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SECTION I

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SECTION II

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S EC T I O N I I I

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Course Objective

Method of Student Assessment

5.2 Demonstrate various gait patterns with various assistive devices accurately and safely

Gait Training Skill Check

5.4 Recognize the assistive devices used Exam #2, 2. Which of the following assistive devices would be the most appropriate for a 24 in gait training year old patient who is NWB on the left L/E with good upper body strength? A) Front wheeled walker B) Standard walker C) Axillary crutches D) WBQC

Course Objective

Method of Student Assessment

2.6 Identify common skin problems for Exam #2, 40. Prior to beginning prosthetic training with a patient, a PTA notices an area of a patient with a prosthesis redness and a slight blister on the distal aspect of the residual limb. This is consistent with: A) A stage I pressure ulcer B) A stage II pressure ulcer C) A normal tissue response to weight bearing in a new prosthesis D) The need to decrease the number of sock plies during gait training 4.0 Recognize the function of common orthotic devices

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Exam #3, 17. Which of the following is the joint motion that a floor reaction AFO prevents? A) Hip abduction B) Knee flexion C) Knee extension D) Hip extension

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SECTION V

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Justin W. Berry

1701 Lewis Boulevard Grand Forks, ND 58203 (701)-772-7518 Justin.berry@northlandcollege.edu

Education: Doctor of Physical Therapy, May 2005 University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND Master of Science in Education, May 2008 Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN Master of Physical Therapy, May 2000 University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy, May 1999 University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND Associate in Applied Science, Physical Therapist Assistant, October 1996 Williston State College, Williston, ND

Academic Experience: Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program Director/Instructor, 8/06-present Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN ●Responsibilities have included initial program development, curriculum design, program administration, budgeting, attaining/maintaining accreditation standards, program assessment, and writing of accreditation reports ●Courses taught: ●PTAS 1105 Fundamentals of PTA ●PTAS 1108 PTA Pathophysiology ●PTAS 1114 Clinical Kinesiology ●PTAS 1116 Therapeutic Exercise I ●PTAS 1118 Clinical Skills Review ●PTAS 2115 Advanced Techniques ●PTAS 2101 Orthopedics for PTA ●PTAS 2125 PTA Ethics and Issues ●PTAS 2160 Professional Integration ●BIOL 2252 Anatomy and Physiology I ●BIOL 2254 Anatomy and Physiology II ●BIOL 2256 Advanced Physiology ●HLTH 1101 Intro to Health Professions ●HLTH 1106 Cultural Diversity in Health Allied Health Division Chair, 8/13-present ●Responsibilities include assisting with: class schedule preparation; budget proposals; recruiting part-time division faculty; orientating new division faculty; and curricular development Adjunct Faculty: University of North Dakota ●PT 426 Manual Therapy I, Spring 2013 ●PT 519 Electrotherapy and Electrodiagnosis Lab, Summer 2010, 2011 ●PT 490 Interprofessional Health Care, Spring 2013, Spring 2011, Fall 2011 ●Indians into Medicine Pathway Program, Summer 2012, 2013

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Justin W. Berry

Academic Experience, continued: Lecturer (Adjunct), 1/05-5/05 Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN ●BIOL 1962 Intro to Anatomy/Physiology II, lecture and lab Lecturer (Adjunct), 8/00-5/03 University of Minnesota-Crookston, Crookston, MN ●BIOL 2103 Anatomy/Physiology I, lecture and lab ●BIOL 2104 Anatomy/Physiology II, lecture and lab

Clinical Experience: Physical Therapist, 8/13-7/14 RehabAuthority, Grand Forks, ND ●Part-time position treating patients in an outpatient orthopedic setting Physical Therapist, 8/11-6/13 Axis Clinic, Grand Forks, ND ●Part-time position treating patients in an outpatient orthopedic setting Physical Therapist Altru Health System, Grand Forks, ND ● 8/06-4/11: Part-time position in outpatient, long term care, and acute care settings ●10/00-9/03, 6/05-8/06: Full-time position treating outpatient, acute, home health, long term care, and phase II cardiac rehab patients in two rural sites ●Responsible for day to day management for two outreach physical therapy sites ●6/00-10/00: Part time position in outpatient orthopedic and long term care settings Physical Therapist, 8/03-5/05 MeritCare Health System, Bemidji, MN ●Full-time position treating an outpatient orthopedic patient population Physical Therapist, 5/00-10/00 Unity Hospital, Grafton, ND ●Part-time position treating outpatient orthopedic and acute patient populations

Publications, Peer Reviewed Articles: Berry JW, Lee TS, Foley HD, Lewis CL. Resisted Side-Stepping: The Effect of Posture on Hip Abductor Muscle Activation. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy.2015. 45(9). 675-682. Berry JW, Hosford, CC. A Regional Survey & Analysis of Burnout among Physical Therapists in Frontier Counties. Physical Therapy Journal of Policy, Administration, & Leadership. 2015. 15(3). J1-J11. Berry JW, Hosford CC. Burnout Among Physical Therapist Assistant Program Directors: A Nationwide Survey and Analysis. Journal of Allied Health. 2014.43(2). Page 2 of 10

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Justin W. Berry

Publications, Peer Reviewed Articles, Cont.: Berry JW, Romanick MA, Koerber SM. Injury Type and Incidence Among Elite Level Curlers During World Championship Competition. Res Sports Med. 2013.21(2)

Publications, Invited Book Reviews Review of Spine Classifications and Severity Measures. Chapman JR, Dettori JR, Norvell DC. New York, NY: Thieme, 2009, 534 pp, hardcover, illus. JOSPT. 2010. 40(10) Review of Essentials of Kinesiology for the Physical Therapist Assistant. Mansfield PJ, Neumann DA. St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier, 2009, 416 pp, soft cover, illus. JOSPT. 2009. 39(7) Review of No More Joint Pain. Abboud JA, Abboud SK. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008, 288 pp, hardcover, illus. JOSPT. 2008.38(11)

Research Presentations, Oral: A Survey of Physical Therapist Assistants in Washington State on Joint Mobilization Performance and Education. Berry JW. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, 2/14 Perceptions of PTA Program Directors on the Increasing Number of PTA Education Programs. Berry JW, Becker B. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, San Diego, CA, 1/13 A Regional Survey and Analysis of Burnout among Physical Therapists Within Frontier Counties. Berry JW, Hosford CC. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, San Diego, CA, 1/13 APTA State Chapters, Manual Therapy, and the Physical Therapist Assistant: Is Conference Programming Consistent with APTA positions? Berry, JW, Worley JE. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Chicago, IL, 2/12 Perceptions of Physical Therapist Assistants in Minnesota Regarding the Legality of Performing Joint Mobilization. Berry JW, Verschyl M, Wilson D. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Chicago, IL, 2/12 Prevalence of Low Back Pain among Professional Orchestral Musicians, Berry JW, Mabey RL. Performing Arts Medicine Association Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 7/11 Nationwide Survey and Analysis of Burnout among Physical Therapist Assistant Program Directors. Berry JW, Hosford CC. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, New Orleans, LA. 2/11

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Justin W. Berry Research Presentations, Oral, Cont.: Perceptions and Prevalence of Academic Dishonesty among Students Enrolled in Technical Healthcare Programs Within the Minnesota State College and University System. Christian DB (Presenter), Berry JW. International Center for Academic Integrity Annual International Conference, Long Beach, CA. 10/10 Interventions Performed by Physical Therapist Assistant Students During Clinical Education: A Nationwide Survey Regarding Consistency with APTA and CAPTE Positions. Berry JW. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, San Diego, CA. 2/10 Perceptions of Physical Therapist Assistant Program Directors on the Education and Clinical Role of the Physical Therapist Assistant. Berry JW, McCartney C APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Las Vegas, NV. 2/09 The Use of Iontophoresis for the Treatment of Peyronie’s Disease. Berry JW. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, San Diego, CA. 2/06

Research Presentations, Poster: A National Survey on Accrued Student Loan Debt by Doctor of Physical Therapy Students. Berry JW, Ibarra J, Kadelbach P, Peterson K, Tarnowski J, Weinreis D. APTA Combined Sections Meeting. Anaheim, CA, 2/16. A National Survey on Perceptions of DPT Students Regarding PTA Education and Clinical Practice. Berry JW, Weinreis D, Tarnowski J, Ibarra J, Kaylie P, Kadelbach P. APTA Combined Sections Meeting. Anaheim, CA, 2/16. Perceptions of PTA Program Directors on the Proliferation of PTA Educational Programs: A National Survey & Analysis. Berry JW, Becker B. APTA Combined Sections Meeting. Anaheim, CA, 2/16 Inter-rater Reliability of Visual Estimation of Hip and Knee Range of Motion by Physical Therapists and Physical Therapist Assistants. Berry JW, Hosford CC. Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society Annual Meeting. Portland, OR, 3/15 Perceptions of PTA Students For and Against a Transition to a Bachelor’s Degree Model. Berry JW, Jenson A, Vierzba S, Johnson. A. APTA Combined Sections Meeting. Indianapolis, IA, 2/15 Effects of theraband placement and stance position on hip abductor muscle activity. Foley H, Lee T, Berry JW, Lewis CL. APTA Combined Sections Meeting. Indianapolis, IA, 2/15 Resisted sidestepping: which leg works more? Lee T, Foley H, Berry JW, Lewis CL. APTA Combined Sections Meeting. Indianapolis, IA. 2/15 A National Survey and Analysis of PTA Students on PTA Program Length and Accrued Student Loan Debt. Berry JW, Miller K, Velasquez T. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, 2/14 Page 4 of 10

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Justin W. Berry Research Presentations, Poster, Cont.: Prospective Analysis of Injury Type and Incidence among NCAA Women’s Division I Hockey Players, Berry JW, Kennedy D, Hosford CC Australian Conference in Science & Medicine in Sport, Fremantle, Australia, 10/11 Interventions Performed by Physical Therapist Assistants: A Regional Survey on Perceptions and Clinical Practice. Berry JW, Benson RJ, Bowden, RG APTA Annual Conference & Exposition, Baltimore, MD. 6/09 Injury Type and Incidence Among Elite Curling Athletes During the 2008 World Men's Curling Championship. Berry JW, Romanick MA, Koerber SM Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine Annual Conference, Vancouver, BC, Canada. 6/09 The Effect of T’ai Chi Chih on Balance in the Elderly. Berry JW, Johnson BJ, APTA Combined Sections Meeting, San Antonio, TX. 2/01

Other Presentations: Building the Team: Academic Program Collaboration to Foster the PT/PTA Relationship. Flom-Meland C, Hanks J, Rogers C, Berry JW. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Anaheim, CA. 2/16 (Accepted). Extreme Assessment Makeover: PTA Program Edition. (Preconference workshop). Bohm T, Berry JW. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Anaheim, CA. 2/16 (Accepted) 2014 PTA Update. Berry JW, McKnight BS Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.9/14 Tales of Low Pass Rate Survivors: Strategies for Improving NPTE Pass Rates for Physical Therapist Assistant Programs. Berry JW, Bohm T. APTA Combined Sections Meeting, Las Vegas, NV. 2/14 2012 PTA Update. Berry JW, McKnight BS Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN, 9/12 Joint Mobilization and the PTA: Exploring the Consistencies and Inconsistencies among the APTA, FSBPT, CAPTE, State Boards of PT and Clinical Practice. Berry JW. Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy Annual Meeting, Denver, CO 10/10 So You Are a PTA Program Director. What Do You Do Now? (Preconference workshop) McKnight BS, Berry JW. APTA Annual Conference, Boston, MA. 6/10

Continuing Education Courses Taught: ●Assessment and Treatment of Running Injuries for the PTA (7.5 hours) Mt. Hood Community College, Portland, OR 3/14 Iowa PT Association Fall Conference, Ames, IA 10/13 Southeast Community College, Lincoln, NE, 6/13 Page 5 of 10

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Justin W. Berry Continuing Education Courses Taught, Cont.: ●Assessment and Treatment of Running Injuries for the PTA (7.5 hours) Northland Community & Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN, 5/13 Oklahoma PT Association Annual Meeting, Oklahoma City, OK, 4/13 ●Evidence-Based Spinal Stabilization for the PTA (7.5 hours) Iowa Physical Therapy Association Fall Conference, Ames, IA 11/15 Nebraska Physical Therapy Association Spring Conference, Kearney, NE, 4/15 ●Evidence-Based Spinal Stabilization for the PTA (7.5 hours) Olympic College, Poulsbo, WA, 3/15 Western Iowa Tech Community College, Sioux City, IA, 3/13 Trinity Health, Minot, ND, 1/13 Carrington College, Mesa, AZ, 10/12 Whatcom Community College, Bellingham, WA, 9/12 Lake Washington Technical Institute, Kirkland, WA, 9/12 St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN, 7/12 Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee, WI, 6/12 Volunteer State Community College, Gallatin, TN, 6/12 Montana State University College of Technology, Great Falls, MT, 4/12 Pima Medical Institute, Denver, CO, 4/12 Madison Technical College, Madison, WI, 1/12 Iowa PT Association Fall Conference, Ames, IA, 10/11 Oklahoma PT Association Midyear Meeting, Tulsa, OK, 8/11 New England Institute of Technology, Warwick, RI, 6/11 Southeast Community College, Lincoln, NE, 6/11 Mt. Hood Community College, Portland, OR, 1/11 West Virginia PT Association Winter Meeting, Beckley, WV, 12/10 Douglas County Hospital, Alexandria, MN, 9/10 St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN, 7/10 Springfield Community Technical College, Springfield, MA, 6/10 Meriter Health System, Middleton, WI, 5/10 Chippewa Valley Technical College, Eau Claire, WI, 5/10 Montana PT Association Spring Conference, Great Falls, MT, 4/10 Laramie County Community College, Cheyenne, WY, 3/10 Williston State College, Williston, ND, 1/10 Prairie Rehabilitation Services, Sioux Falls, SD, 10/09 Lake Superior College, Duluth, MN, 7/09 Colby Community College, Colby, KS, 6/09 North Dakota PT Association, Grand Forks, ND, 12/09 ●Manual Therapy Refresher for the Physical Therapist (7.5 hours) Northland Community & Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN 12/10 ●Evidence-Based Stabilization of the Spine and Shoulder (12 hours) Mat-Su Regional Medical Center, Wasilla, AK, 9/09 North Iowa Area Community College, Mason City, IA, 4/09 Deaconess Hospital, Bozeman, MT, 3/08 San Juan College, Farmington, NM, 10/08 ●Introduction to Manual Therapy (7.5 hours) MSU College of Technology, Great Falls, MT, 10/14 St. Mary’s Physical Medicine Center, Grand Junction, CO, 11/13 Page 6 of 10

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Justin W. Berry Continuing Education Courses Taught, Cont.: ●Introduction to Manual Therapy (7.5 hours) Whatcom Community College, Bellingham, WA, 9/13 Olympic College, Poulsbo, WA 9/13 Aurora BayCare Medical Center, Green Bay WI, 9/08 Spooner Physical Therapy, Phoenix, AZ, 6/08 North Iowa Area Community College, Mason City, IA, 4/08 Williston State College, Williston, ND, 4/08 Meriter Health System, Middleton, WI, 11/07 Mountain View Physical Therapy, Great Falls, MT, 6/07 Deaconess Health Care, Bozeman, MT, 4/07 ● Co-taught with Jim Cenova, PT, MPT, OCS, Cert MDT Momentum Physical Therapy, Fort Collins, CO, 6/07 ●Introduction to Manual Therapy (12 hours) ●Co-taught with Kirk Hayes, PT, MPT, Cert MDT Oregon Orthopedic PT Study Group, Portland, OR, 1/07 Therapeutic Associates, Bend, OR, 11/06 ●Co-taught with Kirk Hayes, PT, MPT, Cert MDT Spooner Physical Therapy, Phoenix, AZ, 8/06 North Iowa Area Community College, Mason City, IA, 3/06 San Juan College, Farmington, NM, 11/05 Rehab Authority Boise, ID, 8/05 Williston State College, Williston, ND, 3/05 University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, 2/05 ●Co-taught with Eldon Johnson, PT, MPT, CSCS Kootenai Medical Center, Coeur d’Alene, ID, 10/06

Awards: 2015 Northland Community & Technical College Faculty Nominee for the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Board of Trustees, Outstanding Educator Award 2014 F.A. Davis Award for Outstanding Physical Therapist Educator American Physical Therapy Association Board of Directors 2001-2002 Faculty Member of the Year, Northwest Technical College, MN

Professional Development: Institutional Review Board 101, 11/15 Concussion Evaluation & Management, 4/14 APTA Combined Sections Meeting, 2013-2009, 2006, 2001 APTA Annual Conference, 2010, 2009 CAPTE On-site Visitor Training, 7/12 Topics in Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, 3/09 FSBPT Item Writer Workshop, 7/08 CAPTE Self-Study Workshop, 10/07 APTA Education Section New Faculty Development Workshop, 8/07 McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, Part C, 5/07 Page 7 of 10

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Justin W. Berry Professional Development, cont.: CAPTE Self-Study Workshop, 2/06 Mulligan Concept Lower Quadrant, 3/04 Mulligan Concept Upper Quadrant, 5/03 Pilates Based Rehabilitation Course, 4/03 Conditions, Concepts, and Evaluation of the Foot/Ankle, 3/03 Clinical Advances in the Treatment of Pelvic Impairment, 2/03 Red Flags on the Horizon, 1/03 Cervical Spine Exercise Programs, 11/02 Mobilization of the Nervous System, 9/02 APTA Clinical Instructor Education and Credentialing Program, 9/02 McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, Part B, 3/02 Orthopedics for the Aging Adult, 9/01 Medicare from A to Z, 7/02 Conditions, Concepts, and Evaluation of the Upper Extremity, 4/01 McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, Part A, 3/01 Altru Health System Sports Medicine Symposium, 4/00 Marketing for the Physical Therapist, 1/00 Rehab Options for Women, 10/99 Red River Valley Sports Medicine Symposium, 6/99 Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Athletic Shoulder Injuries, 5/99 Pan American Games Volunteer Sports Medicine Educational Seminars, 10/98-4/99

Physical Therapist Licensure: Minnesota: PT License # 7210 North Dakota: PT License # 1202

Guest Lectures: University of North Dakota, Department of Physical Therapy ●PT 522, The role of the Physical Therapist Assistant, Spring 2010-2015 ●PT 519, Iontophoresis for the treatment of Peyronie’s Disease, Summer 2008-2015 University of North Dakota, Department of Teaching and Learning ●T&L 548, The Community College Faculty Position, Fall 2011-2015 University of North Dakota, Department of Music ●Musician Injuries, Spring 2013, Spring 2005, Fall 2002

Academic Committees/Service: Northland Community and Technical College ●College President Search Advisory Committee, Fall 2014-Present ●Strategic and New Program Development Committee, Fall 2012-Present ●Shared Governance Committee, Fall 2010 – Present ●OTA Instructor Search Committee, Summer 2012 ●PTA Club Advisor, 2011-2012

●Assessment and Program Sustainability Committee, Spring 2010 . ●Faculty Mentoring Work Group, Fall 2009 ●Search Committee, Practical Nursing Instructor, Summer 2009 ●Paramedicine Program Sustainability Committee, Fall 2008-Spring 2009 Page 8 of 10

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Justin W. Berry Academic Committees/Service. Cont.: ●Search Committee, Biology Instructor, Summer 2008 ●Massage Therapy Program Advisory Committee, Spring 2008-Fall 2010 ● Search Committee, Director of Financial Aid, Spring 2008 ●Institutional Review Board, 1/08-present; co-chair, 2012-Present ●Dining Services Task Group, 11/07-5/08 ●Marketing and Recruiting Task Group, 9/07-5/09 ●Healthy Campus Committee, chair, 5/06-present, co-chair 5/06-9/09 ●Student Wellness Club Advisor, 2006-2007 ●Search Committee, Director of Financial Aid, Fall 2006 ●Search Committee, PTA ACCE/Instructor, Fall 2006 ●Search Committee, Cardiovascular Technology Program Director, Fall 2006

Grant Activity: North Dakota Physical Therapy Association Research Grant, 5/12 ●EMG Analysis of the Gluteus Medius During Theraband Exercises, $300 (Funded) Northland Community and Technical College Foundation Grant, 10/09 North Dakota Physical Therapy Association Research Award, 8/09 ●Burnout Among Physical Therapists in Frontier Counties. $500 (Funded) Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Awards for Excellence, 2007 ●Designing and Implementing H-POD: Health Program Orientation Day Co-wrote with Ruth LeTexier, BSN; and Elizabeth McMahon, MS Ed. $4500 (Funded) ●Designing an Interdisciplinary Discussion Board and Patient Case Studies, Co-wrote with Julie Grabanski, OT, MSA; and Barb Forrest, RN, MS, $4500 (Funded) ●Integrating Information from APTA’s New Faculty Workshop into the NCTC PTA Program. Co-wrote with Shelley Koerber, PT, MSPT, ATC. $10,000 (Funded) North Dakota Physical Therapy Association Research Grant, 8/06 ●Perceptions and Current Clinical Practice of Physical Therapist Assistants Performing Joint Mobilizations and Sharp Instrument Debridement. $350 (Funded) Perkins New Program Development Grant, Fall 2005 ●PTA program development funding for NCTC-EGF. $8000 (Funded)

Professional Associations and Service: American Physical Therapy Association ●Education, Health Policy & Administration, and Research Section Member North Dakota Physical Therapy Association ●Nominating Committee, 10/12-present, Chair, 2013-2015 ●Public Relations Committee, 2009-2012 ●Quality Assurance Committee, 2007-2009, Chair, 2007-2009 ●Continuing Education Committee, 2002-2003 Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy ●Item writer for the National Physical Therapy Examination for the PTA, 7/08-10/08 Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education ●PTA Program On-Site Reviewer, 2012-Present Page 9 of 10

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Justin W. Berry

Graduate Committee Service Committee for Karen Znajda, M.S. Nursing, MSU-Moorhead ●Member at Large, 2012

Community Service Grand Forks Library Board, Grand Forks, ND ●Board Member, 2015-Present Riverside Neighborhood Association, Grand Forks, ND ●Co-chair, 2014-Present Cub Scouts, Grand Forks, ND ●Co-Den Leader, 2014-2015

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11/14/15 To Whom It May Concern: I am proud to write this letter in support of Mr. Justin Berry, my favorite teacher of all time. I was accepted into the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program in 2010 at Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN. Here is where I met Justin, the founder and director of the PTA program. I am extremely fortunate to have had Justin as an instructor, and now as a mentor and friend. The expectations were high and the course-load was intense, but Justin made sure each of us would stay on track throughout our two year schooling. There was comfort in knowing that he would do anything to help us academically, especially if we were having difficulty with the fast-paced work. With his leadership, passion, and encouragement, his goal was to see us succeed to our highest potential. Justin is extremely knowledgeable with the coursework he teaches. This is due to his years of experience in the therapy field. He started as a Physical Therapist Assistant, moved on to earn a Physical Therapist degree, and is now currently the Director of the PTA program, with many other credentials to list. His program has many successful graduating classes, with many of us working in the field. I am one of them. I share my experience with others about PTA school and how remarkable Justin is. The most enjoyable quality of Justin’s teaching has been his down to earth attitude and fun and sarcastic sense of humor. This allows him to connect with his students. I have seen him portray this with those around him. He is able to keep a positive and comforting learning environment. Justin has been an essential part to his past and present students. He is truly my favorite teacher of all time. Sincerely, Brenda Wiser

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November 1st, 2015 Minnesota State Colleges and Universities 30 7th St. East, Suite 350, St. Paul, MN 55101-7804

I am writing this letter on behalf of Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS and 2014 recipient of “F.A. Davis Award for Outstanding Physical Therapist Assistant Educator” because it is my belief that he is well qualified to be the recipient of this year’s Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Board of Trustees educator of the year award. In my professional opinion, as a recent graduate from Northland Community and Technical College’s Physical Therapist Assistant program, Mr. Berry is the perfect model educator in a school of medicine. He is a highly dedicated professional who knows how to motivate each of his students to strive for excellence in what is already a very competitive field of practice. Besides the ability to make complex subjects understandable, he is a humble and approachable person who enjoys sharing his extensive knowledge with others. Mr. Berry has gone to extensive lengths to not only provide top quality education through countless hours of advanced practice research, but as part of the program gathers his students and those of University of North Dakota’s Physical Therapists program together so that there can be a stronger bond between PTs and PTAs in the field leading to highest quality patient care possible. As a Therapist who performed his clinical rotations all across Southern MN, Southeastern SD and currently provides care in the surrounding Grand Forks, ND region; I have never seen a stronger bond between PTs and PTAs than in our local community thanks to the dedicated work Mr. Berry brings to the program. Many know as a first year student, I struggled immensely to keep up with my fellow colleagues. I excelled in practicals, labs, assignments, and spent enough after hours in the lab for it to be my forwarding address; however, the test results never showed my dedication to the program because I also suffered from severe test anxiety. If not for Mr. Berry’s one-on-one education and constant motivation to overcome the challenges I faced; not only do I believe that I would have failed the program, but never would have been honored by my peers and instructors with a “Physical Therapist Assistant student of the year” award at the end of my graduating year. I will be forever grateful for all the extra time he took out of his day not only during school hours, but also before and after class as well to help me further my skills making tests more achievable. In closing and with best regards to Mr. Berry that I recommend he be selected as recipient of this year’s Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Board of Trustees educator of the year award. Caleb Sperl, PTA 3500 30th Ave South, Grand Forks, ND 58201 Page 35

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To Whom It May Concern, Those who have ever sat through a Justin Berry lecture can most likely reiterate a lot of information, some extremely detailed and important while others are random, but relatable. If you do not already know Justin Berry, honestly, I am surprised you haven’t had the pleasure. Here is a glimpse of inside knowledge from a former Physical Therapist Assistant student, current friend and colleague. I have known Justin and his family for approximately eight years. He is not only a remarkable instructor at Northland Community and Technical College (NCTC), he is also a loving and caring husband, father of three and most importantly a mentor to myself and many countless others, not to mention those throughout the community. Justin is an instructor that came from a broken mold. He has a way of touching each and every person in a way that stays with you far past college graduation. Many years later, I still can recall statements made by Justin from class just because he presented the information in a fun, yet thorough manner. He was always available to answer any and all questions you may have, even if it is not class related. He not only is an impressive instructor, he is the director of the entire PTA program at NCTC. He consistently teaches a multitude of students, attends inservices and continuing education courses to better improve the program to keep his students ahead in the professional world of Physical Therapy. I can personally tell you how compassionate and dedicated he is to his students simply because of his willingness to encourage and motivate his students throughout college and life in general. When I graduated college, I was 6 months pregnant with my first child. I was extremely stressed out with finals, studying for PTA State board exam, delivery of my first born and of course, finding my first professional job. He was available throughout the entire journey, even when I failed my first board exam by one point. He called me the next day willing to talk and mentor me through the next step of how to study better and what specific books to study from to increase my score. The failure left me very sad, yet Justin never stopped encouraging. He took time out of his very busy life to uplift and lead me in a positive direction. I will forever owe Justin and his first rate PTA program for passing the next board exam and I am now a successful Physical Therapist Assistant. I highly recommend Justin Berry for this outstanding award, as he has worked tirelessly to educate, encourage and lead his students at the collegiate and professional level. It has been an honor to recommend my mentor, Justin Berry. Thanks for your consideration, Cari Desrosier, PTA

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To whom it may concern: My name is Hailey Klarenbeek, I graduated from the NCTC PTA program in 2012. Justin Berry deserves the outstanding educator award because he is a great program director, teacher, and mentor to all of his students. The first reason he deserves this award is because he is committed. In the time I was in the program, I learned that Justin was “all in” for each and every one of us students. I saw all the adjustments he made each year to the program to make the student success rate improve. Another thing that I really appreciated about Justin as a teacher was that he was so resourceful. He is always up on the latest research in the therapy world, but he doesn’t just read about the new research, he also is a part of making and writing some of the latest research. He loves research and statistics, and gets his students involved as subjects in some of his studies. By doing this, he inspired us as students to keep up with the latest news and research as well, making us better therapists. I always felt I could ask Justin almost anything and he either would know the answer or he would find the answer for me. At various times during the program we had to research certain diagnoses or different methods of treatment and present to the class. Although research isn’t my favorite thing to do, he made it more interesting for me because he showed so much passion about it and helped me to realize the importance of it. I am able to apply those skills today in my career to help me improve my patient care. Justin always encouraged us to get involved in various organizations and associations whether it be within the school, state, or national level, he wanted us to be involved and to stay involved so that we could be a voice for our practice. He led by example when it came to that by being a member of the APTA, and more organizations than I could ever keep track of. He was always a voice for us as PTAs. There are people within the therapy field that will belittle the PTA profession saying they aren’t necessary or that they’re not as important as physical therapists. As a physical therapist himself, he speaks at national conventions educating therapists on the PTA scope of practice and the role that we play in the therapy field. This shows how much he really cares and believes in us. Now that I am a PTA in the work field, I can appreciate everything he brought to the classroom. He taught me what I need to know to get the job done, but also he encouraged me to go above and beyond as a therapist by going above and beyond himself. I wrote this letter because I think he really does deserve to be recognized for all the work he has put in to not only the PTA program and I truly feel that I was blessed to have him as a teacher. Thank you, Hailey Klarenbeek

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December 13, 2015 Dear MnSCU Educator of the Year Selection Committe, I would like to express my admiration and appreciation for Justin Berry, Physical Therapist Assistant Program Director for Northland Community and Technical College. Due to his tremendous commitment to my learning and the learning of my peers, I believe that he is the strongest candidate for this prestigous award. I have known Justin since October of 2012 When I visted NCTC to determine if they were the rigth fit for me to pursue my associate's degree in the PTA field. I was a 32 year old from Wisconsin and had not been on a college campus since I graduated from UW-Eau Claire in 2004, so I, of course, had reservations about moving 6 hours away from my friends and family to atten NCTC. My reservations were immediately quelled when I met Justin and he spoke about his passion for not only Physical Therapy, but also for teaching and mentoring students. Justin treated his classes, not as a time to lecture students, but rather, as a time for interaction and discussion. Justin had an impressive ability to connect with all of his students, no matter what their background or level of knowledge of the subject at hand. Justin was not focused on note memorization, instead he challenged us to build our own thinking skills that would make us the best PTA's possible. Justin is a frequent presenter at State and National Physical Therapy Conferences; is an active, published researcher; and also a respected continuing education instructor throughout the United States. Even with all of these accomplishments, Justin's main priority continues to be to inspire and educate the next generation of PTA professionals. Justin Berry represents the vision set forth by the MnSCU and has my unconditional support in receiving the MnSCU educator of the year award. He truly deserves it. Sincerely,

Jay Adelmann Big Stone Therapies PTA internal Travler NCTC class of 2015

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12/20/2015 To whom it may concern, It gives me great pleasure to support the nomination of Justin Berry for this Outstanding Educator Award. I first met Justin in 2010 when I began pursuing a position in his highly sought after program. Justin readily responded to my inquiry emails and assisted me in securing a place in the 2013 class of Physical Therapist Assistants. My appreciation of Justin came early as I was an older than average student and felt a bit out of my element pursuing higher education. Justin assisted to make this a smooth transition for me. My greater appreciation for Justin came later when I began to realize just how busy of a man he is and yet he willingly took the extra time to assist me. I realized early on in the program that Justin was incredibly intelligent and articulate. He was able to take an absurd amount of information and put it into a two year program in a way that we could understand, assimilate and regurgitate with purpose. I was continually impressed with the ease of which Justin could lecture. It was as if the information was as second nature as breathing for him. I had no doubt that this was a man who had a thorough grasp on the subject at hand. I feel privileged to have learned my skills from him! I appreciated the many ways that Justin presented the information that we needed to learn. We were provided tangible learning aides prior to class and his lectures were always accompanied with visual or audio aides, models, personal clinical experiences, experiences of colleagues and most importantly warmth and humor! I had the utmost confidence in Justin’s information because it was backed with the newest research and references were always provided. Although I was amazed to learn of all that Justin has accomplished in our field it did not come as a surprise to me. Justin set an exemplary example of ethics and professionalism for us and was liked by all. Justin maintained an approachableness and willingness to answer questions and clarify any confusion I may have had along the way. As I look back I realize that Justin had incredible patience with me which I greatly appreciate as I was a particularly intense student! I always felt Justin’s commitment and genuine interest in our individual success. He has also continued to assist us after we graduated, looked for positions and as newly working therapists. I have now been working for two years since graduation and I still feel comfortable contacting him with questions and concerns. I will never forget what Justin has done for me through the Physical Therapist Assistant Program. I cannot imagine a better individual than Justin to receive this prestigious award. All of his hard work, dedication and success truly deserve to be recognized! Thank you for your time and the opportunity to give back to the instructor that has given me so very much!

Sincerely, Tamara McClintock, PTA

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Additional PTA Program Alumni Quotes from Letters and Emails “Justin is one of the best teachers I have had the privilege of learning from in my academic career” Program Graduate, Class of 2013 “In my two years at NCTC studying under Justin I’ve learned more than in my four years in a state university. Justin is always getting the latest information for his students, getting them prepared for the PTA field” Program Graduate, Class of 2013 Justin as a researcher himself is always teaching his students the latest information and how to validate that information” Program Graduate, Class of 2013 “Justin works hard so all his students can pass the Boards Exam and find a career, He uses his own experience from school, career, teaching, and in research so his students are educated and well aware of the obstacles the can face in the PTA field” Program Graduate, Class of 2013 “Justin is very knowledgeable about research, providing his students with the most up to date information” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “During clinicals and even still, Justin makes himself available as best he can for his students to use him as a reference” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “I stay in contact with Justin so he can still help with any questions even though I have graduated” Program Graduate, Class of 2010 “Justin Berry is a profound, hard‐working, goal oriented professor and program director. He pushed his students to strive to meet their goals” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Justin is able to help his students to understand the book material by explaining and working hands‐on with students during lab. Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Justin is a great inspiration. He has taught me very much throughout my PTA career. Justin saw the potential in myself and helped me feel confident that I knew/know what I was doing.” Program Graduate, Class of 2010 “He is one who will explain and answer your questions until you understand the advanced material he is teaching” Program Graduate, Class of 2014

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“Justin has a very well rounded approach towards teaching, I feel his success as a teacher comes from his ability to relate and build rapport with his students by sharing stories from when he was a student himself. Justin stays constant on emerging research and advancements in PT, allowing him to teach the techniques students need to be successful. Justin's knowledge and expertise, and his ability to convey that information, is what sets him apart, and allows his students to excel. “ Program Graduate, Class of 2014 He was always willing to answer any question and made whatever I was unsure of clear. He makes sure that you have tried to find the answer yourself before giving it to you and explained where to find additional information on the topic to help understand. This made me more independent and confident in myself and my abilities when I became a PTA.” Program Graduate, Class of 2012 “Justin Berry was one of my favorite instructors and really inspired me to be the PTA that I am today. I feel lucky to have had him as an educator, and he deserves all the recognition that he receives.” Program Graduate, Class of 2012 “His lectures always had so much research and proof of the techniques. Justin was always able to answer any question we had, and if he didn’t know, he would do the research and help us understand at the next lecture.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “The entire time in the program Justin did anything he could to help us succeed.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Justin is an outstanding professional teacher and mentor” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Justin demonstrated a great deal of concern for his students and past students. He always had a great attitude in every class.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “He was willing to take time in areas that needed longer time learning, if it was by staying longer during his day or coming in on a day off to help go over it again.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Justin prepared us well for the employment as a physical therapist assistant throughout the two year program with his knowledge and education as a physical therapist.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Having Justin as a teacher while going through the PTA Program, I feel I was ready for employment as a PTA. His knowledge and care he puts forth for his students and past students shows through when teaching” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “I feel Mr. Berry’s classes were very interesting and fun to attend, partially because he was enthusiastic about what he was teaching” Program Graduate, Class of 2014

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“He was always prepared and we could dive right into the lesson each day. He was able to make the class fun with projects like assessing our own environment or going into the community using wheelchairs” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “He often shared personal experiences of different scenarios he has been in during his career, which was often helpful to hear some things we may come across and interesting to hear how to handle it.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Mr. Berry was a caring teacher in that we felt he was always rooting for us to do well and was always willing to help any way he could. He was also a good supporter, often giving us encouragement before big exams or practicals when he saw we were over‐stressing.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Not only did he teach us everything in the curriculum thoroughly, he also taught us extra information that helped us study and prepare for our careers. If we ever gave him the blank stare of confusion he was able to backtrack and explain in a different way that we all understood.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “I have found Justin to be a dedicated professor who is genuinely concerned with the success of his students and knowledge in the field of physical therapy” Program Graduate, Class of 2013 “He was able to balance his time well and was always quick to answer any questions we had. He also spent time researching and keeping us up to date on new practices and techniques.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “He continues to stay in contact with us even after graduation and informs us of big changes and interesting research” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “If it was not for Justin’s continuous support I would not be a PTA today. He was always there for me and others to help, inform, and educate.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Dr. Berry is such an asset to the Physical Therapy world and I am so glad I had the privilege to learn from him.” Program Graduate, Class of 2012 “Justin is highly dedicated to his students. He always took the time for students who needed additional instruction after class hours with understanding a concept. He has a personable character that provided for open communication with his students and an enjoyable learning atmosphere” Program Graduate, Class of 2013

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“He was always prepared and we could dive right into the lesson each day. He was able to make the class fun with projects like assessing our own environment or going into the community using wheelchairs” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “He often shared personal experiences of different scenarios he has been in during his career, which was often helpful to hear some things we may come across and interesting to hear how to handle it.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Mr. Berry was a caring teacher in that we felt he was always rooting for us to do well and was always willing to help any way he could. He was also a good supporter, often giving us encouragement before big exams or practicals when he saw we were over‐stressing.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Not only did he teach us everything in the curriculum thoroughly, he also taught us extra information that helped us study and prepare for our careers. If we ever gave him the blank stare of confusion he was able to backtrack and explain in a different way that we all understood.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “I have found Justin to be a dedicated professor who is genuinely concerned with the success of his students and knowledge in the field of physical therapy” Program Graduate, Class of 2013 “He was able to balance his time well and was always quick to answer any questions we had. He also spent time researching and keeping us up to date on new practices and techniques.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “He continues to stay in contact with us even after graduation and informs us of big changes and interesting research” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “If it was not for Justin’s continuous support I would not be a PTA today. He was always there for me and others to help, inform, and educate.” Program Graduate, Class of 2014 “Dr. Berry is such an asset to the Physical Therapy world and I am so glad I had the privilege to learn from him.” Program Graduate, Class of 2012 “Justin is highly dedicated to his students. He always took the time for students who needed additional instruction after class hours with understanding a concept. He has a personable character that provided for open communication with his students and an enjoyable learning atmosphere” Program Graduate, Class of 2013

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Iowa Physical Therapy Association 2015 Fall Conference Spinal Stabilization for the Physical Therapist Assistant Taught by Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS

Quotes from Course Evaluation “Justin was an awesome speaker! I’d definitely go to another course with him” “Justin is a great instructor, enthusiastic, and knowledgeable” “Engaging Speaker” “I appreciated the interjected humor!” “Very energetic and Justin was hilarious!” “Kept my attention the whole time. Well organized. Learned a lot!” “Nice sense of humor. Very knowledgeable!” “I really enjoyed this course” “Justin was very knowledgeable and very interactive.” “He was very knowledgeable on the subject and had great information.” “Justin was a great presenter! Made listening to the material fun & interactive.” “Great presentation. Humor kept it interesting.” “This was the most I have learned at a CEU class in a while”

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RESEARCH ARTICLE

 Burnout Among Physical Therapist Assistant Program Directors A Nationwide Survey and Analysis Justin W. Berry, PT, DPT, MS Charles C. Hosford, PT, PhD ment.2,3 It is estimated that decreased employee retention and productivity due to burnout annually cost U.S. businesses up to $200 billion.4 Over the past 30 years, efforts to research and decrease burnout have increased due to a desire to minimize its negative outcomes, which include cynicism, employee turnover, and job dissatisfaction.5 Directors of physical therapist assistant (PTA) education programs are required to manage multiple responsibilities and hold a unique position within physical therapy education. In addition to performing duties common to other faculty members, such as teaching, college service, and student advisement, they also have considerable responsibilities related to program administration, assessment, and accreditation. Some PTA program directors are also involved with direct patient care and/or scholarly activities, placing further demands on their time. The significant workload and number of responsibilities required of this position may increase the odds of developing occupational burnout. Burnout within this population may lead to decreased effectiveness of classroom instruction as well as problems with program outcomes and accreditation requirements. Although previous research has examined burnout within college faculty from many disciplines,6–8 no previous studies have explored burnout in PTA program directors. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of burnout in PTA program directors and analyze the relationship between individual and institutional factors and burnout.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess burnout in directors of physical therapist assistant (PTA) programs and to analyze the relationship between individual and institutional variables and burnout. METHODS: Surveys were completed by 120 directors from accredited PTA programs. The surveys consisted of demographic information and the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Educators Survey (MBI-ES). The MBI-ES assesses burnout in the areas of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. RESULTS: PTA program directors showed moderate levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization, and high levels of personal accomplishment. Gender, the number of faculty in a department, and length of academic contract had no correlation with participant burnout levels. Significantly lower levels of emotional exhaustion were found in participants who were in their current position for more than 11 years and those who planned to remain in their current position or within higher education for at least 5 additional years. A significant negative correlation was found between participant age and depersonalization. DISCUSSION: PTA program directors and their institutions should develop strategies to minimize the effects of burnout in younger program directors and those in the early years of their position. J Allied Health 2014; 43(2):72–78.

BURNOUT, which affects individuals in many occupations, occurs in response to chronic interpersonal jobrelated stress.1 Individuals employed within human service-related professions such as education, social work, and health care are especially at risk for burnout develop-

Background Maslach and Leiter9 devised an occupational burnout model focusing on the degree of match between an individual and six specific work-life domains. The greater the mismatch between an individual and their job, the greater chance there will be for an individual to develop burnout. The six domains are:

Dr. Berry is Director of the Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, Minnesota; and Dr. Hosford is Assistant Professor in the Office of Medical Education, The University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota. RA1314—Received Apr 21, 2013; accepted Oct 6, 2013. Address correspondence to: Dr. Berry, Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, 2022 Central Ave. NE, East Grand Forks, MN 56721, USA. Tel 218-793-2565, fax 218-7932842. justin.berry@northlandcollege.edu.

(1) workload, including work intensity and time demands; (2) the amount of control one has over the resources needed to do their work; (3) lack of appropriate rewards for the work people perform, including financial and social rewards;

© 2014 Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions, Wash., DC.

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Research in Sports Medicine, 21:159–163, 2013 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1543-8627 print/1543-8635 online DOI: 10.1080/15438627.2012.757229

Injury Type and Incidence Among Elite Level Curlers During World Championship Competition JUSTIN W. BERRY Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, Minnesota, USA

Downloaded by [Justin Berry] at 10:27 01 April 2013

MARK A. ROMANICK Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Dakota, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA

SHELLEY M. KOERBER Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, Minnesota, USA

Our objective was to investigate the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by elite level curling athletes during international competition. This study was conducted during the 2008 World Men’s Curling Championships. All registered athletes and the tournament medical team were given report forms for documenting injuries that occurred during the tournament. Report form information included demographics, area injured, types of injuries sustained, and curling-specific aggravating conditions. During the competition five injuries were reported, resulting in an injury rate of .07 injuries per game. Only one reported injury resulted in missed competition (.014 injuries per game). All reported injuries involved increased pain during curling-specific activities. At the elite international competitive level, injury incidence in curling was found to be low. Future exploration over the

Received 16 November 2011; accepted 6 February 2012. The authors thank the World Curling Federation and the Ralph Engelstad Arena for their assistance in this study. Address correspondence to Justin W. Berry, Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, 2022 East Grand Forks, MN 56721, USA. E-mail: justin.berry@northlandcollege.edu 159

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[

research report

]

JUSTIN W. BERRY, PT, DPT1 • THERESA S. LEE, BS2 HANNA D. FOLEY, BS2 • CARA L. LEWIS, PT, PhD2

Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy® Downloaded from www.jospt.org at on September 1, 2015. For personal use only. No other uses without permission. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®. All rights reserved.

Resisted Side Stepping: The Effect of Posture on Hip Abductor Muscle Activation

W

eakness of the hip abductors is present in individuals with a range of musculoskeletal conditions, including femoroacetabular impingement,8 iliotibial band syn­ drome,17,20 patellofemoral pain,9,33,40,43 and chronic ankle 22 sprains. While the majority of studies measure overall hip abductor strength, reduced strength is typically interpreted as gluteus medius weakness.20,21,44 This interpretation is scientifically supported in that TTSTUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design.

TTOBJECTIVES: To compare hip abductor muscle

activity and hip and knee joint kinematics in the moving limb to the stance limb during resisted side stepping, and to determine whether muscle activity was affected by the posture (upright standing versus squat) used to perform the exercise.

TTBACKGROUND: Hip abductor weakness has

been associated with a variety of lower extremity injuries. Resisted side stepping is often used as an exercise to increase strength and endurance of the hip abductors. Exercise prescription would benefit from knowing the relative muscle activity level generated in each limb and for different postures during the side-stepping exercise.

TTMETHODS: Twenty-four healthy adults partici-

pated in this study. Kinematics and surface electromyographic data from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata were collected as participants performed side stepping with a resistive band around the ankle, while maintaining each of 2 postures: (1) upright standing and (2) squat.

TTRESULTS: Mean normalized electromyographic signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata was higher in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P≤.001). Gluteal muscle activity was higher, whereas tensor fascia lata muscle activity was lower, in the squat posture compared to the upright standing posture (P<.001). Hip abduction excursion was greater in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P<.001).

TTCONCLUSION: The 3 hip abductor muscles respond differently to the posture variations of the side-stepping exercise in healthy individuals. When prescribing resisted side-stepping exercises, therapists should consider the differences in hip abductor activation across limbs and variations in trunk posture. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(9):675-682. Epub 10 Jul 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5888 TTKEY WORDS: electromyography, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, strengthening, tensor fascia lata

the gluteus medius has the largest volume and physiological cross-sectional area of the hip abductors.18,19 Furthermore, the nonoptimal lower extremity kinematics associated with hip abductor weakness, excessive hip adduction and internal rotation and knee abduction during the weight-acceptance portion of the stance phase,10,28 is consistent with a reduced activation of the posterior portion of the gluteus medius.20,21,34 Gluteus medius weakness is hypothesized to result in compensatory excessive use of the tensor fascia lata (TFL).5,41 Increased TFL recruitment may subsequently lead to further gluteus medius atrophy.20 Because the TFL also internally rotates the hip,34 it is theorized that excessive TFL activity may further exacerbate the abnormal lower extremity movement patterns related to gluteus medius weakness.5,41 Therapeutic exercises are commonly used by clinicians to increase gluteus medius strength and enhance functional muscle recruitment patterns. These exercises often include a variation of resisted hip abduction, which activates all of the hip abductors, including the TFL.34 For some patient populations, it is important for clinicians to be mindful of excessive use of the TFL during therapeutic exercis-

1 Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN. 2Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA. Theresa Lee and Hanna Foley were students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at the time of the study. The protocol for this study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Boston University. Research reported in this manuscript was supported by a North Dakota Physical Therapy Association Research Grant, the Peter Paul Career Development Professorship, and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (National Institutes of Health) under award number K23 AR063235. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors certify that they have no affiliations with or financial involvement in any organization or entity with a direct financial interest in the subject matter or materials discussed in the article. Address correspondence to Dr Cara L. Lewis, Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215. E-mail: lewisc@bu.edu T Copyright ©2015 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®

journal of orthopaedic & sports physical therapy | volume 45 | number 9 | september 2015 |

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Physical Therapy Journal of Policy, Administration and Leadership September 2015 | Vol. 15 | No. 3

A Regional Survey & Analysis of Burnout among Physical Therapists in Frontier Counties Justin W. Berry, PT, DPT, MS / Charles C. Hosford, PT, PhD

Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess occupational burnout among physical therapists working and residing in frontier counties (less than or equal to six people per square mile), and analyze the relationship between burnout and demographic variables. Continued on page 3 » IN THIS ISSUE: HPA RESOURCE 32

President’s Message

37

Program Committee Update

33

Follow the Party to the Patio

38

Research Committee Update

35

Global Health SIG News

40

Book Review

36

Message from Technology SIG

41

Sustain and Grow Membership

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Official Publication of the Section on Health Policy & Administration of the American Physical Therapy Association


PTAS 1114 Lower Extremity ROM Assessment Skill Check *Indicates Critical Safety Element Student’s Name: Rating Procedure: RATING DEFINITIONS Each step/criteria will be rated with one of the following: + Acceptable performance of the step Unacceptable performance of the step. +/- Some components were performed at an acceptable level & at an unacceptable level. RATING CRITERIA PASS 1. Receives a - for no more than 2 non-asterisk steps 2. Or Receives a +/- for no more than 3 non-asterisk steps RETAKE

1. Receives a – for 3 or more nonasterisk steps 2. Or receives a +/- for 4 or more nonasterisk steps 3. Or failure of any critical safety element* 1. Check chart for diagnosis and restrictions 2. Plan treatment 3. Gather equipment & prepare treatment area 4. Wash hands 5. Identify patient and introduce self 6. Explain PROM & rationale/informed consent 7. Assess the following motions with a goniometer: Hip: Flexion, Extension, Abduction, Adduction, IR, ER Knee: Flexion, Extension Ankle: Dorsiflexion; Plantar flexion Tarsal joints: Inversion; eversion Subtalar joint (rearfoot): Inversion; eversion Metatarsophalangeal: Flexion; extension; abduction Great toe IP and PIP of 4 lesser toes: Flexion (Can miss a maximum of 2 motions, document any missed item/items in box) 8. Assess functional ROM for the lower extremities 9. Assess muscle length for the following: Hip Flexors (Thomas Test) Hamstrings (Straight Leg Test & 90-90 Test) Tensor Fasciae Latae (Ober Test) Rectus Femoris 10. Perform treatment demonstrating: o Ability to instruct & educate patient o Proper body mechanics/raise bed o Read measuring instrument o Record measurements correctly o Know normal ROM values 11. *Patient safety considerations: o Position, stabilize, and drape correctly o Move body part through appropriate ROM o Determine end-feel o Palpate appropriate bony landmarks o Align measuring instrument with landmarks o Monitor patient’s response (Ask how patient is feeling during treatment + observe facial expressions) o Bedrail up after treatment o Give patient call light o Lower bed at end of treatment 12. Position/drape patient for comfort & clean up area Reviewer Initials Reviewer Assessment of Skill: Pass/Retake Skill Check-Off

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Peer:

Peer:

Faculty:

Date:

Date:

Date:


PTAS 1114 DERMATOMES, MYOTOMES, & REFLEXES SKILL CHECK *Indicates Critical Safety Element Name ______________________________________

Rating Procedure:

RATING DEFINITIONS Each step/criteria will be rated with one of the following: + Acceptable performance of the step Unacceptable performance of the step. +/- Some components were performed at an acceptable level & at an unacceptable level. RATING CRITERIA PASS 1. Receives a - for no more than 2 non-asterisk steps 2. Or Receives a +/- for no more than 3 non-asterisk steps RETAKE

Peer:

Peer:

Faculty:

Date:

Date:

Date:

1. Receives a â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for 3 or more nonasterisk steps 2. Or receives a +/- for 4 or more non-asterisk steps 3. Or failure of any critical safety element*

Check chart for diagnosis and restrictions Gather equipment & prepare treatment area Wash hands Identify patient and introduce self (Nametag required for Practical) 5. Explain rationale for assessing dermatomes, myotomes and reflexes 6. Perform effective treatment: o Not missing any dermatomes or myotomes Dermatomes: Assess dermatomes from C1-T2 Assess dermatomes from L1-S2 (Each level counts as one item) Myotomes: Assess myotomes from C1-T1 Assess myotomes from L1-S2 (Each level counts as one item) Reflexes: Assess the following reflexes: Biceps, Brachioradialis, Triceps, Patellar, and Achilles (each reflex counts as one item) 7. Perform treatment demonstrating: o Ability to instruct & educate patient o Proper body mechanics 8. *Patient safety considerations: o Patient properly draped o Proper hand contact 9. Clean up area Reviewer Initials Reviewer Assessment of Skill: Pass/Retake Skill Check-Off 1. 2. 3. 4.

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PTAS 1105 VITAL SIGNS SKILL CHECK

*Indicates Critical Safety Element

Name ______________________________________

Rating Procedure:

RATING DEFINITIONS Each step/criteria will be rated with one of the following: + Acceptable performance of the step Unacceptable performance of the step. +/- Some components were performed at an acceptable level & at an unacceptable level. RATING PASS

CRITERIA 1. Receives a - for no more than 2 non-asterisk steps 2. Or Receives a +/- for no more than 3 non-asterisk steps

RETAKE

1. Receives a â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for 3 or more nonasterisk steps 2. Or receives a +/- for 4 or more nonasterisk steps 3. Or failure of any critical safety element*

Peer:

Peer:

Faculty:

Date:

Date:

Date:

Check chart for diagnosis and restrictions Plan treatment Gather equipment & prepare treatment area Wash hands Identify patient and introduce self Explain Procudure 7. Earpieces facing forward 8. Perform Correct Vital Sign Assessment of the Following: Pulse (Apically and at 2 peripheral sites) -within 5 bpm of instructor (or automatic retake) Blood Pressure -within 10 mm Hg for systolic & diastolic of Instructor (or automatic re-take) Respiration Rate -Demonstrate how this is assessed - Know correct rate -Describe chest wall expansion observed 8. *Patient safety considerations: o Properly draped for pulse assessment o For BP, U/E at level of heart o Proper inflation of cuff for BP 9. Clean up area Reviewer Initials Reviewer Assessment of Skill: Pass/Retake Skill Check-Off 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


PTAS 2115 Mock Clinic Patient Scenario Patient 2 Patient Script (information not seen by student PTA): Today the patient has AROM: -20° to 80°, PROM: -15° to 85°, with empty end feel and pain of 8/10 with movement near end range. Significant knee pain started to develop several hours after the last treatment session, and you were barely able to move your knee or walk yesterday (the day after the last treatment session) Last visit note, from two days ago (for student taking on the role of the student PTA). After reading the last visit note, you will have 30 minutes to develop a treatment plan and to carry out the treatment. Following the treatment, write a treatment not in SOAP format. S: 55 yo female who is 3 weeks postop left TKA. Pt. had staples removed 5 days ago. Pt. is ambulating with axillary crutches and is WBAT. Pt. has been seen 5 times in PT and is independent in HEP. No pain at rest or with ambulation. Pain of 6/10 with end range stretching. PMH: Patient has rheumatoid arthritis and has hypertension. Meds: Naproxen for RA. O: AROM: -10° to 95°, PROM: -5° to 102°. MMT: Able to perform SLR with slight extensor lag X 5 reps. Rx today: Manual stretching into flex/ext. Sitting knee ext with 3 lb to -25 degrees extension, knee flex with red t-band, AA-SLR, heel slides, mini squats. CP X 10 min after exercise. A: Pt. is having difficulty regaining ROM. Progress intensity of stretching and strengthening program next visit, as patient performed exercises easily today, except for end range extension; and add closed kinetic chain exercises to program AND add at least one CKC exercise to home program. P: Cont. 2-3X/week towards POC.

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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PTAS 1105 Fundamentals of PTA Environmental Assessment Presentation Grading Rubric: Name: _____________ 1. Each presentation will be 4-8 minutes in length and based on the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmental assessment

of the assigned portion of NCTC and of the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Use the assessment forms handed out in class for this assignment. Students will lose 2 points for every minute under 4 or over 8 for

a max of 6 lost points. Students will receive 2 points if their presentation is between 4-8 minutes. 2. Hand in your completed assessment forms, which are worth a maximum of 3 points, the day you are giving your presentation Organization

Home Environmental Assessment Information

Mechanics

Delivery

Time Assessment Forms

Grading Criteria 1 2 Poor Information is in organization and illogical progression, sequence, pictures do not inconsistent in complement organization, presentation lacks information Missing Missing information on information on some rooms, some rooms, does not recognizes most recognize most safety concerns safety concerns and barriers and barrier Presentation had Presentation had four or more three spelling errors misspellings and/or and/or grammatical grammatical errors. errors Student Student mumbles; has incorrectly incorrect pronounces some pronouncing of terms; audience terms; speaks has difficulty too quietly for hearing students in the presentation; back of class to minimal eye hear; contact with presentation is audience; mostly read from reading from slides/notes notes/slides * See above Assessment Portions of forms are assessment incomplete forms are incorrectly filled out

3 Some areas lack logical sequencing, progression, or are not well organized

4 Information organized logically. Pictures complement presentation

Basically describes home assessment. recognizes all safety concerns and barriers

Thoroughly describes home assessment including: bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and entryway -Recognize all safety concerns and barriers Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors. Visuals included

Presentation has no more than two misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Student's voice is clear. Student pronounces most words correctly. Explains, but does not elaborate on information

Student used a clear voice with correct pronunciation; holds attention of audience with the use of direct eye contact; seldom looking at notes; elaborates and fully explains material

Assessment forms are complete and accurate

N/A A Maximum of 3 points is available for this section

Total

Points

X2

/25

Comments: ___________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


PTAS 1105 Practical Examination 3 Rubric Name: _______________________ Category Planning -Check Chart for Restrictions -Plan Treatment -Gather Equipment -Efficiency of Treatment Pre-Implementation -Wash Hands -Wear Nametag -Introduce Self Implementation (Will perform 2 out of 3) -ROM Technique -Gait Training Technique -Vital Sign Communication -Scenario

Maximum Score Comments Points 2

.

.

.

2

6* 6* 3

Knowledge -Know joint motions 6* -Indications/Contraindications -Norms for vital signs -Proper gait cycle -Fit device properly Any Critical Safety Aspect Results in a Failing Grade -Miss more than 2 U/E or 1 L/E motion -Improper guarding -Improper gait belt usage -BP off more than 10 mmHG than instructor for systolic or diastolic -HR more than 5 bpm off from Instructor -Treat wrong side of body 25 *Each of these items is scored out of the 3 possible points on the practical exam rubric sheet (located on the back of this paper) and then multiplied by two. DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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PTAS 1105 Practical Examination 3 Rubric

3

KNOWLEDGE Knows and understands terms, facts, concepts, principles, theories and methods during lab practical.

IMPLEMENTATION/APPLICATION Applies knowledge, skills and methods to manipulate, analyze, synthesize, create and evaluate during lab practical.

-Descriptions during lab practical of terms, facts, concepts, principles, theories and methods are complete and correct.

-Applications are thorough, appropriate and accurate.

Examples: Correct indications/contraindicatio ns, knows correct vital sign norms, knows gait cycles, knows all joint motions -Descriptions during lab practical of terms, facts, concepts, principles, theories and methods are incomplete or have minor problems

2

Example: Incorrectly names one joint motion; minimal error in one vital sign norm; minor error in gait cycle, but is still safe for patient -Descriptions during lab practical of terms, facts, concepts, principles, theories and methods are very incomplete

1

Examples: Incorrectly names two joint motions; incorrectly names one vital sign norm; does not know gait cycles thoroughly to be used by patient

0

*SCORE Page 55

-All descriptions of scientific terms, facts, concepts, principles, theories and methods are missing and/or incorrect.

Examples: Performs ROM into full joint range for all motions; fits assistive device correctly, understands proper gait cycle to be used for patient, performs vital sign assessment correctly -Applications are mostly thorough, appropriate and accurate. Examples: Performs ROM not within full motion; omits one joint motion during ROM performance; improper, but still safe, guarding and assistive device fitting; minor error in vital sign assessment, but still obtains correct reading

-Applications are somewhat appropriate and accurate. Example: Omits two U/E joint motions; moderate error in performance of vital sign assessment, but still within parameters; Does not properly cue patient for weight bearing precautions

-All applications are missing and/or incorrect.

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

COMMUNICATION Communicates knowledge and applications through writing, speech, and visual displays during lab practical. -Written, oral and/or visual communication is well organized and effective. Examples: Introduce self to patient, good verbal/non-verbal communication and instruction to patient -Most of the written, oral and/or visual communication is well organized and effective. Examples: Gait/stair instruction is incomplete, does not fully explain procedures to patient -Some of the written, oral and/or visual communication is well organized and effective. Examples: Very incomplete communication/instru ction to patient regarding assessment techniques and interventions -All of the written, oral or visual communication is missing and/or lacks organization.


PTAS 1114 Practical Exam 2

Name:

Grading Introduce Self/Wear nametag: Muscle ID: Subtotal Goniometry Subtotal MMT

Total

_______/1 _______/4 _______/10 _______/10

_____/25

Goniometry Task

Scoring

Patient is in correct test position

Max points: 2

Accurate alignment of goniometer, inclinometer, CROM, or tape measure Read and make note of the starting measurement Determine that the proximal segment is stabilized Realign the device accurately after patient moves through AROM and record AROM Patient instruction Identify the normal range within 5 degrees* (if appropriate)

Score

Correct position: 2 Close to correct position and still able to do appropriate measure:1 Incorrect position: 0 Max points: 2 Correct Alignment: 2 Min error: 1 Maj. Error: 0 1

1

1

MMT Task

Scoring

Patient is in correct test position

Max points: 2

Resistance is given in correct location & direction

1

Palpate Correct muscle(s)

1

Be able to test grades 0-5 for motion Describe Testing & Movement To patient

Max points: 5 (1 point for each Correct grade)

Score

Correct position: 2 Close to correct position and still able to do appropriate measure:1 Incorrect position: 0

1

1 Within 5ยบ: 2 More than 5ยบ: 0*

Subtotal out of 10 Muscle ID 1. ______/2 Muscle ID 2. ______/2 Total: _______/4

Subtotal out of 10

2 points for correct placement, 1 point for missing origin or insertion, 0 points for missing both

*Automatic Retake Also automatic retake due to critical safety elements of: Wrong body part assessed, wrong joint motion assessed, improper draping.

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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PTAS 2115 Literature Review Grading Rubric: Name: _____________ 1. The literature review will be on a physical therapy topic of interest to the student. The

literature review will be 8-10 pages (this does not include the title page or references) in length and must be written in AMA format. A minimum of 7 references must be used in this paper, of which 5 must be articles from peer-reviewed journals. No web-sites may be used for references. If sources are not cited in your paper, this is plagiarism and you will receive an automatic failing grade on the assignment. 2. The rough draft must be at least 4 pages in length and should include a minimum of 3 references. If rough draft does not fit these requirement = -25% of overall assignment grade

3. A maximum of 2 points will be granted for a paper length of 8-10 pages. For each page over 10 you will lose 2 points, for each page under 8 you will lose 5 points. 4. A maximum of 3 points will be granted for using at least 7 references, with 5 from peerâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;reviewed journals. If you do not meet these criteria, you will lose 50% off your paper grade. Organization

Rough Draft

Grading Criteria 1 2 Difficult to Information is in understand, no illogical real progression sequence, or sequencing of inconsistent in information organization, lacks information 1 page OR 2 pages OR < 1 reference 2 references

Introduction

Missing either area of concern or research question

Mechanics

Paper has four or more spelling errors and/or grammatical errors, including AMA mistakes

Research use

.Minimal use of research or very unorganized use of research

References Length

General topic, issue, or area of concern is not clearly defined AND research question is not clearly defined Paper has three misspellings and/or grammatical errors, including AMA mistakes Inconsistent use of research articles in supporting research question

3 Some areas lack logical sequencing, progression, or are not well organized.

4 Consistent logical sequencing and progression, well organized, easy to follow

3 pages & 3 references

4 pages & 3 references

General topic, issue, or area of concern is not clearly defined OR research question is not clearly defined Paper has no more than two misspellings and/or grammatical errors including AMA mistakes Uses research articles clearly most of the time within body of paper

General topic, issue, or area of concern is clearly defined. Plus research question clearly defined. Paper has no misspellings or grammatical errors. Correct AMA formatting

*See above

Points

Uses research articles clearly to assist in answering research question

* See above

Total

/25X2= /50

Comments: ___________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


Shoulder Shoulder Conditions Rehab

Elbow

Wrist & Hand

Odds & Ends

100

100

100

100

100

200

200

200

200

200

300

300

300

300

300

400

400

400

400

400

500

500

500

500

500

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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PTAS 1108 Case Studies (Performed in Groups during lecture as formative assessment)

1. A patient is being seen in PT following a MVA where they sustained a Grade II sprain of the MCL & ACL of their right knee. The injury occurred the previous day. They are currently in a knee support and are taking Ibuprofen A) How would the four signs of inflammation be present in this patient (give examples) B) What are the actions of the medication in this scenario. What is one possible side effect of this medication? 2. A patient has sustained 2nd degree burns to 25% of their body, including their entire left arm. A) What type of functional complications may this patient have due to burns? B) What are some of the main concerns for a patient in the acute care setting for a burn patient? C) What is the difference in appearance and treatment for all three degrees of burns (know both names) D) Draw a figure showing the burn percentage (draw anterior and posterior view below) 3. A patient has had an exacerbation of SLE and is being seen in PT for joint pain and weakness. A) What type of treatment(s) should not be performed at this time? What other precautions should PTA’s be aware of when treating this patient? B) The patient is on prednisone due to the exacerbation. Why were they prescribed this and what are some of the side effects of this medication? 4. A 15 year old patient was diagnosed with a Stage III fibrosarcoma in their distal right humerus. The patient’s right U/E was amputated below the elbow 7 days previously and the patient is still receiving chemotherapy as a hospital inpatient. A) What are some common side effects of chemotherapy? B) What are your primary concerns/precautions in regard to PT with this patient? C) What does “Stage 3” mean?

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


Purpose

Perceptions of PTA Students for and Against a Transition to a Bachelor’s Degree Model

Results

Will lead to increased respect for PTA Position

Will enable additional time to learn Required information

3.42

3.44

3.62

3.68

Those in Favor of Transition (N = 588 )

Would narrow the gap between PT and PTA educational levels

3.30

3.44

47% of students stated that the amount of time it took to complete their specific PTA program was at the correct length.

May lead to increased scope of PTA Practice

May lead to higher salary

35.8% of students stated that they would not have attended a PTA Program if it was offered at the bachelor degree level.

May make it easier to transition to a DPT Program

3.25

A majority of surveyed PTA students believe that PTA educational programs should be transitioned to a bachelor’s degree model. The main reasons stated for making this transition were to gain more physical therapy knowledge and to potentially elevate the perceptions of the PTA position,

Conclusions

Will allow additional time for elective coursework in specialty areas

68.7% of students stated that PTA educational programs should be transitioned to a bachelor’s degree model.

Results

Justin W. Berry, PT, DPT, MS; Any Jenson, SPTA; Sarah Vierzba, SPTA; Aubrey Johnson, SPTA Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN

Physical therapist assistant (PTA) educational programs have been at the associate degree level since their inception over forty years ago. There are currently discussions within the profession regarding the possible transition of PTA education to a bachelor’s degree model. No previous study has surveyed PTA students regarding their reasons for being for or against this possible transition. The purpose of this study was to survey soon-to-be PTA program graduates regarding their perceptions on a possible PTA bachelor’s degree model.

Methods

A link to an online survey was emailed to program directors of all accredited and developing PTA programs with directions to forward the link onto students who would be graduating over the next three months. 872 PTA students completed the survey.

Students were asked if PTA programs should be transitioned to a bachelor’s degree model, and their reasons why they believe this transition should or should not take place.

The main reasons stated for not making this transition were financial in nature, specifically concerns on increased student loan debt and that the transition would not lead to a higher PTA salary.

Would not increase salary

Would increase student loan debt

3.41

3.48

3.57

3.71

Those Not in Favor of Transition (N = 265)

Would increase years of schooling

3.02

Would not lead to increase scope of practice

Majority of additional coursework would be non-PT general education coursework

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Abstract

Injury Type and Incidence Among Elite Curling Athletes During the 2008 World Men's Curling Championship

Age Range

Back

Injured Area

Reported Injury

2nd

Position

Right

Right

Right

Delivering Hand

Sweeping

Sliding on ice

Activity that increases symptoms

No

Missed competition

No

No

20-29

3rd

No

Yes

3rd

Sliding on ice

Pubalgia

Right

Muscle Inflammation Back ache

Right

Hip

2nd

Back

Skip

20-29

Low back

Pain, joint locked Pain with contraction

20-29

30-39

Adductor magnus

JC, Berg RL. Self reported injury patterns among competitve curlers in the United States: a preliminary investigation into the epidemiology of curling injuries. Br J Sports Med. 2007;38(5):E29

1Reeser

Injuries were few during this tournament of elite curlers. With 568 game exposures (71 games x 2 teams x 4 athletes), only 5 injuries were reported. These exposures resulted in .07 injuries per game and only .014 injuries per game with resultant missed competition. A previous study found few injuries in national tournament play1. Elite international competitive curling also demonstrates low injury occurrence. Injury incidence is as yet unknown among recreational curling.

Conclusion

40-49

Delivering, sweeping, sliding on ice Sweeping

Profile of players and injuries

Only 5 injuries were reported for the entire tournament. They were: 3 lumbar spine injuries, 1 hip adductor injury, and an injury reported as pubalgia. Three of the injuries were reported as re-injuries and 2 were classified as new injuries. All of the injuries involved increased pain during curling-specific activities: stone delivery (20%), sweeping (60%), sliding on ice (60%). Just one of the injuries resulted in missed competition.

Results

Justin Berry1,Mark Romanick2,and Shelley Koerber1 Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN of Physical Therapy, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND

1Physical

2Department

Purpose. This study evaluated the incidence, distribution, and types of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by curlers during the 2008 World Men’s Curling Championship. Twelve teams, each consisting of four curlers and one alternate, competed in the World Championships, with 71 games played during the tournament. Curling, which has had Olympic medal status since 2002, is played by approximately 1.5 million people worldwide. Methods. Injuries sustained by curling athletes during the 2008 World Men’s Curling Championship were self-reported onto an injury report form. Information included age, area of injury, date of injury, whether a new injury or re-injury, curling activities that increased symptoms, handedness for stone delivery, team position, and missed participation time. Each team was issued individual data collection forms for athletes to complete as injuries occurred. These forms were then collected at the end of the tournament and the data analyzed. Results. Five injuries were reported during the championships. Three injuries were of the lumbar spine, one injury was of the hip, with the remaining injury at the pubopelvis. Three of the injuries were described as re-injuries and two were described as new injuries. All of the injuries involved increased pain during curling-specific activities such as stone delivery (20% of injuries), sweeping (60% of injuries), and sliding on ice (60% of injuries). Only one of the injuries resulted in missed competition. Conclusion. At the elite level, curling appears to be a relatively safe sport. Injury rates during this competition were low, with only one athlete missing competition due to injury. During the 568 game exposures (71 games X 8 athletes per game), there were only 5 injuries. There were .07 injuries per game during the tournament and only .014 injuries per game resulted in an athlete missing competition.

Purpose

Curling is a popular winter sport enjoyed internationally by people of all ages. Little has been written regarding injuries that tend to occur when participating in this sport. This study examined injury number and type that developed in elite curlers during the 2008 World Men’s Curling Championship held in April in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Methods

Curling competitors were given instruction and the opportunity to self-report injuries sustained during the tournament. Twelve teams participated with 5 members per team (4 curlers and 1 alternate). Teams competed in a total of 71 games during the tournament. When reporting an injury, data collected included age, team position, handedness for stone delivery, area of injury, date of injury, whether a new or re-injury, curling activities that increased symptoms, and missed participation time if any. Each team was given data collection forms to complete as injuries occurred. The completed forms were collected at the tournament’s end and the data was analyzed at that time.

Photographs by Michael Burns

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Purpose

Justin W. Berry, PT, DPT, MS1; Charles C. Hosford, PhD2

Inter-Rater Reliability and Agreement of Visual Estimation of Hip and Knee Range of Motion by Physical Therapists and Physical Therapist Assistants

Demonstration

PTs and PTAs had similar levels of inter-rater reliability for the knee. Based on the lower inter-rater reliability measures for PTAs visually estimating hip ROM, it may be more appropriate for PTAs to measure hip ROM by means other than visual estimation, such as goniometry.

Clinical Importance

PTs had greater inter-rater reliability than PTAs for visually estimating hip ROM. PTs and PTAs had similar inter-rater reliability for visually estimating knee ROM.

Summary

Inter-rater reliability was estimated via the intraclass correlation (ICC) (Table 1). ICC coefficients of PTs for hip ROMs ranged from .90 to .91 and .66 to .83 for PTAs. ICC coefficients of PTs for knee ROM ranged from .96 to .97 and .91 to .95 for PTAs. Inter-rater agreement was estimated via the average deviation (ADM) (Table 2). Mean ADM of PTs for hip ROM ranged from 5.0 to 6.7 and 7.3 to 9.7 for PTAs. ADM of PTs for knee ROM ranged from 7.7 to 8.3 and 9.9 to 10.7 for PTAs.

Knee position 1-3, estimate 1 Knee position 1-3, estimate 2

Hip position 1-3, estimate 3

Hip position 1-3, estimate 2

Hip position 1-3, estimate 1

.96

.97 .96

.90

.91

.90

PT

.94

.91 .95

.83

.76

.66

PTA

3.43, P < .05

3.43, P > .05 3.43, P > .05

1.77, P < .05

2.86, P < .05

3.43, P < .05

F62, 50

4.2

7.7

8.6 8.1

5.0

7.7

9.0 7.8

5.6

7.7

8.3 7.8

5.0

Mean 6.7 5.7

10.2

10.3 12.5

6.7

ADM1 9.5 8.8

10.1

9.0 9.5

8.0

10.2

10.2 10.2

7.3

10.2

9.9 10.7

7.3

PTA

7.4 7.6

PT

Hip position 3

7.7

ADM2 ADM3 Mean 9.9 9.7 9.7 5.5 6.0 6.8 Knee position 1 Knee position 2

ADM1 ADM2 ADM3 7.5 6.0 6.6 5.4 5.8 5.8

Knee position 3

Hip position 1 Hip position 2

Table 2. Inter-Rater Agreement

Knee position 1-3, estimate 3

Table 1. Inter-Rater Reliability

Demonstration

1.Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN 2. Education Resources, University of North Dakota, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND

Visual estimation of joint range of motion (ROM) is a common assessment technique utilized by physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs). No previous study has determined inter-rater reliability and inter-rater agreement of ROM visual estimation by both PTs and PTAs. Ensuring PTs and PTAs have a high degree of inter-rater reliability for estimating ROM is important for when more than one physical therapy provider is involved in a treating a patient. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine inter-rater reliability and agreement of PTs and PTAs for visually estimating hip and knee ROM.

Methods One hundred fourteen subjects (63 PTs and 51 PTAs) completed an online survey consisting of visually estimating range of motion on a series of photographs of the knee and the hip in various degrees of flexion. Within the survey, three hip positions and three knee positions were each estimated three times by all subjects. Several other photographs of the hip and knee were included in the survey once as distractors in order to make it more difficult for subjects to realize that they were estimating the same hip and knee position three times. The distractor photographs were not included in the analysis.

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


Purpose

At the time of graduation, the average amount of PTA program-specific student loan debt for all subjects was $11,379, with an average total accrued student loan debt of $18,204 . Students at private colleges had significantly more program-specific and total student loan debt than students attending public colleges (P < .05).

Results

Student Loan Debt: PTA Program*

Student Loan Debt: All Higher Education*

6.4 years

33.9%

$8,728

$15,512

Public College (N = 467)

10.9 years

66.1%

$24,688

$31,720

Private College (N = 93)

National: Community College Graduates1

Study: PTA Program Student Loan Debt

Study: All Higher Education Student Loan Debt

62%

38.5%

29.1%

Public College (N = 467)

2%

10.8%

16.1%

Private College (N = 93)

% of Students With No Student Loan Debt

Concerned about ability to repay loans*

Perceptions on Program Length/Degree Model

27.9%

65.6%

The length of the PTA program 42.5% I attended is too short and should be extended

34.1%

65.1%

35.4%

Have bachelor’s degree (N = 229)

24.1%

67.4%

47.4%

Do not have a bachelor’s degree (N = 331)

All Subjects (N = 560)

PTA programs should be transitioned to a bachelor’s degree model

1Baum S, Little K, & Payea K. Trends in Community College Education: Enrollment, Prices, Student Aid, and Debt Levels. 2011. CollegeBoard Advocacy & Policy Center.

Reference

I would not have attended a bachelor’s degree PTA program

*Significant Difference (P < .05)

Estimated Time to Repay Student Loans*

Student Loan Debt at Graduation

Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS; Kortni Miller, SPTA; & Thomas Velasquez, SPTA Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks, MN

A National Survey & Analysis of PTA Students on PTA Program Length and Accrued Student Loan Debt Physical therapist assistant (PTA) educational programs have been at the associate degree level since their inception over forty years ago. There are currently discussions within the profession regarding the possible transition of PTA education to a bachelor’s degree model. Average student loan debt for all college students has also risen significantly over the past decade. No previous study has surveyed PTA students regarding their perceptions on optimal program length or on the amount of student loan debt acquired solely to complete a PTA educational program.

A significantly higher percentage of students attending private colleges were concerned about their ability to repay their student loans (P < .05). Private college students also had a significantly higher estimated time for student loan repayment (P < .05). 65.6% of students stated that PTA educational programs should be transitioned to a bachelor’s degree model. 27.9% of surveyed students stated that they would not have attended a PTA program if it was offered at the bachelor’s degree level.

The purpose of this study was to survey soon-to-be PTA program graduates regarding their perceptions on PTA program length and on their amount of student loan debt.

Methods

Conclusions

Although a majority of surveyed students stated PTA programs should be transitioned to a bachelor’s degree model, a sizable population would not have attended a PTA program if it was at that level. Additional research is required to determine student motivation regarding this possible transition.

The amount of student loan debt for PTA students attending private institutions is significantly higher than students attending public institutions.

A link to an online survey was emailed to program directors of all accredited and developing PTA programs with directions to forward the link onto students who would be graduating over the next three months. 560 PTA students completed the survey. Students were asked: 1) The amount of student loan debt they will have acquired at the time of graduation 2) If PTA programs should be transitioned to a bachelor degree model 3) Their perceptions on the length of their specific PTA program

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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F.A. DAVIS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT EDUCATOR JUSTIN W. BERRY, PT, DPT, MS Justin W. Berry, PT, DPT, MS, has demonstrated sustained commitment to physical therapist assistant (PTA) education through his efforts within the association and the organizations he serves as a clinician and educator. Currently PTA program director for Northland Community and Technical College in East Grand Forks, Minnesota, Berry also serves as Allied Health Division chair. He has also held academic roles at the University of North Dakota and Bemidji State University in Bemidji, Minnesota. Berry earned a MPT and DPT from the University of North Dakota, a MS in education from Bemidji State University, and an AAS as a physical therapist assistant from Williston State College. Although Berry was appointed director of the Northland Community and Technical College PTA program in 2006, the program he was hired to direct had not yet been established. Consequently, he was responsible for its development and implementation. Beyond his work as an instructor and program director, Berry has undertaken a research schedule that has served to illuminate, clarify, and advance PTA practice and education. In the last 6 years, Berry has been principal investigator on 10 research presentations focusing on PTA practice or education at APTA national conferences, and has presented on PTA educational and professional issues at two FSBPT annual meetings. In addition to being an active researcher in PTA education and professional issues, he has also maintained an active schedule of presenting PTA-specific orthopedic continuing education workshops throughout the country, frequently at state chapter conferences. Berry has also served as an FSBPT item-writer for the PTA-NPTE, and is currently a CAPTE on-site reviewer for PTA Educational Programs, Berry serves within the Education Section, Health Policy and Administration Section, and Research Section; on the state level he is chair of the North Dakota Chapter’s nominating committee, and has been a past member of the chapter’s public relations, quality assurance, and continuing education committees. APTA is pleased to recognize Justin Berry’s commitment to PTA education with the FA Davis Award. I am honored to be selected as the recipient of the 2014 F.A. David Award for Oustanding Physical Therapist Assistant Educator. I would like to thank the APTA Board of Directors; the F.A. Davis Company; and Clint Hosford, PT, PhD, who nominated me for this award. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I have been fortunate to have had amazing students and colleagues within the Northland PTA Program. Thank you to all of my current and previous students for making my job the best in the world, and for laughing at most of my jokes. Thank you also to my departmental colleagues: Shelley Koerber, who has also been with the PTA Program since day one and has been instrumental in its success; and Dawn Eickman. Finally, I would like to thank my wife, Whitney, and children, Nora, Ellen, and Jack, for all of their love and support.

1997 - 2000

2002 - 2007

2008 - 2013

2014 - 2019

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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Presentor: Brian Schlattmann PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, CSMT Brian earned his B.S. in Education with an emphasis on Exercise Science from the University of Nebraska. He received his Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Creighton University. Following school, he completed a one year residency in Orthopedic 3K\VLFDO7KHUDS\DW&UHLJKWRQ8QLYHUVLW\%ULDQLVD&HUWLÂżHG6WUHQJWKDQG&RQGLWLRQLQJ6SHFLDOLVWDQ2UWKRSHGLF&HUWLÂżHG 6SHFLDOLVWDQGD&HUWLÂżHG6SLQDO0DQXDO7KHUDSLVW+HKDVEHHQDJXHVWOHFWXUHUDWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI.DQVDV0HGLFDO&HQWHU and taught the spinal manipulation section of the Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy course at Creighton University. Brian and his wife, Meghan, live in Omaha, Nebraska, own and operate Dundee Orthopedic Physical Therapy. Brian is an instructor for The International Spine and Pain Institute.

Assessment & Treatment of Running Injuries for the PTA Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS 6 Clinical Hours Saturday Course Description:

This one-day course will focus on evidence-based assessment and treatment interventions for common running-related injuries. Topics will include running biomechanics, common training errors, footwear, barefoot running and current research for assessing and treating injuries such as patellofemoral pain syndrome, achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, and ITband syndrome. Lecture, laboratory and case studies will be utilized for participants to meet course objectives.

Presenter: Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS:

Justin received his MPT and DPT from the University of North Dakota and his MS in Education from Bemidji State University. He is the Director of the Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Northland Community and Technical College in East Grand Forks, MN. Dr Berry is an active and published researcher who has presented on a variety of topics (including PT professional and educational issues; sports medicine; and orthopedics) at the state, national, and international levels. He has been teaching physical therapy continuing education courses since 2005.

PT Pearls from the Podium 6 Clinical Hours Friday

Course Description:

A panel of PTs will provide short presentations, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pearls of Wisdomâ&#x20AC;&#x153; on a wide variety of topics. There will be 6 total hours of lab and lecture format, with question and answer opportunities for an interactive experience. Â&#x2021;

Manual Edema Mobilization - Why Light Touch is The Right Touch to Move Swelling - Sandy Sublett PT, DPT, CLT

Â&#x2021;

Where are your feet? - Colleen Louw, PT, MPT, Med, CSMT

Â&#x2021;

Stroke Camp - What it can do for you - Kathy Mercuris, P.T., D.H.S.

Â&#x2021;

Be a PAL (Pediatric Active Learner): A Unique Approach to Pediatric Clinical Education. - Janet Matson, PT, PCS, C/ NDT.

Â&#x2021;

A Multimodal Intervention for Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: Combining Nutrition with Physical Therapy. - Babita Bisht, PhD Candidate

Â&#x2021;

Interdisciplinary Management of Patients with Disorders of Consciousness - Nicole Weidman, PTA, CBIS and Dave Anders, MS, CCC-SLP, CBIST, Director of Therapy at On With Life

Â&#x2021;

Use of Therapeutic Neuroscience Education to address Psychosocial Factors Associated with Acute Low Back Pain: A Case Report - Kory Zimney, PT, DPT

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


IPTA Conference Continuing Education Courses Saturday’s Course Descriptions & Presenter Bios Spinal Stabilization for the Physical Therapist Assistant (6 Contact Hours) Saturday, November 7 Course Description: This course will focus on evidence-based cervical and lumbar stabilization with an emphasis on incorporating current research and exercise training into clinical practice. Other forms of complementary therapeutic exercise, such as spinal proprioception and stretching, will also be included. This course is designed for physical therapist assistants who are interested in expanding their knowledge and skill of spinal stabilization assessment and training.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of the course, participants will: 1. Identify stabilization theories, current research and how to incorporate course content into clinical practice. 2. Recognize indications, contraindications and precautions for stabilization training. 3. Demonstrate the ability to safely perform a variety of cervical lumbar stabilization exercises and techniques. 4. Demonstrate effective use of proprioceptive and stretching techniques to complement stabilization training.

Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS Justin received his MPT and DPT from the University of North Dakota. He is the Director of the Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Northland Community and Technical College in East Grand Forks, Minnesota. Dr. Berry is an active and published researcher who has presented on a variety of topics (including

PT professional and educational issues, sports medicine and orthopedics) at the state, national and international levels. He is the recipient of the 2014 F.A. Davis Award for Outstanding Physical Therapist Assistant Educator and has been teaching physical therapy continuing education courses since 2005.

Interventions for the Foot and Ankle That Don’t Stink: Evidence and Hands-on Application (6 Contact Hours) Saturday, November 7 Course Description: Feet are integral to daily and recreational function but are also notorious for their occasional foul aroma. Although feet may stink at times, there are effective interventions for foot and ankle conditions; in other words, interventions that don’t stink. In this course, evidence for effective manual interventions will be presented for the most common foot and ankle conditions to include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, ankle sprain, metatarsalgia and hallux valgus and rigidus. A foundation for manual therapy clinical reasoning for foot and ankle conditions will be provided based on evidence of regional interdependence, biopsychosocial and pain neuroscience concepts. Course participants will get hands-on experience focused on manual therapy interventions and taping applications for the foot and ankle. Rest assured, plenty of hand sanitizer will be provided.

Course Objectives: 1. Appraise relevant literature pertaining to clinical reasoning of manual therapy interventions for the foot and ankle. 2. Select effective manual therapy and taping interventions for foot and ankle conditions. 3. Perform manual therapy interventions for the foot and ankle effectively as demonstrated by lab partner’s short term response to treatment. 4. Perform taping interventions for the foot and ankle. Maximum capacity for course: 30 participants

Shane McClinton, PT, DPT Shane McClinton, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, CSCS, is a physical therapist at the Des Moines University Physical Therapy Clinic and assistant professor in the Des Moines University Post-Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Dr. McClinton graduated with a master’s in physical therapy from Des Moines University in 2001 and obtained his post-professional doctorate in 2007. He completed fellowship training through Regis University in Denver, Colorado, and achieved fellow status within the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT) in 2009. He is now pursuing

his doctorate in philosophy in orthopaedic and sports science through Rocky Mountain University in Provo, Utah. Dr. McClinton is board certi¿ed in orthopaedics (OCS) and a certi¿ed strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) whose clinical emphasis is on the management of endurance athletes, foot and ankle and persisting pain conditions. His current research is focused on examining characteristics associated with plantar heel pain and exploring the functional outcomes and cost-effectiveness of physical therapy intervention for individuals with plantar heel pain.

DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO

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DR. JUSTIN W BERRY | EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR PORTFOLIO


2010 WVPTA Winter Course Saturday, December 4, 2010 Hosted by: Mountain State University, Wiseman Hall, South Kanawha St., Beckley, WV Total 6.75 Contact Hours 7:30-8:30 am

Registration

PT/OT/COTA Session

PTA Session

Challenges in Stroke Rehabilitation Presenters: Lisa Raber Ammons, PT Brandy Brown, OT

Evidence-Based Strategies for the Lumbar and Cervical Spine Presenter: Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS

This course will review the clinical challenges of stroke patients including the deficits associated with neurological infarcts. Speakers will cover Pusher Syndrome and demonstrate strategies for midline orientation and postural control. Information will be presented for both the physical therapy and occupational therapy perspectives. Lab component will demonstrate safe handling for early ambulation after stroke and techniques to maximize extremity motor recovery.

This course will focus on evidence-based cervical and lumbar stabilization with an emphasis on incorporating current research and exercise training for clinical practice. This course is designed for physical therapist assistants who are interested in expanding their knowledge of spinal stabilization theory and exercise.

8:30 - 9:30 9:30 – 10:30

Anatomy and Clinical Presentations Pusher Syndrome

10:30 – 10:45

Break

10:45 – 12:00

8:30 – 9:30 9:30 – 10:30

Introduction, history, and stabilization theory Cervical stabilization research, anatomy, and biomechanics

10:30 – 10:45

Break

10:45 – 12:00

Cervical stabilization training

Midline Orientation/Postural Control Lab

12:00 – 12:45

Lunch

12:00 – 12:45

Lunch

12:45 – 2:00

12:45 – 2:00 2:00 – 2:15 2:15 – 3:30 3:30 – 4:30

Ambulation (Lecture & Lab) Break Upper Extremity Recovery/Function Case Study Presentations; Q & A

2:00 – 3:00 3:00 – 3:15 3:15 – 4:30

Lumbar stabilization research, anatomy, and biomechanics Lumbar stabilization training Break Muscle specific stretching, Case Studies and questions

Justin Berry, PT, DPT, MS received his MPT and DPT from the University of North Dakota and his MS in Education from Bemidji State University. He is the Physical Therapist Assistant Program Director at Northland College in East Grand Forks, Minnesota. Lisa Raber Ammons, PT graduated from West Virginia University Physical Therapy Program, Bachelor of Science, December 1994. She has 16 years of clinical experience in inpatient stroke/neuro rehabilitation. She is the Senior Physical Therapist and Stroke/Neuro Team Leader at HealthSouth MountianView Regional Rehabilitation Hospital and is a Clinical Instructor of Human Performance and Applied Science for the Division of Physical Therapy at West Virginia University School of Medicine. Brandy Brown, OTR/L graduated from West Virginia University Occupational Therapy Program, Masters of Occupational Therapy, May 2008. She currently works toward Clinical Doctorate in Occupational Therapy at Chatham University. She has 2 years of clinical experience in inpatient stroke/neuro rehabilitation. She is an Occupational Therapist on the Stroke/Neuro team at HealthSouth Mountainview Regional Rehabilitation Hospital.

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Justin Berry - 2016 Educator of the Year Portfolio  

Justin Berry - 2016 Minnesota State Colleges & Universities (MnSCU) Board of Trustees Educator of the Year Portfolio

Justin Berry - 2016 Educator of the Year Portfolio  

Justin Berry - 2016 Minnesota State Colleges & Universities (MnSCU) Board of Trustees Educator of the Year Portfolio