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WORTH THE WAIT 5 September 9, 2011

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Volume 108, Issue 4

FRIDAY

Cedar Falls, Iowa

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northern-iowan.org

NorthernIowan

the university of northern iowa’s student-produced newspaper since 1892

opinion 3 | campuslife 5

| sports 7

| games 10

| classifieds 11

Oh so close... Panthers force four Cyclone FOOTBALL

turnovers; still falter 20-19

9/11 victims to be commemorated with flag planting ceremony JOHN ANDERSON Executive Editor

Sunday, Sept. 11 8 a.m. to noon Lawther Field

BRAD EILERS

Editorial Staff

The last time the University of Northern Iowa football team opened the season against an instate rival, they left Iowa City heartbroken after a 17-16 defeat at the hands of the University of Iowa Hawkeyes. Similar feelings of heartbreak and a sense of déjà vu were felt Saturday night as the Panthers suffered a 20-19 loss to in-state rival Iowa State University. “I have similar feelings, but I’m going to learn from the Iowa game,” said UNI head coach Mark Farley. “We did not finish the (2009) season. “The value we’re taking from this one is, it isn’t about this game, it’s about getting ready for the next week and getting better each week. This team is designed to get better once we hit confer-

REACHING FOR HIGHER GROUND

The Northern Iowa Student Government will be hosting a flag planting remembrance ceremony at Lawther Field this Sunday in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. UNI faculty, staff, students and community members will be planting a flag in memory of each person who lost their life during the attacks. Though the flag planting will last from 8 a.m. until noon, a moment of silence will be held at 8:37 a.m., 8:59 a.m., 9:03 a.m. and 9:28 a.m. to commemorate the collapse BRANDON BAKER/Northern Iowan of the World Trade Center The Panthers forced four turnovers and outgained the Cyclones in terms of total yards of offense, but fell short of Towers and the crashes at the defeating their in-state rivals 20-19. For more photos of the game, visit northern-iowan.org. Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. Those who wish to help ence play. Maybe the (2009) Although UNI (0-1) won Panthers, and outgained with the event may sign up at year we put too much into the turnover battle, forcing the Cyclones 385 to 328 in www.uni.edu/higherground/ Iowa and not enough into four ISU turnovers comSunday-sept-11-flag-planting. our season.” pared to just one for the See FOOTBALL, page 9

CAMPUS ISSUES

Skateboarding policy under review

LINH TA

Staff Writer

Six years ago, the University of Northern Iowa Department of Public Safety made a policy that banned skateboarding on campus. This summer, Tyler Gardner, junior communications major and avid longboarder, had a run-in with the policy. Gardner faced multiple warnings for longboarding until finally, last summer, he was stopped and brought into the UNI Department of Public Safety. “I got cuffed and driven to the station on campus,” Gardner said. “They

basically told me why I couldn’t skate on campus. I was in a holding cell for a few minutes, and I had to pay a $35 fine.” According to Gardner, friends of his have also received warnings and tickets for skateboarding. Dave Zarifis, the director of public safety, also said that non-students face penalties and receive no-trespassing citations. As a compromise with skateboarders, the Northern Iowa Student Government proposed a plan revising the no-skateboarding policy and Zarifis is reviewing this proposition.

He said he hopes to give some leniency while also maintaining the safety of students. “(I have) no qualms about taking a look at it and (seeing) how we can resolve the issue,” Zarifis said. Zarifis explained that in the past in areas such as Maucker Union and by Bender and Dancer Halls skateboarders have performed tricks on steps and rails, causing damage to the cement and campus property. There have also been incidents of skateboarders and pedestrians colliding. “It provided a much more dan-

gerous environment than w h at it really needed to be, so the only way we could curb that was to eliminate the skateboarding on campus,” Zarifis said. “(The) number one priority has to be the pedestrians.” Gardner has some ideas on how to make skateboarding on campus less dangerous. “Respect the campus. Don’t grind the rails; don’t deface campus property,” Gardner said, “but if you want to get to class, you should be able to board to class.”


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NEWS

Friday, September 9, 2011

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News in Brief

Forecast from National Weather Service

EXTENDED WEATHER FORECAST

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Student found dead in apartment ALEX MCDANIEL

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Staff Writer

Jennifer Mills, a senior family services major at the University of Northern Iowa, was found dead in her apartment at University Mills on Aug. 26. She was 30 years old. According to Lt. Dan Brown of the Cedar Falls Police Department, the medical results are still pending, but the police have no reason to believe that she was subject to foul play.

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Volunteer Center of Cedar Valley commemorating 9/11

PANTHER PORTRAITS

Storm hits cedar valley

NI NEWS SERVICE

In 2009, the United States Congress passed bipartisan legislation, signed by President Barak Obama, which formally recognized Sept. 11 as a National Day of Service and Remembrance. In accordance with this legislation, the Volunteer Center of Cedar Valley is partnering with the Cedar Valley Arboretum and Botanic Gardens to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. Volunteers will plant trees and shrubs at the arboretum on Sunday, Sept. 11 from 2-4 p.m. Volunteers of all ages are invited to participate.

A storm hit the Cedar Valley on Sept. 3, causing wind damage in the area, including at UNI. Trees were knocked over near the McCollum Science Hall, as seen in the bottommost picture. According to kcrg.com, 1.52 inches of rain was reported at the Waterloo airport. Kcrg.com also reported that lightning caused a building fire in Cedar Falls, while in Waterloo two tree fires occurred and power lines were knocked down.

UNI ranks in Washington Monthly NI NEWS SERVICE

The University of Northern Iowa was ranked 17th in the nation among public universities, according to the Washington Monthly college rankings for master’s universities. UNI was ranked 56th overall for all public and private universities. The magazine rates schools based on their contribution to the public good in three broad categories: social mobility (recruiting and graduating low-income students), research (producing cutting-edge scholarship and Ph.D.’s) and service (encouraging students to give back to their country). For all rankings, go to www.washingtonmonthly. com/college_guide/

NICK MADDIX/Northern Iowan

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The Northern Iowan is published semiweekly on Tuesday and Friday during the academic year; weekly on Friday during the summer session, except for holidays and examination periods, by the University of Northern Iowa, L011 Maucker Union, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0166 under the auspices of the Board of Student Publications. Advertising errors that are the fault of the Northern Iowan will be corrected at no cost to the advertiser only if the Northern Iowan office is notified within seven days of the original publication. Publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertisement at any time. The Northern Iowan is funded in part with student activity fees. A copy of the Northern Iowan grievance procedure is available at the Northern Iowan office, located at L011 Maucker Union. All material is copyright © 2011 by the Northern Iowan and may not be used without permission.


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Opinion

Friday, September 9, 2011

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TRANSPORTATION

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PHILOSOPHY

A certain kind of knowledge GREG GREUBEL greubelg@ gmail.com

W TOM EARLY

earlyt@uni.edu

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ouncing up I-380 from Iowa City to Cedar Falls in my rickety old station wagon, I started to ponder my circumstances. Looking around at some of the other Labor Day travelers, I noticed several old rust buckets attempting the not-so-strenuous drive. Here in Cedar Falls, we’re all familiar with the cavernous potholes and ever-rising gas prices. So as we careen evermore rapidly toward a future without petroleum for asphalt, tires and gasoline, what will our future hold for transportation? Drawing on an extensive knowledge of cartoon lore, I feel “The Jetsons” seem to have it figured out. While some might pine for the flying cars, I wonder why we can’t have one of those crazy tube systems. If a mass of people need to get from point A to point B, then why do we all need to drive our individual gas-guzzlers? Interestingly enough, there is a machine that can cure such woes. It was actually first used publicly in 1804. Its name: the locomotive. And in the 2009 economic stimulus package, President Obama set aside 9.3 billion dollars for passenger rail. Our enterprising rivals in Iowa City took advantage of these monies and proposed a light rail track spanning from Iowa City to Chicago. Why would so much money be put aside on such an archaic form of technology? Well, according to the Iowa

City Chamber of Commerce, the rails between Iowa City and Chicago “will save more than 10 million gallons of fuel during first 30 years, reduce vehicle miles of travel by more than 25 million in the corridor annually, reduce congestion saving $16.3 million in highway user costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 90,000 tons in the first 30 years of operation.” As I look back on my Labor Day drive, I wonder what the world would look like with a railroad resurgence. With an imminent end to oil in our lifetimes, our generation needs to stand up for public transportation. As nice as it is to dream with Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road,” we must realize that the days of frivolous automobile usage are rapidly coming to a close. And as we start to leave a legacy to our children and grandchildren, shall we present an evermore decrepit and polluted Earth, or will we be the generation to take up stewardship with a serious and executing hand? My hope is that with jovial irony, we can laugh that our transportation future lies not with fictional George Jetson of the 1970s but with the mythical John Henry of the 1870s. If you are interested in the Iowa City-Chicago light rail, please visit http://iowacityarea.com, and pledge your support. Today you can be a part of an understated effort to turn the world around.

As nice as it is to dream with Jack Kerouac’s ‘On the Road,’ we must realize that the days of frivolous automobile usage are rapidly coming to a close.

Make your voice heard Write a letter to the editor. Letters may be no longer than 300 words and may be edited for spelling, grammar, length and Associated Press conventions. Send submissions to northern-iowan@uni.edu.

e in the 21st century love to brag of our great advances in knowledge. This is surely not a baseless claim. We do indeed have more knowledge of the world than any previous generation. However, this abundance of knowledge has attempted to bring certainty into areas where it is not welcome. The so-called social “sciences” have attempted to transform humanity into something that is tracked in the same way a meteorologist tracks a storm: not with absolute certainty, but with an understanding that it follows a similar pattern. I do believe that many people would not object to this premise nowadays, yet the student of history will recognize that humanity does not follow any similar pattern. The occurrence of death camps during World War II is enough to prove that. Nonetheless, this does not prevent people from searching for that similar cause-effect paradigm that occupies so much of the classical sciences. It is this type of misunderstanding that has led to ideas such as the rational choice theory in the field economics. This theory aspires to make it possible to understand the economic-human by presupposing knowledge of their behavior in certain circumstances. However, this search for a cause-effect in the economic-human is a figment of our modern minds. If one were to claim that humans were rational actors before the emergence of capitalism, they would have been met with a great deal of confusion. As many have noted, including historian Joyce Appleby, humans were rarely described as rational creatures prior to the rise of capitalism. A timely description by Thomas Hobbes proclaimed: “I put for a general inclination of all mankind, a perpetual and restless desire of power after power, that ceaseth only in death.” Furthermore, See KNOWLEDGE, page 4


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investigation into Elizabethan plays will reveal a caricature of humans as entities controlled more by passion than by reason. With that said, I do not believe one can completely disregard the rational choice theory. With a great deal of humility, it may be used to shed some light on many different subjects. What I would propose is that no student falls under the spell of these theories. They may work well to explain an event retrospectively, but to claim they possess a unique ability to predict the future is simply not true. Due to the vast amount of information we possess today, it is crucial to always rely on that instinct which always seeks out the strange in a world that has been described to us since we were children. Claiming humanity is predictable will lead one down a path that reduces beauty to theory and behavior to numbers. We in the 21st century can become many things, yet it is crucial that we continue to recognize the fundamental unpredictability of what the future holds in store. In doing this, we may be able to correct our world in which the economist has more in common with the meteorologist than the philosopher.

WHAT DO YOU THINK? Share your opinion by commenting on this article on our website, northern-iowan.org.

OPINION

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Friday, September 9, 2011

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FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Reach for higher ground

PETER TOBIA/MCT CAMPUS

JOHN ANDERSON

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Executive Editor

remember where I was when American society turned upside down. I was sitting in my sixth-grade classroom when my teachers wheeled out a television, telling us that we were going to watch the news instead of having our regular classes. It took a while for any of us to realize what exactly was happening as we watched repeating footage of a plane colliding with a smoking skyscraper. At the time, I was too young and immature to recognize the significance of the collapse of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 and the resulting 2,996 deaths. War was something from movies and history books – death was the same. I remember seeing people on television react in tears, murderous outrage and patriotic fervor. I remember seeing more American flags and hearing “I’m Proud to Be An American” every morning in school. I remember the calls for revenge and the wars that followed. And yet it wasn’t until I was older that I realized what any of it had meant. Not only were so many lives taken from us, but the attacks burst our illusion of safety and world dominance. The United States of America, the world’s superpower, which hadn’t seen a significant attack on its shores since Pearl Harbor, had been breached by terrorists. And boy, were we terrified. Suddenly, terrorists had a look, and we were seeing them everywhere. Security measures increased to an extent that many felt hampered our freedom, and numerous incidents of harassment and hate crimes broke out against Muslims and southeast Asians. Fear usurped reason, and our fellow Americans became terrorists hiding bombs underneath turbans. The U.S. government added systematic acts of violence to the individual acts as they invaded Afghanistan and later Iraq, which ultimately led to the killing of Osama bin Laden earlier this year, met with celebration by many Americans. We could debate for decades about the causes behind the attacks, and I’m sure we will, but it is impossible to deny that the United States’ military involvement in the Middle East was a major factor. Violence there resulted in violence in the United States, which again resulted in further violence. This summer I had the great fortune to work at a day camp with underprivileged children, and I was able to speak to one 7-year-old who kept getting into fights. When I asked

him why he continued to fight so much, he told me that his father told him to always push back when pushed. As a result, he had several other children who wanted to beat him up every time they saw him. I tried to help him understand that fighting will just lead to more fighting, that he needed to stop it if he wanted it to stop, but he didn’t get it. He, like me 10 years ago, was too young to understand. It’s never easy to teach someone that violence leads to violence, especially since a nonviolent approach will often lead to at least temporary pain and oftentimes a reputation as a coward. If you turn the other cheek, it’s gonna get slapped. But peacefully standing up to violence is not cowardice – it requires bravery that overcomes the fear of pain. Reaching out to someone who appears threatening and trying to really get to know them requires a lot more courage than avoiding them for fear that they are a terrorist. I am in no place to judge whether or not the United States responded well to the terrorist attacks – many lives depended on their decisions, and I can hardly imagine the deliberations behind each one. However, I can say that there are only two ways that we can find peace as individuals and as a nation: through mutual trust or through force. Trust is without a doubt the difficult way to find peace and security – it means treating your opponents as human beings who will treat you as such and recognizing each other’s value. If your trust is betrayed, you may open yourself up to attack. But making peace through force will always foster the attitudes that lead to terrorism. Such violence has a tendency to demonize the opponents and results in not only fearful attacks from the one in power but murderous responses by those under attack. When they happened, I was too young to recognize the dangerous wages of fear that led to the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Perhaps our nation was as well. But now we need to come together and recognize that our attackers were humans like us, humans driven to violent acts. Man is by no means a perfect being, but he is a redeemable one. As we remember and commemorate the horrendous events of that fateful day 10 years ago, we need to honor the lives of all who were lost by seeking to forgive those responsible and to begin working together to live in peace. It’s not an easy thing to do, and it’s not without great risk, but it may be the only way to prevent such attacks from ever happening again.

When they happened, I was too young to recognize the dangerous wages of fear that led to the terrorist attacks on Sept.11, 2001. Perhaps our nation was as well.


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campuslife

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ENTERTAINMENT

Bald trio paints the town blue ALEX McDANIEL Staff Writer

What do you get when you mix Cap’n Crunch, a 2.5D experience, gigantic iPhones, and emotionless, mute blue guys? The Blue Man Group. The Blue Man Group performed at the GallagherBluedorn Performing Arts Center at the University of Northern Iowa Tuesday, Sept. 6 and will continue to have nightly shows until Friday, Sept. 9. Their shows were rescheduled due to a burst pipe last January, making their performance one of the first of many on the GBPAC’s new stage for the 2011-2012 Artist Series. Dan and Melissa Richardson, who watched the Blue Man Group for the first time, said they “had never seen anything like it.” They enjoyed how the Blue Man Group created a

humorous show mixed with music. Father Ken Glaser of St. Stephen the Witness Catholic Student Center thought that they had a unique multimedia show, but what he liked most was that it was interactive. The show took audience members and used them as props, even turning one man into a human paintbrush. They also made a spectacle of late arrivals, had a Twinkie dinner with a special woman and taught seven rock concert movements, from the fist pump to the behind-the-head leg stretch. Another quirk of the Blue Man Group is that they frequently use ordinary items as musical instruments. After creating a PVC xylophone, all three of them played songs, including Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance,” Beethoven’s “Für Elise” and

Ozzy’s “Crazy Train.” One of the Blue Men completed a daring feat, catching and keeping 30 marshmallows in his mouth, making a statue of them, then giving the statue to an audience member. Another created paintings that he gave to the audience as well. The most memorable part of the show, according to Father Glaser and the Richardsons, was the finale. This consisted of big balls being thrown into the audience and toilet paper being blown into the crowd, all during a spontaneous dance party. Although performances conclude Friday, UNI students may be able to obtain tickets on Thursday or Friday for those respective nights’ shows. Contact the GBPAC ticket office at (319) 273-4TIX for more information on how to get tickets.

Photo Courtesy of Randy Darst/University Relations

The Blue Man Group performed at the University of Northern Iowa on Tuesday, Sept. 6 and will continue giving nightly shows until Friday, Sept. 9.

STUDENT LIFE

Map-Works program may benefit students RACHEL ZIDON Staff Writer

Photos Courtesy of Randy Darst/University Relations

The Blue Man Group had numerous acts, ending the show with big balls being thrown into the audience and toilet paper being blown into the crowd, all during a spontaneous dance party.

Survey says it can help give incoming freshmen a better shot at college success – at least that’s the idea behind the MAPWorks program. For MAP-Works, which debuted at the University of Northern Iowa last year, first-year students take a voluntary 15-minute survey that focuses on five different areas that have been tied to doing well in college: academics, socioemotional state, behaviors and activities, performance and expectations and financial means. After students complete the survey, they receive an individualized report based on their responses that tells them how they are doing in each of the five areas and offers ideas and campus resources to help students improve their college experience. Current freshmen will receive a link to the survey via email and can take the

survey from Sept. 13 to Oct. 2. Students who take the survey on the first day will be eligible to win one of 10 $50 Visa gift cards, and students who take the survey before Oct. 2 will be eligible to win a $1,000 grand prize. Drake Martin, campus coordinator for MAPWorks and director for residence life, compared the early warning signs the MAP-Works report gives students to the newer cars that alert drivers when they are going to run out of gas. “It really is a chance to learn about yourself and how you’re doing in the institution,” said Martin. Martin added that residence life coordinators, academic advisers and some faculty who teach freshmen will have the ability to use the MAP-Works online system to connect to students, noting, “These connections can help freshmen identify potential issues See MAP-WORKS, page 6


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PANTHER PORTRAITS

vo lu n t e e r fa i r

Feeling a little NICK MADDIX/Northern Iowan

More than 700 students attended the University of Northern Iowa’s Volunteer Fair in the Maucker Union Ballroom Sept. 1. The fair provided an opportunity for students to connect with various volunteer opportunities in the Cedar Valley.

Meditation Workshops are now being offered at the Wellness & Recreation Center

Learn different meditation techniques and how to apply them to your daily life. You will also be introduced to proper posture sitting and breathing techniques as well as relaxation, meditation and restorative Asana.

Sundays from 7pm to 8pm, WRC 176 Session One: Sept 18, 25; Oct 2 Session Two: Oct 9, 16, 23 Register online at

www.uni.edu/wellrec/fitness/classes

Wellness & Recreation Services

MAP-WORKS continued from page 5

they may want to address to maximize their likelihood of first-year success at UNI.” Alexis Olson, the RLC in the ROTH Complex and Noehren Hall’s RLC last year, said she used the MAPWorks survey with her student staff to form connections with residents. “It helped in two ways: one, helping students and staff see the needs of their houses… and then secondly, helping us reach out to the needs of students.” She added that she always wanted to keep her residents’ privacy in mind. “I tried to be very conservative with the information I gave to my student staff,” Olson said. Olson noted that the survey, which shows students how their responses fit in

with those of other survey respondents, can help make freshmen feel less alone in their struggles. “A lot of first-year students feel like they’re the only ones dealing with issues (like homesickness), but in reality, there are a lot of other people who are going through the same thing,” she said. April ChathamCarpenter, a professor of communication studies, also plans to use the MAPWorks survey to connect to freshman students in her Cornerstone classes this semester. “We’re going to be using it to develop classroom activities and to build relationships with students … I think it’s a great tool to give an early alert to first-year students and people who can help them,” ChathamCarpenter said.


the university of northern iowa’s student-produced newspaper since 1892

Sports

Friday, September 9, 2011

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VOLLEYBALL

UNI volleyball team wins Delaware Asics Invitational to improve to 7-0 1

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The No. 14-ranked University of Northern Iowa volleyball team faced some challenging competition this past weekend, especially in the No. 25-ranked Florida State University Seminoles on Friday. UNI faced some close calls, but with tough play, they ended up coming away with three more wins to improve to 7-0 this season. The Panthers had to go up against FSU in their first game on Friday afternoon. UNI won the match, but had to come back after losing the first two sets 23-25 and 15-25. The Panthers had some great performances down the stretch of the match to finally get the win. Krista DeGeest had 18 kills and Michelle Burow wasn’t far behind with 13. Bre

Payton dished out 56 assists in the match. After losing the first two sets, UNI pulled together and fought back to win the third set 25-21. The Panthers used a 7-2 surge to pull away and eventually take the set, making the score 2-1. UNI’s streak continued as a kill from Shelby Kintzel ended the fourth set to make the match score even at 2-2. The fifth and final set of the match was when the Panthers really came together to take down the nationally ranked Seminoles. The score was close all the way to the end when the score was 14-13 in favor of UNI. Once again it was time for Payton to step up, and she did just that with an assist to Burow for the match ending kill. On Saturday, UNI faced more challenges in their first game against the

CASSANDRA HAYNE/Northern Iowan Archives

The Panthers improved to 7-0 over the weekend after victories over Florida State, UC-Irvine and Delaware. Senior Bre Payton (2) recorded 141 assists in UNI’s three victories.

University of California-Irvine. Once again, the Panthers had to come back from a deficit and win in the final set. UNI won the match with scores of 21-25, 25-16, 23-25, 25-20 and 15-8. After three sets, the score was in favor of UC Irvine 2-1. Kintzel put down a couple of kills late in the set to make the score 23-18 and helped lead UNI to their 25-20 victory. The Panthers picked it up in the fifth set, where they led most of the

time. Payton drove the attack with some big kills to ensure the UNI victory. The Panthers never looked back after they took a 4-3 lead and won the set 15-8, giving them the match victory 3-2. DeGeest achieved 14 kills, a figure that was complimented by Burow’s 11. Payton had another large assist tally with 34. See VOLLEYBALL, page 9

UNDER FURTHER REVIEW

Three grand slams in one game: the future of baseball? BRENNAN ACTON Sports Columnist

Three grand slams in one game. Impossible to repeat, or the future of baseball? On Aug. 25, the New York Yankees hit their way into the record books. The “Bronx Bombers” won their game at Yankee Stadium in a stunning display of power against the Oakland Athletics, smashing three grand slams in a single game. In just four innings alone, the Yankees compiled 20 runs, including their three bases-loaded home runs. The grand slams were hit by Robinson Cano in the fifth inning, Russell Martin in the sixth, and Curtis Granderson in the eighth. Hitting three grand slams

in a single game is one of Others, however, disagree home runs hit in a season. the most astonishing sports with this view. Some believe Look at Joe DiMaggio – conrecords ever set. The sidered large for his perceived impossibility time – at 6-foot-2 and inspired fans to rethink 193 pounds. Not many the possibilities of the players, particularly batfuture. ters consistently hitting Hitting three grand One view: The new home runs, weigh less slams in a single game than 200 pounds today. record cannot be broken. The statistics alone show As all of these statistics is one of the most how improbable hitting increase, the chances of astonishing sports four grand slams in a hitting multiple grand game would be. It took slam games seems more records ever set. more than 130 years for probable. a team to hit three grand Yankees center fielder slams. The possibility of Curtis Granderson himhitting four seems naive. self takes this side. In It is rare to even load the it’s only a matter of time until an interview with ESPN New bases enough for a record four grand slams are hit. York, Granderson said, “I’m of this magnitude to be broThe natural increase in surprised it hadn’t been done ken. It’s amazing that the human size and the focus on before with all the great teams Yankees managed to hit three; weight training and strength and great individual hitters it’s unimaginable to consider conditioning may also that have come throughout beating this record. increase the total amount of the course of the game.”

While Granderson’s statement is humble, I don’t think he understands the impact of his and his teammates’ achievement. He may be too close to the anomaly to realize how spectacular the effort truly was. In this market-driven time in sports, expansions have occurred both with the additions of franchises and in the length of the season. In 1962, Major League Baseball extended the regular season from 154 games to 162. Now that there are 30 teams playing 162 games in a season (totaling 4,860 regular season games) the chances of a statistical anomaly, such as this game, increase. That said, I See REVIEW, page 9


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FOOTBALL continued from page 1

yards, the Panthers still came up short against another team from the Football Bowl Subdivision. “Our team played hard, they executed the game plan, they had the fight in them … It sucks that we lost, but you know what, those kids from both teams played their tails off,” said Farley. “(The game) was fun all the way until the last (touchdown) there,” added Farley. “What was fun about it is when you can see the fight in your players for that length of time. That was fun because you saw two college football teams battling their tails off. That’s college football. We just came out on the wrong end of the deal this time.”

Rennie rocks

One bright spot for the Panthers was the performance of senior quarterback Tirrell Rennie. After completing just six-of-13 passes for 102 yards in Ames last fall with no touchdowns and two interceptions, Rennie was 15-for32 for 181 yards on Saturday with one touchdown and no interceptions. He also rushed for a game-high 127 yards on 18 carries. “(Tirrell) heard all the turnover talk and the interception talk and the throwing the football talk. He just worked at it. The coaches worked with him; we designed our system to work for him and he put all the extra effort in to make it happen,” said Farley. “This didn’t happen overnight, Tirrell has worked at it.” “Everybody cares what is said about them and I took it to heart sometimes, but at the end of (last year) I realized that everybody gets better,” said Rennie. “I know I got better, the (offensive) line got better … our defense was as sound as they have been in previous years. All I can say is that we have improved as a team.”

Play-by-play

The Panthers took an early lead at the 12:09 mark in the first quarter when sophomore kicker Tyler Sievertsen made a 42-yard field goal

VOLLEYBALL continued from page 7

The momentum from the last victory carried over for UNI as they won all three sets 25-23, 25-16 and 25-18 in their last match against the University of Delaware. Delaware kept the first set close, but the Panthers took the set by a score of 25-23. Delaware had the lead at 23-22 until the Panthers scored the remaining three points, led by a kill from DeGeest to give them the 1-0 lead. The second set was close

REVIEW continued from page 7

don’t see any team breaking this record. There are too many variables in any given game. Grand slams are rare in a season, let alone in a single game. The opportunities seem so improbable that I cannot imagine a record like this being broken. The chances of performing such a feat are rare based on the numbers, but in an age of development with more teams

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for his first career points as a Panther. Sievertsen would add another field goal at the 8:55 mark of the second quarter to stretch the UNI lead to 6-0. Iowa State quarterback Steele Jantz got the Cyclones on the scoreboard as time expired in the first half with a one-yard touchdown run. A Zach Guyer extra point gave ISU a 7-6 advantage heading to the locker room. UNI used three first-half takeaways inside their own 30-yard line to keep the ISU offense in check. Junior safety Garrett Scott intercepted a pass at the UNI 20-yard line to end ISU’s second drive of the game. Senior safety Tre’Darrius Canady intercepted a Jantz pass at the goal line with 2:09 left in the first quarter to stop the Cyclone’s next drive. Senior linebacker L.J. Fort also forced a fumble that Canady recovered at the UNI 24-yard line with 5:04 remaining in the first half. The Panther defense held the Cyclones to a three-and-out on the first series of the second half, and the UNI offense went on a 22-play, 90-yard drive that lasted 10 minutes, 36 seconds. Redshirt freshman running back David Johnson scored a touchdown on a one-yard rush to give the Panthers a 13-7 lead after the Sievertsen extra point with 2:30 remaining in the third quarter. For the first 54 minutes of the game, Iowa State’s offense was inconsistent and the Cyclones (1-0) looked overmatched instead of looking like a Big 12 Conference football team facing a team from the Football Championship Subdivision. Part of the reason behind ISU’s offensive inconsistencies was junior quarterback Steele Jantz, who was making his first career start for the Cyclones after transferring in from City College of San Francisco. “I assure you, those 54 minutes had nothing to do with us not being ready,” said ISU head coach Paul Rhoads. It had everything to do, as he said, with the Panthers. “They played sensationally,” said Rhoads.

until UNI went on a 8-1 run to earn their second victory of the match, 25-16. UNI eliminated the possibility of a fifth set by putting Delaware away in the third set. The score was 24-18 and with a kill by Lehman, UNI extended their winning streak to seven to start the season. UNI will defend their winning streak Friday against Kansas University to kick off the Clarion “Inn-vitational” at home in the McLeod Center. The match is scheduled to start at 7 p.m. and bigger athletes than ever before, the probability that an old record will fall increases. To some, triple grand slams is a record that simply cannot be broken. History shows how absurdly improbable hitting four grand slams in a game would be. Is it even a possibility? I think it is unlikely that this record will ever be broken, so maybe we should step back from the debate and marvel at the feat in itself.

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BY THE NUMBERS: First Downs Total Yards

UNI: 21 ISU: 20

UNI: 385 ISU: 328 Passing Yards UNI: 181 ISU: 187 Rushing Yards UNI: 204 ISU: 141 Penalties UNI: 16 - 113 yards ISU: 8 - 81 yards Third Down Conversions UNI: 8-for-17 ISU: 7-for-19 Fourth Down Conversions UNI: 0-for-0 ISU: 3-for-3 Turnovers UNI: 1 ISU: 4 UNI had ISU on the ropes, but just couldn’t capitalize and shut down the Cyclones when the game mattered most. “UNI is a great team,” said Jantz, who was 18-for-40 for 187 yards with one touchdown and three interceptions. Jantz also rushed for 85 yards on 20 carries. “They have so much speed on defense. They have a great defensive line. They put a lot of pressure on me.”

A last-minute loss

The Panthers clung to their 13-7

lead until late in the fourth quarter, when the Cyclones regained the lead at 14-13 on a 26-yard scoring strike from Jantz to junior receiver Josh Lenz on fourth-and-10 with 4:30 remaining in the game. “It was do or die,” said Jantz of the Cyclone’s miraculous fourth-down touchdown. “I thank God first, then Josh and the rest of the offense.” UNI responded quickly, scoring on their first play from scrimmage following the ISU touchdown. Rennie connected with Johnson, who raced 80 yards untouched down the sideline for the score. A failed two-point conversion attempt left the Panthers with a 19-14 lead with 4:17 remaining in the game. ISU took the ensuing kickoff to their own 40-yard line and executed a nine-play, 60-yard drive that was capped by a one-yard touchdown run by Jantz with only 40 seconds remaining in regulation. The Cyclone’s twopoint conversion was no good, keeping the score at 20-19 Iowa State. The Panthers’ final drive ended with a failed lateral attempt by redshirt freshman receiver Kevin Vereen, which was recovered by the Cyclone defense at the UNI 23-yard line. “Yes, we wanted this game … but if we linger on this loss, all we’re going to do is fail,” said Rennie. “Last year we didn’t play as a family; this year we played as a family and we will continue to play as a family throughout the season. When we get kicked down, we will get back up.” Despite losing to ISU, the Panthers moved up in “The Sports Network” poll from No. 7 to No. 4. UNI will return to action Saturday when they travel to Nacogdoches, Tex., to face the No. 16-ranked Stephen. F. Austin University Lumberjacks (1-0). The Lumberjacks defeated the Panthers 22-20 last season. Kickoff is set for 6 p.m.


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GAMES

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Friday, September 9, 2011

Games

Answers to Sudoku and Crossword. Don’t look!

By Bruce R. Sutphin Across 1 Gung-ho response 7 Delay 10 Evans of country 14 Buff 15 Farm female 16 Left 17 Village with very little gardening equipment? 19 The NCAA’s Runnin’ Rebels 20 Lab, for one 21 Reject 22 Sends 24 Jacket label letters 26 Get off the shoulder, say 27 Entrance purchases for a conditioning program? 35 Actor Milo 36 Pool game call 37 Tiny beef 38 Fly on a line 39 Gives credit where credit is due

40 On the safer side 41 Rational ending? 42 “__ it Art?”: Kipling 43 1955 UN joiner 44 What Ruth forgot to bring to pool night? 47 Morgan Freeman won its 2011 Life Achievement Award: Abbr. 48 Morning talker 49 Fly over the equator? 52 Pleased cry 53 Droid, e.g. 56 Slip through the cracks? 57 Like calls between drudges? 61 Run well 62 Unsound 63 Like Napoleon 64 Relaxing locales 65 The Hartford logo 66 Failures (and in another way, a hint to 17-, 27-, 44and 57-Across)

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Down 1 Tune carrier 2 One-track 3 Couturier Cassini 4 Med. research agency 5 Bar opening? 6 Pistons’ place 7 Last non-priest to be named pope 8 “Isn’t that cute?” 9 It involves mapping 10 Gripe 11 Reunion attendee 12 Stir up 13 Off-rd. rides 18 Worker with light metal 23 Bonkers 24 Slush Puppie maker 25 Radical ‘70s group 27 __ acid: vitamin B9 28 Amigo on the road 29 Crowd starter? 30 “Socrate” composer 31 Nice compliment 32 Zhou __ 33 Happy Meals toy, e.g. 34 Writer of short letters 39 Honey 40 NYPD notices 42 Ones who’ve got your back, in Internet shorthand 43 Future George W. Bush Presidential Library site 45 “Hondo” et al. 46 Dutch brewery 49 A-one 50 Food in a memorable “Seinfeld” episode 51 Pound of verse 52 White partner 53 “__ Eterno”: 2004 sports documentary 54 Active sort 55 Addenda 58 Lascivious leader? 59 Big name in kitchenware 60 Tecs

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! We want to know what you think of the Games page in The Northern Iowan. Shoot us an email at pollb@uni.edu and let us know of any suggestions or comments you have about this page.

Horoscopes By Nancy Black Tribune Media Services

Today’s Birthday (09/09/11). You’re wiser than you realize. Sift fact from rumor, and keep an open mind. Your regular skills of analysis and organization are especially heightened for the next 88 days, as Mercury enters your sign. Learn from experienced friends, and share the glory. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is an 8 -- Mercury in Virgo for the next 88 days leads to a phase of research and planning. Follow the advice of someone you respect

to support home and family.

firm an old bond.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Today is an 8 -- The blueprint comes together. Practice leads to better skills, which pay off. Spiritual words from a trusted advisor hit the spot. Listen and learn.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Today is a 6 -- You get farther now through partnership. The challenge may seem difficult, but don’t worry ... you’ll think of something. Sometimes leadership is just showing up.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) -Today is a 9 -- A work-related investment may be necessary. Keep your deadlines and promises, and stick to a wellproven plan.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- You’re in charge. Allow your instincts to contribute. Follow another’s experience to avoid making the same mistakes. They can tell you what pitfalls to avoid.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) -Today is an 8 -- A new phase of deliberate and patient action begins. Follow the rules for best results. Connect with a distant colleague, and reaf-

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -Today is a 6 -- Enjoy spending time doing something you love today. You may have

difficulty making work decisions, so do the research. Be patient with money. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -Today is a 7 -- Your intuition is heightened today, so take advantage. Your talents come in handy, especially now. Travel goes well. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- To ease any worry, write down the obvious factors for solving the problem. Analyze how it is now, and what’s needed. Schedule action items. Keep quiet about finances. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 7 -- It’s easy to get overwhelmed by money

and financial responsibilities now. Don’t fret, just be responsible and take it one step at a time. Stay in communication. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 9 -- You’re ready to make changes for the better now. Write a ‘to do’ list and get to work, one checkmark at a time. Make some wise choices (after careful research). Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -- It’s not necessary to overanalyze, but solid forethought will aim you in the right direction. Trust love and your spiritual leader, before you reach any tricky forks in the road.


The University of Northern Iowa’s student-produced newspaper since 1892

Classifieds Friday, September 9, 2011

FOR SALE / FOR RENT Large 4 BR. plus extra room, facing UNI; Singles welcome. 2 bath, W/D in unit. Cable, internet, garage parking, etc. Leave message. 266- 5544; 610- 2882 Brand new 4 BR. townhouse apartments. Individuals may apply and rent room. 1 block from campus. 706 West 26th Street. AugustMay lease. 2 bath, 2 stall garage. Dishwasher, W/D, free cable and internet. $430 per person/MO. Call Jeanette. 319- 415- 5804 1, 2, 3, 4 bedroom units 10 minutes north of CF. Security gated complex. Some utilities/cable paid. $400-800/MO. www.hildebrandrentals.com 319- 352- 5555

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Volume 108, Issue 4

FOR SALE / FOR RENT 1431 Ingersoll Rd Waterloo, IA 50701. Call: (319) 610-4535. Split Foyer Home, $138,900. 3-4 bedrooms, 1.5 bath. 1638 finished sq ft. Many updates: new roof, furnace, central air, carpet, lighting. Large corner lot. Detached 2-car garage (24x24). Appliances negotiable. Great neighborhood, close to schools (Black Hawk, Central, West High). (SEE PHOTO BELOW)

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Cedar Falls, Iowa

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FOR SALE / FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

3 story duplex, 6 blocks from Main Street. Nice neighborhood. Includes stove/fridge. Washer/ dryer for sale, if needed. Contact Jenn 319-231-2242, jenfreed@hotmail.com.

Hog operation: Work during the week and one weekend per month. 319- 296- 1898

Earn $1000-$3200 a month to drive our brand new cars with ads. www.AdDriveClub.com

School bus driver. $14.50 per hour. Will train. Call 319- 553- 2458

MISC

For rent. CF 4 BR. with single detached garage. Air. No pets. $650/MO. 319- 266- 0903 CF 4 BR. townhouse. 2 1/2 baths. $1200/MO. 1413 West 2ND Street, Cedar Falls. 266- 5789

Help wanted. Tony’s Pizzaria downtown Main Street. Hiring servers, cooks and drivers. Go to www.277tony.com. Fill out application and mention The Northern Iowan.

Local game console repairs: 360 - PS3 - Wii - DSLite - PSP. www.cvxgameconsolerepair.com Selling, furniture mattress sets, chests. Much more. Reasonable. Schwabs 266- 2076.

Student positions available for Board of Directors of the Northern Iowan

4 BR. duplex. 610 Iowa Street. $900/MO. 319- 236- 8930

Reasonable time commitment Great learning opportunity Valuable experience As a board member you will: Represent the student body and attend all board meetings Govern and oversee operations of the Northern Iowan If interested, please email Amy Dillard in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs at adillard@uni.edu and request a NI Board of Director Student form. Submissions are due by September 12.

Student Opportunity!

Accidents happen when you least expect them – and never on schedule! One minute you’re fine, and the next, you need medical help for cuts, bruises and more. What do you do? Just Walk In, No Appointment Needed • Cough, Cold, Fever and Flu 2 LOCATIONS • Nausea, Dizziness and Vomiting Covenant • Ear, Eye, Nose and Skin Ailments ProfessionalBuilding • Burns, Bites and Allergies Waterloo • Sprains, Strains and Fractures OffGreenhillandS.Main • Respiratory and Urinary Tract CedarFalls Infections • Lab and X-Ray Services Available Onsite

Hours: M-F Noon – 8 PM, S/S 10 AM – 6 PM Open Holidays, too!

<< Scan with your mobile device for more information


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CLASSIFIEDS

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Friday, September 9, 2011

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9-9-11  

The September 9th, 2011 edition of the Northern Iowan, the University of Northern Iowa's student-produced newspaper.

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