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OCTOBER 2011


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Contents 22 22

October 2011 volume 6, number 7

Mistletoe in the Making As the first chairman of an event that had never taken place before in the city nor the state, Renda McGowan knew she had her work cut out for her. But with the help of a group of dedicated women who formed Renda’s committee, Mistletoe Marketplace was a huge success that first year, and 31 years later has become the major fund-raiser for the Junior League of Jackson. Today the event runs like a well-oiled machine. During the first weekend in November, Jackson becomes the premier shopping destination for thousands of shoppers throughout the Southeast.

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Lee Paris At a citywide evangelistic/unity event organized by the Christian Businessmen's Committee, some 25,000 men and women of different races and church affiliations filled a stadium to hear Pat Morley and Tom Skinner issue a call for Christians to solve the racial issues which separate the people in this state. Lee could not get the call out of his mind. He distinctly felt he was being pursued by God to undertake such a venture. Thus was born Mission Mississippi 18 years ago, and Lee has been involved with it since.

MetroBites A Guide to Area Restaurants

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Departments October

MetroBites (see page

2011 october 2011

PARTIES WEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS

65 66 68 69 70 72 72 73 73 74 74 76 76 78 78 16

Anna Catherine Purvis/ Andrew Davis Frame Rachel Kay Iupe/ Austin Patrick Cooley Elizabeth Lea Thomas/ Christopher Lee Bowers Laura Maren McKinley/ Brad Marshall Hutto Shelley Marie Baas/ Jeremy Bryce Neely Abbie Lauren Eason Paul Caleb Koonce Anne Elizabeth Smith/ Jason Wilton Bailey Barbara Jo Agnew/ Richard William Brillard Camille Jesse Lynn Allen/ Drew Landon Snyder

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Engagement Party

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Wedding Celebration

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Camille Allen and Drew Snyder, both of Washington, D.C., were honored recently with an engagement celebration in the home of Jean and Kelley Williams.

Friends and family gathered at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Walter Shelton to celebrate the wedding of Anna Catherine Purvis to Andrew Davis Frame.

Engagement Party An engagement party honoring Stayce Westmoreland and Robbie Watson was held recently in the home of Jerry and Anne Veazey.

Engagement Party An engagement party honoring Jennifer Whatley and Jacob Vaughn was held recently at Scrooge’s Restaurant.

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Jamie Carol Meaut/ Erroll Alexander Eaton Virginia Callaway Smith/ Dallas Webster Younce Carly Jenae Stegall/ Bryce David Yelverton Christy Leigh Simmons/ Jason Thomas Brooks Brittany Amanda Sullivan/ Tyler Carlton Lake Mary Caroline Harkins/ William Corey Mays

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Tennis Advantage Jenny Markow

Food Wise Marlana Walters

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Ten Most Endangered Historic Places

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Celebration of Leadership

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The new list of the 10 Most Endangered Historic Places in Mississippi was unveiled at a party hosted by the Mississippi Heritage Trust.

A “Celebration of Leadership,” an event hosted by Leadership Greater Jackson, was held recently in the Pinnacle at One Jackson Place.

Spring Luncheon Annie Morhauser with Annieglass was the guest speaker for the Jackson Symphony League’s spring luncheon held at The South in downtown Jackson.

The Debutante Mothers Club The Debutante Mother’s Club gathered at the Country Club of Jackson for their spring luncheon. Patty Roper was the guest speaker and presented easy ideas and tips for entertaining.

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Rise Above for Youth

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Baptist Children’s Village Sunset at the South

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UMC Nursing Alumni Meeting

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Mississippi Children’s Home Wine Tasting

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An Evening of Hope

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Tee It Up

COLUMNS

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EVENTS

Engagement Party An engagement celebration for Betsy Smith and Jason Bailey was held August 20 in the home of Scottie and Burdette Russ.

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Rise Above for Youth held its second annual dinner and silent auction supporting at-risk youth in Mississippi at St. James Episcopal Church.

The Baptist Children’s Village recently presented Sunset at the South Silent Art Auction featuring more than 100 works of art donated by the Steve Glaze family.

The University of Mississippi’s nursing alumni annual meeting was held at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Mississippi Children's Home Services Auxiliary annual wine tasting and silent auction was held in the home of Peggy and Johnny Louis in Eastover.

An Evening of Hope Benefit Gala celebrating the opening of the 2011 Exhibit of Jackson Public Schools Student Artwork was held at the Art Center of Mississippi.

The Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership and the Greater Jackson Alliance teamed up this year to bring the annual "Tee It Up" Golf Invitational to chamber members.


northsidesun the

magazine

A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE NORTHSIDE SUN NEWSPAPER P.O. BOX 16709 JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39236 601-957-1122

EDITOR Jimmye Sweat

WRITERS Susan Deaver • Glenda Wadsworth • Anthony Warren Jenny Markow • Jenny Woodruff • Marlana Walters Katie Eubanks • Mary Mac Jones

PHOTOGRAPHERS Beth Buckley • Lonnie Kees Christina Cannon • Chris Grillis David Johnston • Greg Campbell Anthony Warren • Jenny Woodruff

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Melanie North

ADVERTISING Katy Agnew • Holly Dean • Amy Forsyth Carly O’Bryant • Carley Baker

ART DIRECTOR Wanda McCain

PRODUCTION MANAGER Beth Buckley

PRODUCTION Jo Ann Ward • Mary Margaret Thiel

BOOKKEEPING Dani Poe

CIRCULATION Dale Frazier • Dottie and Jeff Cole • Kerri Hawkins THE NORTHSIDE SUN MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE NORTHSIDE SUN NEWSPAPER. ALTHOUGH THE MAGAZINE IS DISTRIBUTED FREE ON NEWSSTANDS, PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE FOR $20 ANNUALLY. FOR NEW SUBSCRIPTIONS, CHANGES OF ADDRESS OR OTHER SERVICES RELATED TO SUBSCRIPTIONS, CALL 601-957-1542. FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR CURRENT AD REP. FOR INFORMATION CONCERNING WEDDING SUBMISSIONS, PARTY COVERAGE OR FEATURES, CALL 601-957-1123 OR E-MAIL JIMMYE@NORTHSIDESUN.COM. THE MAGAZINE OFFICE IS LOCATED AT 246 BRIARWOOD DR., JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39206; THE MAILING ADDRESS IS: P. O. BOX 16709, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39236.

ABOUT THE COVER OCTOBER 2011

Janis Boersma was photographed at Nick’s Restaurant by Lonnie Kees.

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Mistletoe IN THE MAKING BY

A

JENNY WOODRUFF

S THE FIRST CHAIRMAN of an event that had never knew anything," McGowan said. "We had a pseudo sketch logo that Sandra taken place before in the city nor the state, Renda Maris' husband designed and the name was created by the committee." McGowan knew she had her work cut out for her. But with the help of a group of dedicated women who formed Renda’s IN AUGUST, the membership gave the committee the final go-ahead for committee, Mistletoe Marketplace was a huge success that first year, and 31 the event to take place two months later.With a budget of $20,000, the comyears later has become the major fund-raiser for the Junior League of mittee went to work. Surprisingly, almost all local merchants were totally Jackson. against Mistletoe Marketplace because they felt it was in competition with Today the event runs like a well-oiled machine. During the first weekend their businesses, McGowan said. "We could not convince them that this in November, Jackson becomes the premier shopping destination for thou- event would encourage shopping in Jackson," she said. "One locally owned sands of shoppers throughout the Southeast. store owner was rude during a meeting asking for his support and cut the However, this was not the case the first year, according to McGowan. "We meeting short with wording to the effect that if we proceeded with this event had nothing to go by and had to literally create everything - including the their future involvement in league events might be questioned." But thanks name, logo, theme, merchant list, schedule - everything," McGowan said. to 33 vendors, Mistletoe Marketplace was established. McGowan was asked to serve as the chairman of the community fund-rais"Without the risky commitment of eight area merchants we might not ing event that would take place for have been able to complete our venthat year by the incoming president dor goal and therefore without them of the junior league. "Even though there might not have been a many ideas were presented at our Mistletoe Marketplace," McGowan usual December meeting for a vote said. "For their commitment, I perby the membership, it was assumed sonally will be forever grateful." that the membership would vote to Today, the setup for Mistletoe is have another Bargain Barn Sale," done by professionals, the food is McGowan said. "I had previously catered and decorations are paid for. been a department chairman at two That was definitely not the case back Bargain Barn events." Bargain Barn during the first year because they was similar to a large garage sale the didn't have the financial resources. league sponsored. It has grown into "We the members did it all from the Bargain Boutique, a secondscratch and we cooked all of the hand shop. food," McGowan said. "We made all The first steering committee: Sharon Rhoden, Margaret Tohill, Suzan Thames, Kent Peters, Elizabeth The Christmas holiday shopping of our decorations from carpet rolls, Cossar; (front) Renda McGowan, Sandra Maris. event was being held in a few cities wrapped packages, and we even had across the United States. "If I remember correctly the first one was held by a sewing committee who made the red and white awnings that are still used the Pi Beta Phi social sorority in Nashville and was copied by leagues in today." Donated trees were used for decorations and the committee had to Evansville and Indianapolis. There was also a huge one in Austin," she said. make tree stands. The membership voted to do this shopping event and the committee includ"Because we were not supposed to be in the Trade Mart until Monday, we ed Sandra Maris, Suzan Thames, Sharon Rhoden, Margaret Tohill, Elizabeth tried to get an early start on Sunday," she said. "I drove a motor home there Cossar and Kent Peters. According to McGowan, Tohill, who was in charge so we could use the generator to cut trees with chain saws and make tree of publicity, kept envisioning a ball of Mistletoe as the logo. "None of us stands."

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Photo by Beth Buckley

“

Without the risky commitment of eight area merchants we might not have been able to complete our vendor goal and therefore without them there might not have been a Mistletoe Marketplace. For their commitment, I personally will be forever grateful. - Renda McGowan

�

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Mistletoe IN THE MAKING

Although they did get caught, the head of the Trade Mart did not get too angry and let the ladies continue to work outside, according to McGowan. "We also used plenty of cedar greenery to decorate," she said. "We did not know you could be allergic to cedar and no one used gloves. By the end of the day several workers had rashes and itched terribly." MCGOWAN REMEMBERS working so hard to have this event the first year because she really believed in the junior league. "With the accomplishments that had been done by the junior league in previous projects, I had no doubt that if we could just get started, we could really have something to build upon each year and it would mean a tremendous success for our projects," she said. "Yes I believed we could be successful, but could anyone believe the type of money this event has raised each year? No, because I don't think we could think in those terms." In those days, the majority of league members did not work outside the home, according to McGowan. "Therefore volunteering in league projects provided an avenue to showcase their many talents and professional skills. Not only was it a goal for league projects to better the community but it also provided a sense of personal satisfaction to the majority of league members." McGowan remembers people lined up outside for the opening of the first day. And by noon they had almost run out of what they had cooked for lunch and had to begin to serve just homemade cakes. "That night several on the lunch committee had to go back and make hundreds of box lunches for the next day," she said. "They worked until early morning of the next day to finish. Like I said, the ladies of the junior league at that time could get anything done when they had a goal." McGowan describes herself as an ultimate consonant fund-raiser. "And I really have a true belief people give and they will give more if they are enjoying themselves." That first Mistletoe was wonderful, according to McGowan. "Every league member should take a sense of pride that they created something so fresh, new and exciting and now look at it. It's a phenomenon." MCGOWAN,WHO originally was born in New Orleans, moved to Jackson when she was 15

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months old. She lived all her life in Jackson and was educated in the Catholic lower schools and was graduated from Murrah High School. She received her degree from Louisiana State University and married and lived in New Orleans where her husband completed Tulane Law School. She moved to Jackson after a brief stay in Virginia. In Jackson she was involved in activities such as Children’s Community Theatre, Middle Mississippi Girl Scouts, Young Lawyers Wives Association, and JLTA Tennis. She was asked to join the junior league in 1976 at age 26. She cochaired departments at two Bargain Barns, she chaired the playground project at Crippled Children’s Hospital building which was a barrier free playground, she co-chaired the provisional committee, and served on the committee for marketing the cookbook “Southern Sideboards.” She volunteered 15 years in the league.

“And I really have a true belief people give and they will give more if they are enjoying themselves.” - Renda McGowan Today, McGowan is the executive director of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Mississippi Chapter and has been in this position for more than 19 years. Prior to that for three years, she was the executive director of the Leukemia Society in Mississippi. She also is a Doncaster Clothing Representative and has been for more than 10 years. McGowan has three children and three grandchildren. They include Tracy McGowan Stewart, who is a nurse at University of Mississippi Medical Center in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and a current member of the Junior League of Jackson. Tracy has one daughter, Margaret O'Neil Stewart, who is a sixth-grader at Jackson Academy. McGowan's daughter, Shannon McGowan Breier, lives with her husband, Eric, in Atlanta. She is an artist and taught high school art in Atlanta for eight years and now is home with their daughter,

Emma, age six, and son, Charlie, age two. She was accepted into membership to Junior League and transferred to Atlanta. David McGowan Jr. lives in Atlanta where he owns his own computer company and is a computer engineer. FOR MORE THAN 23 years, McGowan has been involved with fund-raising as a professional and previously volunteered in many civic events as an individual. She chaired the Halloween Carnival at JA, chaired the Revolutionary Fair at Jackson Prep, chaired the Tennis Classic for Cystic Fibrosis, and chaired the first tennis tournament for Jackson Prep and Easter Seals Telethon. She has served on the boards of the junior league, Inter-City Advisory Council, Middle Missisippi Girl Scouts of America, Children's Community Theatre, Jackson Ladies Tennis Association, Metro-Jackson Crime Commission, and Leadership Jackson Alumni Association. Currently she serves as a commissioner on the Mississippi Motor Vehicle Board as an appointment by Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann. She also is a member of River Hills Tennis Club where she has played on a JLTA Tennis Team since 1983 and is a member of St. Richard's Catholic Church. Tyler Armstrong, who serves on the committee of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, says McGowan is an amazing woman and an unbelievable volunteer. "She is what every volunteer should strive to be. When Renda says she is going to do something, she gets it done," said Armstrong. "She is truly an unbelievable person who knows what she is doing and is a wonderful woman. She is someone we can all learn from." McGowan ponders the pros of that first Mistletoe. "They had nothing to compare with - so whatever we did would be good," she said. "It was exciting and we could make all of the first decisions. We created the name, logos, schedule, themes - all are still used today. So I guess we were really good at what we did and created." Today she can't be as involved in Mistletoe because of work demands, but she volunteers at times in the information booth. "It was fun to see so many former members who I had not seen in some time," she said. "I just enjoy the excitement and energy that goes with being a part of such a fantastic event. I usually attend the preview party each year, which grows and grows and grows."


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(1) Mistletoe First Year Map (2) First layout of Mistletoe (3) Children David McGowan, Tracy McGowan Stewart, Eric and Shannon Breier (4) Renda McGowan’s grandchildren Miss Emma Breier, Miss Neil Stewart, Charlie Breier (5) Tattler 20 year Mistletoe. Shown are all of the past chairmen. Renda McGowan (1st year) and Lisa Avra (20th year) are seated in the front L to R. (6) The Spirit of Mistletoe (7) Mistletoe Marketplace Chairman Renda McGowan shown with her family, husband David and their children Tracy, David and Shannon.

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LEE PARIS BY

GLENDA WADSWORTH

Henry, Lee, and Henry Paris in from of The Lyceum Building at Ole Miss where all three were graduated.

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A

T A CITYWIDE evangelistic/unity event organized by the Christian Businessmen's Committee, some 25,000 men and women of different races and church affiliations filled a stadium to hear Pat Morley and Tom Skinner issue a call for Christians to solve the racial issues which separate the people in this state. Lee Paris was there and says he came away with a heavy heart. "I thought there is no way we could solve 400 years of racial problems. I knew it would take at least a 20-year commitment on the part of all of us." Lee could not get the call out of his mind. He distinctly felt he was being pursued by God to undertake such a venture. "I argued with the Lord. I told him I didn't have the appropriate background to handle this mission." He shakes his head. "I did not feel I could do it. But the Lord said, 'Lee be quiet and do what I say.'" Originally his efforts to be true to his calling met with misunderstanding from many people, "but I was absolutely confident that I was doing what God wanted." Thus was born Mission Mississippi 18 years ago, and Lee has been involved with it since. Mission Mississippi calls itself a ministry of reconciliation which seeks to encourage and demonstrate unity in the body of Christ across racial and denominational lines so that communities throughout Mississippi can better understand the gospel message. It is now active in more than 20 cities in Mississippi. Lee explains, "Mission Mississippi is a place for people to meet and pray and build relationships, to see we have more in common with believers than with those who are not.We are not denominational. We come together in the body of Christ to pray, support and encourage, then go into the world." Thomas Jenkins met Paris around 1993. A mutual friend in Mission Mississippi introduced them, and they met for lunch shortly thereafter. "I was pretty skeptical that we could or would become friends, but, in fact, we became very close friends on every level -- social, religious


and philosophical. We have shared problems, challenges and victories. We can be totally honest with each other on any subject. Lee is a genuine person who knows no color barrier." THIS FEELING OF COMFORT working among diverse people of God comes naturally to Lee. His mother is a devout Christian, his father a devout Jew. "The Lord was worshiped and honored in our home. That was instilled in me from an early age," he says. Because his father was a banker and entrepreneur, Lee grew up more or less assuming he too would go into business. Once in college, he briefly considered entering the ministry, but determined that was not his calling. "I was to be a minister in the marketplace. I saw I could use business as a platform for my convictions. In the business environment I get to go places and meet people that most clergy could not. God wants different people to do different things." Paris was graduated from Ole Miss with a business degree and a law degree. Paris met his future wife, Lisa Redditt of Greenwood, at the Delta Gamma house, in the same room where his parents married. The Parises are avid Rebel fans. "Ole Miss is a big part of our family," says Lee, who recent-

“I was to be a minister in the marketplace. I saw I could use

BUSINESS

ly taught a class on the anatomy of a real estate deal at the law school. "Our family is spread out from daughter Vivian in D.C. where she is now a Senate page, to son Henry in Memphis working as an investment counselor, to daughter Rachel Marie, who is in Nashville working on a master's degree in counseling. But we come together in Oxford." Today Lee serves as managing partner of Meadowbrook Capital. Business partner Dan Hall met Lee in 1993 through Mission Mississippi. "Lee has a strong work ethic without being obsessive about it. He creates a positive atmosphere. If he has a

Lee Paris

as a platform for my convictions. In the business environment I get to go places and meet people that most clergy could not. God wants different people to do different things.� -Lee Paris

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Lisa, Rachel Marie, Henry, Vivian, and Lee Paris.

bad day, we would never know it. He makes sure every one is okay." Paris' accomplishments are numerous. In 2009, Lee began his second three-year term as a member of the district committee for Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) and has served on the FINRA district nominating committee. He has also been director of Planters Bank and Trust Company and the Mississippi Business Finance Corporation. He is a member of the Mississippi Bar Association. Lee is a deacon of the First Presbyterian Church of Jackson. He is chairman of the National Center for Fathering, the Mississippi Charitable Foundation and the I CAN Foundation U.S. He is director of the Children's Scholarship Fund of Jackson and was a director of the University of Mississippi Alumni Association. He has served as chairman of Mission Mississippi and as a director of the Rotary Club of Jackson, the University of Mississippi Foundation and Patrick Morley Ministries and mostly recently as president of River Hills Club, where he is an avid tennis play-

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“All of his decisions in life are deliberate and based on his

CHRISTIAN VALUES. Over any trials in life, no matter how large or small, he asks God for guidance, and that is the direction that he tries to take.� -Henry Paris

er. He has served as state chairman of the Young Presidents' Organization (YPO) and is chairman of YPO's Christian Fellowship Network. OF THAT LENGTHY LIST, Lee is probably most impassioned about his work with the National Center for Fathering. He sees the numerous children in this community who have no strong father figure. "I believe that the good influence of a father is extremely important in a child's development." To that end, Lee affiliated himself with the National Center for Fathering, which reaches more than one million fathers annually through seminars, small-group training and other specific programs to create a culture of "championship fathering." His children are Lee's greatest witnesses to his personal example of strong belief in the importance of faith in God and fatherly influence. Son Henry, 24, says, "I cannot remember a time in my life when I have counted on my father to do something and it did not happen. He is 100 percent dependable and always there for me. All of his decisions in life are deliberate and based on


his Christian values. Over any trials in life, no matter how large or small, he asks God for guidance, and that is the direction that he tries to take. That's what makes him so accountable." Seventeen-year-old Vivian recalls, "Some of my fondest memories with Dad are Sunday afternoon walks around the neighborhood.We walk and really talk. My Dad influenced me in countless ways! To start and end he has shown me how to love and forgive even when it's really hard. He has taught me life skills that will always remain with me." RACHEL MARIE, 28, writes, "My father instilled in me: love and loyalty for family, a love for the Ole Miss Rebels, respect for my Southern heritage, a desire to see and hope for the good in people, and he taught me how to find the silver lining to a rainy day. Dad has also shown me what it looks like to be genuine. I have an enormous amount of admiration and respect for my father." She recounts incidents of his loving sense of humor. "When we were little and we would get upset, Dad would make us laugh by pretending to be a three-year-old boy named Junior who acted like Dennis the Menace. Once I told Dad that I loved him all the way to the moon.The expression

Lee in South Africa

Lisa, Lee, David and Mamikie Molapo in South Africa

stuck until eventually we skipped the 'I love you' and would just say, '2damoon.' " Paris was instrumental in initiating the National Center for Fathering chapter in Africa. He has been on three mission trips to South America and five mission trips to Africa. Rachel Marie relates, "He is genuine in his love for the Lord. When I was younger, it was hard to see that my father's relationship with God was different from just what was at church, but as I grew spirituality he became a model for what it is like to have a personal walk with God. He showed me that being a Christian means to follow Christ instead of trying to charm everyone in Jackson, Mississippi. Mission Mississippi is a great example of what it was like to see my dad obedient to God's plan and be part of building a difficult bridge." Victor Smith, with Paris, was a charter member of Mission Mississippi. "Lee has great love for God. He is committed to being a disciple to others and has a gift for leadership." Hall notes that Paris gives himself freely to all manner of people. "Lee is the same person, whether he is dealing with work, church or business. He lives his faith and is an open door to friends and families, a real gentleman."

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TENNIS ADVANTAGE

WELCOME COOLER WEATHER

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ven though it doesn’t feel like fall just yet, the calendar says it is on the way. After a sizzling hot summer, join me in a big welcome to some cooler weather. As hot as it’s been, tennis hasn’t slowed down one bit. Adults and juniors have been seen all over the Northside playing tennis. The first tri-level state championship was recently held in Jackson with play at Ridgeland Tennis Center. Tri-level tennis has been on the rise across the entire Southern Section and Mississippi has enjoyed playing this format. What is tri-level, you might ask. Three consecutive levels of play are all included on one team, with each level player competing against the same level player. More than 300 players from across the state participated in the three-day championship with five championship teams crowned on Sunday. These teams will travel to Memphis and join the teams from four other states to play in a regional tri-level championship. Even though there were no winners from the Northside, many local teams participated in the tournament. Following that championship, winning teams from local USTA League Senior Mixed Doubles traveled to Tupelo to play in the state championships. “This is always a fun tournament to work. The players love tennis and enjoy being together,” reports Lindsey Sartain, director of adult programs for USTA Mississippi. “Tupelo and Pontotoc rolled out the red carpet for us and we all really appreciate it,” continues Sartain. Muriel Greer’s 7.0 team and Carolyn Galloway’s 8.0 team emerged victorious at the end of the weekend. They will travel to Macon, Ga. this month for the Southern Sectionals. Congratulations to all mixed doubles teams that played. Georgia Spencer isn’t afraid of the heat. She has close to 60 ladies that she organizes each week during the summer for a morning of tennis fun. “We have been doing this for three summers now, and it’s great. Everyone gets a number, we rotate courts and just have a fun morning of some really good tennis,” says Spencer. These dedicated ladies play at Ridgeland Tennis Center. Cissy Jackson recently invited all the ladies to her home for a tennis luncheon, out of the heat for a change. Not all the ladies

were able to come, but those that did had as much fun off the courts as they do on the courts. Update on Carrie Starks and her 3.0 USTA League Adult team that’s heading to Tucson, October 21-23. Captain Carrie reports in on some of the things they have been doing to raise money for their trip. “We had a benefit doubles tournament at Ridgeland Tennis Center in September and will have a pancake breakfast at Applebee’s on Lake Harbor Drive, October 8. “We are so grateful to all that have supported us on our road to nationals, please join us at Applebee’s and continue to help us out,” says Starks. Our junior players have been busy as well. Some of our former junior players that are now playing col-

career at Holmes Community College. Well, not exactly, she will be the team manager for the 2012 season as she finishes her classes at Holmes. While at Holmes, Jennifer was the number one singles and doubles player for the team. She received the team’s Most Valuable Player award both years she was playing. After completing Holmes, she plans to enroll in the two-year dental hygiene program at UMC. In addition to school, Jennifer works part time at Everyday Gourmet. Jennifer’s parents are Jan Holland and Rick Holland. How cool would it be to be on the college tennis team with your brother. Well, the Aru boys, Robbie and Marco, from the Northside have done that at Furman. Robbie is entering his junior year at Furman University where he is a bio-chemistry major, with hopes of becoming a surgeon one day. “Going to Furman has been an awesome but challenging experience. Academics and tennis dominate my life, but it has been well worth it. It has been outstanding to have my brother here on the team too.” During the spring 2011 season, Robbie played singles in the number four, number five, and number six positions throughout the season. For him, the highlight of last season was defeating Florida State’s number five player who finished the season ranked and playing number two for them. “I hope to contribute more to our team than I did last year. My goal for this year is to go back to the NCAAs.” Marco is returning to Furman for his sophomore year. Last season, Marco played in the number two and number three spot in doubles. With English in mind as his major, tennis and academics take up most of his time, but he did join the Kappa Alpha Order and has enjoyed all aspects of college life. He finished his first year with an overall 3.5 GPA which speaks volumes as Furman just got named number two Most Rigorous School in the nation by Newsweek. Robbie and Marco are the sons of Giorgio and Jan Aru. Phillip Johnson, son of Mimi and Brian Johnson, returns to Rhodes College as a sophomore. Johnson is majoring in physics and is a member of the Rhodes tennis team. Kris Roberts will join former Prep teammate, Ross Peets, at SMU where she will continue her tennis. Kris is the daughter of Robyn and Todd Roberts.

After a sizzling hot summer, join me in a big welcome to

SOME COOLER WEATHER. As hot as it’s been, tennis hasn’t slowed down one bit.

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lege tennis, Will Freeman, Jennifer Holland, Kris Roberts, Ross Peets, Marco and Robbie Aru, and Phillip Johnson, checked in over the summer to let us know how their college days were going. Will Freeman is entering his senior year at Birmingham Southern College in Birmingham. He has been a vital part of the BSC tennis team for three years as a solid contributor to their 34-14 record. Will is a 2008 graduate of Jackson Preparatory School and a former River Hills Ace Academy player under Dave Randall. He is an economics major graduating in May 2012 and the son of Betty Lynn and Rod Freeman. Ross Peets will begin his SMU tennis career this year. He was red-shirted his freshman year, but plans to hit the courts hard for his team. His SMU tennis coach told him to enjoy his freshman year, because he would be focusing on tennis for the remainder of his time at SMU. He took advantage of that opportunity and joined a fraternity, where he is an active member of Kappa Alpha. Ross lived and worked in Dallas over the summer and served as an assistant to Coach Neufeld. He is looking forward to representing both SMU and Mississippi on the tennis court this year. Ross is the son of Jackie and Randy Peets. Jennifer Holland has finished her tennis college

by JENNY MARKOW


TENNIS ADVANTAGE

Greer Senior Mixed Muriel Greer and her 7.0 Senior Mixed Doubles team won their division during the USTA League Senior Mixed Doubles Championships in Tupelo. (From left, back) Art Leis, Skip Lowe, Don Roberts, Chris Jones, Tom Wofford; (front) Sylvia Jones, Frances Spinosa, Muriel Greer, Linda Blissett. Not pictured: Stephanie Gilbert, Cleve Barham

Jennifer Holland and Taylor Morgan played number one doubles for two seasons at Holmes Community College in Lexington

Galloway Senior Mixed Carolyn Galloway’s 8.0 Senior Mixed Doubles team won their division during the USTA League Srenior Mixed Doubles Championships in Tupelo. (From left, back) Carolyn Galloway, Anne Culpepper, Sidney Smith, L. C. James; (front) Jeff Boyles, Connie Brewer, Deborah Norman, Hap Davis. Not pictured: Cindi Beesley, Wesley Whitehead

Taking a break from the summer heat. These ladies play weekly all summer at Ridgeland Tennis Center. Georgia Spencer heads these ladies up each week. (From left, back) Anne Gibson, Cheryl Harris, Vicki McDowell, Toni Williams, Susan Toler, Virgie Breazeale, Cheryl Clayton, Trish Windham, Dorthy Graham; (front) Missy Kim, Angie Deleon, Gwen Emmons, Georgia Spencer, Sissy Jackson, Zandra Nowell, Pat Werne, Kathy Davini.

Local girls winning at the state and sectional levels get ready to head to Tucson in October to compete in the USTA League National Championships. (From left, back) Jaime Fisher, Erin Crowe, Laura Carman, Laura Baldwin, Gala Loflin, Brett Thompson, Natisha Crosby, Jean Tonnar-Seale; (front) Audrey Thomas, Carrie Starks (captain), Silvia Chough, Landon Farlow

Jackson Prep graduate Will Freeman enters his senior year at Birmingham Southern College.

Both Jackson Prep graduates, Ross Peets and Kris Roberts return to SMU as sophomores with hopes of helping the tennis program there have another great season.

Brothers playing tennis together at college is a neat thing. Robbie and his brother Marco Aru (not pictured), graduates of Jackson Prep, travel back to South Carolina to attend Furman University where they are both on the tennis team. october 2011

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FOODWISE

R I C K V I R D E N ’ S PA I N T E D

BY

M A R L A N A W A LT E R S

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

ick Virden could be considered by some to be a renaissance man. A native of Jackson, Virden lived in Alaska while working as banker, sold produce and plants at the local farmers market on Woodrow Wilson Boulevard, and has now found his niche traveling the country as a rare coin dealer. For years, painting pumpkins has been something he does for fun, not compensation. According to Rick, “There is not enough money in the world to paint an Auburn elephant and I really only paint when I feel inspired.” Last year, Rick stopped by The Everyday Gourmet with one of his painted pumpkins and I mentioned that I would love to have a Thing 1 and Thing 2 for

R

GREG CAMPBELL

Marlana Walters, Proprietor The Everyday Gourmet

my twins for Halloween. The very next day, Thing 1 and Thing 2 showed up, and I can tell you Dr. Seuss would have been proud. They were almost as cute as my little pumpkins! I am not one of those people that posts every grocery store trip or minute-by-minute detail of my life on Facebook, but on this particular occasion I was so excited that I posted a picture of Rick’s creations on my Facebook page. When I sat down to talk with Rick about his pumpkin painting, he had a wealth of knowledge about the numerous varieties of the pumpkin family, the process of growing pumpkins and selecting the perfect pumpkin. For those of you interested in some of the key points about pumpkins, here’s what I gathered. The best time to plant is around July Fourth and we don’t really have the best climate in central Mississippi for pumpkin growing. Pumpkins grow best in a cooler climate to keep the inside from boiling in the Mississippi summer sun. Rick suggests buying a pumpkin if you forgot to plant your seeds this summer or if you’re like me - forgot to water them. Rick’s favorite place to purchase pumpkins is Wright’s Fruit Stand on Hwy 49 South. If you give them a call, Melinda Wright (601-497-0996) will take your custom requests for painted pumpkins. Prices vary depending on size, but you can expect to pay $25 for a medium size painted pumpkin. However, if you are looking for a fun project that is less messy than actually carving a pumpkin, Rick and I both suggest that you paint your pumpkin this year. If you don’t like what you paint, you can wipe it off before the paint dries and start all over. As Rick explains, “pumpkins are very forgiving.”

RICK’S PUMPKIN PAINTING SUGGESTIONS: • Look for strong stems • Do not pick pumpkin up by the stem. The stem is sharp and could cut your hand. Breaking the stem could also damage the pumpkin by exposing the interior to air. • Look for pumpkins with fewer ridges for an even painting surface. • Use acrylic paint. The colors are vivid and can be washed off if you are unhappy with your painting. • Allow paint to dry before covering with clear spray paint. • Do not cover a painted pumpkin completely with paint or lacquer. The pumpkin needs to breathe to avoid rotting from the inside out. • Do not place pumpkin directly on the ground. To prolong the life of a pumpkin, elevate it so that air may circulate. • Have fun, and remember that the possibilities are only limited by your imagination. If you do paint your pumpkin, please send us a picture on Facebook or e-mail facebook@theeverydaygourmet.com. We will post one pumpkin photo every day on our Facebook page in the month of October. 36

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FOODWISE There’s just something about seeing a pumpkin that lets you know fall is here and winter is just right around the corner. Pumpkins are the perfect bridge between summer and winter, they are one of the rare fruits that can be used as fall decoration and dining. Any recipe that calls for fresh squash

PUMPKIN CHICKEN CHILI

can be substituted with fresh pumpkin. As long as the rind and seeds are removed, you will have similar results and an enhanced depth of flavor to that of summer squash. So, if you do decide to carve your pumpkin, here are some of my favorite recipes for pumpkin including the seeds.

SPOTTED PUMPKIN CAKE with PUMPKIN CREAM

(If you don’t tell, I’ll bet no one will know your secret ingredient.)

PUMPKIN CREME INGREDIENTS: 1 package Pleasingly Pumpkin seasoning

FILLING

1 pint heavy whipping cream

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

4 cups chicken broth

4 eggs

1 cup pumpkin puree (see recipe below)

2 cups sugar

1 package Bleached Blonde Chili Mix

2 cups pumpkin puree (15 oz canned pumpkin)

Pleasingly Pumpkin seasoning, stir together and

1 rotisserie chicken, shredded

1 cup butter, softened

place in refrigerator for 1 hour. Beat the whipping

2 cans northern beans

3 1/2 cups flour

cream mixture until stiff. Place mixture in center of

1 can Rotel tomatoes

2 teaspoons baking soda

Bundt Cake or place a dollop on each slice of cake

2 teaspoons cinnamon

when serving.

DIRECTIONS:

1 teaspoon nutmeg

Over medium heat in large soup pot, combine

1/2 teaspoon salt

DIRECTIONS: Pour whipping cream into a small bowl and add

STOVETOP TOASTED PUMPKIN SEEDS

chicken broth and pumpkin puree. Stir in chili sea-

1/2 teaspoon powdered ginger

soning. Add chicken, beans and tomatoes. Cook

1/4 teaspoon cloves

for 10 minutes uncovered. Reduce heat, cover and

1 1/2 cups dark chocolate chips

INGREDIENTS:

allow to simmer for 30-45 minutes. Serve with a

1 1/2 cups pecans (chopped)

Seeds from 1 large pumpkin (about 1 cup),

dollop of sour cream, chives and shredded cheddar cheese.

rinsed, drained and pulp removed. DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 375°. In a large bowl, combine

ROASTED PUMPKIN PUREE

Seasoning of your choice. (I suggest Sprout’s Spicy Seasoning or Ely’s Seasoning but salt, garlic

cream eggs, sugar, pumpkin, and butter. In another

powder, onion powder, or cayenne pepper are

INGREDIENTS:

large bowl, sift flour, baking soda, cinnamon, nut-

great too)

1 large pumpkin

meg, salt, ginger, and cloves. Add to egg mixture

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 325º. Slice the pumpkin in half

and stir until combined. Fold in chocolate chips

DIRECTIONS:

and pecans.

Allow pumpkin seeds to dry overnight on a single

Pour mixture into large heavy cast Bundt Pan.

layer of a cookie sheet.

and place rind side down on lined cookie sheet.

Bake 50 to 60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted

Remove seeds and pulp. Cover each half with foil.

in the middle comes out clean. Remove from oven

fer into a seasoned cast iron skillet (dry) over medi-

Bake for 1 hour, or until tender. Scrape pumpkin

and cool completely before adding pumpkin cream

um heat pumpkin seeds. Shake and stir the seeds

from shell halves and puree in a blender. Puree

mousse.

constantly as they are toasting to prevent burning.

may be used to thicken sauces or in soups. Puree can be frozen for later use.

Toss dry seeds with desired seasoning and trans-

When the pumpkin seeds begin to release toasted aroma, pop-open or turn golden they are done. Remove promptly from skillet and allow to cool before storing in an airtight container.

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an advertising supplement 40

AJ’S SEAFOOD GRILLE 361 Township Ave., Ridgeland, 601-856-2844 Web site: www.ajsgrille.com Type: Seafood and steaks. Atmosphere: upbeat and casual Open seven days a week, lunch & dinner; Sunday brunch Reservations accepted Popular menu items include tres leches, a South American dessert; seafood gumbo; seared crab cakes; redfish with creamy crabmeat sauce; and seafood pasta. ALADDIN MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 730 W. Lakeland Dr., Jackson, 601-366-3613; 601-366-6033 163 Ridge Way, Flowood 601-992-7339 Hours: Sunday - Thursday, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Type: Mediterranean Aladdin offers a mix of Mediterranean cuisine featuring chicken, beef and lamb kabobs. AMERIGO 6592 Old Canton Rd., Jackson, 601-9770563 Type: Contemporary Italian Amerigo has a varied lunch and dinner menu including traditional appetizers, soups, salads, pizzas, pastas and entrees.

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ANOTHER BROKEN EGG 1000 Highland Colony Pkwy Suite 1009 Ridgeland, 601-790-9170 Type: Breakfast/Brunch; Lunch

BIG D’S BAR-B-Q 1153 Main Street, Pocahontas, 601-3667489 Type: Traditional Barbecue

APPLEBEE’S 2389 Lakeland Dr., 601-939-4060 900 E. County Line Rd., 601-957-7632; 124 Grandview Blvd., Madison, 601-6052652 Type: Sandwiches, American Sandwiches, steak, ribs and those types of things.

BIAGGI’S RISTORANTE ITALIANO 970 Highland Colony Pkwy. Ridgeland, 601-982-9295 Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Type: Italian Atmosphere: casual dining Reservations accepted Signature dishes include shrimp and crab cannelloni; ziti al forno; fettuccini with lobster; shrimp oreganata; lobster and shrimp roughy.

BABALU 622 Duling, Duling School, 601-366-5757 Type: Tacos and Tapas Famous for tableside prepared guacamole; family friendly. BACK YARD BURGERS 6230 Old Canton Road, 601-957-3790 2601 North State Street, 601-362-5223 1863 Main St., Madison, 601-856-1449 Type: Fast Food Charbroiled burgers, blackened chicken, spicy fries, chili cheese dog. BEAGLE BAGEL 4500 I-55N. Suite 145, Highland Village; 769-251-1892; 898 Avery Blvd., Ridgeland, 39157, 601-956-1773; 100 Mansdale Park Dr., Ste. 2 Madison Type: Lunch Fare, Sandwiches, Bagels Web-site: www.beaglebagelcafe.net Bagels aren’t all they have, they have party trays, pastries and are known for chicken salad. BASIL’S 2904 North State St., Jackson, 601-9822100 Type: sandwiches, salads, soups 904 E. Fortification St., Jackson; 601353-2002 Type: steaks and seafood BEEF O’ BRADY’S 111 Colony Crossing, Ste. 130, Madison, 601-607-3171 Type: Family sports pub

BILL’S GREEK TAVERN 4760 McWillie Dr. - Jackson, 601-9829295 Hours: Monday - Friday 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., 5 to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 5 - 9 p.m. Type: Greek Fish, burger and steak restaurant. BON AMI 1220 East Northside Dr., Jackson, 601982-0405 Hours: 7 days a week, breakfast, brunch (Saturday and Sunday), lunch, dinner Reservations accepted, but not required. Type: Southern Louisiana flair Atmosphere: French bistro Popular menu items include the fish du jour; tilapia almondine; and grilled tuna Provencal. Sunday brunch features Eggs Benedict, Eggs Sardou, beef tenderloin grillades and grits, and an assortment of quiches. BONEFISH GRILL 201 Colony Way, Madison, 601-607-3334 Type: Seafood Bonefish specializes in market fresh fish grilled over an oak-burning grill. BONSAI JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE 1925 Lakeland Dr., Jackson, 601-9810606 Type: Japanese Steak House


BRAVO ITALIAN RESTAURANT & BAR 244 Highland Village, Jackson, 601-9828111 Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 11:30 a.m. 10 p.m.; Sunday, 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Type: Nouveau Italian Web site: www.bravobuzz.com Atmosphere: open, inviting, intimate, lively, exposed kitchen with wood-fired oven at the center of the restaurant. Reservations are not accepted House Specialties: Bruschetta, Polenta, Wood-fired Pizzas, Crab-Crusted Fish, Caramelized Banana Creme Brulee. BRENT’S DRUGS 655 Duling Ave., Jackson, 601-366-3427 Hours: Monday - Friday, 6:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Type: Breakfast, Ice Cream Sodas, Lunch Popular menu choices include Brent’s burger; chocolate shakes; egg and olive sandwich; pimento cheese sandwich; lemonade.

BULLY’S 3118 Livingston Rd., 601-362-0484 Type: Soul Food Soul food featuring hamhocks, turnip greens and cornbread. THE BULLDOG 6111 Ridgewood Rd., 601-978-3502 Type: Sports pub Web-site: www.bulldog-jackson.draftfreak.com CAPITAL CLUB 125 S. Congress St. - Jackson, 601-9697101 Type: Traditional American

CHAR 4500 I-55 N, 142 Highland Village, Jackson, 601-956-9562 Type: Steak and fresh fish Web site: www.charrestaurant.com Atmosphere: warm Chicago style steak house Hours: 11 a.m. daily, 10 a.m. Sunday brunch; Reservations accepted Menu favorites include daily lunch specials; sin city bbq shrimp; cowboy bone-in ribeye steak; Long Island duck; apple butter crunch cake. CHEROKEE INN 1410 Old Square Rd. - Jackson, 601-3626388 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Type: Bar Food Burgers, onion rings, fries.

CHILI’S GRILL & BAR 475 Briarwood Dr., Jackson, 601-9577090; 1893 Main St., Madison, 601-8536102 Type: Bar Food, Eclectic CHIMNEYVILLE BBQ SMOKE HOUSE 970 High Street, Jackson, 601-354-7090 Web site: www.chimneyville.com Type: Barbecue COCK OF THE WALK 141 Madison Landing Cir., Ridgeland, 601-856-5500 Type: Catfish, Southern Signature item - fried catfish filets served with fries, cole slaw, hushpuppies, marinated onions and skillet bread COOL WATER CAFE 1011 Lake Harbour., Ridgeland, 601-956-6332 Open Daily, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Type: sandwiches, wraps, salad bar, burgers COZUMEL MEXICAN RESTAURANT 823 South Wheatley, 601-991-0577 Type: Tex Mex CRACKER BARREL 6020 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-977-1055 Type: American, Southern CRAWFISH HUT 6956 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601956-3474 Type: Seasonal crawfish CRAZY CAT BAKERS Highland Village, Suite 173, 601-3627448 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; lunch served 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.; Early Bird Dinner, Wednesday-Friday from 5-8 p.m. Type: Gourmet Sandwiches and Specialty Desserts Customers’ favorites include the Pimento and Cheese made with smoked Gouda, Vermont white cheddar and Parmesan cheeses, the caramelized Vidalia onion BLT, grilled cheese made with melted Brie and strawberry preserves, and the Meatloaf Panini plus any of the daily quiches.

october 2011

an advertising supplement

BROAD STREET BAKING COMPANY 101 Banner Hall, Jackson, 601-362-2900 Hours: Monday - Thursday, 7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Sunday, 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. Type: Salads, Fresh Breads, Sandwiches Web site: www.broadstbakerv.com. Best Bets: Breakfast and breakfast pastries, award winning coffee, any of the sandwiches (especially on focaccia bread).

CERAMI’S ITALIAN 5417 Lakeland Dr., Ste I, 601-919-2829 Type: Southern Italian Web site: ceramis.net Atmosphere: casual Hours: Lunch: Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Dinner: Tuesday-Thursday, 5-9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5 - 10 p.m. Menu favorites include cannelloni Forentine, Cajun pasta, eggplant parmesan, lasagna, tiramisu.

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CRECHALE’S 3107 Highway 80 West, Jackson, 601355-1840 Hours: Monday - Sunday, 4 to 9:45 p.m. Type: Seafood and steaks CS’S 1359 1/2 NW Street - Jackson, 601-9699482 Type: Burgers and Sandwiches

an advertising supplement

CUPS 2757 Old Canton Road, 601-362-7422 1855 Lakeland Dr., 601-981-9088 971 Madison Ave., 601-607-7094 Type: Snacks, Coffee, Sandwiches

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ELITE RESTAURANT 141 East Capitol Street, Jackson, 601352-5606 Hours: Monday - Friday, 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Saturday, 5 to 9:30 p.m. Type: Southern Elite is famous for house made yeast rolls served hot. Specialties are veal cutlets, lightly breaded and fried; chicken fried steak; calf liver; hamburger steak; enchiladas; charbroiled steaks; broiled snapper and redfish served with lemon butter sauce; jumbo fried shrimp with homemade remoulade sauce; and fried oysters.

Type: Irish, Pub Food Authentic Irish dishes, such as Irish Stew and Shepherd’s Pie.

ELY’S RESTAURANT & BAR 115 W. Jackson St., Suite E, Ridgeland, 601-605-6359 Type: American fine dining Hours: Monday through Saturday, 4:30 to 10 p.m. Reservations accepted Signature dishes: Bone-in filet; stuffed flounder; gorgo-asiago mac and cheese; jumbo scallops and shrimp; chocolate cashew pie.

FIVE GUYS 1000 Highland Colony Pkwy, Suite 2001, Renaissance; 601-605-1115 Type: Hamburgers and Fries

THE EMPRESS 6720 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601977-6279 Type: Gourmet Chinese.

DING HOW 5350 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-956-1717 Type: Chinese Classic Chinese food. EDO 5834 Ridgewood Road, 601-899-8518 Type: Sushi EL CHARRO AUTHENTIC MEXICAN 2086 Lakeland Dr., Jackson, 601-3624447 136 South Pearson Road, Pearl, 601-9363500 721 Highway 49S, Richland, 601-9325774 Type: Tex Mex EL RANCHERO 2741 Old Canton Road, 601-982-0809 Type: Tex Mex

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FERNANDO’S 1149 Old Fannin Rd., 601-992-6686 Type: Mexican FITZGERALD’S MARTINI BAR & GRILL 1001 E. County Line Rd., Jackson, 601957-2800 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 6:30 a.m. - 1 a.m.; Sunday, 6:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. Type: Contemporary American

FRANCO’S 900 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland, 601-991-3111 Type: Italian Hours: Monday - Friday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Thursday, 5-9 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5-10 p.m. The Ridgeland location specializes in pasta, steak and seafood and five varieties of veal.

FAT TUESDAY’S 6923 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 769216-3579 Type: Po-boys, New Orleans This neighborhood pub offers po-boys and a Friday fish special. FATSUMO 3100 N. State St., Fondren, 601-956-2971 Hours: Tuesday-Thursday, lunch 11 a.m.2:30 p.m.; Monday-Thursday dinner 5 - 10 p.m.; Friday all day; and Saturday, 11 a.m. until. Type: American-style sushi Sushi restaurant offering a full bar. FENIAN’S PUB 901 E. Fortification, Jackson, 601-9481195 Hours: Open Weekdays, 11-2 a.m.; Saturday, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m.Midnight.

FRATESI’S ITALIAN FOODS 910 Lake Harbour Dr., Ridgeland, 601956-2929 Type: Classic Italian A popular entree is the eggplant parmigiana. The signature salad dressing is a wet oil-and-vinegar.


an advertising supplement 44

Type: Southern Comfort food Stockyard Angus Filets and Ribeyes, Shrimp & Grits, Smoked Duck, Sweet Potato Risotto, Fried Green Tomatoes, Red Beans & Rice and more.

FULL HOUSE CHINESE RESTAURANT 587 Hwy. 51, Ridgeland, 601-898-0585 Type: Chinese GEORGIA BLUE 111 Colony Crossing Way, Madison, 601898-3330 Hours: Sunday-Wednesday, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Thursday- Saturday, 11 a.m. Midnight

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HAL AND MAL’S 200 S. Commerce St., Jackson, 601-9480888 Type: Mississippi Creole Southern Hours: Monday: 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; TuesdayFriday, 11-until; Saturday, 5-until. Reservations suggested Popular menu items include seafood gumbo, red beans and rice with sausage, fried catfish, open faced roast beef, poboys. HAMIL’S 751 Highway 51 in Madison, 601-8564407 Type: Soul Food, Barbecue HAUTE PIG 1856 Main St., Madison, 601-853-8538

Hours: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m., seven days; Web site: www.hautepig.com Type: Barbecue Atmosphere: casual Five top choices on menu include queenie’s chicken; ribs; pulled pork; chef salad; sandwich platter. HICKORY PIT 1491 Canton Mart Rd., Jackson, 601-9567079 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Atmosphere: Casual Type: Barbecue Pulled pork; ribs; smoked chicken; hamburgers; sandwich platters. HIGH NOON CAFE 2807 Old Canton Rd., Jackson, 601-3661602 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Type: Vegetarian


HOMER’S BARBECUE 1215 High St., Jackson, 601-355-4020 Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Thursday, Friday, 11 a.m. until. Reservations accepted. Type: Barbecue HUNTINGTONS GRILLE 1001 E. County Line Rd., Jackson, 601-957-1515 Monday - Thursday, 5 - 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday, 5 to 10:30 p.m. Reservations suggested. Type: Contemporary American Sushi grade tuna, wood fired redfish, and Atlantic salmon on a cedar plank, are fresh seafood favorites. ICHIBAN 359 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-919-8879 Type: Japanese JULEP RESTAURANT & BAR Highland Village/ 4500 I-55N, Suite 105, Jackson; 601-3621411 Web site: wwwjuleprestaurant.com Hours: Monday - Friday, 11 a.m.. - 10:30 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday late night menu until 1 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday brunch, 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Type: Contemporary Southern Cuisine Atmosphere: Casual Reservations accepted Top five menu items: shrimp toast; catfish taco; honey Rosemary fried chicken; fried green tomato Napoleon; shrimp & grits. KATHRYN’S 6800 Old Canton Road, Jackson, 601-956-2803 Type: Traditional Steak, Fish, Pasta Some of the dishes include stuffed red snapper, filet and fried shrimp and steaks. KEIFER’S 705 Poplar Blvd., Jackson, 601-355-6825 Hours: Sunday - Thursday, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Friday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Type: Mediterranean Specializing in pita wraps, Greek salads, soups and appetizers. KYOTO 6800 Old Canton Road, Jackson, 601-956-8268 Type: Japanese Steak House, Sushi LITTLE TOKYO/SAKURA BANA 4800 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-982-3035; 876 Avery Blvd., Ridgeland, 601-991-3800 Type: Sushi

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LOGAN FARMS 1220 E. Northside Dr., 601-366-4267 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Popular selections: fried pork chop, poboys, sandwiches, barbecue ribs, pulled pork. LONE STAR CAFE 6010 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-957-6026 Type: Bar Food, Steaks MAJESTIC BURGER 1491 Canton Mart Square, Jackson; 601899-8822 Web site: www.majesticburger.com Hours: Monday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Type: Casual dining Favorite dishes include burgers; sweet potato fries; grilled fish sandwich; grilled chicken sandwich; Amy’s favorite salad.

an advertising supplement

MANCHU WOK 4659 McWillie Dr., Jackson, 601-3627972 Type: Chinese

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MARGARITAS 1625 E. County Line Road, 601-957-7672 Type: Tex Mex MARKET BITES 659 Duling Ave., 601-982-4005 Hours: Monday - Friday, 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Reservations accepted Type: Southern Tea Room Favorite dishes include the curry chicken salad, the salad sampler plate of chicken salad, fresh fruit salad and fried greens, the spicy southwestern ravioli, shrimp remoulade, vegetable lasagna and crawfish penne. MAYFLOWER 123 W. Capitol St., 601-355-4122 Hours: Monday - Friday, 11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., 4:30 - 10 p.m.; Saturday, 4:30 to 10 p.m. Type: Seafood/New Orleans Atmosphere: Retro No reservations; Beer offered; BYOB Fresh Gulf fish served in the traditional New Orleans manner; broiled shrimp and oysters; Greek salad with comeback dressing; fresh baked pies.

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MCALISTER’S 1240 East Northside Dr., Maywood Mart, 601-982-3883; 2129 Main Street, Madison, 601-8082515 1200 E. County Line Road, Suite 1530, 601-896-0007, Ridgeland 1065 River Oaks Dr., Flowood, 601-9396810 276 Dogwood Blvd., 601-919-2520, Flowood Type: Deli MCB’S 815 Lake Harbor Dr., Ridgeland, 601-9568362 Type: Burgers, Pub Food MEDITERRANEAN FISH AND GRILL 6550 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601956-0244 Hours: Lunch, Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.; Dinner, 4:30-9 p.m. Type: Mediterranean Atmosphere: Casual Accepts reservations Menu favorites include fish, kibi, kabobs, gyros. MELLOW MUSHROOM 295 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-9927499 THE MERMAID CAFE Lake Caroline, 601-605-8764 Web site: www.TheMermaidCafe.net Atmosphere: Casual MINT THE RESTAURANT 1000 Highland Colony Pkwy., Ste. 5002, Ridgeland, 601-898-6468 Web site: www.minttherestaurant.com Hours: Opens daily at 11 a.m. Type: Contemporary Southern Atmosphere: Casual fine dining Reservations accepted MONTE’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD 1855 Lakeland Dr., Ste. N-10, 601-3628182 Type: American NAGOYA 6351 I-55N, 601-977-8881; 111 Colony Crossing, Ste. 380, 601-856-5678, Madison Type: Sushi

NEWK’S 379 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-919-8303 4450 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-709-4990 733 Lake Harbour Dr., Ridgeland, 601707-0700 Web-Site: www.newks.com Type: casual dining Signature dishes include Debra Pizza, Q Sandwich, The Newk’s Salad. NICK’S 3000 Old Canton Road, Fondren., 601981-8017 Hours: Monday - Friday, 11 a.m. until; Saturday, 5 p.m. until Web site: www.nicksrestaurant.com Reservations accepted Atmosphere: Elegant Type: American-French-New Orleans Menu choices that rate among diners include paneed tilapia; Seared Duck Breast, Hereford Filet, Oysters Apostle, Crabcake Camille, Crab ‘N Brie Soup and the nightly specials. OEC JAPANESE EXPRESS 201 E. Layfair Dr., Suite 200, Flowood, 601-932-3588 Type: Japanese OLGA’S 4760 I-55N Frontage Rd.., 601-366-1366 Hours: Lunch, Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.; Dinner, 5:30 p.m.-til. Reservation accepted. Web-site: 111.olgasfinedinning.com The signature dish is Abramovich filet, hand cut, topped with sauteed crabmeat in white wine sauce, served with jumbo grilled shrimp and asparagus. OLD CAPITOL INN 226 North State Street, 601-359-9000 Type: American Contemporary Signature dishes include the inn’s “Down in Dixie Crab Cakes;” shrimp and grits; grilled tilapia topped with lemon and capers; crispy Asian shrimp salad; and crawfish etouffee. OLIVE GARDEN 6347-I-55 North, Jackson, 601-978-3407 Type: Contemporary Italian OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE 6030 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-977-9040 Type: Steaks, Bar Food, American


PARKER HOUSE 104 SE Madison Dr., Ridgeland, 601-8560043 Type: American Popular dishes include Crawfish Bisque or Oyster Mescalero. Entrees include a variety of fresh fish, hand-cut USDA Choice steaks, pork and nightly specials. PARLOR MARKET 116 W. Capitol St.; 601-360-0090 Type: Seasonal Southern The menu includes dishes designed

around products made in the Southeast and incorporates the ethnic cuisines of Mississippi. PASSAGE TO INDIA/RUCHI INDIA 5101 I-55 North, Jackson, 601-366-9680 Type: Indian PAUL ANTHONY’S MARKET 44500 I-55N, Ste 100., Jackson, 601-9817559 Web site: www.paulanthonymarket.com Type: Hot lunches, sandwiches, salads Hours: Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Atmosphere: market style with seating The beef brisket; special of day; smoked chicken; hamburger; and smoked turkey are popular. PEACH STREET CAFE 6392-B Ridgewood Court, Jackson , 601-899-8585 Type: American Breakfast, burgers, sandwiches.

PELICAN COVE GRILL 3999-A Harbor Walk Dr., Ridgeland, 601-605-1865 Type: American PENN’S FISH HOUSE 2085 Lakeland Dr., Jackson, 601-9829004 Hours: Monday, 11 .m. - 2 p.m.; Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Type: Catfish

an advertising supplement

PAN ASIA 720 Harbour Pointe Crossing, Ridgeland, 601-956-2686 Hours: 11 a.m. - 11 p.m., seven days a week Type: Asian - fusion Atmosphere: upscale Reservations accepted Signature entrees include yellow curry beef; miso-glazed sea bass; wok and noodle dishes; plus martinis and sushi.

Make the advertising scene in our next edition. To find out how call the Northside Sun at 601-957-1122 JULY 2010

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PICCADILLY CAFETERIA 4800 I-55 North Frontage Road, Jackson, 601-366-6802 Type: Southern, American Buffet THE PIGSKIN 500 Hwy. 51, Suite J, Ridgeland, 601988-1100 Hours: Monday - Friday, 11 .m. - 9 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Reservations accepted Type: Barbecue

an advertising supplement

PIZZA SHACK 1220 North State St., Jackson, 601-3522001 Type: Gourmet pizzas

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RO’CHEZ 204 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-5038244 Type: Fine dining ROBERT WALTHALL CLARION HOTEL 225 East Capitol Street, Jackson, 601948-6161 Type: Traditional American ROSSINI 1060 E. County Line Road, Jackson, 601899-9111 Type: Traditional Italian A sampling of menu items includes veal parmigiana; piccata marsala; veal oscar; lasagna a la forno.

PRIMOS CAFE 2323 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-9363398; 515 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-8983600 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Web site: www.primoscafe.com Type: Southern Creole Atmosphere: energetic Southern diner The five “must haves” on the menu include Creole seafood salad; reuben; prime rib; fudge cake; and buttermilk pancakes. QUE SERA 2801 N. State Street, Jackson, 601-9812520 Type: Po’boys, New Orleans, American Hamburgers and po’boys plus pastas, chicken and pork chops. RED LOBSTER 6357 I-55 N, Jackson,601-977-8884 Type: Seafood REMINGTON’S 5075 I-55N, 601-366-9411 Type: American They offer food from omelettes to prime rib. Appetizers are the soup du jour. Lots of sandwiches. Entrees are sirloin steak, grilled lemon mushroom chicken, grilled chicken pasta.

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The menu includes pizzas; grilled panini sandwiches; hamburgers; home-style pastas; ice cream scoop shop. SAL AND PHIL’S 6660 Old Canton Road, Jackson, 601957-1188 Type: New Orleans, Po’boys SCHLOTZSKY’S 2451 Lakeland Dr., Flowood, 601-9391449 Type: Sandwiches, American Pizzas and sandwiches. SCROOGE’S 5829 Ridgewood Road, 601-206-1211 Type: American SHAPLEY’S 868 Centre St., Ridgeland, 601-957-3753 Hours: Monday - Thursday, 5 to 9:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5 to 10 p.m. Reservations accepted Type: American The most popular appetizers are the crab claws marinated in Shapley’s own house salad dressing and their homemade hot tamales. The signature dish is steak.

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE 1000 Highland Colony Pkwy, Ste. 6001, 601-853-2734 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 5-10 p.m.; Sunday, 5 to 9 p.m. Reservations recommended Web site: www.ruthschris.com Type: Steakhouse Atmosphere: Upscale, contemporary American steakhouse Signature dishes include petite filet with crabmeat oscar; cowboy ribeye; filet; ahi tuna steak; sweet potato casserole. SAL & MOOKIE’S 565 Taylor St., Jackson; 601-368-1919 Hours: Tuesday - Thursday, 11 a.m. 9:30 p.m.; Friday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Web site: www.SalAndMookies.com Reservations accepted Type: American

SOPHIA’S RESTAURANT AT FAIRVIEW INN 734 Fairview - Jackson, 601-948-3429 Hours: Lunch, Monday - Friday, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Dinner, Tuesday - Thursday, 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.; Friday - Saturday, 5:30 -10 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Reservations recommended Web site: www.fairviewinn.com Type: American Southern Atmosphere: Romantic casual Top dishes include blackened Louisiana redfish; roast Australian rack of lamb; bayou crab cakes; Caesar Fairview; grilled filet mignon. SPICE AVENUE 4711 I-55N., Jackson, 601-982-0890 Type: Indian cuisine


SOULSHINE PIZZA FACTORY 1111 Highland Colony Pkwy, Ridgeland, 601-856-8646 l139 Old Fannin Road, Brandon and 5651 Hwy 25, Flowood Hours: Monday, Sunday, Tuesday, 11 a.m. 9 p.m.; Wednesday - Thursday, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Friday - Saturday 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Type: Pizza and sandwiches Handmade gourmet pizzas, calzones, sandwiches and salads. SPORTSMAN’S LODGE 1220 E. Northside Dr., Jackson, Maywood Mart Shopping Center; 601-366-5441 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 11 to 2 a.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Reservations accepted Type: American STONE PONY OYSTER BAR 116 Commercial Parkway, Canton, 601-859-9999 Type: Bar Food and Oyster Bar Popular with diners are Mookie’s Championship Pulled Pork Sandwich, burgers; and oysters on the half shell. STRAWBERRY CAFE 180 Main Street, Madison, 601-856-3822 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., 5 - 9 p.m. Type: American TABLE 100 100 Ridge Way, Flowood, 601-420-4202 Type: Euro-American Bistro Casual dining featuring a piano bar. THAI HOUSE 1405 Old Square Rd., Jackson, 601-982-9991 Hours: Monday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., 5 - 9 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.; 5 - 9:30 p.m.; Type: Thai Signature dishes include spring rolls, lightly seasoned cabbage wrapped in rice paper and fried to a golden crisp; Tom Kha Gai, a lemony coconut milk soup seasoned with lemongrass, galanga, chicken, and mushrooms; pad thai, a spicy, slightly sweet stir-fried rice noodles; Paht Meht Mamuang Himapahn, a stir-fry of chicken or shrimp in a sweet spicy sauce with cashews. TICO’S 1536 E County Line Road, Jackson, 601-956-1030 Type: Traditional Steak, Fish, Pasta

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an advertising supplement 50

TRACE GRILL 558 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601-8531014 TWO RIVERS Hwy. 22W I-55N Frontage Rd., Canton, 601-859-9999 Type: Steaks, Seafood Fresh snapper with a creamy rich sauce; soft shell crab; shrimp; and oysters lead the menu in popularity. TWO SISTERS 707 N. Congress, Jackson, 601-353-1180 Type: Traditional Southern UNDERGROUND 119 119 President St., Jackson, 601-352-2322 Type: Tapas VASILIOS 828 Hwy 51 N, Madison, 601-853-0028 Type: Greek, American

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WALKER’S 3016 N. State St., Jackson, 601-982-2633 Hours: Lunch, Monday - Friday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Dinner, Tuesday - Saturday, dinner, 5:30 - until; Web site: wwwwalkersdrivein.com Reservations recommended Type: New American The signature dishes include crispy fried lobster tostada, crisp corn tortilla tomato salas, house pickled jalapeno and a jicama slaw with mango couli and tomato vinaigrett; everything crusted number one tuna, sushi grade tuna on spicy cheese grits with a chipotle glaze topped with a tomato relish; Redfish Anna with lamp crabmeat; grilled nine ounce filet with bacon-cheddar mash, sauteed asparagus and crispy onions in a red wine sauce; and jumbo Georges Bank sea scallops, dry-packed on truffled hummus topped with a hearts of palm grape tomato, Kalamata olive and micro greens salad with a red pepper coulis and grilled pita.

WELLINGTON’S RESTAURANT 1001 E. County Line Rd., Jackson, 601957-2800 Hours: Monday - Friday 6 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Reservations accepted Type: American


AJ’s on the lake

BY

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JENNY WOODRUFF PHOTOGRAPHY

S SOON AS the redfish at AJ's on the Lake enters your mouth, your taste buds will begin to relish the flavor that the chef's seasoning brings to life. And to top it off, AJ's has now embraced the trend of fish tacos and has surpassed it with the combination of their divine redfish and in-house-made tortillas. But the food isn't the only thing that makes AJ's special, it's the atmosphere on which owners John and Lucy Taylor have placed great importance. Lucy, the "face" of the restaurant, goes the extra mile to make sure customers are enjoying their food and having a great time. On any given night, you can see her going from table to table to make sure food is cooked to perfection and that the people are having a wonderful experience. The combination of the delicious food and the ambiance of AJ's makes it the perfect spot for a first date, an anniversary dinner or even a girls night out. AJ's Grille actually opened in July of 1999 on County Line Road. John and Lucy named the restaurant after their two children, Alyssa and Johnny. Three years ago they moved the eatery to the Township at Colony Park. But the story of John and Lucy began many years before the restaurant opened.The two met at, of all places, the food court at Northpark Mall. John, originally from New Orleans, asked Lucy, a native of Colombia, South America, to pass the salt. "I stalked her all around the mall," John laughing-

BY

BETH BUCKLEY

ly remembers. "I asked her for her phone number and I was shocked when she gave it to me." For a solid week John called Lucy until she returned his phone call. Their first date took place at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, where

“I had a vision, I wanted a restaurant with a great

ATMOSPHERE, a huge patio, something beautiful.” - John Taylor John was shocked when Lucy was greeted by two famous Mississippians, Eudora Welty and Willie Morris, who both hugged her neck. "I thought ‘I'm with a famous person,’ " he said. The two were married a year later. october 2011

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AJ’s on the lake

cult going from 10 to 50 employees," said John, who admits they weren't prepared for the business. "Sales tripled when we moved here," he said. "It was a huge undertaking." But today, the restaurant continues to grow. Especially now that they cater for The Club next door. "I think what makes us special is that we treat our servers like family," Lucy said. "We try to make it special." THEIR FAVORITE STORY is the first year they opened at Township, the first lady of Mississippi came to a birthday lunch with her friends and liked the food so much that she brought the governor back the very next day. Lucy believes it's the fresh quality and the AJ's seasoning that makes their food so unique. The Taylors also love to change up their menu. They get ideas from traveling to other restaurants throughout the country. Their favorite restaurants are in New Orleans.

LUCY GOT HER START here in Jackson in 1987 when she moved from Miami and started working at a local restaurant. She knew no English and worked at Bill's Greek Tavern where she learned the language. John, who is a graduate of Louisiana State University, also owns Taylor Industries. John decided to open AJ's because Lucy's brother was traveling a good bit and they wanted him home. "There was a bankrupt Chinese restaurant I decided to buy and I remember Lucy thought it was so dumb," he said. Lucy's brother was a great cook.There weren't too many seafood restaurants in town so John decided to go in that direction. “We opened with 12 tables. The location on County Line Road was such that expansion was limited.” It was a short time after opening on County Line that Lucy decided to take over to John’s relief. "Lucy knew everybody," he said. "She is wonderful with people and everybody loves her. It was just perfect that she would take over." For nine years, the restaurant thrived on County Line Road. However, County Line became so congested during the Christmas season, the restaurant would actually lose their customer base for a couple of months out of the year. When someone approached the Taylors about moving to Township at Colony Park, they were interested. "I had a vision," John said. "I wanted a restaurant with a great atmosphere, a huge patio, something beautiful." Lucy brought that vision to life with the new restaurant. She picked out the colors and decorated the entire place. "It's so much bigger, we have a real bar, an outdoor patio and a raised dining room," Lucy said. "It's absolutely beautiful at night." And now with the addition of Chef Carlos, who moved from Napa Valley over a year ago to work at AJ's, the food continues to be superb. The move transition though hasn't always perfect. "It was very diffi-

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Favorite AJ’s recipes....

AJ's Green Tomato Sandwich 1 cup flour 4 eggs 1/2 cup buttermilk 2 T chopped Cilantro 2 cups bread crumbs Salt and pepper 8 slices applewood smoked bacon cooked 16 slices Chevre cheese 2 T Dijon mustard 2 T honey 1/2 cup mayonnaise 4 each Kaiser rolls (or Po Boy bread) 4 ounces spinach leaves 1 each red onion shaved thin Mix mustard, honey and mayonnaise together and set aside. Combine crumbs and herbs together. Whip eggs and buttermilk. Dust both sides of tomatoes with salt, pepper and flour. Dip dusted tomato in egg wash and drain. Coat tomatoes in bread crumbs completely. Deep fry tomatoes in 350-degree oil until crisp. Drain. To assemble: Place cheese under broiler. Top with two slices of bacon. 1 tablespoon of honeymustard-mayonnaise mixture on a roll. Top with spinach leaves and red onion. Place on bun and cut in half.

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Cajun Crawfish Risotto Ingredients: 3 oz Crawfish 3 oz Roasted bell peppers Green onions 1/4 cup Tomatoes 2 T White wine AJ’s seasoning or salt and pepper to taste 1/2 cup Heavy cream 1 t Minced garlic 3/4 cup Arborio rice 1/4 cup Corn cream 3 T Butter 1/2 cup Veggie stock 2 T Ketchup 2 t Cajun seasoning 1 oz Parmesan cheese For the corn cream 1/4 cup Onions 1/2 cup Corn 1 t Garlic 1/2 cup Veggie stock 1/2 cup Cream 2 T butter For the corn cream Saute vegetables in a sauce pan with butter until

onions are translucent and garlic is golden brown, then add veggie stock and cream. Reduce, puree, and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook Arborio rice until it is al dente. In a separate sauce pan sauté onions, garlic, tomatoes, roasted bell peppers, seasoning and crawfish with one Tbs of butter until they get caramelized then deglaze with white wine until alcohol evaporates and add veggie stock with rice and cream. Reduce until it is thick, then add remaining butter. Add salt and pepper to taste and cheese. Serve on a warm bowl and drizzle with corn cream sauce.

Crabmeat Dip Ingredients: 3 lb Cream cheese 1/3 cup Milk 1 t White pepper 1 1/2 T Salt 1 t Horseradish 3/4 cup, fine Onions 2 lbs. Crabmeat 1/2 cup Almonds Pita chips or flat bread 1. Gather all ingredients 2. Mix together all but almonds and crab in mixer. 3. Potion 2 oz of crabmeat in crabmeat ramekins 4. Cover crab with cream cheese mixture 5. Lightly top with almonds. 6. Bake in convection oven for 25 minutes at 275 degrees


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Title: Bartender How long have you been at your current restaurant? I have worked at Ruth's Chris for one year and seven months. What is your favorite part of the job? My favorite part of the job is that I enjoy making people happy with great food and great service. What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? I won employee of the year for 2010 at Ruth's Chris. What was your biggest tip? My biggest tip was $373. Why the restaurant business? It is just an exciting business and something different to look forward to every day. If you could choose another career, what would it be? Well, I've always enjoyed working on cars inside and out.

photo by David Johnston

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Title: Manager How long have you been at your current restaurant? I've been here 25 years. What is your favorite part of the job? I have so many but I'll choose: meeting and greeting our customers and seeing that pleased “SMILE” when they've finished a delicious meal and return again. What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? I would say, learning about the history of Primos and listening to childhood stories from some of our frequent customers and long term employees. What was your biggest tip? Following the advice given to me through the years from Don - “Be nice and always SMILE!” Why the restaurant business? I grew up in south Mississippi (Centreville) watching my family cook different dishes for family and friends and grew a passion for cooking and serving others. If you could choose another career, what would it be? Law enforcement with concentration in Youth Court which is what I studied at Jackson State University.

photo by Jenny Woodruff

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Title: Queen of Nick’s How long have you been at your current restaurant? 22 years What is your favorite part of the job? My favorite part of the job is seeing my customers return again and again. We become like a family sharing with one another. Many of my customers have my personal e-mail and phone number. I love to hear from them and see them. What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? I have customers I dearly love: The number is too numerous to list, but they know who they are. They are on my Christmas card list. Now that is another story... I guess the interesting thing was about six or seven years ago when I went to pick up Nick's Best of Jackson Award at the Jackson Free Press party. I walked up to receive it and Donna Ladd said, "You're Janis..we don't have a category for Best Server yet, but people keep writing in your name." What was your biggest tip? My largest tip was from a single man, I still remember, he ate lamb chops and sat at table 10. He tipped me $600. I jumped on the ottoman in the bar like it was a trampoline and it cracked. He was from Atlanta and I think he may have been an angel. One week after that I had an unexpected $600 expense. I Googled him and sent him a thank you card. I have never seen him again. Why the restaurant business? I have a degree from the University of Arkansas in education. I was a librarian and publications advisor for 12 years. I have been a server since I was 19. Even when I taught I worked in a restaurant. I love my customers and have a blast with the staff. I try to stay involved in my community, Fondren. If you could choose another career, what would it be? If I could not wait another table, I would work in the exercise industry full time. I have taught Body Pump at The Courthouse for 10 years. It would be nice to work for a non profit. My love is promotion and fund-raising. Projects keep me going. I panic when I get to the end of a project and start looking for another. As far as people are concerned and my people talents, I remember something Mr. Broome, a photographer from the Clarion Ledger, said when he spoke to my photographers at Hillcrest. "Everyone has a gift you just have to be patient and wait for it." I can feel frumpy, sad or mad, and my customers can just light up my day and wash the blues away. If I have one person to thank it has to be my hero, Nick Apostle. I had to convince him to keep me 22 years ago, because I was teaching school and he didn't allow part-time help. He took a chance on me. Oh yes, there is Aven Bilbo who hired me to work at Primos Northgate in 1988 and then took me to Nick's. Love my Primos, especially Mr. Kenneth. Mr. Kenneth wrote when I received the waitress award in the Clarion Ledger years ago, "There must be a mistake, but congratulations anyway." photo by Rachel Kabukala

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Title: Manager-Chef How long have you been at your current restaurant? We opened the restaurant in April 2000. Started work in 1998 with Jim. What is your favorite part of the job? I love cooking!! I also enjoy the people, those I work with as well as all the customers. What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? Jim and I were delivering a wedding cake to the University Club and the city of Jackson was having a bike race. They were circling Capitol Street and Amite Street and we had to park on the other side of the street and run each tier of cake over, wait for bicyclers to pass and run back. It was a five tier cake, needless to say, it was a little stressful but also very comical.

photo by Rachel Kabukala

What was your biggest tip? Never dread anything, always try to make whatever you are doing fun. Why the restaurant business? It was something Jim always wanted to do, open a restaurant, and working for him and with him has been a joy. As I said earlier I love cooking and working with people and that goes with the business. If you could choose another career, what would it be? I don't want to think about doing anything else as a career, but one of my joys in life is working with the Center for Domestic Violence. I enjoy helping others.

Title: Bartender How long have you been at your current restaurant? It will be six years in October. What is your favorite part of the job? My favorite part of my job would have to be the people I interact with and get to meet every day, whether it be the people I work with or the ones I wait on. There are so many fabulous individuals in this town and I am proud to have the opportunity to get to know as many as I have.

What was your biggest tip? I can say that my best tip was advice by a very smart man. He told me that no matter how hard you try, you cannot make everyone happy. The best that you can do is make yourself happy and hope that they see that and strive to do that for themselves. Why the restaurant business? I was young and knew a lot of people in the industry who recommended the job. They thought I would succeed based on my personality and my energy level. I like to think they are right and that I have succeeded. If you could choose another career, what would it be? I have actually already begun to pursue another career. If my plans go well, I should be well on my way in the medical field soon.

photo by Rachel Kabukala

What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? Well, every day winds up being an interesting day, but my favorites were the days of the Sweet Potato Queens before the St. Paddy's Day Parade. Having women from all over the world come together in Bravo! to share one joyous experience and get dressed up to celebrate life and friendship is truly an interesting day.

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Title: Manager How long have you been at your current restaurant? I have been at Kristos since before they opened, two years ago this September. Before that I worked for Chili's as a bartender for a few years. What is your favorite part of the job? I love the unpredictable side of the job. No day is the same as another. Every problem is different. New customers all the time. You can try, but it is almost impossible to control a restaurant. Something can always disturb the flow. What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? I was bar tending during St. Patrick's Day parade years ago and it started raining. Two ladies came into the bar I was working at because of the inclimate weather. They ordered some food and started asking for shots. A few hours later they needed a cab. While they were waiting for the cab one lady went to the bathroom. The other one gave me a credit card. She paid the hundred dollar tab and tipped me $25. After they left I went to clean the table and there was $125 in cash on the table. The lady that went to the bathroom didn't realize her friend had already paid the tab. The next day one of them called to ask what happened and when I explained all the lady could say was I made good shots and to have a good day. What was your biggest tip? Percentage wise the story above and at Christmas I was given a $100 bill on a $40 ticket from a husband and wife. I went back to the table and showed the lady thinking she made a mistake and she told me she could read. Not much you can say other than thank you at that point. Why the restaurant business? I started waiting tables when I was $19. I have worked on cars, air conditioning systems, cell phone towers and a few other things. For the time, money and entertainment, I have always come back to the restaurant business. If you could choose another career, what would it be? A pilot because my father was one. But, I am probably going to get my private license instead of trying to make a living flying planes. I love playing the guitar and singing, but realistically who ever makes it as a rock star. A lot of pipe dreams. Race car driver, baseball player, who doesn't want to be in the movies. I would like to invent things one day. Stuff people use on a daily basis to make their lives easier. But, for now I like what I am doing. photo by David Johnston

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Title: General Manager How long have you been at your current restaurant? Nine years What is your favorite part of the job? So I know it is totally cliche, but the customers. We have the best people that come in and it is a pleasure to serve them. I love to go to work. There is a lot to be said if you enjoy your job. What is the most interesting thing that has ever happened to you? Not at Walker's, but at a different restaurant, I had to perform the Heimlich maneuver on a man. At Walker's, I have had the pleasure of meeting several celebrities such as Emeril and Octavia Spencer. One of the coolest was Denis O'Hare. I am a big True Blood fan and was thrilled to meet him. What was your biggest tip? I once gave myself a $1000 tip, total mistake. Thank goodness the customers were understanding when they called back. Why the restaurant business? My parents were in the business and I have been drawn to it since I was little. I have tried other jobs but this is what I like to do the most. If you could choose another career, what would it be? I would love to be an artist, I admire people who can look a blank canvas and make something beautiful.

photo by Rachel Kabukala

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the northside sun magazine our wedding policy IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

F O R C OV E R I N G W E D D I N G S & E N GAG E M E N T A N N O U N C E M E N T S

E Please type, double space, your article in story format. No forms are used by the Sun. All write-ups should be submitted by the first day of the month for the following month’s publication. Please include photos. At least one photo will be featured with each wedding and engagement announcement. More will be used as space permits. If a stamped, self-addressed envelope is enclosed, every effort will be made to return photos. Please include a daytime phone number on all releases. Payment is due with submission. Wedding announcements are $150 and are full page. Engagement announcements are a half page for $90. Mail to Northside Sun Magazine, P.O. Box 16709, Jackson, 39236; or e-mail to jimmye@northsidesun.com. Deliveries are also accepted at our office at 246 Briarwood Dr. For more information,

call 601.957.1123.

The Sun accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs.

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Anna Catherine Purvis , Andrew Davis Frame A

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Davis Frame

June 18, 2011 Tucker Plantation Colbert, Georgia

nna Catherine Purvis and Andrew Davis Frame were united in marriage at 6 p.m. June 18 at Tucker Plantation in Colbert, Ga., close to Athens. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. John Milton Martin III of Macon, formerly an assistant minister at Northminster Baptist Church. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Purvis. She is the granddaughter of Janet Mitchell Purvis and the late Dr. George D. Purvis Jr. of Jackson, and Ruth Glidewell Ballard and the late Richard Oren Ballard of Randolph, Tenn. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Sullivan Frame Sr. of Savannah. He is the grandson of Edith Ragans Davis and the late Dr. James Aubrey Davis of Madison, Fla., and Dr. Eugene Martin Frame Sr. and the late LaRue Sullivan Frame of Jacksonville. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a gown of ivory tiered French Alencon lace over Italian silk satin with delicate ribbon embroidered bodice. The ivory satin sash was secured with a vintage pearl brooch. Her hand tied bouquet made of esperance, ambiance, and garden roses as well as peonies, hydrangea, and freesia was secured by a hand embroidered handkerchief belonging to her great-grandmother Purvis. Attending the bride as matron of honor was Abby Coker Lechthaler of South Londonderry, Vt. Bridesmaids were Margaret Cagle Jones of Macon, and Virginia Cole Stanley of Mt. Pleasant, S.C. Their strapless dresses of matisse blue were enhanced with vintage brooches, a gift from the bride. Flower girl was Catherine Ballard Purvis of Jackson, niece of the bride. She wore an ivory silk chiffon dress with lace inserts. Attached on the bodice was an antique gold and cameo pin which had belonged to her great-greatgreat-grandmother Mitchell. Readers were Mary Largent Purvis of Jackson and Emy Watson Vernier of Nashville. The guest registry was attended by Mary Mitchell Purvis of Washington, D.C. Greeters were Taylor Morse Davis of Jackson; Susan Blair Leake of Washington, D.C.; Katy Morgan Neely Pulvere of Birmingham; Rita Roxanne Rollins of Chicago; and Cameron Egan Seward of New York. The bride’s proxy was Samma Faye Harper Bromley of Knoxville. The bridegroom’s father was best man. Groomsmen were John Alexander Purvis of Jackson, and Spencer Ballard Purvis of Golden, Colo., brothers of the bride. Ringbearer was John Largent Purvis of Jackson, nephew of the bride. Seating guests were Zachary Brendel of Athens, Ga.; James Catts of Charleston; Tripp Collins of Gadsden, Ala.; Adam Cone of Birmingham; Knox Gale of Decatur, Ga.; and Sam Rodgers of Ketchum, Ind. A luncheon for the bride, bridesmaids, close friends and family was held on June 17 in an antebellum house at The Hill in Athens, which was home to the bride’s family for the week. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the bridegroom’s parents on Friday night at Farm 255 in Athens. Local, organic cuisine harvested at the restaurant’s own farm was served to guests. The dinner was followed by a meet and greet with drinks and live music at Farm 255 hosted by family friends of the bridegroom. Wedding guests were invited for brunch and bocce at The Hill on Saturday morning which was hosted by friends and family of the bride. Following a wedding trip to Watercolor, Fla., the couple is at home in Jackson. october 2011

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Rachel Kay Iupe , Austin Patrick Cooley R

Mr. and Mrs. Austin Patrick Cooley

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December 11, 2010 First Baptist Church Madison, Mississippi

achel Kay Iupe and Austin Patrick Cooley were united in marriage the evening of December 11 at First Baptist Church Madison. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Iupe Jr. of Madison. She is the granddaughter of Kay Foshee of Madison and the late Edward Foshee Jr., and Jeane Iupe of Canton and the late Joe Iupe Sr. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Cooley of Ellisville. He is the grandson of Patricia Cooley of Ellisville and the late Simeon Cooley, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hardee of Ellisville. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Tommy Arinder and the Rev. Eric Estes, the bridegroom’s cousin. Vocalists were Maggie Iupe, Lauren Iupe, and Ladell Newell. Guests were greeted by program and registry attendants who were cousins of the bride and nieces of the bridegroom: Darby Cooley, Delaney Cooley, Elizabeth Foshee, Lauren Foshee, Claire Iupe, Elizabeth Lucas, and Dallas McKinnon. The bride’s proxy was Maribeth Willoughby. Escorted by her father, the bride wore a designer gown of ivory silk taffeta. It was fashioned with a strapless sweetheart neckline detailed with crystals, pearls and mirror beads, and closed in the back with covered buttons. From the shirred dropped waistline fell the full A-line skirt and chapel train encircled with bands of beading and ruched ruffles edged in silver. With her gown she wore a long cape cut corded edged veil of illusion. The bride carried a bouquet of white roses. She also wore a pearl bracelet and added a diamond broach to the lining of her gown each provided by her mother. Attending the bride as matron of honor was Courtney Jones. Maid of honor was Lori Brooks. Bridesmaids were Avery Carlisle, Sarah Compton, Laurel Donahoo, Jessica Holmes, Sarah Kendrick, Mary Katherine Lombardi, Elizabeth McCraw, Mallory Rosamond, Allyn Self, and Claire Winchester. They wore strapless dresses of black chiffon with pleated satin cummerbund sashes and long softly gathered skirts. They carried bouquets of red roses and amaryllis. The bridegroom’s father was best man. Groomsmen were Elliot Burch, Benji Cooley, Brett Cooley, Brent Culpepper, Andrew Iupe, Joseph Iupe, Matt Kendrick, Nick Laviano, Kevin Martin, Michael Welch, and Justin Woodyear. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at Colonial Country Club. Guests danced to the music of Meet the Press while enjoying a buffet dinner. The bride’s cake was a four-tiered ivory cake decorated with red roses and amaryllis. The bridegroom’s cake was a red velvet cake with a Mississippi State theme. “Dog bone” sugar cookies from the bakery at Mississippi State also adorned the bridegroom’s table. Miniature cowbells were given to the guests to ring as the happy couple left the reception. On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at the Country Club of Canton. A bridesmaids brunch was held the morning of the wedding in the home of Terri Iupe and was hosted by the bride’s aunts. After a wedding trip to St. Lucia, the couple lives in Mobile.


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Elizabeth Lea Thomas , Christopher Lee Bowers E

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Lee Bowers

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June 25, 2011 St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church Oxford, Mississippi

lizabeth Lea Thomas and Christopher Lee Bowers were united in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony in a nuptial mass on the evening of June 25 at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Oxford. The bride is the daughter or Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Frank Thomas Jr. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Randal Lee Bowers of Shreveport. Officiating the nuptial mass was Father Joe Tonos. Music was presented by Melody Carol Eubank, soloist; Ann Boswell Johnson, cantor; Charles F. Miles, musician; and Betty B. Harness, organist. Readers of the sacred Scripture were Collins Woodbury Johnson and Katherine Hallene Reed. Escorted by her father, the bride wore a gown of candlelight of embellished ribbon lace over satin, adorned with seed beads, sequins and bugle beads. The slim silhouette featured a bodice with a sweetheart neckline closed in the back with covered buttons. From the waistline fell a trumpet skirt, flowing into a circular train. The fingertip veil was edged with appliqué adorned with pearled beading and sequins. The bride carried a rosary with her bouquet that belonged to her father. The bride’s bouquet was hydrangea, roses, peonies hand wrapped with candlelight ribbon. Mary Kathryn Thomas of Jackson was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Kathleen Mae Ambose and Josephine Luck Clark of Nashville; Mary Katelyn Armstrong, Sally Kathryn Hazard, Laura Kathryn House, Mary Alexandra McCaskill, Emily Clark McLaurin, Melissa Banister Russell, and Mary Brook Traxler of Jackson; Jennifer Hart Burke and Elisabeth Camille Maddox of Memphis; Jessica Glynn Fort of Meridian; Courtney Andree LaBorde of Baton Rouge; Louise Wallace Nesbitt of Washington, D.C.; Susan Grace Roberts of Hattiesburg; Marjorie Ann Sauer of Ridgeland; Katherine Nichols Sneed of Birmingham; and Virginia Catherine Yarber of Oxford. They wore gowns of coral pink organza with a V neckline and self-tie at the natural waist. They carried bouquets of hydrangea, roses, and peonies hand wrapped with candlelight ribbon. Junior bridesmaids were Anna Blake Lively and Mary Elizabeth Lively, both of Rogers, Ark. Flower girls were Natalya Elizabeth Salvo and Olivia Quinn Salvo, both of Jackson. The bride’s proxy was Mary-Crosby Turner of Nashville. Attendants were Ellon Christine Eubank of Madison; and Mary Blair Johnson and Tara Hallie Tighe of Jackson. The bridegroom’s brother, Chase Nathan Bowers of Shreveport, was best man. Groomsmen were Kane Richard Alber, Robert Dudley Park Jr., and Thomas Robert Stephenson of Memphis; Jason Dwanye Cook of Oxford; Ben Jarvus Green-Ellis of Lafayette; Don Paul Hargroder Jr. of Abbeville, La.; George Andrew Helow of Jacksonville; Danny Terrell Jackson of Brandon; David Reid Neely of Nashville; Dean Justin Sparks of New York; William Travers Tapp Jr. of St. Petersburg, Fla.; Elliott Frank Thomas III of Jackson; and David Lee Traxler III of West Hollywood, Calif. The ring bearer was Christian Michael Hargroder of Abbeville. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at the Mary Buie Museum, where the guests enjoyed a cocktail buffet and were entertained by the music of The Compozitions. On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents hosted a seated rehearsal dinner at the Mary Buie Museum. Prior to the rehearsal, the bridal party was honored at a luncheon at the OxfordUniversity Club. Co-hostesses were Jennie Clark, Stacy Duff, Diane Hazard, Janet House, Suzy Mayer, Tammy McLaurin, Debbie McCaskill, Anne Nesbitt, Cathey Russell, Betty Sauer, and Carol Sneed. A wedding day brunch was held at the M Club Room in the Starnes Center on the campus of the University of Mississippi. Co-hosts and hostesses were Messieurs and Mesdames Rob Barefield, John Bolls, Mickey Crosby, Ian Cross, Billy Denny, Joe Durfey, Winston Gilbert, Howard Graham, Sam Jew, Bill Johnson, Peter Keyes, Mitch Monsour, Johnny Neely, Stump Russell, Fred Salvo, Larry Stacy, and Bo Tighe. After a wedding trip to the Sun Palace in Cancun, Mexico, the couple is at home in Memphis.


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Laura Maren McKinley , Brad Marshall Hutto March 5, 2011 Chapel of Memories Mississippi State University, Starkville

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Mr. and Mrs. Brad Marshall Hutto

aura Maren McKinley and Brad Marshall Hutto of Madison were united in marriage March 5 in an evening ceremony at the historic Chapel of Memories on the campus of Mississippi State University. The Rev. James Harrison of Meridian officiated the candlelit ceremo-

ny. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Karl Dibrell McKinley. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Cyrel Honeycutt and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Glyn Love of Madison and the late William Edward McKinley. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Edgar Hutto Jr. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Edgar Hutto, Frances Marshall Blalock and Harold Burnett Blalock. Nuptial music was presented by Lauren Zumwalt, pianist; Marc Ransier soloist; and the Mississippi State University string trio. Given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father, the bride wore an ivory gown of lace accented by a V-shaped neckline. Scalloped edging and Swarovski crystals highlighted the empire waistline as lace appliqués adorned the slim, A-line skirt. She wore her mother’s cathedral length illusion veil accented with seed pearls. She also wore a pearl bracelet given to her by her father. She carried a French clutch of white hydrangeas, miniature calla lilies, white freesia and bridal white roses tied with an heirloom monogrammed handkerchief given to her by her aunt, Judy Honeycutt. Attending the bride as man of honor was her brother, Bryan Edward McKinley. Bridesmaids were Lara Eley Barkley of Cleveland; Esley Naron Brister of Atlanta; Mollie Zalenda Buchanan of Starkville; Elizabeth Hinton Craig and Katharine Day Lightsey of Jackson; Carrie Foster Hay of Nashville; Camille Deborah McKinley of Oxford; Brooke Bardin Newton and Jessica Bailey Shive of Madison; and Kimberley Rutland Witcher of Houston, Texas. They wore dresses of mango chiffon with crumb-catcher necklines, ruched bodices and floor length skirts. They carried hand tied bouquets of green hydrangeas, purple velvet lisianthus, circus roses, lipstick alstromeria lilies, flame miniature calla lilies tied with custom died French ribbon. Sara Beth Stockton of Corinth recited Scripture selected by the couple. Sarah Beth Gary of Madison was the bride’s proxy. The bridegroom’s father was best man. Groomsmen were Wesley Phillip Gordon and Jefferson Allan King of Starkville; John Baker Harrington of Knoxville; Blake Edgar Hutto and Truitt Austin Taylor of Madison; Matthew Monroe Keith and Daniel Wayne Ross II of Hattiesburg; Christopher Ryan Toms of Oxford; Thomas Brent Tyler of Ridgeland; Jackson Lee Walters of Brandon; and Paul Bennett Witcher of Houston, Texas. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at the Hunter Henry Center on the campus of Mississippi State University. The reception featured the music of Chris Gill and the Sole Shakers. The bride exited the reception wearing her mother’s redesigned wedding dress. On the eve of the wedding the bridegroom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at Anthony’s Market in West Point. On the morning of the wedding, Mitzi Aldridge, Judy Honeycutt, Laura Gill, Melanie McKinley and Kathleen Mazzanti, aunts of the bride, hosted a bridesmaid’s brunch at The Veranda Restaurant in Starkville. Family and friends of the bridegroom LeeAnne Cox, Ramona Hill, Fran Marshall, Nancy Powell, Cindy Spencer, Pat Sudduth, Kathy Waggener, Lesa Waggener and Rhonda Webb honored the bridegroom and his groomsmen on the day of the wedding with a lunch at Central Station Grill in Starkville. Following a wedding trip to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, the couple is at home in Ridgeland where the bride is a physician liaison with University of Mississippi Medical Center and the bridegroom is an assistant district attorney in Hinds County. october 2011

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Shelley Marie Baas , Jeremy Bryce Neely S

Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy Bryce Neely

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March 12, 2011 Hazlehurst United Methodist Church Hazlehurst, Mississippi

helley Marie Baas and Jeremy Bryce Neely were united in marriage March 12 at 6 p.m. at Hazlehurst United Methodist Church. The candlelight ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Bill Barksdale of Madison. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Alan Baas of Ridgeland. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Dale Newman of Gillsburg and Mr. and Mrs. John O’Hara Baas of Hazlehurst. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Keith Neely and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Melvin Gilmore, all of Florence, and Mr. and Mrs. John (Jack) George Neely of Richland. The couple had all of their grandparents in attendance at the marriage ceremony. Nuptial music was presented by Will Mary Cooley, pianist; Shelia Puryear, organist; and Laura Hughes, soloist. Escorted by her father, the bride wore a diamond white designer silk dress. The shirred strapless sweetheart neckline was centered with a cluster of seed pearls, crystals and mirror beads; from the sculpted draped bodice the A-line skirt was caught to the side into a gathered cascade that fell from matching beading, sweeping into a chapel train. Her hair was adorned with a French-net birdcage, accented by a single white anemone. She carried a hand clutched bouquet of white ranunculus, white garden roses, white anemones and green hypercium berries, tied with an ivory satin ribbon. An antique heirloom hat pin from the bride’s paternal grandmother adorned the bouquet. Attending the bride as maid of honor was her sister, Lindsey Lea Baas. Bridesmaids were Kristen Elizabeth Beal, Megan Elizabeth Holland, Laura Parsons Hughes, Robin Leigh Miller and Rachel Lynn Sistrunk. They wore teal taffeta V-neckline dresses with softly gathered tea length skirts. Their hand-tied bouquets were a mix of light and dark pink garden roses, pink ranunculus and green hypercium berries. The bridegroom’s father was best man. Groomsmen were Anthony Kyle Neely, brother of the bridegroom; Dylan Wade Baas, brother of the bride; Michael Hunter Bowering and Robert Daniel Boyett. Honorary groomsmen were Cooper Grey Nordan and Anthony James Yancey. Ushers were Jacob Brannon Morris and Austin Cole Neely, cousins of the bridegroom. Program attendants were Jill O’Hara Horner and Alexander Lee King, cousins of the bride. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at The White Oak. The bride’s table featured a three-tiered butter crème wedding cake, each layer encircled by teal satin ribbon. The cake was topped with fresh flowers and a pair of Wolfe lovebirds from the bride’s collection. The bridegroom’s dessert bar also featured a display of photographs of the couple and wedding photographs of their parents and grandparents. Guests enjoyed dancing to music chosen by the couple. The couple departed the reception amid a shower of rose petals and climbed into a 1941 Hollywood Graham, courtesy of the bridegroom’s aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Usry. On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner for the wedding party and guests in the church fellowship hall. The couple and outof-town guests were honored with a Sunday send-off brunch at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Walter Croswell, aunt and uncle of the bride. Co-hosts were Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Steven Horner. Several showers hosted by family and friends to honor the couple were held in Ridgeland, Gillsburg, Flowood and Jackson. After a wedding trip to Antigua, the couple is at home in Eagle, Colo. The bridegroom is a registered nurse with Vail Valley Medical Center in Vail, Colo., and the bride is a design associate with Slifer Designs in Edwards, Colo.


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, Abbie Lauren Eason Paul Caleb Koonce

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October 1, 2011 WaterColor Inn Santa Rosa Beach, Florida

r. and Mrs. Robert Earl Campbell and Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bowen Eason announce the engagement of their daughter, Abbie Lauren Eason, to Paul Caleb Koonce, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Clifton Koonce of Hattiesburg. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Porter Faye Vandevere of Yazoo City and the late J.J. Vandevere of Benton, and Jean Berry Eason and the late Gene Bowen Eason Sr. of Jackson. Miss Eason is a 2003 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School and a 2007 cum laude graduate of the University of Mississippi where she earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration. At Ole Miss, she was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. In 2010, she was graduated cum laude from the University of Mississippi School of Law. Miss Eason is associated with the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Jay Gore Jr. of Grenada, and Doris Koonce and Bob Koonce of Olive Branch. Koonce is a 2003 graduate of Oak Grove High School and a 2007 graduate of Mississippi State University with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. At State, he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. He was graduated in 2011 from the University of Mississippi School of Law. The couple will exchange vows October 1 at the WaterColor Inn and Resort in Santa Rosa Beach, Fla.

Abbie Lauren Eason

, Anne Elizabeth Smith Jason Wilton Bailey

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January 14, 2012 Reid Chapel at Samford University Birmingham, Alabama

rs. Charles Alexander Tinnin Jr. and Lemuel Owen Smith III announce the engagement of their daughter, Anne Elizabeth Smith, to Jason Wilton Bailey of Olive Branch, son of Debbie Mullen Bailey and the late Wilton Bailey Jr. of Grenada. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel Owen Smith Jr. of Jackson and the late Mr. and Mrs. Welcome Davis Hemphill of Indianola. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Mrs. Spencer Alberta Mullen Jr. and the late Mr. Mullen and the late Mr. and Mrs. Wilton Bailey, all of Grenada. Miss Smith is a 1997 graduate of Jackson Academy and received her bachelor’s degree in human development and family studies from Samford University in 2001. She received her master’s of social work from the University of Alabama in 2003. Miss Smith lives in Birmingham where she is a medical device representative with Boston Scientific Neuromodulation. Bailey is a 1994 graduate of Winona Academy and received a bachelor’s of accountancy degree from the University of Mississippi in 1999 and a master’s of taxation in 2000. He was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Bailey returned to Ole Miss in 2005 completing his juris doctorate in 2007. He is an attorney with Watkins, Ludlam, Winter and Stennis P.A. The couple will exchange vows January 14 at Reid Chapel on the campus of Samford University in Birmingham.

Anne Elizabeth Smith 72

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, Barbara Jo Agnew Richard William Brillard

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November 5, 2011 Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral Jackson, Mississippi

r. and Mrs. Lewis Samuel Agnew announce the engagement of their daughter, Barbara Jo Agnew, to Richard William Brillard, son of Richard Wiley Brillard of Memphis, and Mr. and Mrs. James Robin Rogers of Germantown. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Dean Dalby Moody of Phoenix, the late Martin Luther Agnew Sr., the late Josephine Floyd Agnew Davis, and the late Ira Clayton Davis, all of Meridian. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Frances Brooks Brillard and the late Mr. Richard Francis Brillard of Memphis, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Roberto de Moya of Havana, Cuba. Miss Agnew is a 2002 graduate of Jackson Preparatory School. She received a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Auburn University where she was active in Chi Omega sorority and the student government association. Miss Agnew is a member of the Memphis Chapter of AIA and the Memphis Chi Omega Alumnae Association. She is associated with the Horrell Group Architects in Memphis. Brillard is a graduate of Germantown High School. He received a bachelor’s degree in finance from the University of Tennessee where he was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He is associated with Stefanini Tech Team in Memphis and also enrolled at the University of Memphis in a master’s of accountancy program. The couple will exchange vows November 5 at Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral, with a reception following at the Mississippi Museum of Art.

Barbara Jo Agnew

, Camille Jesse Lynn Allen Drew Landon Snyder

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October 29, 2011 Northminster Baptist Church Jackson, Mississippi

r. and Mrs. David Bennett Allen announce the engagement of their daughter, Camille Jesse Lynn Allen, to Drew Landon Snyder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Arnold Snyder. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mrs. William Jesse DuBard and the late Mr. DuBard of Drew, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Neville Gray Allen of Laurel. Miss Allen was graduated with honors from Jackson Academy and magna cum laude from Washington and Lee University. At Washington and Lee, she was inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa, served as president of Kappa Kappa Gamma fraternity, and was recognized as the university’s Greek Woman of the Year. Miss Allen was presented by the Debutante Club of Mississippi and is a member of the Junior League of Washington, D.C. She is associated with the Guardian Life Insurance Company of America as a disability specialist in Washington, D.C. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Lois Corban Akin of Brandon and the late Francis Geoghegan of Jackson, and the late Mr. and Mrs. D.W. Snyder of Eupora. Snyder was graduated with honors from Jackson Academy and summa cum laude from the University of Mississippi. At Ole Miss, Snyder served as president of the Associated Student Body. He was a Taylor Medalist, inducted into the Hall of Fame, and named Sigma Nu National Man of the Year. Snyder received a juris doctorate from the University of Virginia School of Law where he was the managing editor of the Virginia Law Weekly. He is associated with Hollingsworth LLP in Washington, D.C. The couple will exchange vows October 29 at Northminster Baptist Church. Camille Jesse Lynn Allen october 2011

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, Jamie Carol Meaut Erroll Alexander Eaton

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October 8, 2011 Sacred Heart Chapel New Orleans, Louisiana

r. and Mrs. Emmett Allan Eaton Jr. announce the engagement of their son, Erroll Alexander Eaton, to Jamie Carol Meaut, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Craig Anthony Meaut and Cynthia Carol Meaut of Gulfport. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Dr. and Mrs. Emmett Allan Eaton, Lawrence Sam Iupe of Ridgeland and the late Elaine Francise Iupe. He was graduated with a bachelor’s degree in arts and sciences from Mississippi State University in 2007, and attended Johnson and Wales University to pursue a culinary career, where he was graduated magna cum laude in 2009. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Jacqueline Frentz Meaut and the late Clarence A. ‘Buddy’ Meaut of Biloxi, and Louise Cummins and the late J.A. Cummins of Bethpage, Tenn. She also graduated from Mississippi State University in 2007 with a bachelor’s degree in business. After spending a few years in the Carolinas and New Orleans, the couple now live in Flowood where Miss Meaut is a national account coordinator for TEKsystems and Eaton is a sous chef at Table 100. The couple will exchange vows October 8 at the Sacred Heart Chapel in New Orleans.

Erroll Alexander Eaton, Jamie Carol Meaut

, Virginia Callaway Smith Dallas Webster Younce November 5, 2011 Home of Mrs. Robert L. McCommon Jr. Macon, Georgia

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r. and Mrs. George Boone Smith III of Macon, Ga., announce the engagement of their daughter, Virginia Callaway Smith, to Dallas Webster Younce, son of Theresa Overstreet Younce of Jackson and Dr. Dale Richard Younce Sr. of Mobile. The wedding will take place November 5 at the home of the bride’s grandmother, Mrs. Robert L. McCommon Jr. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late George B. Smith Jr. and Mrs. Smith and the late Robert L. McCommon Jr. and Mrs. McCommon, all of Macon. The 1998 salutatorian of Stratford Academy and a 2000 Bons Hommes and Beaux Arts Ball presentee, Miss Smith was graduated from Yale University with honors in history and from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA). She is an editor with the Penguin Press in New York. Younce is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. N.W. Overstreet Jr. of Jackson, and the late Mr. and Mrs. D.C. Younce of Saraland, Ala. A 1990 graduate of Jackson Preparatory School, Younce attended the University of Mississippi as a National Merit and Carrier Scholar, graduating summa cum laude. He has a master’s of philosophy in English literature from Oxford University and is a senior editor at Suhrkamp Verlag in Berlin, Germany. After a wedding trip to the Grenadines, the couple will live in New York.

Virginia Callaway Smith 74

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, Carly Jenae Stegall Bryce David Yelverton

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October 22, 2011 First Baptist Church Jackson, Mississippi

r. and Mrs. Alan Deryll Stegall announce the engagement of their daughter, Carly Jenae Stegall, to Bryce David Yelverton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joel Leslie Yelverton of Clinton. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Doyle Julian Pearson of Jackson and Zelda Davis Stegall and the late Shelly Deryll Stegall of Ridgeland. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Pomeroy Clayton Jr. and the late Mr. and Mrs. Talmadge Benoit Yelverton, all of Clinton. Miss Stegall is a 2007 graduate of Jackson Academy. She attended Mississippi College and was graduated with a degree in biology in 2011. She is associated with Mississippi Retina Associates as an ophthalmic tech. Yelverton is a 2004 graduate of Clinton High School. He attended Mississippi College, where he was graduated in 2008 with a degree in mathematics education. He is a geometry teacher at Clinton High School. The couple will exchange vows the evening of October 22, at First Baptist Church in Jackson, with a reception afterward at The South. The couple will make their home in Clinton.

Carly Jenae Stegall, Bryce David Yelverton

, Christy Leigh Simmons Jason Thomas Brooks October 1, 2011 First Baptist Church Jackson, Mississippi

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r. and Mrs. James Marion Simmons II announce the engagement of their daughter, Christy Leigh Simmons, to Jason Thomas Brooks, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde David Brooks. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Anderson Whitt of Jackson, and the late Mr. and Mrs. James Marion Simmons of Monroe. Miss Simmons is a 2005 honor graduate of Clinton High School. She attended the University of Mississippi where she was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. Miss Simmons is a 2010 graduate of the University of Mississippi Medical Center with a master’s in occupational therapy. Miss Simmons is an occupational therapist at Laskin Therapy Group in Jackson. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Luther Frank Thomas of Jackson, and Juanita Ware Brooks and the late Hobart Clyde Brooks of Magee. Brooks is a 2004 graduate of Jackson Preparatory School. He was graduated from the University of Mississippi where he earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing and economics. He was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. Brooks is an assistant branch manager and loan officer for BancorpSouth. The couple will exchange vows October 1, at First Baptist Church in Jackson with a reception to follow at the Old Capitol Inn.

Christy Leigh Simmons, Jason Thomas Brooks 76

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, Brittany Amanda Sullivan Tyler Carlton Lake November 5, 2011 First Baptist Church Chapel Jackson, Mississippi

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r. and Mrs. Keith Ronald Sullivan of Brandon announce the engagement of their daughter, Brittany Amanda Sullivan, to Tyler Carlton Lake, son of Dr. and Mrs. Chester Hamilton Lake Jr. of Flowood. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Warren Hart Farmer of Natchez and Janis Sullivan and the late John Walter Sullivan Jr. of Bay Springs. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Alton Eugene Windsor, and Betty Hamilton Lake and the late Dr. Chester Hamilton Lake, all of Jackson. Miss Sullivan is a 2005 graduate of Jackson Preparatory and 2009 graduate of the University of Mississippi Medical Center Radiologic Technology program. She is a recent graduate of Chattanooga State University, where she specialized in radiation therapy. Lake is a 2005 graduate of Jackson Academy and attended Delta State University where he played football. He is enlisted in the United States Marine Corps with a current rank of lance corporal. The couple will exchange vows November 5 at 6 p.m., at First Baptist Church Chapel of Jackson, with a reception to follow in Ridgeland.

Tyler Carlton Lake, Brittany Amanda Sullivan

, Mary Caroline Harkins William Corey Mays October 22, 2011 Sacred Heart Catholic Church Canton, Mississippi

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r. and Mrs. Michael Murray Harkins Sr. announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Caroline Harkins, to William Corey Mays, son of Marie Cox Sawyer of Brandon, and Mr. and Mrs. Martin Hubert Mays. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mrs. Robert Edward Hitchins Sr. of Flowood and the late Mr. Hitchins, and Mr. and Mrs. Ansley Honeyford Harkins of Jackson. Miss Harkins is a 2005 graduate of Jackson Academy. She was graduated from Mississippi State University in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in marketing. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. Miss Harkins is associated with First Heritage Credit’s corporate office in Ridgeland. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Eva Wood Godfrey of Eufaula, Ala., Lawrence Aubrey Cox of Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. William Hubert Mays of Brandon, the late Joyce Nowell Mays, and the step-grandson of Mrs. Edward Clay Lovelace Sr. of Brandon and the late Mr. Lovelace. Mays is also the great-grandson of Mrs. William Haynes Nowell of Brandon and the late Mr. Nowell. Mays is a 2005 graduate of Jackson Academy. He was graduated from Mississippi State University, cum laude, in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in insurance, risk management and financial planning. He received his master’s of business administration from Mississippi State University in 2010. At State, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. Mays is associated with Travelers Insurance. The couple will exchange vows October 22 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Canton. A reception will follow at The Jiggetts Home. William Corey Mays, Mary Caroline Harkins 78

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Camille Allen and Drew Synder engagement celebration

David, Courtney, Cheryl and Camille Allen, Drew, Marilyn and Ed Snyder

engagement party Drew Snyder, Camille Allen

Becky Ivison, Courtney Allen

David Allen, Angela and Davidson Forester 80

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Camille Allen and Drew Snyder, both of Washington, D.C., were honored recently with an engagement celebration in the home of Jean and Kelley Williams. Miss Allen is the daughter of Cheryl and David Allen. Snyder is the son of Marilyn and Ed Snyder of Madison. Co-hosts and hostesses were Carolyn and Barry Aden, Rebecca and Marion Black, Suzanne and Bill Boone, Cathy and Jeff Davis, Betsy and Kane Ditto, Lynn and Jim Grenfell, Jeri and Lucian Harvey, Annette and James Hitt, Clara and Colton Joorfetz, Connie and Tom Kossen, Gloria and Jim Martin, Linda McGehee, Marcia and Chuck Poole, Gayla and John Purvis, Kandy and Joe Sims, Geri and Preston Smith, Jan and Johnny Wade, Rebecca and Mark Wiggs, Jean and Kelly Williams, and Cindy and Jeff Wilson. The couple will wed October 29 at Northminster Baptist Church.

Rush and Kate McNeese

Cathy Davis, Emily Jones, Jane and Bill Smith

Jean Williams


Jim Martin, Betsy Ditto, Gloria Martin

Amy Williams, Drew Snyder, Camille Allen, George Williams

Rebecca Black, Suzanne Boone, Jeri Harvey

Brittany Allen, Angela Forester, Camille Allen, Claire Brabec

Johnny Wade, David and Cheryl Allen, Jan Wade

Haydn and Morgan Roberts, Will Bardwell, Jamie Holcomb

Rebecca Wiggs, Ed Snyder

Lauren Wade, Courtney and David Allen

Don Rush, Drew Snyder, Camille Allen, Claire Rush october 2011

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Anna Catherine Purvis and Andrew Davis Frame wedding celebration

Andy, Anna, Becky and Tim Frame

Beth West, Monique Lastique, Anna Purvis Frame, Laura West, Kristin Richardson

wedding celebration

Friends and family gathered July 16 at the Brandon home of Dr. and Mrs. Walter Shelton to celebrate the June 18 wedding of Anna Catherine Purvis to Andrew Davis Frame at Tucker Plantation in Colbert, Ga. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Purvis of Jackson. The bridegroom’s parents are Becky and Tim Frame of Savannah. The couple are at home in Jackson where the bride teaches third grade at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School and the bridegroom is in his third year at Mississippi College School of Law.

Virginia Foreman, Ann Fry, Diane Morse, Tom Johnson, Kathryn Koury

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Co-hosts and hostesses for the evening were Messieurs and Mesdames Barry Aden, David Allen, Bill Ashford, Gene Barrett, Bill Boone, Henry Burkhalter, Charles Bush, Rodney Chamblee, Alex Haick, Joe Hegwood, Bill Hulett, Tom Johnson, Jim Johnston, Arthur Jones, Eason Leake, Jim Martin, Kurt Metzner, David Morse, Walter Neely, Mike Peters, Hunter Pratt, Gorman Schaffer, James Shaw, Walter Shelton, John Studdard, Mac Temple, Burney Threadgill, Ralph Vance, Gerry Ann Houston, Abe Malouf, and Ruth Fly.

Beverly Shelton, Anna Purvis Frame, Gayla Purvis, Karen Bush, Diane Morse

Wes and Taylor Davis, Anna and Andy Frame, Nikki, Andrew and Taylor Neely


Todd and Amelia Willis, Andy Frame, Jacob and Katie Caddas, Kelsey Rogers

To have your parties, events, weddings, happenings included in our magazine, please call 601-957-1122 for more information. It’s easy.

Walter and Beverly Shelton, Gayla and John Purvis

We’ve Got You Covered!

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Stayce Westmoreland and Robbie Watson engagement party

Robert and Rebecca Watson, Stayce Westmoreland, Robbie and Ruth Watson, Billie Penton, Matt Watson

engagement party An engagement party honoring Stayce Westmoreland and Robbie Watson was held recently in the home of Jerry and Anne Veazey. Parents of the couple are Annette Riley and the late Henry Westmoreland and Robert and Rebecca Watson. Co-hosts and hostesses were Jerry and Anne Veazey, Dow and Cheryl Welch, Richard and Charlotte McNeel, James and Joyce Corbett, Ed and Julie Phillips, William and Amanda Griffin, Alex and Debye Haick, Harry and Deery Walker, George and Robin Gunn; Also, Jerry and Olivia Host, Farris and Gail Gibbs, Cliff and Fran Mitchell, Dennis and Carol Craig, Oscar and Carol Hartman, Ron and Melissa Applewhite, Tom and Nancy Wright, David and Jill Landrum, Sam and Pat Agnew, Charles and Jane Bryan, and R. J. and Dawn Pizzalato. The wedding will be October 15.

Robbie Watson, Stayce Westmoreland, Matt Watson

Tanya Shelby, Pam and Mark Whittington

Deery and Harry Walker, Rebecca Watson, Cheryl Welch 84

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David and Jill Landrum

Cliff and Fran Mitchell

Carol Craig, Pat Agnew, Joyce Corbett, Deery Walker, Amanda Griffin, Fran Mitchell, Olivia Host, Jane Bryan, Gail Gibbs, Debye Haick, Jill Landrum, Cheryl Welch; (seated) Melissa Applewhite, Robin Gunn, Anne Veazey, Julie Phillips


Robert and Rebecca Watson, Deborah and Phil Bryant

Robert, Rebecca and Robbie Watson, Stayce Westmoreland, Anne and Jerry Veazey

Jennifer and Barry Penton, Robbie Watson, Stayce Westmoreland

Peggy Aikens, Robbie Watson, Stayce Westmoreland, Mike Aikens

A.J. Baker, Hunter Black, Sarah Kyzar, Robbie Watson

Barbara Jo Agnew, Ed Phillips, Sam and Pat Agnew

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e love a good party and so do our readers!

Don’t let your party end when the guests go home. Keep it going by submitting pictures from it to The Northside Sun Magazine. It’s Easy. Just make sure when using a digital camera to have the setting at the highest resolution possible and e-mail them to us or submit a CD. Or the old fashioned way using film prints still works great!!! Type up something about the fun event and identify everyone in the photos and it’s done. And remember we like photos exclusive to us.

Still have questions? Gives us a call: 957-1123 or e-mail jimmye@northsidesun.com october 2011

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Betsy Smith and Jason Bailey engagement celebration

Jason Bailey, Betsy Smith, Meade Hartfield, Cable Hawkins, Emily Glahn, Dallas Quin

engagement party Jason Bailey, Betsy Smith

Emily Payne, Betsy Smith, Rachel VanNortwick, Emily Glahn

Debbie Mullen and Jason Bailey, Betsy Smith, Marilyn Tinnin 86

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An engagement celebration for Betsy Smith and Jason Bailey was held August 20 in the home of Scottie and Burdette Russ. Miss Smith is the daughter of Mrs. Charles Alexander Tinnin and Lemuel Owen Smith III. Bailey is the son of Debbie Mullen Bailey and the late Wilton Bailey Jr. of Grenada. Co-hosts were Lydia and Randy Bolen, Ellen and Jimmy Clayton, Emma George Hamilton, Mary Margaret and Freddie Hickman, Suzanne and Ed Hudgins, Polly and Hal Lott, Margaret and Coleman Lowery, Helaine and Thomas Maley, Camille and Bill Morris, David Mosal, Blue and Bill Reeves, Jackie and Don Roberts, Carol and Mark Rodgers, Ann and Tommy Rueff, Bubba Shaw, Joni Shaw, Sweyn and Newell Simrall, Cappie McLean, Hilda and Sonny Westbrook. Shown are scenes from the party.

Betsy Smith, Sanders Lowery

Lem Smith III, Betsy Smith, Jason Bailey, Debbie Mullen Bailey

Bubba Shaw, Scottie Burdette Russ, Ed Hudgins, David Mosal, Bill Reeves, Coleman and Margaret Lowery, Mary Margaret Hickman, Jimmy Clayton, Hal Lott; (fourth row) Emma George Hamilton, Ellen Clayton, Helaine Maley; (third row) Tommy Rueff, Suzanne Hudgins, Alton Westbrook, Cappie McLean, Blue Reeves, Polly Lott; (second row) Ann Rueff, Joni Shaw, Hilda Westbrook; (front) Betsy Smith, Jason Bailey, Lydia Bolen


Josh Lynch, Forbes Grogan, Jason Bailey, Preston Frazer; (front) Natalie Lynch, Jill Grogan, Betsy Smith, Ashley Frazer

Emily Payne, Rachel VanNortwick, Ben Harris, Matthew Hicks; (middle row) Trey Word, Lem and Jenny Montgomery, Ashley Frazer, Meg Harris, Forbes Grogan; (front) Jason Bailey, Betsy Smith, Jill Grogan

the

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601-957-1125 october 2011

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PARTIES

AND

CELEBRATIONS

Jennifer Whatley and Jacob Vaughn engagement party

Steve and Marcia Whatley, Jennifer Whatley, Jacob Vaughn, Connie and Grady Vaughn

engagement party An engagement party honoring Jennifer Whatley and Jacob Vaughn was held recently at Scrooge’s Restaurant. Co-hosts and hostesses for the party were Vicki and Lance Benefield, Jim Bowles, Dannie and Boyce Craig, Tell and Hal Flowers, Helen and Jimmy Fowler, Lynn and Walter Green, Clare and Tim Hanlon, Elizabeth and Tommy Lyle, Patsy and David Marsh, Maggie and Jim Nippes, Janice and Keith Parsons, Peggy and Bob Rives, Anna and David Selby, Priscilla and Leland Smith, Terry Wells, Jan and John Wofford.

Jennifer Whatley, Jacob Vaughn

Virginia Buchanan, Holli Roach, Beth Graham

Bill Raphael, Fred and Virginia Ezelle, Susan Raphael

Eleanore Hanlon, Sydney Bowles, Katie Ellis, Ava Ellis, Jim Bowles

Dannie and Boyce Craig, Jimmy Jones

Holly Edwards, Natalie Mayo, Anna Moak, Hal Flowers, Jennifer Whatley october 2011

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EVENTS w h a t ’ s

TEN MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES The new list of the 10 Most Endangered Historic Places in Mississippi was unveiled at a party hosted by the Mississippi Heritage Trust. The list is compiled from nominations submitted by the public to trust. The gala was held at Duling School in Fondren.

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Jane Waugh, Tom Tanner

Brad Tisdale, Dudley Wooley

Michelle Weaver Jones, David Preziosi Ann Brock, Sharon McCreery, Margaret Walenczyk

Amy and David Turner, Carolyn and Hayes Dent Brad Prewitt, Amanda Cobb

Bill and Nancy Howard, John Rings

Jen McGehee, Dana Robertson

Francine and Bill Luckett

Tricia Nelson, Dan Johnson

Linda Bartling, Vicki Overstreet october 2011

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TEN MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES Kane Ditto, Julie Skipper

Richard McNeal, Mark and Beth Davis, Charlotte McNeal

Fred Reeves, Lorrine Lias

Todd and Kristen Kern, Amanda and Scott Overby

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Don and Virginia VanLandingham, Ben Nichols

Terrance and Viva Sanders

Dawn Buck, Bill McCarty, Paul Vanderberry, Charles Clark

Don and Becky Potts

Wilma Clopton, Karen Gilder

Doyce Deas, Doug and Clare Dale

Steve Davis, Hank Holmes


TEN MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES Melissa and Tony DiFatta, Jeff Hellings

Katie Lightsey, Chris Myers, Rachel Jarman, Julie Skipper

Corrine Fox, Akili Kelly, Bennie Hopkins

Carolyn Dent, Ginny Emmerich, Amy Turner

David Abbott, Alan Huffman, Vidal Blankenstein, Marcia Abbott

Maria and James Madden

Sherry Lucas, Chuck Lindsay, Ivy Alley, Carla Wall, Frank Alley, Virgi Lindsay, Kit Barksdale

Whit Waide, Jane Anna Harris

Ann Somers, Lauren and Jim Rosenblatt

Martha Duvall, Robbie Fisher

Elizabeth and Bill Waits

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EVENTS w h a t ’ s

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CELEBRATION OF LEADERSHIP A “Celebration of Leadership,” an event hosted by Leadership Greater Jackson, was held recently in the Pinnacle at One Jackson Place. This was a networking social and silent auction held to help establish a fund that can be used to invest in greater Jackson’s future leaders by providing scholarships for the Leadership Greater Jackson Program.

Alice Skelton, Shirley Tucker

Brad Davis, Chantell Lott

Rosemary Jalink, Beth Poff

Danny and Tina Gallagher, Pat Chambliss, Stephen and Stephanie Hopkins, Laurie and Bob Williams

Evelyn Reed, Barbara Rooks Jackson, Arthur and Ouida Watson Erica Thompson, Desire Hunter

Chris and Shona Stephens

Alice Skelton, Lauren Guichard, Shirley Tucker

Barnard and Shonda Kines

Scherrie Prince, Reginald Thompson, Suprena Hill

Alfred Daniel, Keishunna Randall, Clarence Webster 94

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CELEBRATION OF LEADERSHIP Ken Warriner, Jackie Meck, Laura Pickard

Kenneth Greer, Tracie Wade, Larry McMillan

Rickey Martin, Amy Welsh, Matthew Ingram

Fidelis Malembeka, Pat Chambliss, Laura and Chris Walters

Matt and Caroline Grenfell, Paula and Omar Wilson

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Paige Sessums, Michael Beattie

Sonia Shrestha, Mary Eby, Marina Mychaskiw, Fulvia Subausde, Noella Bellan

Nora Frances McRae, Kim Porter

Shelly Griffin, Cecilia Derrington

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SPRING LUNCHEON Annie Morhauser with Annieglass was the guest speaker for the Jackson Symphony League’s spring luncheon held at The South in downtown Jackson. The league is the auxiliary branch for the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra. Cecilia Derrington, Crafton Beck, Faira Bishop

Barbara Russell, Kay Little

Cheryl Welch, Kirke and Charlotte McNeel, Joyce Corbett

Pam Cirilli, Rebecca Watson, Diane Studdard

Lisa Rotolo, Marylin Trainer Storey

Jean Bush, Clare Agostinelli, Lindsay Hamm

Joan Marie Kaye, Ree Walden


SPRING LUNCHEON Sylvia Carraway, Michael Beattie, Regina Boyles, Connie Kossen

Martha Thomas, Kay Mortimor, Faira Bishop, Earline Raines

Cynthia Thomas, Susan Burnham, Donna McCarthy, Kristy Moak

Joy Batte, Donna Russell, Annie Morhauser,

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THE DEBUTANTE MOTHERS CLUB The Debutante Mother’s Club gathered at the Country Club of Jackson for their spring luncheon. Patty Roper was the guest speaker and presented easy ideas and tips for entertaining.

Sandy Brooks, Susie Brabec

Becky Ivison, Cathy May

Deborah Allen, Sandy Brooks, Gay Drake, Susie Brabec, Becky Ivison, Patty Roper, Cathy May, Cheryl Wells

Keller Wray, Irene Mangum

Anna Liddell, Mary Sue Mitchell

Frances Cole, Gayla Rawls

Sally Byram, Cheryl Wells 98

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Melanie Taylor, Patty Roper, Ida Yerger

Norma Carroll and Rebecca Ezell

Jean Bush, Ann Hawthorne

Becky Ivison, Karon Bush


THE DEBUTANTE MOTHERS CLUB Sandy Black, Ella East, Honey Bennett

Tricia Scott, Jane Smith

Pam Butts, Susie Brabec, Rivers Lurate

Beth Young, Marty May

Claire Brabec, Shannon Collins

Joy Cannada, Cheryl Welch, Gay Drake

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EVENTS w h a t ’ s

RISE ABOVE FOR YOUTH Rise Above for Youth held its second annual dinner and silent auction supporting at-risk youth in Mississippi at St. James Episcopal Church.

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Sheila Hailey, Bear Atwood, Emily Kimber

Hallie Duckworth, Stacey Howard, Denise Wall

Karen Hearn, Kim Jones Dennis Smith, Alice Johnson, Brad and Margaret Pigott, Jim Johnson

Greg Tidwell, Bob Lowery

Mike Camardelle, Trevor Smith

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Bear Atwood, Ellen Langford, Eric Wood

Hugh Trippe, Lori Collum

Shelly, Alice, Jim and Taylor Johnson

Eric and Myra Davis, Lori Collum

Holly Smith, Adam Carson


RISE ABOVE FOR YOUTH Natalie Maynor, Adam Carson

Brian Wilson, Tabatha Miller

Sam Adams, Maurice Brown

Hallie and Ron Duckworth

Laurie Roberts, David Hoskins

Lisa Alexander, Stacey Aldridge

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EVENTS w h a t ’ s

BAPTIST CHILDREN’S VILLAGE SUNSET AT THE SOUTH The Baptist Children’s Village recently presented Sunset at the South Silent Art Auction featuring more than 100 works of art donated by the Steve Glaze family. The auction was held to benefit the Baptist Children’s Village ministry.

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Sue Grubbs, Steve Glaze

Janet Lee, Lacey Lee Swanson, Rory Lee

Sharron Willoughby, Bobby Thames Randy and Janet Hankins, Tonya and John Matthews

Jan and John Polk, Deborah Gill Craft, Celeste Cade Chrystelle Thames, Chantel Lott

Barbie Bassett, Celeste Cade

Bert Emrick, Bobby Lawson

Melinda and Jim McCullough

Chrystelle and Bobby Thames

Lewis and Chyrl Grubbs 104

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BAPTIST CHILDREN’S VILLAGE SUNSET AT THE SOUTH Gerald and Patricia Hasselman

Mike and Deb Lightsey

Kenon and Barbie Ferguson

Marianna Fountain, Heidi Cheatham

Christy and Chip Jones

Lynette Jackson, Doris Macsherry, Shem Polk, Ginger Martin

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UMC NURSING ALUMNI MEETING The University of Mississippi’s nursing alumni annual meeting was held at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. The 2011 Nursing Alumnus of the Year Award was presented to Jan Evers, a 1960 graduate of the school.

Virginia Lee Cora, Janet Harris

Robin Wilkerson, Jennifer Robinson, Sallye Wilcox

Mim Sito, Donna Singleton, Shannon Kelly

Lisa Vaughan, Sheila Henderson, Sonja Fuqua, Bess Blackwell Blake and Mike Avenmarg

Jan Evers, Ralph McDaniel

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Pat Waltman, Jan Evers, Sallye Wilcox, Sandra West, Jeanete Waits, Robin Wilkerson Ginger Daniels, Kim Hoover, Geoff Mitchell

Steve and Sandra West

Paul and Shayne Boackle

Becky Wade, Delores Barlow


EVENTS w h a t ’ s

MISSISSIPPI CHILDREN’S HOME WINE TASTING The Mississippi Children's Home Services Auxiliary annual wine tasting and silent auction was held in the home of Peggy and Johnny Louis in Eastover. Proceeds from the event support the many programs of Mississippi Children's Home.

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Mimi and Rick Bradley

Michael and Jennifer Bracken

Carol Biedenharn, John and Helaina Damon Jim Blackwood, Rebekah Hixon, Kristen Crass, Becky Ivison, Tish and Kenny Windham

Emily and Rick Dye, Susan and Steven Burnham David McNamara, Rick Garraway, Candace Jones Johnny and Peggy Louis

Kathy and Larry Accardi, Cathy Hudgins Alon Bee, Pam Partridge

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Ellen Carr, Kristine Jacobs

Steven and Emily Mulhollen


MISSISSIPPI CHILDREN’S HOME WINE TASTING Laura Hearn, Katie Nelson

Pam Nail, Katherine Penton, Kristin Malouf

Catherine and Bucky Bell Jason and Susan Murphy, Jennifer Gross, Kathy Eure

Stacey and Terry Hight, Stacey Palmer, Chris and Sue Cherney Kim and Steven Inzinna, Cathy Hudgins

Sutter and Sharolyn Smith

Bert and Jamie Carpenter, Matt Holleman, Leslie McLin Gretchen Ware, Monica Day, Lee Carney, Marcy Cader

Wes and Missy Black

Peggy Louis, Becky Ivison october 2011

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AN EVENING OF HOPE An Evening of Hope Benefit Gala celebrating the opening of the 2011 Exhibit of Jackson Public Schools Student Artwork was held at the Art Center of Mississippi. An Evening of Hope Gala event was presented by local artist, Nicole Marquez. The event featured a performance by renowned jazz artist, Rhonda Richmond.

Limeul Eubanks, Serenity Luckett

Donald Thomas, Susan Womack, Carolyn Jolivette

Eyra Graves, Thelma Hardiman, Talamieka Brice

Melinda Wilcher, Candra Nelson, Kim Rost

Ron Coleman, James Graves Jr.

Kacy Hellings, Jane Everly, Monique Lastique Herbert and Stephany Brown

Kathryn Usry, Erica Jones, Ann Land, Samantha Kimble

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Chris and Lori Blount

Patricia Oyarce, Keri McCullough

George Schimmel, Jonathan Larkin, Pam Shaw, Michael Beattie


AN EVENING OF HOPE Darren Schwindaman, Melia Dicker, Beth Kander, Danny Dauphin, John and Diana Howell

Neola Young, Jenny Culver, Mary Lundgren Amanda Thomas, Shemika McClendon, Herbert Brown

Nikki Reese, Randi Jackson

Pam Shaw, Jonathan and Dana Larkin

Susan Womack, Nicole Marquez

Jeff Sanford, Jenny Woodruff

Dionna Woody, Faith Strong, Erica Jones Crystal Williams, Sunny Russell

Mary Weber, Arlinda Day

Susan Greco, Donna Short october 2011

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TEE IT UP The Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership and the Greater Jackson Alliance teamed up this year to bring the annual "Tee It Up" Golf Invitational to chamber members. Sponsored by BankPlus, the tournament brought golfers to Annandale Club to participate in the tournament. John Wise, Peyton Lockey, Marty Milstead, Mike Cottingham

Wayne Mansfield, John Moss, John Ferguson, Rusty Hawkins Clinton Dear, Jack Hanie, Mark Frye, Norman Katool

Ricky Ates, Tom Troxler, Sonny Thomas, Jim Craig

Wayne Walters, Red Moffat, Shawn Giles, Mark Slyder

Mark Pipper, Andy Lambert, Kiley Ham, John Oxley

Mickey Milligan, Michael Ingram, Drew Troxler, Chris Dunn

Eddie Maloney, Randy James, Duane O'Neill, Walter Weems 112

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TEE IT UP Steve Lesley, Bo Chastain, Larry Bourne, Eddie Foster

Gil Barrios, Brandon Hinton, Joseph Graham, Mitch Stringer

Harold Oden, Walter Baylis, Kenny Herrington, Justin Blair

Larry Mobley, Chance Carter, Griff Salmon, David Parker

Lee Nations, Doug Parker, Bobby Croswell, Joseph Simpson

Jim Stringer, Hibbett Neel, Billy Klausen, Mike Meadows

John Wesley, Stacey Luster, Jay Moon, John Turner

Mike MacGowan, Don Loy, Marc Jaromin, Travis Recek

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TEE IT UP David Barrentine, Terry Mobley, Ken Graeber, Charlie Chandler

Adam Lane, Jack Lane, John Mark Fisher, Chino Gutierrez

Bill Maxey, John Mark Casey, Wes Black, Scott Parenteau

Scotty King, Dan Tucker, Buddy Mitchem, Neil Honan, Steve Hillman

Bryan Lagg, John Proctor, Scott Moak, Will Arnold David Welch, Scotty Scott, Tony Webb, Johnny Ray

Gary Knight, Duffy Dulaney, Father Jerry Hurley, Michael Kimbrell Glenn Patrick, Sidney Allen, David Gates, Joe Sims 114

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NSS October Magazine 2011