.

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Like Me

NORTHWESTERN MEDIA FM 98.5/AM 900 KTIS Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN FM 101.9/AM 1090 KNWS Waterloo, IA FM 97.9/AM 1200 KFNW Fargo, ND FM 96.5/AM 1270 KNWC Sioux Falls, SD FM 102.5/AM 1190 WNWC Madison, WI FM 97.3 KDNW/FM 90.5 KDNI Duluth, MN FM 107.1/FM 96.1 KNWI Des Moines, IA FM 88.5 KJNW Kansas City, MO University of Northwestern – St. Paul does not discriminate with regard to national origin, race, color, age, sex or disability.

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from

The President

Northwestern has always been proud of its close-knit community. In the early years we were so small (seven students in 1902!), collegial closeness must have been nearly effortless. But our reputation has continued to thrive through the decades, and I believe that is because we pursue community. We’re intentional about it, dedicating ourselves to meaningful relationships among employees, leaders, faculty members and students. We ask, “How can sincere Christian community be lived out on our campus in 2013 and, beyond that, into our world?” And we implement ways to do it. So when we talk about community here—in board meetings, faculty gatherings and classes—it’s not offhand or wishful thinking. Northwestern is growing into its identity as a university, and as a result, our campus and online learning opportunities will attract more students from around the region, nation and world. Believing that thoughtful growth is God at work, I can’t help also wondering, “How will we be able to offer every student—even online learners—that unique Northwestern kind of community?” This issue of Pilot delves into some nuances of community in a time in which many of our person-to-person interactions happen virtually. How can we truly know others and be known in a high-tech world? How can we wisely access the tools that facilitate relationships across campus and across the world? We have a low-tech model in the early Jesus followers. The young Christian church was a wonderful mosaic of people who supported one another in tangible ways and, eventually, during terrifying circumstances. They were a covenant community with Christ at the center. And participating in true community gave them the strength and will to reach out to the world around them. Here at UNW, gestures of true relationship happen every day. Last year, a member of our Northwestern community experienced a devastating house fire. Within moments, texts, emails and phone calls were flying to request prayer and resources that allowed our colleague the opportunity to secure temporary housing, clothes and day-to-day necessities. Many others in our community are journeying through health crises in their own lives or the lives of loved ones; individuals at Northwestern pray, act and engage to help carry the burden in real and practical ways, sacrificially extending themselves to help. That’s community. At Northwestern, we want to bring out the best in others by resolutely and continuously investing in relationships. It’s in our DNA.

Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D. President, University of Northwestern – St Paul 4

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news

WEB EXTRA: THERE’S MORE HAPPENING AT UNW THAN CAN BE CONTAINED IN A MAGAZINE! For additional content (photos, extended articles and more) visit unwsp.edu/pilot/extra.

Determined and focused before the game, the Eagles triumphed on the field during Homecoming 2013.

Homecoming 2013: Welcome to a New U! Moments to remember The Northwestern community had a lot to celebrate at Homecoming 2013. The festivities of the week, September 22–29, gave alumni the opportunity to join students in celebrating the “New U” and the 40th anniversary of the Eagles football program. There were moments of worship, happy memories, a focus on Northwestern’s heritage of missions and avid school spirit. Nearly 1,000 students, parents and alumni attended special events on campus. On Wednesday, September 25, a movie night featured two mission-focused films, End of the Spear and Trade of Innocents, both with close ties to Northwestern’s alumni and mission-mindedness. Daily

chapel throughout the week also featured a missions theme and called students not only to global missions, but also to daily missions wherever God has called them to work and serve. On Friday, September 27, the Champions’ Reception for Eagle athlete alumni provided time for fellowship and acquainted alumni with the Soar Campaign (unweagles.com/soar). The Showcase! concert, also on Friday, featured the Northwestern Choir, Orchestra and Symphonic Band. Saturday, September 28 brought the Homecoming football game against Crown College along with gray skies, rain and cold. Despite the miserable weather, nearly 1,700 spectators showed their support for the Eagles, cheering Northwestern to a win of 27-14. The game was opened by Northwestern’s first-ever junior ball girl, Siena Wolcyn, the

daughter of alumni athletes Ben ’06 and Becky (Bremer ’04) Wolcyn. Siena battled leukemia for 18 months but her cancer is now in remission. Congratulations to the 2013 homecoming honorees Distinguished Alumnus: Laurie (LeGree ’89) Bolthouse served as producer of the film Trade of Innocents which tells a story of child sex trafficking in Southeast Asia. She has lived around the world and serves people in the mission field through a support ministry called Thrive. Buckles-Hanna Service Award: Sara Robertson ’54 has served on the Northwestern Board of Trustees for more than 20 years. She is an educator, writer and active worker for God’s Kingdom.

Music Hall of Recognition: Terry Esau ’78 is the composer of hundreds of commercial jingles and the author of Surprise Me: A 30-Day Faith Experiment (NavPress, 2005) and Be the Surprise (NavPress, 2008).

Youderian Missional Center

Athletic Hall of Fame: Julie (Bleadorn ’86) Pipp held Northwestern records in five different events at one time, ranging from the 100-meter dash to the second-longest distance in the 3,200-meter event.

formerly known as the Youderian

Athletic Hall of Fame: Joe Wise ’03 was the only student to rush for more than 4,000 yards in his Eagle career. His performances helped lead Northwestern to their first NCCAA Victory Bowl appearance in 2000.

their lives to serving indigenous

In recognition of Roger ’48 and Barbara (Orton ’49) Youderian’s commitment to missions, the Nazareth Hall meeting room Lounge was rededicated during Homecoming week as the Youderian Missional Center. Roger and Barbara met at Northwestern while studying medical missions and dedicated people groups in Ecuador with Gospel Missionary Union. In 1956, Roger Youderian and fellow missionaries Nate Saint, Ed McCully, Jim Elliot and Peter Fleming embarked on a dangerous but hopeful mission of reaching out to the isolated Auca people of Ecuador. They were murdered

in a surprise ambush, and their martyrdom became international news. Despite her great loss, Barbara stayed and continued to serve the people of Ecuador for more than 30 years. The Youderian Missional Center honors the work of the Youderians while also inspiring students to respond to the call to global missions.

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WEB EXTRA: THERE’S MORE HAPPENING AT UNW THAN CAN BE CONTAINED IN A MAGAZINE! For additional content (photos, extended articles and more) visit unwsp.edu/pilot/extra.

Building Community Through Shared Experience For Bethany (Groten ’06) Solum, defining community and its importance in her life came through Northwestern’s Intercultural Studies (ICS) internship program in 2005. “When I think of community now, it is usually with an idea of [my ICS] trip in the back of my mind: people of various backgrounds, united for a purpose, sharing life together.” Solum, an Intercultural Studies major, traveled with 18 other students to England, Romania, South Africa and Mozambique. Garry Morgan, D.Miss. (Christian Ministries), led the trip and commented that the community bond experienced by Solum is common among ICS internship trip participants. The trip itself is just part of the experience. Prior to the eight weeks of travel, students spend a half-semester together in course work and team-building activities. Students may feel disheartened when, at first, they feel like a group

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of strangers. “But community happens through shared experience,” Morgan said. He tells them to wait with anticipation. “It’s very encouraging to hear a student say the internship was a highlight of their four years at Northwestern,” Morgan said. Social media and technology help ICS teams like Solum’s connect to the world while they’re away and to each other when they get home. Teams keep blogs while they’re gone so friends and family at home can follow their activities. They also keep in touch through Facebook, Skype and other social media tools. Solum said, “Our team was very unified and worked well together.” Their friendships have remained strong; 11 of 19 members of the 2005 ICS trip attended a recent reunion at Homecoming along with other ICS alums. On October 17, the 2013 ICS Internship group left for eight weeks in China, Thailand and Southeast Asia. Follow their activities at icsfall2013.blogspot.com.

PILOT FALL 2013 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN – ST. PAUL

Halfway There: An Update on the Soar Campaign

Living in—and Loving—the City Last year, Northwestern urban studies majors experienced community in a powerful way as part of the Urban Cross-Cultural College Consortium program (U4C). Living for all or part of the school year in a South Minneapolis neighborhood, the women learned about the challenges of showing God’s love in a metro area of more than three million people and 150 different cultures. Training students to be leaders in global cities, the U4C experience includes academics, internships and life together. David Fenrick, Ph.D., Northwestern’s U4C program coordinator, said that students have a community covenant—a certain number of meals together, Bible study and classes. Many of them go to the same urban church. For Houa Moua ’14, Sandra Ruhr ’12 , Rebecca “Bex” Brandt ’13 (Dec.) and Heidi Wilson ’14 (pictured left to right with their RA Kara Schumann ’12, far left), their togetherness gave them a whole new idea of community. They shared everything, even money. As they grew closer, they also came to love the urban community around them. “We developed a heart for cities,” Brandt said, “the culture, diversity and languages. I learned that loving means giving of myself.”

In the imagination of some, fans are already cheering their Eagles to victory in expanded, world-class athletic facilities. Planners of the Soar Campaign for Eagle Excellence report nearly $5 million has been raised toward a $10.8 million goal. As the fundraising effort continues, several contractors are pursuing bids for the construction project. The new facilities will include: • new tennis courts • additional gym space • synthetic turf fields • outdoor lighting • a stadium complex with locker rooms, concessions, restrooms and a press box Over 20,000 households—alumni, parents and other friends—received mailings between July and September. This fall, student volunteers led a phonathon effort to contact them personally. By December 31, 2013, campaign planners hope to raise the remaining nearly $6 million. With the projected three-year pledge commitments and onetime gifts, contractors will break ground in spring 2014. Facilities will be ready for Eagle athletes by fall 2014. Kirby Stoll, senior director of Advancement Services said, “Prayer is a big part of the Soar Campaign. We are asking everyone to commit to prayer—and also to consider what their part might be in committing financially.” “Athletics are a tool to build the total person,” said Northwestern Trustee Russ Reynolds. “I believe the expansion of our athletic fields provides physical assets that will expand the reach and impact of activities for current and future students.” Learn more about opportunities to help expand University of Northwestern through the Soar Campaign. Visit unwsp.edu/soar.

“There’s an immediate need for these facilities for students,” said Russ Reynolds, whose father, Chub Reynolds, served as a coach, teacher and athletic director at Northwestern between 1980 and 1990. “We are trying to juggle needs with limited physical assets. Of course, Northwestern offers much more than great playing fields to current and prospective students. But to reach new students, we need to be aware of the facilities that many high schools and other comparable institutions offer. Today, there is a gap.”

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New Programs at Northwestern University of Northwestern provides increasingly diverse academic degree programs aimed at guiding students into careers after graduation. Bachelor of Science in Health Psychology Launch date: January 2014 Adult undergraduate, online degree As part of the accelerated adult degree completion program, the online Bachelor of Science in Health Psychology with concentration in Applied Behavior Analysis teaches students how psychological, behavioral, cultural and social factors influence health and illness. Through online courses, students gain an

overview of health psychology that directly prepares them for the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA) knowledge exam. This program will equip students for jobs assisting children in school settings; aiding the development of people with various kinds of disabilities; and enhancing the performance of employees in organizations and businesses. Master of Arts in Education Launch date: January 2014 New online graduate degree The on-site Master of Arts in Education (MAED) was launched in spring 2013 and provides experienced educators with a rigorous, Christ-centered, graduate-level curriculum. The

Meet the Board: Russ Reynolds Connection with Northwestern Dad [Chub Reynolds] was a coach, teacher and athletic director at Northwestern (1980 –1990). My brother Rich and nephew Rob are alums. I am a Bethel University grad but switched allegiances, as Dad loved everything Northwestern. Dining out for the Reynolds was a meal shared in the Northwestern bleachers, watching whatever sporting event was on campus. Most influential mentor I have been fortunate to work for and with a number of good business leaders in my career, but far and away the most influential person in my life remains my dad—a clear example to me of a Jesus follower who worked hard, spoke the truth, had integrity and poured himself into other people’s lives. Current career CEO and president of Batteries Plus, LLC in Atlanta, Georgia. Favorite aspect of work I am a people addict so I love working with and leading teams driven by a common vision.

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new online MAED will meet the growing demand for flexible course schedules. Both programs help students become leaders in the field of education. The online MAED offers students the same challenging courses taught by engaging, high-caliber professors. Students will develop essential knowledge and skills related to teaching and learning, instructional media and technology, immigrant and refugee education and educational research. Master of Business Administration Anticipated launch date: September 2014 Graduate degree, blended on-site and online The Master of Business

Administration (MBA) at University of Northwestern offers students a unique opportunity to earn a master’s degree that combines excellent business practices and faith. Through a blend of evening and online courses, students will work with experienced faculty to gain a global business perspective, build partnerships with real business and community organizations, and complete high-level analysis of accounting, marketing, management, technology and business law. This degree is designed for business professionals who desire to further their business expertise and develop skills for integrating their faith into the workplace.

Family I was very lucky to marry my wife, Lisa, in Nazareth Chapel in March of 1990. (It is a tradition for Reynolds men to outkick their coverage when it comes to their life partner. Ask any football player and they will explain this concept.) My daughter Nicole is 20 and a junior at Auburn University. Kylie is a high school senior and planning to play lacrosse in college. Matt is a sophomore at Greater Atlanta Christian School. Ty entered kindergarten this year (and thinks he’s a sophomore). Favorite free time activity Our family loves the beach and we like spending any spare time we can find near Daytona Beach (Ponce Inlet). Guiding verse Like a lot of believers, I find a certain verse or parable to be especially meaningful during a specific time or season of life. Right now, Ephesians 3:20 is a powerful verse to me. (“…all glory to God, who is able through his mighty power at work within us, to accomplish infinitely more than we might ask or think.”) Wow. Advice for Northwestern students Each of us has a life purpose, so I would encourage them to attack theirs with passion, courage of conviction and intense effort.

Emergency Readiness Northwestern is a campus of passionate, high-performing people who want to serve others. That was evident on Tuesday, October 22 when the university campus was the site of a largescale emergency response training exercise. Initiated and led by the Ramsey County Sheriff’s Office (headed by Sheriff Matt Bostrom, ’92, a UNW distinguished alum), the exercise included crisis simulations, creative problem solving and the participation of nearly 100 emergency response professionals including area police, SWAT, fire departments, EMTs, Metro Transit and the Department of Homeland Security. Members of UNW’s Emergency Response Team congregated to practice strategies, and 75 students participated as volunteer role players.

UNW President Alan Cureton and Ramsey County Sheriff Matt Bostrom ’92 met with law enforcement officers before the training exercise.

Lessons for Leaders Throughout the year, Northwestern will again host the Lessons for Leaders speaker series designed especially for business, church and community leaders. All events are at 12 p.m. Thursday, November 7 – Jeff Bethke (Youderian Missional Center) Jeff is the creator of the Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus video (viewed over 26 million times on YouTube) and author of the book Jesus>Religion. Wednesday, November 13 – Skye Jethani (Blue Room) The author of With and Futureville, Skye Jethani is also a speaker, consultant, pastor and executive editor of Leadership Journal.

It was a “whole community” approach. “The staff at Northwestern had obviously thought a lot about this in advance,” said Judd Freed, director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, Ramsey County. “In our discussions, they already had their people thinking about what happens next. That ability to think forward is a huge step to managing a crisis.” UNW is only the second four-year university in the state of Minnesota to host such an exercise, and, according to Ramsey County, the first to do so with such a high participation rate from multiple agencies. Northwestern will continue to place emphasis on emergency preparedness, building relationships with local and federal agencies.

Tuesday, January 28 – Rachel Cruze (Blue Room) Rachel Cruze, the daughter of personal finance expert Dave Ramsey, will share a personal message of money and hope. Tuesday, February 25 – Ravi Zacharias (Blue Room) Ravi Zacharias is a Christian apologist, leader, distinguished lecturer and author and editor of more than 20 books, including Has Christianity Failed You? and Why Jesus? Monday, March 31 – Joni Eareckson Tada (Blue Room) Joni Eareckson Tada is founder and CEO of Joni and Friends International Disability Center. She is an artist, speaker and author of more than 50 books, including her best-selling autobiography Joni.

Jeff Bethke

Eugene Cho

Wednesday, April 23 – Eugene Cho (Blue Room) Eugene Cho ministers at Quest Church in Seattle and is the founder/executive director of One Day’s Wages, “a movement of people, stories and actions to alleviate extreme global poverty.” This schedule is subject to change. For the latest information or to order tickets, visit unwsp.edu/ lessonsforleaders.

Joni Eareckson Tada

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Faculty Highlights

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Scholarship Recipients Savor Travel and Study

Psychology and Humor: Melissa Baartman Mork Melissa Baartman Mork, Psy.D. (Psychology) spent a fall 2012 sabbatical studying the psychology of humor. As a result of her studies, she presented “Humor in Relationships” at the UNW Set Apart conference. In April, she provided a workshop, “Humor and Parenting,” at the Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor annual conference. She presented “Instructional Humor: Enhancing Learning in the College Classroom” at UNW's Faculty Scholarship Symposium in May. For the National College Music Tour Association Conference, she presented “Stress Group Dynamics and Humor.” In May she will do a presentation for the North Dakota Supreme Court Clerks of Court Convention on “Stress and Humor in the Workplace.”

Research on the Republic: Jonathan Den Hartog Jonathan Den Hartog, Ph.D. (History) completed a year-long (2012–13) fellowship at Princeton University with the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. During his time as Garwood Visiting Fellow, he completed revisions on his book manuscript Patriotism and Piety: Federalist Politics and Religious Struggle in the New Nation, which will be published by University of Virginia Press. He also began work on a book tentatively titled John Jay and the Politics of Prudence and did research for a project on global reactions to the French Revolution. He had the opportunity to write and publish other scholarly materials, deliver several academic presentations and start and contribute to his blog, historicalconversations.wordpress.com.

J. Edwin Hartill Professorship: W. Ed Glenny W. Ed Glenny, Ph.D., Th.D. (Biblical & Theological Studies) published two books: Hosea: A Commentary Based on Hosea in Codex Vaticanus and Amos: A Commentary Based on Amos in Codex Vaticanus (both in the Septuagint Commentary Series). He also presented three papers: “Davidic Covenant Fulfillment in 1 Peter” and “Translation Technique in the Septuagint of Micah” at the International Society of Biblical Literature meeting in St. Andrews, Scotland and “Translation Technique in the Minor Prophets” at the International Congress of the International Organization of Septuagint and Cognate Studies in Munich, Germany. Glenny received University of Northwestern’s first endowed professorship in 2011.

Uncovering Opportunities in China Pamela Solvie, Ph.D., Margaret Johnson, Ph.D., Susan Johnson, Ph.D., and Ying Wang Shen, Ph.D. (Education) participated in an exploratory trip to China in May 2013. A joint venture between the Departments of Education and World Languages, this trip enabled them to investigate opportunities for Northwestern students in mainland China and for international students coming to the Northwestern campus. The team met with more than ten schools and universities and successfully identified opportunities for Chinese language study. All of the international schools committed to working with University of Northwestern as school partners for field placements. 10

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All-American Athlete Perseveres through Pain Physical pain is an expected hurdle for the athlete. Eyes ahead, she is driven by a burning appetite to play hard. In one astounding season for Eagle volleyball, fans saw a team on fire led by AllAmerican setter Krista Stoltz ’14, but this stellar athlete’s hurdles were higher than anyone could have known. With every move on the court, Stoltz pushed through the excrutiating pain of a uterine fibroid tumor. While fibroids are not uncommon, the symptoms Stoltz started experiencing in fall 2012 were extreme. Waiting for medical test results, she found herself unable to even climb to the top bunk in her dorm. At a memorable October game against Carleton College, the team took Stoltz’s struggle on together, with passers focusing on accuracy to their setter and teammate Jacki Smith ’15 on the sideline ready with Biofreeze. “On the court,” said teammate Emily Robertson ’14, “you wanted to make your passes that much better so she wouldn’t have to move.” Stoltz couldn’t even stand straight on the court. The team’s wins enabled it to claim the UMAC regular season

championship and advance further into the NCAA postseason than any Northwestern team in program history. Stoltz entered surgery on December 12 and emerged with a seven-inch scar after the removal of an enormous tumor the size of two grapefruits. Today she is captaining the team with which she fought so hard for victory. “This year, I can play at my fullest potential without having to ask for help,” Krista said. “I am mentally tougher having played through that experience, and I’ve learned to really trust in the Lord.” With eyes on a 16th conference championship, Stoltz leads the conference with 11 assists per set and has the scars to prove her yearlong test of endurance and faith through the pain. To read a more detailed account of Krista Stoltz’s story, visit unwsp. edu/eagles.

In April 2013, Anastasia Pederson ’13 was awarded a prestigious Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Scholarship to teach high school students in Levice, Slovakia. She is Northwestern’s tenth Fulbright Scholar in as many years and graduated with a B.A. in ESL Education and an Intercultural Studies (ICS) minor. Three Northwestern students recently received Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships, awards that help undergraduates participate in study abroad programs. This fall the scholarships enabled Kou Thao ’14 and Maly Lee ’15 to join a Northwestern team of 15 on a tricountry tour of Asia—and classmate Brittany Jones-Dumas ’14 to travel to Hong Kong to study Chinese. Thao

said, “I’ve taken it as a confirmation. Since I was a kid, my heart has always wanted to be in China.” Advisor Sally Harris, Ph.D., provided guidance during the extensive application processes. In 10 years, Harris has helped 16 students travel overseas funded by these competitive scholarships. Learn more about our Fulbright Scholars at unwsp.edu/fulbright.

Finding the Forgotten “I’m never going to do missions. I’m never going to travel.” At home this fall in Duluth, Paige Slighter ’13 laughed off old declarations, having just returned from a summer tour to Eastern Europe with No Longer Music (NLM). Through Steiger International, this group of musicians, actors and artists used live music, drama and visual effects to present the Gospel, performing in open squares in major urban centers. The 2013 tour was Slighter's final internship to graduate from Northwestern and included events in Albania, Poland, Germany and Ukraine. As Slighter joined the creative effort to “reach out to rebels,” disenfranchised youth with

little hope, she saw a full range of responses up close—from opposition to skepticism to joy. Some joined the team in prayer after hearing of God’s love for them. Years ago, Slighter gave up performing after a failed college audition. Her experience with NLM affirmed that “God will always be surprising me.”

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Beyond

Superficial Connections The sun rises, and with it, a chorus of rings, beeps, hums, buzzes, clicks and song snippets. They are the voices of our “devices,” the ever-present companions of people in the digital age. We stare into monitors and keep our devices close in pockets, purses and messenger bags. We Facebook, Instagram and link in. At night we drift to sleep, one of the only places technology can’t physically follow us. Unless we make our homes in caves devoid of WiFi access, we can hardly work, shop, go to school or keep in touch with the family without Internet connection. Is this virtual life real life or a one-dimensional substitute? Can we find genuine community online—or just megabytes of near approximation and shallowness? Living in a connected world These questions were far from our minds when the Internet came into routine public use in the ’90s. Most people were just mesmerized. The speed! The efficiency of connections with people next door or continents away! MIT professor and author Sherry Turkle heralded the new age of Internet connection in a TED1 talk and her book Life on the Screen. Online communication changed the way we related to fellow human beings. As the number of venues mushroomed, we added friends…joined groups…wrote blogs…bought and sold goods on eBay. And it all happened without the interference of actual physical human connection. In 2012, sixteen years after her first TED lecture, Sherry Turkle again 1

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stood on stage, but this time she brought a measure of caution to her previous ebullience. In “Connected, but alone?” she said, “I’m still excited by technology, but I believe…we’re letting it take us places that we don’t want to go. People can’t get enough of each other if—and only if—they can have each other at a distance, in amounts they can control.” We may be sitting together at the breakfast table, but we’re all looking at our phones. Lost in the crowd To go online is to join a massive meeting already in progress and in session 24 hours a day. Seventy-two percent of adults who are online use social networking sites.2 On Facebook alone, there are 665 million daily active users 3 and 1.1 billion monthly active users.4 How could anyone be lonely here? When the animated Dreamworks character Shrek tried to explain the nuances of creatures like himself to his companion, Donkey, he spoke for humans, too. “There’s a lot more to ogres than people think. Ogres are like onions. They have layers.” True relationship means getting to know the layers, and that can be a challenge when information comes to us in fortune cookie snippets. The resulting composite pictures are often sketchy outlines. Looking at the outer layers—people’s trip photos, politics, gourmet meals, movie preferences or work experience—doesn’t help us know them, just know about them. 2 3 4

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As of May 2013 (The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project) On average for March 2013 As of March 31, 2013 (Facebook 2013 first quarter reports)

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Is this virtual life real life or a one-dimensional substitute? Can we find genuine community online—or just megabytes of near approximation and shallowness? But whether in the virtual world or the “real” world, we face misunderstandings… unfriending…or the intentional inflammatory remark. Upbeat tweets and posts create the illusion that everyone’s life but ours is stress-free and idyllic. Authentic relationships happen when we devote ourselves to people. Block out the noise There are times when we just need to get out of the fray for a while. Doug Trouten, M.A., associate professor of journalism and chair of the Department of Communication, suggests occasionally disconnecting from quick, shallow communication through a short media fast— including TV, movies, recorded music, social media and the Internet. “Pay attention to how your media use changes your interactions with people,” he said. “Take a critical look and ask, ‘What exactly is this doing to me, and am I okay with that?’ If you’re not, ask, ‘What can I do about it?’” We have permission to be unavailable for a time, ignoring the incessant demands of technology.

“Real community transforms everyone who is part of it.” 14

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Slow down (sometimes) It’s hard to carve out people time in a life filled up with activity and obligation. Being with people is time-consuming and it can be boring, too. We don’t expect to be bored; it feels wrong. Our minds are used to being engaged in online news, games and tweets. It takes determination and patience to match our pace to someone else’s. And that’s when we observe the quirks and inconsistencies—and reveal our own. It makes some of us a little skittish to be studied that closely. Garry Morgan, D.Miss., professor of Intercultural Studies, said that when you slow down “you may have to face some things in yourself and others that are easy to overlook when you’re just texting one another back and forth. Even Skype can’t duplicate it.” Be fully present In a multitasking world, conversation is a powerful, single-focus task. According to Melissa Mork, Psy.D., associate professor and chair of the Department of Psychology, healthy connection can occur in a variety of media, not just face-to-face. It includes four factors: • Intentional, active listening • Empathy (a compassionate investment in another person)

• Congruency (saying what you mean and meaning what you say; having your nonverbal messages match your verbal messages; and living out your words rather than just using words to appease) • Immediacy (being fully present) Mork is optimistic about the abilities of Northwestern students. “The students at this institution are deeply empathic. They are highly congruent. They’re immediate. I see a really connected group of people.” When everyone has a chance to speak and listen, barriers can begin to erode. Learn the stories Tim Kowalik, Ed.D., professor of Communication, says that not only does everyone have a story, but “God tells a story through each of our lives.” Blogs, discussion forums and YouTube give us unprecedented access to the stories of people who have been isolated, oppressed and hurt. They call for a response—some sign that people care and are paying attention. “We all want to feel like we belong,” said Dawnette Scott, associate dean, Orientation & Student Activities.

When stories are told and heard, the message sent is, “You matter.” Stories help everyone get noticed. And, Kowalik noted, “We are a story-loving people.” Embrace vulnerability Intimacy is the result of thoughtful disclosure. “God made us people who need to express to others who we are,” said Michael Wise, Ph.D., professor of Hebrew Bible and Ancient Languages. “It requires sharing thoughts that are honest and revelatory. When we tell what’s true about us on a deep level and others listen, intimacy grows.” In real community, we are involved with people at a deeper level, mourning, celebrating, being transparent and sharing difficult as well as good things. We find wisdom and accountability. Online or in-person, community isn’t always about being with people who are “just like me.” And bringing our differences to a group environment can only happen when our communities invite us to come as we are, including bringing our vulnerabilities and weaknesses. While every relationship is of value, deep friendships inside of community have the potential to change us. “Real community,” said Garry Morgan, “transforms everyone who is part of it.” Plan for the good of others The Christian life can’t be lived in isolation, said Wise, because “biblical love means to actively plan for the good of the other. That’s not passive. You don’t simply hope that good things happen or stand by and applaud when they do.” A short description in Acts 2 paints a stunning portrait. They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. All the believers were together and had everything in common. They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. Every day they continued to meet

together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts, praising God and enjoying the favor of all the people. “It’s an incredibly high standard of life,” Wise said, “and it’s held out as an ideal. We really have to know each other and have relationships that are beyond superficial.” Christians are called to respond, moving beyond the “Like” button or the affirming text message.

“We can say, ‘This is another tool. How might we use this well?’” Build community—even slowly We have concerns about the incessant distraction of technology, but we have options. “Human beings are quick to feel the need to categorize,” stated Dawnette Scott. “Black and white, yes or no, good or bad. I don’t think that’s the conversation. Instead we can say, ‘This is another tool. How might we use this well?’ The Internet makes the world a smaller place where proximity no longer determines whether we can be involved in other people’s lives. But true connections will always require sacrifice. Honesty. Active care. And time.

Intentional Technology University of Northwestern uses a variety of online tools to build community. These are just a few examples. • Through Northwestern’s internal website, theROCK (Relevant Online Community Knowledge), individuals in the Northwestern community and KTIS listeners can post anonymous prayer requests. Each time someone commits to pray through PrayerWorks, an alert is sent to the recipient. “Prayer creates depth in community and brings us back full circle to Christ-centeredness,” said Jim Johnson ’94, senior director, Constituent Relations & Campus Ministries. “The Northwestern community shares problems and struggles.” • Private Facebook pages are created to serve as a meeting place for students preparing for overseas missions or study abroad. Before they travel, students have already journeyed together. • Freshman and new student communities get their own Facebook page where posts can include everything from newly forming study groups to spontaneous offers of dessert (“I have half a mixed-berry pie in my dorm room.”) Newcomers to campus immediately have a place to meet their peeps. • Dr. Cureton tweets—an invitation for students to interact. • The Northwestern Twitter feed provides an opportunity for staff and students to interact around topics such as chapel, student activities and campus news.

Shelly Barsuhn is a Minneapolis writer.

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Online Classes, Real Relationships The Pew Research Center says that 60 percent of four-year private schools now offer online courses and the number is growing. While some institutions are hunkering down into the bricks and mortar instruction for which they’re known, University of Northwestern continues to widen the door of opportunity to online learning. How can Northwestern offer the unique level of community and relationship in virtual programs and courses that traditional students experience in the classroom? Is it even possible? “Yes,” say the professors and staff who are involved with the programs, but it has to be intentional.

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A Kitchen Table Graduate Student Anitra Taylor Master of Arts in Theological Studies With a B.A. in history and a career in the Air Force behind her, Anitra Taylor struggled with health issues, including severe asthma. Keeping up with doctors’ appointments become a nearly full-time endeavor. Despite the challenges, she wanted to pursue her dream of getting a master’s degree in Theological Studies. Studying at home in Florida seemed the best option, so she prayed, searched online for the right university and found University of Northwestern almost immediately. “I wanted it to be similar to a traditional in-class setting,” she said. “I wanted my professors to encourage me to learn instead of just throwing work at me. Northwestern was accredited and established. And I liked that.” From the beginning, there was an emphasis on relationship in the online classroom. Professors and students in Anitra’s courses posted introductory photos of themselves and shared information about their lives. “I learned that in an online class, if it’s done right, you’ll be able to learn the personalities

of the different students. If I actually met any of the people in the class, I’d be able to recognize them!” All of her studies included interacting with other students through online discussions and forums. It’s the right fit for Anitra, but that doesn’t mean it has been easy. “My schedule is crazy!” she admitted. During the week, between online forums, posting work and paper writing, she also interns at a church as part of the requirement for her degree. She said she is learning about many different areas of ministry, helping wherever she is needed. “I have experience doing missions. I’ve been to Haiti, helped with Hurricane Katrina and was in the military. I love helping people so I’m focusing on being a teacher or working in the church. I want to be able to help others learn and grow,” she said. Anitra is shooting for a goal date of 2016 to receive her degree.

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Willie Grimm, from tiny Wanamingo, Minnesota, is a man of diverse abilities. He has an engineering background and juggles the demands of a boat and propeller business (12 years) and active church planting (11 years). In 2010, after helping with the planting of two churches, he was beginning a third plant when his denomination, Fellowship of Evangelical Churches, recommended that he pursue his bachelor’s degree in Biblical Studies and Theology. It was time to answer the call to pastorship. Willie checked out programs at a variety of universities, looking for depth and flexibility. “I didn’t want to do it as a hoop-jumping thing,” he said. He also knew that college would have to fit around all the other responsibilities in his life. He was familiar with University of Northwestern, and the distance learning option seemed the right avenue to his degree. It wasn’t going to be easy. In season, the business he operated with his father took 20–30 hours per week. Church planting efforts claimed another 30 hours per week. He needed to

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Jim Johnson ’94, Senior Director, Constituent Relations & Campus Ministries: “We’reMKT1086 working on a plan for a pastoral care provision for people who are Fundamentals ofonline opportunities. How do we do that and do it well? solely participating via Marketing Community is such a high priority to us. When significant growth continues to happen through the online resource, we want to be ready to ensure that we remain true to our core, with Christ at the center of that community.”

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Melissa Baartman Mork, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology: “Some students are very reluctant to speak up in class but will become very verbal online. Others are more willing to do it face-to-face and not online. I find that some of us have more freedom to disclose when people can’t see our faces. Anonymity provides safety, or perceived safety. What is better for the student? It’s subjective. One person might be more auditory and another more visual—someone who likes to look at charts and graphs online.”

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The Best Colleges conducts “independent evaluations of online colleges and degree programs based on publicly available data and research.” Northwestern was recognized for its online associate, bachelor and master degree programs and its distance education program that offers over 50 online courses in Bible and the liberal arts.

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An online resource, The Best Colleges (thebestcolleges.org), ranked Northwestern #3 in its list of Top 10 Online Christian Colleges & Universities of 2013.

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day and age of accessibility and flexibility. People’s lives are busier than they’ve ever been.”

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Rick Thoman, Professor of Christian Ministries and Department Chair: “Northwestern has a significant niche. We’re biblio-centric and fewer and fewer schools are holding this value. As we expand online offerings, we don’t want to become degree mills and stop touching lives. As a Christian community that invests in current and future leaders, our values come through in online classes, too. When I’m teaching courses in the classroom, I reserve time before or after class to meet students and have discussions with them. In the online classes, I try to make that up by having a printout of each student’s face which I keep in the class folder. I ask for prayer requests and pull out the photos when I pray for them.

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We work hard at creating a sense of community in a virtual classroom and have made significant strides. Is it the same as face-to-face community? Maybe not, but just because SCI2108 you’re in the same room with someone doesn’t Concepts of can hide in the bushes—whether in meanJu you have a relationship. Anyone lia Astronomy & person or online. We’re good atLabwearing masks so people can’t see who we really are. Our aim at Northwestern has been to work at that community element and to know, care and pray for each other. We try to create more of a biblical fellowship. ToJeremiah replicate that in online communities, we try to build relationship into discussion forums online. There is one forum that’s nothing but prayer—different from general course forums. Every student has a face icon so when they chime in on a discussion online, I really do see them. They’ll email me often and any student who is able can drop by my office. At times, I’ll buy them a cup of coffee and if they’re out of town, I’ll give them my cell number for calls or texts. Technology is changing the way we teach. For example, we use voice threads quite a bit. A student can create a PowerPoint, embed their own video into a discussion or project or also use a YouTube video—often in a final project where they’re communicating that they can synthesize all components. From a teacher’s point of view, it has been a real transition, but this is the

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Students in my courses are in regular communication with each other, working in groups of 3–5. The online classroom is one of the greatest things to come along for introverts. Especially with Millennials [individuals born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s], online is how they’re comfortable responding. It isn’t for everyone, but there are tremendous opportunities. I am passionate about the importance of building community in the virtual classroom.”

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Tanya Grosz ’95, Director of Undergraduate Pathways and Assistant Professor of English: “When I was asked to create an online composition course at BIB4460 Northwestern, my alma mater, some people said, ‘It can’t be done. You can’t Studies in Vi o l e tThat encouraged duplicate a traditional course environment.’ Biblicalme to do it— Theology and I loved it. I send out my weekly announcements that lay out my expectations and I always include something personal—what’s going on in my life, not just what’s going on in class. In turn, I want to hear all of my students’ voices too, and about their walk with the Lord. I was surprised to find that the online discussion forum was a great equalizer. Students weren’t worried about what they were wearing or what others were thinking. And, oftentimes, the quality of their discussions was better than what I got in the regular classroom. We have to combat feelings of isolation and online attrition rates by inviting students in. A lot rests on an instructor’s online personality. I believe it is MAT2122 Calculus important to respond to every single online post in the introductions forum in order to welcome students, engage and with Analytic them and show them I am interested Geometry II and attending to them. If they send me an email, I need to respond in a very timely fashion. Eight hours is a really long time to them.

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spend time with his family—his patient wife and teenage daughter. And now he was looking at adding 36 hours of schoolwork on top of everything else. “I came back to school as a 41-year-old,” he recalled, “and I was not looking forward to it. I love to learn and had done a lot of biblical study on my own, but I didn’t consider myself an academic type. I was a more practical ‘Let’s just get ministry done’ guy.” He was also more of an in-person learner. “I would much rather have conversations,” he said. “’Hey, let’s talk about this over coffee.’” But the online format allowed him to work from home and on his own schedule. Today, his classroom is wherever his laptop lands. “My wife will tell you that my study area is everywhere around the house,” he said. “I get bored in one spot.” That portability is a benefit when he leaves town. When reflecting on his university experience, Willie said, “This is making me do things I probably wouldn’t have done on my own. It has forced me to get out of my box.” He was never a paper-writer before coming to Northwestern, considering it an area of weakness. “I think God’s got a sense of humor because that’s all I’m doing now.” Pursuing this degree, he said, has “forced me to be independent and push myself.” Willie will achieve his degree by the summer of 2014.

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. Practice the art of rapid response. 11.

6.6 DON’T SHOUT!

The tools that allow people to instantly communicate raise the expectation of a breakneck answer in return. “This very moment” isn’t always possible, but 24 hours in a time of online communication is almost interminable. Get into the habit of treating digital messages like the people behind them—with respect and a prompt answer.

Unless written in fun, capitals in online correspondence are considered rude. Can anyone have a reasoned conversation with someone who is yelling? Lower your voice.

2.2. Be yourself.

7.7. Sleep on it.

Even in the virtual world, share the real you. Try not to impress with your piety, achievements or the persona others prefer you to be. Who are the most natural and unpretentious people you know? Let them inspire you to drop the mask and jargon. Speak in your own voice and never hide behind the name “Anonymous.”

Online communication creates possibilities for the exponential spread of gossip and downright misinformation. Before you pass along any information, make sure to check the source as well as a fact-checking site such as Snopes.com or FactCheck.org.

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Give yourself time to cool down before sending that irate email or making that controversial Facebook comment.

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Ten rules of etiquette for the digital age

Stamp out phubbing.

8.8 Think (and write) positive.

When someone disengages from face-to-face conversation so they can search online, answer a call or read a text, they’ve committed the social faux pas known as phubbing (phone snubbing). Are you guilty of this breach of etiquette? Turn off the phone or discipline yourself to ignore it when you’re at dinner, social events, concerts, movies and in conversation. (If you don’t mind being phubbed, get help!)

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lways.. . e n ever yo. says... 5.5. Thou shalt not spam.

Do some soul searching before sending a sales pitch or political rant to a group list unless you first give people the chance to “opt in.”

A negative diatribe, however well-reasoned, won’t convince anybody of your point of view. Flip that thought on its back and express it in useful terms. Arguing is bad manners.

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9. If you can google it yourself, don’t ask. Do you ask others for information that you could easily find on your favorite search engine? Empower yourself. It’s easy.

1010Try . grace. Everyone makes mistakes. Forgive others for missteps and learn from your own. Thanks to Courtney Cunard ’16 and Olivia Arnold, ’14 UNW Student Ambassadors.

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WEB EXTRA: THERE’S MORE HAPPENING AT UNW THAN CAN BE CONTAINED IN A MAGAZINE! For additional content (photos, extended articles and more) visit unwsp.edu/pilot/extra.

Community in Chapel It’s mid-morning and Maranatha Hall is crowded with chapelgoers, their voices a lively rumble. The experience they are about to have has been thoughtfully planned and designed—“everything from the theme to the music to the speaker,” said Drew Shepp, director for Chapel and Worship Ministries. And it’s all built around three primary aims. God-Glorifying

Identity-Oriented

Community- Focused

God-Glorifying

Our central purpose as Christians is to glorify God with our lives, and we view chapel through this lens. Content is in line with the University of Northwestern Doctrinal Statement and finds its foundation in the Word of God.

Community-Focused We are a body of believers from different backgrounds culturally, denominationally, economically and in many other ways. In Jesus, we become the family of God, living and learning alongside each other in community.

Identity-Oriented We are a collection of individuals in whom God is working to make us more like Christ. We pray that God uses daily chapel to shape this image in each individual in our community.

Forty minutes of chapel every weekday adds up to a significant amount of quality time together—a chance for participants to learn, grow and sharpen one another. “We want every person to see change happen in their individual lives,” Shepp said. “Chapel can do that and also serve as a powerful catalyst for deeper community. But our central purpose is to glorify God. That’s why we’re here.”

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Social media started building momentum around the time they were born, and many college students can’t imagine a social life without it. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr… Northwestern students share some thoughts on their evolving relationship with online communication.

Tucker: I never use my phone around friends unless it’s an emergency.

Samantha: I had email in 4th grade when I was 10 years old. Jennifer: Myspace in middle school.

“I never use my phone around friends unless it’s an emergency.” – Tucker

PILOT FALL 2013 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN – ST. PAUL

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What rules do you have for yourself now?

Macayla: I was one of the first of my friends to get Facebook in 8th grade.

Alex: I only used it when my parents were gone. I’d sneak into their room to use the laptop.

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Madison: “Not at the dinner table.”

Gabe: The principle of cherishing time—instilled by my parents. David: I have a Facebook fast every month to not waste so much time on it. Katelynn: Facebook, sophomore year of high school.

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Facebook. I just used them anyway till they accepted it.

How old were you when you started using social media? Amanda: My parents didn’t want to give us kids another excuse to sit in front of a screen. They allowed my brother and sister to sign up for a Facebook account when they reached 18!

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“I am careful not to be negative online because I want to be a positive influence on friends and followers.” – Samantha

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Andrew: I try to be intentional about the content I produce. I hope to post something worth reading or viewing to my connections. There's enough noise in the virtual world already.

Annie: Facebook at age 20.

Were there rules? De Andre’: At first I couldn’t use it. I hid my usage. Amanda: We would usually be allotted one hour of screen time.

Samantha: I am careful not to be negative online because I want to be a positive influence on friends and followers.

Faith: There were no rules because social media wasn’t a huge deal back then.

Abby: I won't put anything online that my grandma would have to call me about.

Megan: My mom had to know my password. Charity: I wasn’t allowed to have a blog or

Macayla: I truly don’t enjoy how much time I

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Northwestern students on social media

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spend on it, so there are days I just ban myself from Facebook, and it honestly brings a crazy sense of relief. De Andre’: I try not to indulge in using social media until my work is done. Amanda: With smart phones it is too easy to check social media all the time. I often leave my phone in the other room so that I am not tempted. Lauryn: I don’t accept friend requests from people I have never met face to face.

Do you prefer in-person or online communication?

enduring, I have to see my friends in person. Macayla: In person! I want to know people are making the effort to get to know me, not just sending a passing “How are you doing?” message.

“I won’t put anything online that my grandma would have to call me about.” – Abby

Madison: Too much.

“I have a Facebook fast every month to not waste so much time on it.” – David

De Andre’: Two to three hours.

Can you be yourself online? Is the online you the real you?

De Andre’: In person. That’s how you learn who people really are. Nicole: I prefer in-person with people I really care about or like so I can read their body language. Abby: I like seeing people’s eyes. Amanda: After meeting in-person I am much more comfortable online because a rapport has already been developed.

Do you feel freer when you're online?

Gabe: Facebook is a great bridge between times I get to see my friends, but to make friendships

Lauryn: So much gets lost in online communication. The message you’re trying to send is not what the other receives. Mason: I am myself online, but it doesn't give a good representation of my personality. Macayla: I feel freer behind the safety of my screen, when I’m able to read and reread what I’m saying. My inhibitions decrease. I can forget about body language and voice inflection. Andrew: In person. Online posts are forever. That's a scary thought.

Macayla: Online is almost always going to be someone’s best foot forward. I may find articles or blogs, or have statuses that I would like to post, but I have to rethink them because of how many people could see them. My online self is a filtered self. Nicole: Yes, but sometimes I post things I know others would like. De Andre’: Not enough information can be given online to know the real me. It’s only a snapshot of my life. Gabe: Can I be my spunky, energetic self on Facebook? Absolutely! But can I also express my deep thoughts about faith and really examine life alongside others? Somewhat, but social media does not do these types of conversations justice. Andrew: Online communication can still be absolutely genuine. David: I’m actually a catfish.

Mason: It is easier for people to lie online.

“Any time I have tried to argue with someone over social media has been a mistake. Disagreements just cannot be solved through that medium of communication.” – Dan

Andrew: Flame wars [name-calling/slurs/personal attacks] and chain emails with completely false messages.

Mason: One hour.

Megan: Forty-five minutes a day—no more.

Teddi: People posting every little thing. Selfies.

Dan: People who talk about sports constantly.

Faith: Two hours max.

Annie: One-half hour.

Lauryn: Too many people use social media to feel important or popular—or to bully.

Gabriella: It’s distracting. And people who struggle with their identity tend to overuse social media.

Macayla: I’ve been guilty of spending hours perusing Facebook, but now it’s about 30 minutes a day.

Faith: It really depends on the situation.

“To make friendships enduring, I have to see my friends in person.” – Gabe

Honestly—how much time do you spend each day on social media?

What’s the upside of online communication? Pao: Sharing life and ideas. Lauryn: From a public relations perspective (my major), planning for clients and campaigns would be leagues different and much less effective or fast-paced. Jessica: It helps build the beginning stages of a new relationship.

Do you have any social media pet peeves? Katelynn: Game requests. Abby: People put all of their angsty feelings online and political hoopla. Macayla: Edited coffee cup and meal photos. Overly dramatic and repetitive posts. Lovey-dovey interactions. Social media is out there for all to see and shouldn’t take the place of personal communication.

Have you made any online mistakes? Dan: Any time I have tried to argue with someone over social media has been a mistake. Disagreements just cannot be solved through that medium of communication. De Andre’: Posting too much of my personal business. Emma: I used to add people I didn’t know and my Facebook became a negative place. At one point I deleted 300 friends. Alex: I had a fight with my old best friend that ended our friendship.

“Online is almost always going to be someone’s best foot forward. My online self is a filtered self.” – Macayla

When have you felt really connected? Samantha: I was in a Facebook group with peers/ coworkers during a summer school program in 2012. Emma: The UNW Facebook page for incoming students allowed me to meet people before coming here. Amanda: Earlier this year, my dad had a heart attack. I received an overwhelming number of personal messages from people expressing their support and sending their prayers. Gabe: Am I encouraging others? Am I loving God and others? If I could ever describe a time that I felt connected on social media, it is when I can say “yes” to those questions.

Samantha: I dislike hashtags and constant status updates. Online, it’s easy to not have a filter so everything is “out there.” De Andre’: It can become a gossip site, highly addictive and time-consuming.

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alumni Through the Years Fast Forward: Joanna Buyert ’07 Major: Studio Art Career: Professional potter Hometown: Minnetonka, Minnesota Current Home: St. Paul, Minnesota

Beautiful Things Inspired by Faith After graduating from Northwestern in 2007 with a Studio Art major and Graphic Design minor, Joanna Buyert was unsure what direction to go with her art degree. Although she quickly landed a full-time job casting mugs for a mass manufacturer, she disliked the repetition of creating the same shapes all day, every day. Buyert decided to assert her creativity by going into business and handcrafting original pottery full time. She launched Fringe & Fettle Ceramics. Through Etsy (an online marketplace for handmade and vintage creations) and her website, Buyert has developed admirers of her artistry and buyers of her visually soft and playful pottery. A growing artist As a Christian, Buyert views the interaction between her creativity and her faith with what she describes as a holistic perspective. “My relationship between faith and art happens very organically. That urge to create and my desire to make beautiful things stems from God. I think that was introduced to me at Northwestern by many of my professors.” Buyert continues to develop her skills and artistic vision. As she daily molds and refines clay, she strives to create and reflect the “romanticized atmosphere the kitchen creates, of family meals and childhood memories, of beauty in the everyday encounters.” Her creations include pitchers, mugs, bowls, citrus juicers and trays with matte or metallic finishes, patterns or hand-painted imagery. She was featured in the October 2013 issue of Country Living magazine. Buyert is in the process of relocating her Uptown studio to St. Paul. To view Joanna Buyert’s line of pottery, Fringe & Fettle, visit etsy.com/ shop/fringeandfettle.

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1942 George Oliver ’42 is a former pastor and lives in Yakima, WA. He is 94 and remembers stories of Dr. Riley at Northwestern. 1952 Rod and Twyla (Holsteen ’52) Sawtell live in Waconia, MN and enjoy “various opportunities of ministry.” They have 4 children, 11 grandchildren and 4 greatgrandchildren. Sidney ’52 and Darleen (Wilson ’52) Schmidt have led a full life of ministry. Sidney served as a missionary in Malaysia and Singapore (1961–1993) and also as a teacher and administrator in Baptist seminaries in those two nations. 1953 Mary Jane Ponten ’53 and Fred O’Riley were married on June 30, 2013. 1960 DuWayne Lee ’60 lives in Apple Valley, CA. He served churches in fellowship with the Baptist General Conference for 38 years (1965–2003). At 81, he is in semiretirement, serving as an interim pastor in a small Southern Baptist Church in Victorville, CA.

Thinking about a master’s degree? 1981 Ron Carey ’81 is chairman of the board for the Minnesota Autism Center, whose mission is “to promote and provide home, school and center-based therapeutic and academic services for children and youth affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 1987 David Braun ’87 will conduct a professional choir performing Handel's Messiah this November in Ontario, Canada. 1988 Eric and Becky (Simonson ’88) Trip welcomed Elizabeth Frederica on February 24, 2013. She joins Anna, Zoe, Emily and Lydia. 1989 Dan and Lisa (Collins ’89) Friesen are continuing to help the Oroko people of Cameroon translate the Bible into their language. A milestone was reached this year when 50 percent of the New Testament was consultant checked; 75 percent has been drafted. 1991 Suzanne (Shedenhelm ’91) Finical works at ACT as a math content specialist and assistant performance lead. 1993 Brandt Dick ’93 serves as the superintendent of schools for Hazelton-Moffit-Braddock school district and Underwood school district in central North Dakota.

Lisa Horton ’93, an English major at Northwestern, received her doctorate from Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI.

Paul and Dawn (Johnson ’95) Ray welcomed Elizabeth Lynn on February 26, 2013. She joins Katherine.

Chad Silbernick ’93 has his own accounting firm in Alexandria, MN. His daughter, Lauren ’17, currently attends Northwestern.

Chris ’95 and Kristin (Mertens ’95) Salvevold welcomed Jakely Jami on June 28, 2012. Jakely joins Max, Maci, Tygen, Tate, Brinkley and Britlyn.

1994 Dustin and Katie Kelm ’94 spent 97 intense days crossing the country on unicycles to raise money and awareness for Syrian refugees. Their motivation came from an encounter with a 10-yearold Syrian boy who had recently lost both of his parents during the civil war. On June 21, 2013, they began riding 36-inch “big wheel” unicycles coast to coast and completed their goal on October 9 —3,511 miles. Updates on their ride and ministry are at unishow.org. 1995 Jason Harms ’95 was the vocal soloist in an evening-length work by composer/pianist Jeremy Walker titled 7 Psalms. The composition debuted at Bethel University’s Benson Great Hall on April 13, 2013. Heidi (Ronzheimer ’95) Lemke and her family are now living in Mayer, MN, after spending six years as missionaries in Japan and adopting their daughters there. Heidi works part-time in the media center at the local Lutheran high school.

Chuck ’95 and Diana ’98 Swensson welcomed Liam Jeffrey on April 13, 2013. He joins Samantha and Vanessa. 1997 Peter and Julie (Radloff ’97) Hillman welcomed Hannah Joy on March 27, 2013. Todd and Dawn (Buller ’97) Lafferty welcomed Miles Dean on March 21, 2013. He joins Cooper. 1998 Barry and Suzanne (Miller ’98) Evavold welcomed Brandon Gerald on March 20, 2013. He joins Jeremiah. Jason ’98 and Fawnda (Velner ’99) Norman welcomed Evytt Silas on April 8, 2013. He joins Kyan and LaNyah. Dayna (Anderson ’98) Taylor is working as grant manager at UNW. Hannah Zinke ’98 is starting an education ministry called Firm Foundation Learning Center. It is a ministry of Calvary Chapel in Dickinson, ND that uses the A.C.E. program to educate K–12 students so that they can learn solid academics and biblical values.

1999 Lt. Colonel Frederick A. Coleman III (Trey) ’99 was promoted to Commander, 961st Airborne Air Control Squadron, 18th Wing at Kadena Air Base in Japan. He has deployed in support of Operations Southern Watch, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, flying more than 400 combat and combat support hours. 2000 Joshua ’00 and Marlene (Derksen ’00) Brekke welcomed Tyler Samuel on March 17, 2012. Kyle ’00 and Emilie (Probst ’00) Schmitz welcomed Joshua Tobias (Toby) on September 7, 2012. Lynn and Shereen (Kramer ’00) Wolters welcomed Clara Peace on December 27, 2012. She joins Elliana, Madeline, Abigail and Violet. 2002 Joseph and Karna (Bergstrom ’02) Fronden welcomed Liliana Joy on October 3, 2012. Peter Black ’02 is featured on a new ABC show that recently debuted called The Wildlife Docs. Pete is senior veterinarian at Busch Gardens in Tampa, FL. Jennifer and Allen Ondriezek ’02 welcomed Julia Brook on May 2, 2013. She joins Kade.

Northwestern now offers seven master’s degrees to prepare you for opportunities in a variety of fields, advanced study, and effective leadership. As you respond to God’s call and purpose for your life, our Christcentered, academically rigorous programs will challenge you to higher levels of learning and deeper levels of faith. Enroll now for January classes. Learn. Lead. Invest. Impact.

unwsp.edu/gradstudies 651-631-5200 888-362-8715 gceadmissions@ unwsp.edu

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alumni

Accelerated Degree Completion 2004 Jessica and Jon Day ’04 welcomed Shiloh Kristine on July 3, 2013. Troy Roberts ’04 teaches “all subjects” to six students in grades 5–12 in a 50-person, fly-in village, Pilot Point, AK. He also teaches 8th grade math online, coaches cross country, basketball and martial arts. He and his wife, Cora, host Bible studies, disciple teens and operate regular Kid's Club Bible events.

Fast Forward: David Cazorla ’05 Major: Broadcasting Career: Producer, InTouch Ministries Hometown: Canary Islands, Spain Current Home: Atlanta, Georgia Family: Wife: Melissa (Court ’05); Children: Alexander (2) and Eliana ( born 10/27/13)

Walking Through Open Doors David Cazorla arrived at Northwestern to complete his final year of college after studying three years at the Center for Christian Communications in Ecuador. He immersed himself in college life, playing soccer and working student jobs for Northwestern’s admissions and public relations departments. His broadcasting degree prepared him for his chosen field and, even more important, increased his understanding of who God is and how God works. “We are not here to be a good producer, lawyer, doctor. We’re here to be tools in God’s hands,” Cazorla said. “Northwestern helped me to realize it’s about being a missionary and then a doctor; a missionary and then a lawyer.” Following God into ministry Cazorla’s faith and career intersected right after graduation. Through Northwestern connections he found a job at the Christian Broadcasting Network in Virginia Beach, Virginia. “I jumped into Christian ministry, working in TV as an associate producer,” he said. “God opened doors.” But after 4 1/2 years that door closed due to cutbacks. After applying for “a ton” of different jobs he got a call from a place he had not applied. The caller from In Touch Ministries in Atlanta asked if he might be interested in a job as a producer. “I started laughing,” Cazorla recalled. “I said, ‘I’ve been praying for a job for the last three months.’ I look back and see again how God opened doors. I was amazed.” Cazorla is passionate about his recent work in Brazil and Paraguay as part of a project translating Dr. Charles Stanley’s messages into indigenous languages. “We’re able to give tools for people to hear the Word of God. Many of these people can’t write or read so if they get a Bible they don’t know how to read it. But if they get something they can hear, they will learn about God.”

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Daniel Peterson

Daniel and Katie (Anderson ’04) Snow welcomed Oliver in January 2013.

2003 Matthew ’03 and Rebekah (Koppelman ’04) Kleinsasser welcomed Elisabeth on March 28, 2013. She joins Caleb, Lydia and Isaiah.

Dave ’06 and Jamie (Grimstad ’06) Schussman welcomed Gwynith Adelle on September 26, 2013. She joins Samuel. 2007 Danielle Marcus ’07 and Daniel Harper ’11 were married on June 22, 2013. Aaron ’07 and Heather (Gregory ’09) Pearson welcomed Soren Gregory on May 25, 2013. Josh ’07 and Becki (Neville ’08) Peterson welcomed Lyla on April 23, 2013. She joins Troy.

Paul ’02 and Amanda (Spurgeon '02) Peterson welcomed Daniel Joseph on September 23, 2013. He joins Eric, Eli and Micah. Rev. Mark Van Steenwyk ’02 is the founding pastor/leader of the Mennonite Worker, “an urban intentional community and Mennonite congregation that includes residential members and members who live in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis.” He also hosts an Internet radio podcast called Iconocast.

Chad and Amanda (Sabin ’06) Nolde welcomed Corey Joseph on May 14, 2013. He joins Caleb James.

Emma Grace Wolcyn 2005 Benjamin ’05 and Rebecca (Bremer ’04) Wolcyn welcomed Emma Grace. She joins siblings Avery and Siena. 2006 Colin Brown, M.D., ’06 is a captain in the U.S. Army and a general surgery resident at the Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon near Augusta, Georgia.

Aaron and Michelle (Satren ’03) Olson welcomed Jerome Judah on May 21, 2013. He joins Edell.

Joel ’06 and Jamie (Thompson ’06) Hogberg welcomed Nathan David on March 16, 2013. He joins Caleb and Micah.

Aaron ’03 and Lauryn (Lundberg ’06) White welcomed Kinsley Elizabeth on June 16, 2013.

Dennis ’06 and Stephanie (Strasser ’08) Holsman welcomed Halle June on March 21, 2013.

Michael and Susan ’07 Wuollet developed Clotit, a hemostatic powder that quickly stops bleeding in minor cuts and scrapes. It has been launched for the pet market. They are working toward FDA clearance for the product's use in humans. Their company is called Protégé Biomedical.

Jeremiah Josiah and Micah Joseph Cree 2008 Josiah and Samantha (Ferrozzo ’08) Cree welcomed twins Jeremiah Josiah and Micah Joseph on August 20, 2013. They join siblings Linnea and Rebekah.

Jonathan ’08 and Jolene (Bottemiller ’08) Harms welcomed Samuel David on August 9, 2013. Jake Martens ’08 opened his own printing company, Button Man Printing. Elisabeth (Preble ’08) Morley has paintings on display at several locations around the Minneapolis/ St. Paul metro area. She has created an art program for a home school co-op and designed programs and signage for gala events at Elim Care. Ken and Natalie (Slagter ’08) Simerly welcomed Amelia Jean on July 15, 2013. She joins Samuel. Brett ’08 and Kelina (Pearson ’06) Toney welcomed Maranatha Ann on August 13, 2012.

Thomas ’08 and Caitlin (Johnson ’10) Willard welcomed Rory in April 2013. He joins Josiah. Thomas is pursuing a career in mechanical engineering and serves as a captain in the Marine Corps Reserves. Caitlin works from home and cares for their sons. 2009 Nathan Cousins ’09, Stephanie Cousins ’09 and Dan McLaughlin ’11 performed in Theatre for the Thirsty's production of Kingdom Undone at the Southern Theatre in Minneapolis, April 2013. Stephanie also performed in The Children's Hour at Sabes Jewish Community Center Theatre in St. Louis Park, MN. Amber Fletcher ’09 and Matthew Busacker were married on June 29, 2013.

Northwestern’s Adult Undergraduate degree completion programs are tailored for working adults. Classes meet one night a week or online so students can earn their degree in two years or less. Christ-centered degrees are available in seven areas of study: • General Studies • Business Management • Christian Counseling • Communication Studies • Health Psychology (online only) • Ministries • Psychology Enrollment for January classes is open now. Learn about the possibilities and start the process.

Matthew and Amber Busacker

unwsp.edu/adult-ed 651-631-5200 888-362-8715 gceadmissions@ unwsp.edu UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN – ST. PAUL FALL 2013 PILOT

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alumni David ’09 and Elizabeth (Ebben ’09) Fry welcomed Mason Joseph on February 11, 2013. Adina Johnson ’09, former Northwestern history major, earned her M.A. in American History from Baylor University. Her master's thesis treated women and religion in the World War II era. She is now enrolled in Baylor’s Ph.D. program. Jeremy and Elise (Osvold ’09) Larson welcomed Austin Joel on April 24, 2013. Jonathan ’09 and Suzanne (Rich ’08) Scheil welcomed Avaree on September 11, 2012.

2010 Heidi (Stoltz ’10) and Tyler Anderson ’07 were married on September 15, 2013.

Rachel Hinderaker ’11 performed in Seussical: the Musical at Lakeshore Players in White Bear Lake.

Martha Barrett ’10 married Todd Ewing on June 15, 2013.

Ariel Johnson ’11 and Thomas Carlson ’10 were married on April 12, 2013.

Seth Conover ‘10 performed in Bohemian Flats at Nimbus Theatre in Northeast Minneapolis. Emily Fagerstrom ’10 is moving to the Philippines to work with Wipe Every Tear, an organization that rescues and restores girls and young women who have been trafficked in the sex trade. Kierstin Fure '10 is a media specialist/communication Associate with Dakota County.

In Memory We extend condolences to the families of these Northwestern alumni who have passed away. Jessomine “Jay” Johnson ’40 on September 29, 2012. Harry Nelson ’49 on July 1, 2013.

Jasmine and Adam Maarschalk ’11 were married in August 2012. They moved to Bowling Green, OH so Jasmine could finish her degree. Benjamin and Amanda (Rosemark ’11) Myrick welcomed Lydia Rose on February 25, 2013.

Heidi and Tyler Anderson Shannan (Pogones ’10) Gourley is a second-year fourth grade teacher at Today's Fresh Start Charter School in Los Angeles.

2011 Kurt Bender ’11 performed in On the Town at Bloomington Civic Theatre.

Brandon Warne ’10 is working with 1500 ESPN Twin Cities, covering the Minnesota Twins as a beat writer.

Jessica Fackler ’11 and Nicholas Pedersen were married on August 23, 2013.

Maria Swanson ’11 is connected with Actors, Models, and Talent for Christ since graduating with her theater degree. Lydia Thoreen ’11 performed in The Sound of Music at Morris Park Players in Northeast Minneapolis. Hannah Tutt ’11 and Joseph Hassler were married on May 18, 2013. 2012 Emily Herset ’12 is the minister of discipleship and youth at Faith Church (AFLC) in Kalispell, MT. She enjoys “building relationships with kids and their parents, and helping equip others to do ministry here in the community.”

Vivian Laird ’54 on October 3, 2013. Elaine Peterson ’65 on April 7, 2013. Catherine Jensen ’89 on June 10, 2013

Jasmine and Adam Maarschalk

Josiah Leake ’12, an International Business graduate, accepted a job in supply chain management with The Gap in San Francisco. Ashley Young ’12 and Dan Hazel ’15 have been cast in the Guthrie Theater’s summer production of Pride and Prejudice. 2013 Laura Nyhus ’13 is a speech language pathologist at Perham Health Speech, certified in providing VitalStim therapy, a treatment for patients suffering with difficulty swallowing (dysphagia).

Mariah Wilder ’13 and her dad, Mike Wilder ’87, embarked on a 1,000-mile bicycle trip over the summer called the TORCH tour (Touring for ORphans in CHina). Their goal was to raise funds for and awareness of Hope Station, a foster care ministry in Chengdu, China cofounded by Rebekah Wilder ’11. Hope Station “serves the orphaned and disabled children of China by providing quality care and enrichment for their healthy growth and development until they can be adopted.” Andrew Wipf ’13, accepted a position with Google in the San Francisco Bay area.

Jessica and Nicholas Pedersen

Martha and Todd Ewing 32

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Best place to HANG OUT WITH FRIENDS: Best place FOR A PRIVATE CONVERSATION:

THE ISLAND

EAGLE’S NEST

Best place to run into lots of people:

The Billy Don’t miss out on UNWSP news or events!

Who you’ll bump into: Squirrels, couples and students communing with God. Topics of discussion: Love and relationship issues. Ambiance: Wooded and secluded, with a long walking path, bridge and chapel.

Best place to procrastinate:

campus green

Who you’ll bump into: Social butterflies, Frisbee enthusiasts, claustrophobes and class groups. Topics of discussion: The weather, classwork, love interests and weekend plans. Ambiance: Relaxed and natural, punctuated by “outdoor voices.”

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Who you’ll bump into: People who live in the Student Center dorms. Topics of discussion: Friends, recent sporting events and the daily grind. Ambiance: Inviting with a splash of the athletic (see games on mounted wall TVs).

Favorite Community Hangouts Best place to RELAX:

DORM ROOM

Who you’ll bump into: Roommates and close friends. Topics of discussion: Class stresses, future career concerns, relationship struggles, shared joys and spiritual issues. Ambiance: Homey messiness.

Update your alumni profile at unwsp.edu/alumni (choose “Stay Connected” then “Update Your Profile”). If you include your email you’ll receive our monthly Alumni E-news in addition to the Pilot. Connect with us:

Who you’ll bump into: Everybody— students from on and off campus, professors and staff. Topics of discussion: Classwork, the day’s happenings and theological intricacies. Ambiance: Casual, with side of muffins and coffee drinks.

Best OFF-CAMPUS DESTINATION:

J. ARTHUR’S COFFEE

Who you’ll bump into: Students who own cars, paper-writers and barista/server/performer alumni and students. Topics of discussion: This killer assignment and the test on Wednesday. Ambiance: Warm and studious.

Faculty Authors

Alumni Authors

Daryl Aaron, Ph.D., Understanding Your Bible in 15 Minutes a Day, (Bethany House, 2012).

Donald Carlson ’99 Jewish-Christian Interpretation of the Pentatuech in the PseudoClementine Homilies (Fortress Press, 2013).

Garry R. Morgan, D. Miss., Understanding World Religions in 15 Minutes a Day (Bethany House, 2012).

Amy Espeseth ’97, Sufficient Grace (Scribe Publications, 2013). This debut novel was nominated for the prestigious Warwick Prize.

Shari Harris ’05, Walking in Faith: Stories of Hope and Encouragement for the Workplace (WestBow Press, 2011).

University of Northwestern – St. Paul @NorthwesternMN Northwestern Professional Network Group University of Northwestern – St. Paul

Read Pilot online after November 13 at unwsp.edu/pilot

Christa Kinde ’92, The Broken Window (Zondervan, 2013). Mark Van Steenwyk ’02, The Unkingdom of God: Embracing the Subversive Power of Repentance (InterVarsity Press, 2013). Addie Eclov Zierman ’04, When We Were on Fire (Convergent Books, 2013).

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN – ST. PAUL FALL 2013 PILOT

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"Hope of the World" Embrace the beauty of the Advent season and take a moment to breathe and reflect. Christmas at Northwestern is coming to Maranatha Hall, December 6, 7 and 8. Over 300 student musicians—including the Northwestern Choir, Orchestra, Symphonic Band, Women's Chorale and Varsity Men's Chorus—will perform in this highly anticipated concert of worship. Tickets: unwsp.edu/tickets or 651-631-5151. And in the flurry of year-end activities, remember that your tax-deductible gift to Northwestern makes a world of difference to our students and mission: unwsp.edu/nwfund. University of Northwestern – St. Paul Equipping Christ-centered learners and leaders to invest in others and impact the world.


Fall Pilot 2013