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NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE S T. PA U L , M I N N E S OTA

2009–10 PRESIDENT’S REPORT


“Our faith moves us to pursue the Christian intellectual tradition, expanding the God-given gift of the mind so we can shape culture and serve God in our world.” – ALAN S. CURETON, Ph.D., PRESIDENT


JOSH STOKES


GREETINGS FROM THE PRESIDENT I am a few decades older than most of our students. That’s why I am particularly interested in understanding the beliefs and values of today’s young people.

the importance of academic rigor and biblical truth, is to show students how their goals in life should be centered around their relationship with Jesus Christ.

The Barna Group recently published a study of today’s American Christians. We recognize that people’s values and belief systems continue to shift rapidly in our culture, but the results of this study were staggering to me. Two of the primary themes Barna noted* were:

I always say that our world needs more Northwestern graduates—men and women who are academically and spiritually equipped to meet today’s challenges. This study reinforces why our world desperately needs quality Christ-centered higher education solidly grounded in biblical principles. Our four pillars—Wholeheartedly Christian, Academically Excellent, Focused on Community and Engaged in the World—reflect our mission.

• The Christian Church is becoming less theologically literate Biblical illiteracy is prevalent today. Few Americans, especially young adults, believe that faith should be integrated into the whole of their lives. • People are less interested in spiritual principles Teenagers—the young men and women who are our future college students—cited education, career development, friendships and travel as their life priorities. They admit that faith takes a back seat to their pursuit of accomplishments.

As leaders in Christian higher education, our charge is to communicate that God created us not simply to collect experiences and achievements, but to glorify Him as we pursue with excellence His calling for our lives.

When the next generation of college students holds such a superficial approach to faith, it is for us as educators, a call to action. One of our opportunities at Northwestern, as we emphasize *http://www.barna.org/culture-articles/462-six-megathemes-emerge-from-2010 4

Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D. President Northwestern College and Northwestern Media


3,070 Total Enrollment, Fall 2009

1,858 Traditional Undergraduates

14:1 Student-to-Faculty ratio

50+ Undergraduate Majors

2 Graduate Degrees

18 Competitive Sports

MISSION STATEMENT

GEORGE BYRON GRIFFITHS

Northwestern College exists to provide Christ-centered higher education equipping students to grow intellectually and spiritually, to serve effectively in their professions, and to give God-honoring leadership in the home, church, community, and world. 5


JOSH STOKES

ACADEMICS

More than 98% of seniors

Agreed or Strongly Agreed that Northwestern’s faculty are role models of Christian maturity, professionally competent, and interested in the welfare of students. 2009–10 Senior Capstone Survey

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PR OFES S OR T O S EN IOR VICE PR ES IDEN T — JA NET S O MMERS — “Christ-centered higher education promotes both knowledge and action,” says Janet Sommers, Ph.D., who after 18 years of excellence in teaching and leading the Department of English & Literature at Northwestern transitioned to Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs in January 2010. “It fosters in students a compelling desire to pursue truth and lifelong learning and to use knowledge and skills for the good of others and, ultimately, for the glory of God.” Students aren’t the only beneficiaries when a biblical worldview is combined with academic rigor, notes Sommers, who also served as a key leader in developing Northwestern’s Biblical Worldview Core Curriculum. “Teaching from a biblical worldview enables the faculty to demonstrate God’s beauty, love, revelation, and redemption, while encouraging them to address with courage and confidence, issues that seemingly resist or conflict with God’s truth. Now an administrator with a teacher’s heart, Sommers is passionate about upholding Northwestern’s commitment to Christ-centered education because “we participate in the transformation of our students’ lives.” Above all, she values being able to work in a place “where students and faculty strive together to fulfill God’s plan regarding their scholarly work and vocation.”


JOSH STOKES

BRI NG I N G ANC IENT HIST O RY T O LIF E — M I CHAE L O. WI SE — When the Science Museum of Minnesota hosted the exhibit, “Dead Sea Scrolls: Words that Changed the World” in 2010, they called upon Michael O. Wise, Ph.D., (Biblical & Theological Studies) for assistance. Wise is a worldrecognized expert on the scrolls and author of several books on the topic, including the highly regarded The Dead Sea Scrolls: A New Translation. Working closely with exhibit curators and other advisors, Wise helped plan the entire exhibit, which included artifacts, pictures, placards and interactive media. “My personal goal,” said Wise, “was that this would be the best exhibit of the Dead Sea Scrolls there has ever been, helping to answer such questions as ‘Who wrote them?’ ‘How did we get the Bible?’ and ‘How did it come together?’” In conjunction with the exhibit’s presence in St. Paul, Northwestern hosted several events featuring Wise, drawing more than 3,000 people to campus to hear from the expert that students have the incredible opportunity to learn from on a regular basis.

The 2009–10 Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI), taken by a representative number of freshmen to seniors, reported a high level of satisfaction with their intellectual growth and academic instruction, exceeding samples from the National Private Colleges and the Council of Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU).

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FA R ME R T O PHILO SOPHER T O DIS TIN GUIS HED S CHOL AR — WALTER S CHULTZ — In 2010, the Thomas F. Staley Foundation selected Walter Schultz, Ph.D., (Philosophy, Biblical & Theological Studies) as a Staley Distinguished Scholar, recognizing his work on Christian responses to market economics and poverty. “Our identity is neither in property ownership, nor in our place in the economic game,” said Schultz. “We are stewards of whatever talents, gifts, grace and wealth God has entrusted to us.” In his forties, Schultz changed careers from farming to philosophy professor. Fourteen years ago, he argued his doctoral case with Nobel Prize winner Leonid Hurwicz (Economics, 2007), who was then the Regents Professor of Economics at the University of Minnesota.

“When I began teaching,” Schultz recounts, “the most pleasant surprise for me was that these students seemed like my sons and daughters. They seemed like my kids. And I wanted them to be strong in the Lord. And that’s remained till this day.” The philosopher takes seriously his responsibility to his students and the families that send them to college. “That’s some father’s daughter, that’s some mother’s son, just leaving the nest,” he says. “And on my watch, I can look that father, that mother in the eye and say, ‘I gave them all my best academically and to establish them strong in Christ.’”

More than 99% of students Agreed or Strongly Agreed that they could integrate their faith with their academic field and discuss the theories and concepts of their major in relation to a biblical worldview.

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JOSH STOKES

2009–10 Senior Capstone Survey


SUBMITTED

IN ADDITION TO COND U C TING R ES E A R C H , D R . L IS A NNE W INS L O W TAU GHT MARINE INVE R TE BR AT E S T O U NIV ER S ITY O F TO K YO GRADU ATE S TU DENTS. W INS L O W, H E R S TU D ENTS , A ND H E R DAU GH TERS EXPERIM E NTE D W ITH IMMU NE C EL L S FR O M T H E A S IA N PACIFIC S EA U RCH IN.

F U L B R IG HT E X PE RIE NCE IN JAPAN OPEN S DOOR S — L I SANN E WINS LO W— “Biology is part of my life,” says Professor of Biology Lisanne Winslow, Ph.D. “I love it, and it’s my way of getting to people who may not otherwise hear the Gospel.” Winslow has no problem combining science with faith. Her 2009 visit to Japan as a recipient of a Fulbright Scholar Award for Research and Lecturing overseas allowed her to integrate science, faith and life in many ways. The experience was unforgettable, and her connections there continue to have an impact on Northwestern and beyond.

pollution control policy. Ongoing collaborative research on the immune system pathways in marine invertebrates, with her Japanese colleague Dr. Koji Akasaka of the Misaki Marine Biological Station of the University of Tokyo, is scheduled for publication in an upcoming scientific journal. Winslow’s ability to engage with students and colleagues has also opened doors of opportunity for NWC biology students. In spring 2011 she will lead a group of 10 students to Japan to partner with 10 University of Tokyo students for an intercultural intensive marine biology course.

Her research with sea urchins in Japan is being used by the Japanese government to establish

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JOSH STOKES

NE H IL BEJA R A NO D EG R E E : MA S TE R O F A R TS IN TH E O L O G IC A L S T U D IES

2010 GRADUATES E DU C ATION THAT LE ADS T O DOIN G GOD’S WOR K — N E HI L B E J ARA NO M’10 — Colombia native Nehil Bejarano came to Minnesota in 2006, and in 2007 began his studies at Northwestern to pursue a Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS).

perspective for someone doing ministry in the capacity of a founding pastor,” he said. “The quality of the teachers and education I received proved Northwestern was the right choice.”

While at Northwestern, Bejarano joined the pastoral staff of New Hope Church (Minn.) and helped start a Hispanic-Latino Ministry. He is now enrolled in the Ph.D. in Philosophy—Intercultural Studies program at Trinity International University in Illinois.

With a goal to continue work in multicultural ministry settings, Bejarano seeks to live out the words he shared at commencement with his fellow 2010 graduates: “As we continue in intellectual growth, we must go beyond the discourse and its academic confines. We must fully engage in the changes taking place in our present times...using our knowledge to effectively do God’s work in the streets, offices, or pulpits.”

For Bejarano, the MATS program at NWC was a good fit. “It provided the elements to combine theology and philosophy along with a pragmatic 10


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B E C O MI NG A DIF F E RE NT KIND OF DOC T OR — H ANNAH OREM ’10 — As captain of the track team and an honors scholar in college, Hannah Orem ’10 was a determined achiever. After struggling with injuries that limited her athletic performance, Orem was frustrated; however, she refused to give up. She began seeing a chiropractor and experienced significant healing. “I felt like someone had just given me a new pair of legs!” Her health restored, she achieved her long-standing athletic goals, including anchoring a relay for a conference championship and setting a new college record. As a biology major, Orem knew she wanted to go in to health care. With guidance from her professors and coach, she decided to become a chiropractor. She is now studying at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Iowa, with a goal to “help people recover their health, hope, and future, so they can experience life to the fullest and function at their highest potential.”

H A NNA H O R E M D EG R E E : BIO L O G Y A L EX A R MEND A R IZ D EG R E E : G R A P H IC D ES IG N

E Q U IPPE D T O SE RVE — AL E X ARME N DARI Z ’10 — UNION GOSPEL MISSION

When Alex Armendariz received Northwestern’s first annual Intercultural Unity Award in 2010, she felt deeply honored. Her peers nominated her for the award, which recognizes servantleadership in intercultural educational efforts to increase awareness and promote Christian unity. Her ability for intercultural leadership and her heart for service led to a position with the Union Gospel Mission Twin Cities, working directly with the Latino community. As an immigrant from Mexico herself, Armendariz enjoys the opportunity to serve immigrant families. She works closely with families who are learning English, teaches the Word of God, and develops children’s programs. She credits Northwestern for providing her “with practical knowledge and tools for equipping other people.”

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SUBMITTED

ANCHOR IN G HIS DR EAM JOB — KENNY KING ’10 — Since he was in 2nd grade, Kenny King dreamed of a career in television. After graduating with a degree in broadcasting, he landed a job as a TV reporter and three months later was promoted to full-time anchor and producer for the live evening newscasts at KSAX-TV (ABC) in Alexandria, Minn. At Northwestern, King pursued hands-on opportunities to learn broadcasting. He hosted shows on the campus radio and TV stations, and sharpened his experience with internships at two major-market TV stations. “I am so glad I was able to go to Northwestern, not only for the broadcasting opportunities, but also to make Christian friends,” said King. “The support system I have with professors, friends and coworkers from NWC has been helpful as I’ve moved into my career. The things I learned at NWC about my career and about my spiritual life are being practiced and lived out every day.”

K EN N Y KING D EG REE: BROAD CAS TING N I CK O LS ON D E GREE: AC C OUNTING

ACCOUN TIN G FOR S UCCES S SUBMITTED

— NICK O LS O N ‘10 — These days, it can be challenging to secure a job after college graduation, much less before. But six months before he graduated, Nick Olson was offered a position as an Audit Associate with KPMG, a leading U.S. tax and audit organization. Olson’s success also extended to athletics. As a competitive golfer with the Northwestern Eagles, he received the 2010 Upper Midwest Athletic Conference (UMAC) Scholar-Athlete Leadership Award. But his experience as a student athlete reaped benefits beyond the green. While on the golf team, Olson learned to balance a busy schedule and budget time—skills he is grateful to carry with him into his career. “All of my accounting classes gave me a base of accounting that I have been able to build on with the training provided through the firm,” said Olson. Now, he is enjoying building his career at KPMG, “getting to know people from different colleges and working together on a team.” 12


On the 2009–10 Senior Capstone Survey, more than 95% of seniors Agreed or

Strongly Agreed that they are well prepared for their first job in the field and can compete well with graduates from other institutions with similar majors.

JOSH STOKES

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CONNECTIONS MINISTRY & COMMUNITY The Northwestern experience includes a vital campus community where students, faculty and staff come together in learning, outreach and worship. Through our media ministry, listeners connect with each other to serve in Jesus’ name. With shared belief in Jesus Christ and a desire to serve, the NWC community reaches into the world to live out their faith at home and abroad.

SE RVING (IN) THE CITY A group of Northwestern students spent their 2010 spring break confronting the realities of hunger, poverty and spiritual need—right in their own backyard of Minneapolis. “We partnered with a local ministry for a shortterm service-learning opportunity in order to participate in God’s mission right here in our own community,” said David Fenrick, Ph.D., director of NWC’s Center for Global Reconciliation and Cultural Education. The team of 10 students and two staff members worked with a local ministry that runs an

urban art center, outreach to homeless youth, transitional housing, and a church plant. From 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. each day for 10 days, the students ministered to people in need. The experience tore down barriers and provided an opening for service and friendship. “We’re seeing homeless people as part of the family rather than ‘different,’” said Koobmong Kong ’11, an intercultural studies major. “The world is coming to our neighborhood, and it is a great gift to us,” said Fenrick.

RE ST O RING ADIEDO A L UMN U S’ VI SI ON B RI N GS WAT E R A ND HO P E TO KENYA N VILLA GE Growing up in the village of Adiedo, Kenya, David Opap ’01 faced death and disease daily. With no source of clean water, Opap and his family suffered water-borne illness. His mother and siblings eventually died from drinking the water.

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“My young brother and I both got sick at the same time, but [he] died and it was as if I’d been snatched from the lion’s mouth.” (continued on p. 16)


JOSH STOKES

FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR TEACHES IN TURKEY In the spring, Rachel Grammer ’10 became the college’s seventh Fulbright recipient in the last seven years. Grammer, an English major from McHenry, Illinois, was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) Grant that gave her the opportunity to teach English in Turkey for nine months.

MEN’S BASKETBALL WINS NCCAA CHAMPIONSHIP Northwestern College won its first National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) Division I Men’s Basketball National Tournament on March 20, 2010. Head coach Tim Grosz ’92 was honored as NCCAA Coach of the Tournament and Stephen Hanson ’10 was named the tournament MVP. The Eagles finished 2009–10 with a 22-7 overall record, winning 18 of their final 19 games of the season.

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After surviving several near-death experiences, Opap believed God wanted to use him to bring tangible hope to his people. His passion for the Gospel eventually led him to Northwestern College, where God prepared Opap for the work He had called him to do. VOLLEYBALL TEAM EARNS NCAA’S SPORTSMANSHIP HONOR The Northwestern women’s volleyball team, coached by Beth Wilmeth ’02, won the 2009–10 NCAA StudentAthlete Sportsmanship Award for female athletes. While good sportsmanship is a standard for all of NWC’s 18 intercollegiate athletic teams, the Eagle volleyball squad made intentional efforts throughout the season to demonstrate integrity by making honor calls—selfreporting touches at the net if officials do not see them, which results in awarding a point to the opposing team. CAPITAL CAMPAIGN MILESTONE REACHED With the groundbreaking of the Billy Graham Community Life Commons, Northwestern celebrated a major milestone for the Envision Excellence capital campaign, which raised $24 million from 2004–2010. The prayers and faithful gifts given toward the campaign provide scholarship funds and a new building that will help support the academic and spiritual lives of students for generations to come. 16

Opap established the nonprofit organization Spring of Hope International, to bring clean water to Adiedo and other parts of Africa. In 2009, his long-held dream was realized when they drilled the first well in his hometown village. Spring of Hope continues to expand with child sponsorship, endowment funds to promote education, and micro-financing for Kenyan business endeavors.

GR OUN DBR EAK IN G: BIL LY GR AHAM COMMUN ITY L IFE COMMON S The first weekend of October 2009 held a monumental celebration for Northwestern College. On October 2, Northwestern’s 107th anniversary, the college celebrated the groundbreaking of its newest building, the Billy Graham Community Life Commons, named for Northwestern’s second president. Two of Billy Graham’s daughters, Ruth Graham and Gigi Graham, participated as keynote speakers in recognition of their father’s legacy at Northwestern.

K TIS CELEBRATES 60 YEARS OF R ADIO MIN IS TR Y On October 3, 2009, the Twin Cities community joined Northwestern Media’s flagship radio station, 98.5 KTIS (founded in part by Billy Graham), in celebrating 60 years of broadcast ministry. A celebration concert at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul featured recording artists Michael W. Smith, Matthew West and Phil Stacey, and special guests Ruth Graham and Gigi Graham. More than 6,000 people attended the event, which also featured a 1,000-voice choir drawn from local churches. Leading up to the concert, KTIS launched 60 Days of Service, a citywide initiative that encouraged listeners to volunteer in their communities.


JOSH STOKES

NORTHWESTERN RECEIVES 10-YEAR REACCREDITATION

D AV I D OP AP ’ 01 F OUNDED S PRING OF H OPE I NT E R NATI ON AL , A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION B R I NGI N G CL EAN W ATER TO HIS HOMETOWN OF A D I E DO, K EN YA AN D OTHER PARTS OF AFRICA.

In December 2009 the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools granted Northwestern full accreditation for another 10 years. In preparation for the HLC visit, the NWC community engaged in a comprehensive self-study process that began in early 2006 and culminated in a 314-page self-study report, submitted in February 2009, and a site visit by the HLC in April.

NWC NAMED A TOP WORKPLACE

JOSH STOKES

A F T E R THE OF F I CI AL GROU NDBREAKING IN OC T O B ER 2009 ( ABOVE), CONS TRU CTION OF THE B G C LC PROGRESSED RAPIDLY. PROGRES S AS OF A P R I L 2010 SHOW N BELOW. JOSH STOKES

In June 2010, Northwestern College was named to the Star Tribune Top Workplaces 2010 list for the Twin Cities, ranking seventh in the private/nonprofit large organizations category (500+ employees) and 10th overall (large organizations category). In this same category, NWC ranked second for working conditions/culture, and third for employees’ confidence in their managers.

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NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE 09–10 N O R TH W E S TE R N COL L E GE B UDGE T E D R EVENU ES & EXP ENDITU RES • 2009–10

AUXILIARY SERVICES $10,662,000 22.6%

TUITION & FEES $35,436,000 75.1%

CAMPUS SERVICES & PLANT $8,566,000 18.1%

AUXILIARY SERVICES $1,847,000 3.9%

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS $18,491,000 39.2%

INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT $7,264,000 15.4%

GIFTS & GRANTS $1,100,000 2.3%

STUDENT SERVICES $11,030,000 23.4%

BUDGETED REVENUES

BUDGETED EXPENDITURES

TOTAL $47,198,000

TOTAL $47,198,000

N O R TH WE ST E RN COL L E GE FAL L T ERM ENRO LLMENT BY P RO GRA M TRADITIONAL PROGRAM TOTAL 2944

FOCUS TOTAL 2978

532

2005

80

2007

775

737

379 38

2006

1858

722

477

TOTAL 3070

1846

682

636

GRADUATE STUDIES

TOTAL 3023

1845

18

18

TOTAL 3026

1781

1767

DISTANCE EDUCATION

347

2008

93

348

2009

89


NORTHWESTERN MEDIA 09–10 N O R TH W E S TE RN ME DI A B UDGE T E D REVENU ES & EXP ENDITU RES • 2009–10

CAPITAL PURCHASES $911,840 7.1%

LISTENER SUPPORT $9,797,080 76.1%

TECHNICAL $1,569,918 12.2%

FUND RAISING $1,908,640 14.8%

FAITH RADIO $29,404 .2%

SERVICE REVENUE & CONCERTS $3,050,520 23.7%

PROGRAMMING $3,042,952 23.6%

STATION OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT $3,925,589 30.5%

PROMOS, CONCERTS & EVENTS $1,518,065 11.8%

BUDGETED REVENUES

BUDGETED EXPENDITURES

TOTAL $12,877,004

TOTAL $12,877,004

A M & F M COMBINED L I S TE N E R S H I P T OTAL S* 2005–09

ACTUAL TOTAL CASH GIFTS RECEIVED** 2005–09

*FALL ARBITRONS

**COLLEGE, MEDIA AND FOUNDATION

800,000

$20

700,000

$15

500,000

400,000 $15,525,799

$15,600,023

$16,861,000

200,000

$16,147,000

$14,288,00

786,700

747,200

742,100

717,500

722,700

300,000

$10

MILLIONS

LISTENTERS

600,000

$5

100,000

2005

2006

2007

2008 2009

2005

2006

2007 2008

2009 19


BOAR D OF TR US TE E S Alice E. Balzer, Secretary Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D., President Megan Doyle Mary Edwards, MPH Ronald R. Halvorson William J. Hamel, M.Div. Dalynn Hoch ’94, CPA George Kenworthy, D.Min. Carole Lehn Lauren D. Libby Arnold (Bud) Lindstrand ’54 Michael Meloch B.A. Blue Olson, MBA Russell R. Reynolds, MBA Sara Robertson ’54, Ed.D. Grover C. Sayre III, J.D., Chair Daniel E. Stoltz ’83, MBA Selwyn M. Vickers, M.D. Scott Whitmore, ’05, Ex Officio, Alumni Council

PRESID ENT ’ S CABINET Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D. President Janet B. Sommers, Ph.D. Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul H. Virts, Ph.D. Senior Vice President for Media Amy Bragg Carey, M.A. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Matt Hill ’89, Ed.D. Vice President for Student Life & Athletics Don F. Johnson, Ph.D. Vice President for Graduate & Continuing Education Raymond C. Kuntz, M.S. Vice President for Campus Techologies/CIO Alford H. Ottley, Ph.D. Vice President for Global Initiatives Douglas R. Schroeder, CPA Vice President for Business/CFO Timothy A. Rich, PHR Director of Human Resources

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2009-10 Annual Report