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Northern Iowan t h e u n i v e r s i t y o f n o r t h e r n i o wa’s s t u d e n t - p r o d u c e d n e w s p a p e r s i n c e 1 8 9 2

JUNE 22, 2012

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VOLUME 108, ISSUE 57

FRIDAY

CEDAR FALLS, IOWA

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NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG

SOLAR BOATS

Solar Panthers splash into third place at international solar boating championship KARI BRAUMANN

Executive Editor

The University of Northern Iowa solar boat team took third place overall at the 2012 Solar Splash World Championship of Intercollegiate Solar Boat Racing last weekend. Teams from around the United States and the world vied for the championship title at the competition, held at George Wyth State Park in Cedar Falls. UNI served as the official host of the championship. Istanbul Technical University of Turkey placed first overall, followed by the team from Cedarville University in Ohio. UNI’s third place overall finish is the team’s third the past four years. The team placed third

Photo courtesy of University Relations

Members of the University of Northern Iowa solar boat team are pictured with their vessel at the 2012 Solar Splash World Championship of Intercollegiate Solar Boat Racicng at George Wyth State Park in Cedar Falls. The UNI team claimed third place overall in the competition for the third time in the past four years.

in 2009 and 2010, falling one point shy of another thirdplace finish in 2011. In addition to their overall placement, the UNI team earned first place in the Sprint Event, third place in Solar Endurance, second place in the qualifying heats and an award for outstanding drive train design. “Compared with many topnotch engineering colleges in the United States as well as worldwide, I am extremely happy with the overall performance of my Solar Panthers team this year,” said Reg Pecen, the group’s adviser, in a press release. Pecen is a UNI professor of industrial technology. This year is the second in a row UNI has hosted the competition. UNI will host again in June 2013.

STURGIS FALLS

37th annual Sturgis Falls Celebration to bring Mardi Gras flavor to Cedar Falls KARI BRAUMANN Executive Editor

The 37th annual Sturgis Falls Celebration will take over Cedar Falls this weekend with dozens of events, including live music, a parade, contests, food and more. This year’s theme is “Mardi Gras at the Falls.” The weekend-long celebration begins Thursday with the Gateway Market. From 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., vendors will gather near the shelter area in Gateway Park selling various family-friendly items, including jewelry, sunglasses, clothing, arts and crafts and more. Booths with information about local wellness services and Cedar Falls Patch will also be present. Gateway Market will be open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday as well. Later on Thursday, live music will take the Gateway Park stage. The Mittens will perform at 5 p.m., Lick It Ticket performs at 6:30 p.m. and Cornmeal will go on at 8 p.m. Starting at 8 on Friday morning, a new event will

take place at Gateway Park along the river. About a dozen chainsaw carvers from around the Midwest will make carvings on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. All the weekend’s carvings will be auctioned off at 2 p.m. on Sunday. Friday’s schedule is filled with events taking place in multiple venues. Live music will be available on the Overman Park stage, including ensembles such as The Chocolate Crackers, Cedar Valley Jazz Club and more. Kid-friendly performances and activities will be available all day on the Kidsway stage, located in the Kidsway tent next to Overman Park on Franklin Street. The Sturgis Falls opening ceremony will take place on the Overman Park stage Friday night at 6:30 p.m. Over at Gateway Park, the Vic Ferrarri band will play from 9 p.m. until midnight. Saturday features another day full of events for all ages. More kids’ arts and crafts activities are available in the Kidsway area, along with multiple performances

by Dean Franzen, “The Dean of Juggling.” Area organizations will take part in a parade at 10 a.m. Saturday. Musical performances will continue throughout the day at the Overman Park and Gateway Park stages. Because of a cancellation on the Overman Park stage, Sturgis Falls attendees will be able to enjoy a performance by the nine-piece Marine Jazz Band from New Orleans Saturday afternoon from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Other events of the weekend include a carnival at 2nd and State Streets Thursday through Sunday, the Cedar Basin Jazz Festival at Sturgis Park Friday through Sunday, a classic car show Sunday at Gateway Park and many more. Food and beverages will be sold by various vendors at Overman Park and Gateway Park. For more information and a full schedule of events, visit www. sturgisfalls.org. Smartphone users can download a mobile app for iPhone, Android or Windows Phone.

WHITNEY PHILLIPS/Northern Iowan

Ryan Pearson (left, guitar and vocals) and Andrew Thoreen (right, bass), members of Lick It Ticket, play at the HuB Dec. 2, 2011. Lick It Ticket will play at the 2012 Sturgis Falls kickoff concert Thursday at Gateway Park.


NEWS

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NORTHERN IOWAN L011 Maucker Union Cedar Falls, IA 50614 www.northern-iowan.org 319.273.2157

KARI BRAUMANN

NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG | FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 2012

EXTENDED WEATHER FORECAST

FRIDAY HIGH: 84 LOW: 61 SUNNY

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SATURDAY HIGH: 81 LOW: 65

SCATTERED T-STORMS

DATA FROM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

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Editorial Assistants at the Northern Iowan are a team of volunteers who assist the Copy Editor in reviewing content. The Northern Iowan is published semiweekly on Tuesday and Friday during the academic year; weekly on Friday during the summer session, except for holidays and examination periods, by the University of Northern Iowa, L011 Maucker Union, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0166 under the auspices of the Board of Student Publications. Advertising errors that are the fault of the Northern Iowan will be corrected at no cost to the advertiser only if the Northern Iowan office is notified within seven days of the original publication. Publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertisement at any time. The Northern Iowan is funded in part with student activity fees. A copy of the Northern Iowan grievance procedure is available at the Northern Iowan office, located at L011 Maucker Union. All material is copyright © 2012 by the Northern Iowan and may not be used without permission.

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CIRCULATION

Off-Campus Circulation

FREE JAZZ CONCERT Parking lot of University Book and Supply, off 22nd St. 6:30-8:30 p.m. The UNI Jazz Combo Camp musicians will play a free jazz concert in advance of the Sturgis Falls and Cedar Basin Jazz Festival. The high school students at the camp will give the concert to cap off a week of rehearsal. The concert is hosted by the College Hill Partnership, University Book and Supply and UNI. Attendees are advised to bring lawn chairs and coolers are allowed; concessions will be available for purchase. DAVID DELAFIELD SILENT AUCTION Kamerick Art Building 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The University of Northern Iowa Gallery of Art and the UNI art department are hosting a silent auction of work by David Delafield, a former UNI art professor who passed away in 2003. The UNI Foundation will host a reception in the KAB lobby with music and refreshments. All proceeds benefit the UNI Gallery of Art.

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CEDAR FALLS MUNICIPAL BAND CONCERT Overman Park 7:30 p.m. The band will offer a free open-air concert featuring traditional and light band music for all ages. The Cedar Falls Kiwanis Club will sell popcorn and soft drinks. Attendees may bring lawn chairs and/or blankets if they prefer. Rain location is the band hall at 211 Washington Street.


NEWS

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NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG | FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 2012

IMMIGRATION LAW

Obama limits deportation for some immigrants CHRISTI PARSONS, BRIAN BENNETT AND JOSEPH TANFANI Tribune Washington Bureau

Using his executive powers to go where Congress would not, President Barack Obama ordered his administration Friday to stop deporting illegal immigrants who came to the United States as children, a shift that could affect more than 1 million people. The new policy allows younger immigrants to apply for a two-year renewable reprieve on deportation, providing they have no criminal record. Appearing in the Rose Garden, Obama said his executive order did not provide amnesty, immunity or a path to citizenship. But, he said, a “temporary, stop-gap measure” was necessary because Congress had failed to pass a comprehensive immigration overhaul, as he had sought. “These are young people who study in our schools; they play in our neighborhoods; they’re friends with our kids; they pledge allegiance to our flag,” Obama said. “They are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every single way but one: on paper. “They were brought to this country by their parents – sometimes even as infants – and often have no idea that they’re undocumented until they apply for a job or a driver’s license, or a college scholarship,” he added. Critics denounced the move as an end run around Congress that will reward illegal immigrants when many Americans are struggling to find jobs. The presumptive GOP nominee, Mitt Romney, said Obama’s order “makes reaching a long-term solution more difficult.” The immediate aftermath was more emotional, however, for many families. Immigrant advocacy groups and supporters held boisterous rallies in Los Angeles, Houston and New York and in front of the White House. At the University of California, Los Angeles Labor Center, many held up cell phones and cameras to snap photos of the TV screen as Obama promised to “lift the shadow of deportation.” An elated Carlos Amador, 27, coordinator of the Dream Resource Center for undocumented immigrant students, got choked up trying to express his feelings. “ I t ’ s just been hard to put words together,” said Amador, whose family came to the United States illegally from Mexico City in 1999. Others cautioned that unlike an act of Congress, the executive order could be

Roberto Koltun/El Nuevo Herald/MCT

Jose Machado, a student of Nicaraguan descent, listens to President Barack Obama’s announcement in Washington, D.C., that his administration has ordered the suspension of the deportation of of thousands of undocumented young students who were seeking protection under the Dream Act, at the Wolfson Campus of Miami-Dade College in Miami, Fla., on June 15, 2012.

reversed by a future president. Young illegal immigrants have been openly challenging the White House, and they urged followers to keep up the pressure. “This is a huge victory, but it’s only the first step,” said Cyndi Bendezu, who arrived illegally in the city of South Gate, Calif., from Peru at age 4, and now is pursuing a master’s degree in higher education at Columbia University. “We’ll keep fighting.” Administration officials acknowledged the concerns, saying people could make their own decisions whether to come forward. In a conference call with reporters, Janet Napolitano, secretary of Homeland Security, described the policy as an “exercise of discretion.” Crystal Williams, executive director of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said many lawyers would still advise their clients to apply if they qualified. “It will give them some protection from the overriding fear that they live with, of being deported,” she said. Under Obama’s order, illegal immigrants under 30 can stay and work, at least temporarily, if authorities decide they don’t pose a risk to national security or public safety. They must have come to the United States before they turned 16 and stayed continuously for at least the past five years. They must also be enrolled in school, have a high school diploma or equivalent degree or be in the U.S. military. Honorably discharged veterans are also eligible. Applicants convicted of a felony, a significant misdemeanor or multiple misdemeanors are not eligible. As a presidential candidate in 2008, Obama promised comprehensive immigration

reform, and he faced pressure from immigrant groups that he is now courting for reelection. His order Friday follows several largely unsuccessful attempts to slow deportations of illegal immigrants who don’t pose a threat. In the last three years, his administration has deported a record 1.1 million people. About half the total were convicted of felony or misdemeanor charges, including repeat violators of immigration law, and were considered priorities for deportation. Last June, John Morton, director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, announced that ICE would chiefly focus on deporting dangerous criminals, not illegal immigrants with strong family ties in America and no police records, among other factors. He issued guidelines giving prosecutors discretion to favor illegal immigrants who are close relatives of U.S. citizens, who were brought to this country as children or who have served in the U.S. military. But the new prosecutorial discretion, and a separate review of more than 280,000 deportation cases in immigration courts since November, led to temporary reprieves for only about 6,000 people. Most were not given work permits or permanent legal status, and the total was significantly less than immigration advocacy groups had hoped. Obama’s announcement immediately moved immigration policy back to the forefront of the presidential campaign. During the spring primaries, strong stands on illegal immigration proved widely popular with Republicans. Romney staked out some of the toughest positions, criticizing rivals who called for

creating legal paths to citizenship. But GOP strategists worry the hard-line stance may permanently alienate the nation’s fast-growing Latino population, especially in crucial electoral states like Florida, New Mexico and Colorado. In a tight election, turnout could also make a difference in states with fewer Latinos, such as Iowa and Virginia. Romney agreed with Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a Cuban American who says he has been drafting legislation for young illegal immigrants, and who called Obama’s action “a short-term answer to a longterm problem.” “I believe the status of young people who come here through no fault of their own is an important matter to be considered and should be solved on a long-term basis so they know what their future would be in this country,” Romney told reporters. For Obama, the move could help solve one of the biggest worries hanging over his reelection efforts – flagging enthusiasm among Latino voters. Some Democrats worry that these voters, discouraged by the recession, may simply stay home. Gallup surveys from this spring showed only about two-thirds of Latino voters said they definitely planned to vote in November, compared to about 80 percent of nonLatino whites. The path to Obama’s surprise announcement began about two months ago, according to White House aides and members of Congress. On April 25, several senior Democratic senators – including Dick Durbin of Illinois, sponsor of the DREAM Act that failed in Congress – met with White House public policy director Cecilia Munoz and other West Wing aides, according to a source familiar with the talks. The senators argued that Obama should use his executive powers to simply order a halt in deportations of young illegal immigrants. Over the next several weeks, White House lawyers studied the president’s authority over immigration enforcement actions, and finally gave their support. The news cheered Alaa Mukahhal, 25, of Chicago, who came to the U.S. from Kuwait with her parents in 1993, when she was 6. Despite earning an architecture degree from the University of Illinois, Mukahhal is facing deportation proceedings that started after she applied for asylum. “We understand this is a temporary move, but it’s an important step forward,” she said. “As far as I’m concerned,

growing up on the South Side of Chicago, I’m as American as they come.” (Los Angeles Times staff writers Paloma Esquivel, Mitchell Landsberg, Maeve Reston and Corina Knoll in Los Angeles; Michael Finnegan in Milford, N.H.; Mitch Smith in Chicago; and Matea Gold, Lisa Mascaro, Kathleen Hennessey, Michael Memoli, Kim Geiger of the Tribune Washington Bureau and Times staff writer Richard Simon in Washington contributed to this story.)


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Brandon Poll Managing Editor pollb@uni.edu

JUNE 22, 2012

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Single bedroom unfurnished apartments available on-campus in Hillside Courts. Must be grad student or 23 or older, or married or veteran. 319- 273- 6232 weekdays or www.uni.edu/dor link to housing: apartments

1, 2 or 3 roommates needed. Available now through the school year. 319- 240- 0880.

4 or 8 bedroom duplex for rent. Half block from campus. 319- 240- 0880 Available July 1ST, 4 bedroom duplex. $960/MO., appliances included. 319- 236- 8930 or 319- 290- 5114.

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VOLUME 108, ISSUE 57

2 male roommates wanted to share house one block off campus. 3328 Panther Lane. $300 plus utilities per person. 563- 650- 7432

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