Page 1

UNI HISTORY

DISABILITIES

WRESTLING

CAMPUS LIFE PAGE 4

OPINION PAGE 3

SPORTS PAGE 6

Take a step back in time and see what was happening at UNI decades ago.

Columnist Stormy O’Brink discusses the issue of disability accommodations

The wrestling team improved to 12-0 for the first time in the program’s history.

Thursday

Feb. 20, 2014

Volume 110, Issue 38

Opinion X3 Opinion

Campus Campus Life XLife Sports 4 X Sports Games 6 X

Classifieds Classifieds X 7

northern-iowan.org

NISG candidates vie for office CORREY PRIGEON sity on campus, quality of educaAssociate News Editor tion and fostering a better relation-

With less than a week to go before Northern Iowa’s Student Government elections, the presidential and senatorial candidates answered questions posed by a live audience and through Twitter on Tuesday. “The questions were hard but fair and it wasn’t just based on our platforms,” said Eric Boisen, vice presidential candidate. “We were all equally grilled on things that we’re lacking and things that we do well in.” Boisen is running with presidential candidate Corey Cooling. Presidential candidate Kevin Gartman and vice presidential candidate Paul Andersen are running against the pair. While some students who attended the debate were content with the questions asked and the candidates’ answers, others thought the debate focused on the wrong aspects of the candidates’ campaigns. “I think we focused too much on the fluffy positive aspects of their platforms,” said Alicia Jessip, senior communications major. “I do want to hear about the flaws in your platform and your running mate. Have you addressed those?” The questions covered such topics as gender-neutral bathrooms and housing, inclusion and diver-

ship between the student body and NISG. The candidates agreed on many issues, including a second year of tuition freeze and working with the Department of Residence to create gender-neutral establishments. They differed on issues concerning how best to help student organizations. Cooling and Boisen plan to promote the current resources for UNI’s student organizations. Gartman and Andersen hope to establish a “one-stop shop” for student organizations to find resources. Andrew Kunkle, senior pubic administration major, said the best question was about student organization fairs. “I was a transfer student and I think it would’ve helped me had they had one,” Kunkle said. The tickets also differed on how to improve the quality of education and on what will help UNI the most when facing the legislature. Cooling and Boisen plan to place more value on the Liberal Arts Core, but Gartman and Andersen said it was important to communicate the availability of already existing educational resources on campus, like the Office of Academic Advising.

Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates Kevin Gartman (left) and Paul Anderson (right) are answer questions from the audience at the NISG debate Tuesday.

 See DEBATE, page 2

Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates Corey Cooling (left) and Eric Boisen (right) answer questions from the audience at the NISG debate Tuesday.

What did you take away from the nisg presidential debate?

JACINDA RUGGLES/Northern Iowan

JACINDA RUGGLES/Northern Iowan

STUDENT VOICES

It was a great event to show where both candidates stand. I really got a good grasp of who they were. MICHAEL KELLY

JACOB SHULTZ

Junior, Philosophy

Staff Writer

Both sides did a really good job speaking and furthering their platforms. SAM GEORGE

Sophomore, Public Administration

 See VOICES, page 2

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NEWS

PAGE 2

NORTHERN IOWAN L011 Maucker Union Cedar Falls, IA 50614 www.northern-iowan.org 319.273.2157

LINH TA

Executive Editor tal@uni.edu 319.273.6826

EXTENDED WEATHER FORECAST

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

HIGH: 28 LOW: 14 RAIN & SNOW

DEBATE

MICHELE SMITH

Since UNI is the regent university with the highest percentage of native Iowa

Managing Editor inglesdni@gmail.com 563.580.5628 Northern Iowan Manager michele.smith@uni.edu

continued from page 1

DATA FROM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

SATURDAY

HIGH: 28 LOW: 8 MOSTLY SUNNY

DAKOTA INGLES

NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

HIGH: 20 LOW: 5 MOSTLY SUNNY

students, Gartman and Andersen said it was important to communicate the funding needs of the school. However, Cooling and Boisen said convincing the legislature that

SUNDAY

THURSDAY

HIGH: 20 LOW: 3 PARTLY SUNNY

UNI isn’t the “little brother” of the regent universities was the most important. NISG election polls open at 7 a.m. Tuesday and close 7 p.m. Wednesday.

KRISTIN GUESS

Adviser kristin.guess@uni.edu

EDITORIAL STAFF News Editor aunej@uni.edu

CAITIE PETERSON Campus Life Editor petercap@uni.edu Sports Editor bemisj@uni.edu

JACINDA RUGGLES/NORTHERN IOWAN

Alicia Jessip, senior communications major, asks a question during the audience Q-and-A session.

JACINDA RUGGLES/NORTHERN IOWAN

Candidates running for seats in the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences state their ideas for NISG.

JACINDA RUGGLES Art Director ruggljaa@uni.edu

AMANDA BLANCHE Copy Editor blanchea@uni.edu

BRIANNA LEWERKE

Advertising Executive northern-iowan@uni.edu

CARSEN ANDERSON

PRODUCTION STAFF DAKOTA INGLES Senior Production Typesetter Webmaster

NI STAFF SARAH KELZER Business Assistant

CHANCE INGLES Business Assistant

CIRCULATION CHANCE INGLES Circulation

ASSOCIATE EDITORS AMBER ROUSE

Associate Executive Editor

CORREY PRIDEON Associate News Editor

RILEY UBBEN

Associate Sports Editor

SAMUEL HARRIS

Associate Opinion Editor

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS EMMA WRIGHT RACHEL GUHIN The Northern Iowan is published semiweekly on Tuesday and Friday during the academic year and weekly on Friday during the summer session, except for holidays and examination periods, by the University of Northern Iowa, L011 Maucker Union, Cedar Falls, IA 506140166 under the auspices of the Board of Student Publications. Advertising errors that are the fault of the Northern Iowan will be corrected at no cost to the advertiser only if the Northern Iowan office is notified within seven days of the original publication. Publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertisement at any time. The Northern Iowan is funded in part with student activity fees. A copy of the Northern Iowan grievance procedure is available at the Northern Iowan office, located at L011 Maucker Union. All material is © 2013 by the Northern Iowan and may not be used without permission.

PLANETARIUM SHOW Room 105, Latham Hall 7-8:30 p.m. A chance to view the night sky from the warmth and comfort of the Earth Science Department’s Planetarium.

SUNDAY

MEN’S BASKETBALL McLeod Center 4 p.m. The Panthers take on the Illinois State University Redbirds.

MONDAY

ADVERTISING STAFF

Advertising Executive northern-iowan@uni.edu

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR Room 201, McCollum Science Hall 4-5 p.m. Rebecca Krewer, medical school student at the University of Iowa, will present “A Crash Course in Medical School at Iowa.”

POETRY SLAM AND OPEN MIC NIGHT CME 7:30 p.m. An opportunity to hear original poetry and participate in an open mic session. Refreshments will be served.

JORDAN AUNE

JAKE BEMIS

CAMPUS EVENTS

JACINDA RUGGLES/NORTHERN IOWAN

Cooling, Boisen, Gartman and Andersen listen as Moderator Linh Ta delivers a question. The candidates answered five predetermined questions and were then subject to more inquiries from audience members and social media.

VOICES

continued from page 2

STUDENT VOICES

Both sides really showed up. Hard to say if there was truly an overall winner.

JAY FRUECHTE

Junior, Management Information Systems

I wish more of the student body would have been present, but hopefully for those who were in attendance, it made a huge impact on them. JOHN GOGOLA

Senior, Social Sciences and Technology

FLUXCONCERT UNI Gallery of Art 6-7 p.m. UNI Performance Art Students will perform Fluxus Art pieces, in association with the exhibition “Remix: Art and Sound Unbound” featuring avant-garde music and art. FACULTY SENATE MEETING Oak Room, Maucker Union 3:30-5 p.m. The UNI Faculty Senate will hold their regular meeting in Maucker Union. Anyone can attend.

Do you want to have an event listed here? Email us at northern-iowan@uni.edu with information about the event to have it featured.

HOW TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE NORTHERN IOWAN JOIN OUR STAFF

Visit northern-iowan.org/ employment to apply.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters must be less than 300 words in length and are subject to editing. Not all submissions will be printed. Send submissions to tal@uni.edu.

GUEST COLUMNS

Email submissions to Executive Editor Linh Ta at tal@uni.edu.

SEND US STORY IDEAS

Tell us what’s happening on campus. Email submissions to northern-iowan@uni.edu.

CORRECTIONS

The Northern Iowan strives for complete accuracy and corrects its errors immediately. If you believe the NI has printed a factual error, please call our office at 319.273.2157 or email us at northern-iowan@uni.edu immediately.


LINH TA

OPINION EDITOR TAL@UNI.EDU

FEBRUARY 20, 2014

|

Opinion

NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG

|

PAGE 3

VOLUME 110, ISSUE 38

TWLOHA to help winter blues RENAE BEARD

renaeb @uni.edu

Welcome to Antarctica … I mean, Iowa. Thanks to Mother Nature, we have been experiencing extreme colds, dropping approximately 30 F below normal. At times like these, when 15 F feels like a heat wave, it may seem like the seven potential months of winterlike weather will never come to a conclusion. But, the end is in sight. March 20, the first day of spring, is just a few weeks away. However, for those affected with Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, those few weeks may as well be an eternity. According to “Psychology Today,” over 10 million Americans suffer from this illness, which is commonly referred to as “winter depression.” “Some people expe-

You need to know you’re not alone in the place you feel stuck. Jamie Tworkowski

TWLOHA founder

rience a serious mood change when the seasons change,” according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. “They may sleep too much, have little energy and may also feel depressed. Though symptoms can be severe, they usually clear up.” Iowa college students are at a heightened risk for this disorder, as it commonly affects people 20 and older, with higher rates in the northern U.S. Symptoms often include a tendency to oversleep and overeat (causing weight gain), nausea, difficulty waking up in the morning, lack of energy, difficulty concentrating, decreased sex drive

and social withdrawal. Scientists believe SAD may be an evolutionary remnant in humans. The lower mood would have reduced the need for food intake, eliciting a sort of hiber nation-type period and thus explaining the change in behavior today. Furthermore, this disorder affects more women than men, suggesting it may have something to do with the regulation of reproduction. There is a battery of different treatments available to combat SAD. Typical managements include medication, light therapy, melatonin supplements and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Support groups are another convenient option. UNI has a student organization called To Write Love On Her Arms, otherwise known as TWLOHA. This inspirational group is one of thousands of chapters around the world. The national mission statement is, “To Write Love On Her Arms … is dedicated to pre-

Jose Osorio/MCT Campus

senting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury and suicide. TWLOHA exists to encourage, inform, inspire and also to invest directly into treatment and recovery.” The executive board plans insightful, motivating meetings each week, full of group participation and fun to help lift participants’ spirits. The UNI TWLOHA chapter encourages all students to attend their meetings at 9 p.m. every Tuesday

in the Elm Room of the Maucker Union. In the words of TWLOHA founder Jamie Tworkowski, “We live in a difficult world, a broken world. We believe everyone can relate to pain. All of us live with questions and all of us get stuck in moments. You need to know you’re not alone in the places you feel stuck. Beyond treatment, we believe community is essential. People need other people. We were never meant to do life alone.”

A need is a need, and it should be accommodated Stormy O’Brink obrinks @uni.edu

This weekend, I was at a conference and attended a workshop called “Queering Disability.” As I arrived in the workshop room, I noticed the presenter, who had a visible disability, sitting on the stage instead of presenting on it. Somehow the conference committee had failed to notice they booked his workshop in a room with an inaccessible stage (one could only get onstage by using stairs). The irony of the situation showed an ugly part of our society: we are failing to accommodate people with disabilities. Many don’t see the need for accommodation because they fail to acknowledge disabilities that are invisible. The definition of disability is broad. A lot of people immediately think of a person in a wheelchair when they think of people with disabilities, but this is a narrow view. The Americans with Disabilities Act defines disability as having a physical or mental impairment that

The assumption that only visible disabilities exist is harmful to people with disabilities substantially affects one or more major life activities. This definition includes visible disabilities as well as invisible disabilities, such as mental illness. People often harshly judge those whose disabilities aren’t visible, sometimes even publicly mocking them. The assumption that only visible disabilities exist is harmful to people with disabilities, and we need to broaden our view to stop shutting them out. Sometimes I see problems with accessibility at UNI. When UNI Proud’s office was placed in the Purple Pen room in Maucker Union for a year, we quickly noticed it was not accessible to everyone. The only way to get to the room was by using stairs. Soon after, we started noticing there were many other places on campus with limited accessibility. When our sidewalks are not properly plowed, the snow can get caught in

Barry Wong/ MCT Campus

the wheels of a wheelchair, which makes movement difficult. I have rarely seen sign language interpreters at UNI events. I see strobe lights at our dances more often than not, which can be a hazard to people with photosensitive epilepsy. We aren’t the most inaccessible campus, but we aren’t the most accessible either. We keep operating on the assumption that someone with a disability should be present before we set up accommodations. We should be setting up

accommodations regardless of who is present, so that all students really are welcome at our events. According to the 2010 U.S census, 19 percent of the population had a disability. When such a large percentage of the population is affected by a disability, there is no excuse for widespread ignorance of their needs. When we classify disability related needs as “special,” we think of accommodating them as a special circumstance.

However, accommodating people shouldn’t be a special circumstance; it should be something we do every day without hesitancy. A need is a need, and it should be accommodated.

DISABILITIES

Have a question? Find more information on accommodations for students, faculty and administration with disabilities visit http://www. uni.edu/resources/disability.


PAGE 4

CampusLife

FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG

|

CAITIE PETERSON CAMPUS LIFE EDITOR PETERCAP@UNI.EDU

VOLUME 110, ISSUE 38

SPORTS: PRO DREAMS

Road to the NFL: A weekly update from Tyler Sievertsen TYLER SIEVERTSEN Former UNI Kicker

Alpha Phi Fraternity JACOB SHULTZ

Greek Life Writer

During the next eight weeks, the Northern Iowan will feature a Greek chapter every Thursday to better acquaint UNI students to fraternity and sorority life on and off campus. This week’s column features UNI’s chapter of the Alpha Phi International Fraternity. Members of Alpha Phi at UNI and colleges nationwide share a commitment to excellence and a strong desire to help one another and their communities, according to the Alpha Phi website. Jessie Benson, UNI Alpha Phi president, said the main focus of Alpha Phi is to help each other go further. “It is always nice to bounce ideas off of each other or having someone to talk to no matter what,” Benson said. Alpha Phi is one of the oldest Greek chapters to have its own foundation, according to the UNI Alpha Phi website. Members raise awareness and money for women’s heart health. The UNI chapter partners with the Waterloo House of Hope, which aids homeless women

and children. “My favorite part of A(lpha) Phi is the philanthropy part of it, especially the Red Dress Gala and the Alpha Phi Foundation,” said Amanda Walker, junior interactive digital studies major. Alpha Phi holds the Red Dress Gala every February to raise funds for their national foundation. Last year, the women of Alpha Phi raised almost $10,000 dollars to benefit their foundation and local charities. Alpha Phi places value on sisterhood, service, scholarship, leadership, loyalty and character development, and it is these values that bring individuals together. As an out-of-state student, Walker said it was important to identify with other members of Alpha Phi in order to make her college experience more enjoyable. A lot of sorority women would agree that the bonds you make throughout your college journey with your fellow sisters are important. For this reason, Alpha Phi regularly holds sisterhood activities, such as planned dinners or craft days. “Sisterhood and mak-

ing friends” is the best part of Greek life for Mackenzie Bloem, senior elementary education major. There are many motivations for joining a sorority or fraternity at UNI, but one commonality is to make intimate friendships and unlimited networking opportunities. “With our large numbers it is easier to recruit, increase awareness about our philanthropic events on campus and be involved in the community,” Benson said. With 77 members this year, Alpha Phi continues to be a large presence on campus and in the Greek community.

This week in UNI history JACINDA RUGGLES

Staff Writer

February 1878 • A joint committee appointed by the general assembly spent the day at the Iowa State Normal School, now UNI. • Tuition for students obtaining a teaching degree was free, and for all others it was $2. • Vocal music and drawing classes were free. Feb. 21, 1931 • The Washington Ball, said to be the biggest event of the season, had students dressing up in full Martha and George Washington regalia.

Feb. 19, 1943 • The student newspaper announced an upcoming fivemonth training period for 400 aircrew students at the Iowa State Teachers College. The Teachers College was one of 281 education institutes commissioned for specialized training for World War II. Feb. 17, 1950 • Two new radio broadcasts came to the campus radio station: “Town and Gown,” a talk show, and “College Kitchen,” a show that gave cooking and household tips. Information from Rod Library special collections and university archives

JACINDA RUGGLES/Northern Iowan

An advertisement for the Washington Ball appeared in an issue of the College Eye Feb. 21, 1931. Documents like these can be found in the Rod Library archives.

This past week was full of training and preparation for the first combine in New Jersey at the New York Jets facility. I made a trip to Naples, Fla., to kick on artificial turf and work with another kicker who was attending the same combine. We got in two two-hour workouts and we both felt prepped and ready to go. The journey to New Jersey was interesting to say the least. I woke up early Saturday morning to leave for my first flight from Tampa, Fla., to Houston. The drive to the airport went without traffic and I arrived in plenty of time to catch my first leg. The flight was smooth and I arrived two hours before my next flight. I got off the plane and my next gate was close so I checked the departure board. That’s when I noticed my flight to Newark had been cancelled because of snow in the Northeast. I began to panic because I had to report to the Jets facility at 7 a.m. Sunday morning. My parents began to make phone calls as I waited in a long line with angry passengers who were supposed to be on the same flight. After a long hour and a half, I had two options. The first was to catch a direct flight to Baltimore and drive four hours once I arrived, which would have put me in New Jersey at 8 p.m. The second was to risk the weather and fly to New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport and take an hour cab ride to the hotel. This experience remind-

ed me of the road trip to Missouri State University this past season. That trip was filled with airplane issues due to weather and we didn’t make it to the stadium until an hour before game time. I decided to take a chance and fly to New York. The plane made it out on time, and after being in a holding pattern for half an hour to clear the snow from the runway, we landed in New York. I walked down to baggage claim and I found a town car waiting to take me to my hotel in New Jersey. I arrived at the hotel and checked in to the room the NFL had set aside. The room was pretty amazing and I was finally able to relax and get ready for the morning competition. I left early the next morning and got into the facility with plenty of time to spare. The temperature inside was 20 F degrees and the footballs were slightly flat and felt like rocks when they came off the foot. I knew that I would have to set this aside and do what I prepared to do. The competition began and it involved a lot of sitting around and waiting. When it was my turn to kick, I hit my kickoffs pretty well compared to the other kickers. Once I hit my three kickoffs I had to wait for the field goal portion. I finished the day in the middle of the pack, but I learned a lot about the format and how to stay focused. I believe I am now prepared to move forward to my next combine in Phoenix Feb. 28. Time to get back to work and enjoy the weather for the week before I start the next journey.


NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

SEND US YOUR SNOW PICS!

With a blizzard on the way, we know you all will find a way to have fun with it (after the storm passes, of course). So take a photo and send it to northern-iowan@uni.edu. We’ll include it in a future issue.

CAMPUS LIFE

PAGE 5

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FREAKY FAST

DELIVERY! ©2013 JIMMY JOHN’S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


PAGE 6 FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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Sports

NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG

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JAKE BEMIS

SPORTS EDITOR BEMISJ@UNI.EDU

VOLUME 110, ISSUE 38

WRESTLING

Senior day win sets school record NICK GARY

Sports Writer

It was a record-setting night for the fourth-ranked Northern Iowa wrestling team as they improved to 12-0 for the first time in program history during Saturday’s meet with Purdue University. The fate of the match was up in the air going into the heavyweight match, but Blaize Cabell sealed the 21-12 victory over the Boilermakers with a decision over Alex White. “Our guys should be proud of what they have done so far,” said head coach Doug Schwab. “With the kind of history that this program has had, setting some history is a great thing. It’s a tribute to our guys.” Not only did they earn their 12th victory of the season, but the Panthers were able to send their six seniors out with a bang at the last home meet of their careers. “There is a lot of emotions on a day like today,” Schwab said. “We wanted to send our seniors out victorious, but they still have a lot to accomplish.” In the only match consisting of two ranked wrestlers, top-ranked senior Joe Colon fought off a hard effort from 12th-ranked Cashé Quiroga, 8-6. Colon, currently 23-1, has now defeated seven of

ERIN KEISER/Northern Iowan

Senior Ryan Loder (above) left the West Gym for the final time in his career with a win Sunday. Loder is now 10-0 on the season after missing time earlier in the year due to injury.

the top 15 wrestlers at 133 pounds. Senior Joey Lazor lost his first dual match of the season to Danny Sabatello, 14-10. Lazor, who is still recovering from an elbow injury, fought back after falling behind 10-5. Lazor used a takedown to bring the score to 12-10 before Sabatello used a reversal at the end of the match to put

it out of reach. “It’s a sour taste for Lazor to lose on senior day,” Schwab said. “Sabatello came out firing, and he has to make adjustments, but he still has a lot to do.” Senior Ryan Loder improved to 10-0 after a win against Tanner Lynde. He used a takedown in the first period, a reversal in the third period and nearly

5 minutes of riding time to defeat Lynde, 5-0. Loder has defeated his opponents by a combined score of 75-8 with one fall this season. Despite the day centering around the seniors, it was freshman Dylan Peters who once again stole the show. At 125 pounds, Peters tallied his 16th fall of the season against Camden Eppert. Peters was trailing Eppert

midway through the second period until he overpowered him, using a takedown and an eventual pin to earn the only bonus points of the day for either team. “The win is great, but our ultimate goal is the MidAmerican Conference and NCAA Championships,” Schwab said. “We have five weeks left of being ultradisciplined to get ready.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Panthers stun 24th-ranked Shockers NICK ALVARADO

Sports Writer

As the final buzzer sounded and reality sank in, Northern Iowa forward Jen Keitel ran over to her team’s bench and into the open arms of Brittni Donaldson, which the two would later laughingly acknowledge as a somewhat awkward moment. But it’s not every day you beat the 24th-ranked team in the nation 80-71 while simultaneously snapping their 20-game winning streak. “I was just so excited,” Keitel said. “I could see that my teammates were excited. Brit and I shared this awkward hug at the end of the game; it was just awesome. It’s one of the greatest feelings in the world.” The Panthers jumped on the Wichita State University Shockers early, starting the game off with a 14-4 run and forcing WSU into a slew of miscues, which included eight

ERIN KEISER/Northern Iowan

Hannah Schonhardt (20) returned to the UNI starting lineup Sunday and recorded 11 rebounds in the Panthers’ 80-71 upset of 24th-ranked Wichita State.

turnovers in the first 10 minutes of regulation. Forward Amber Sorenson sunk a trio of 3-pointers during that timeframe and was a big contributor to the early offensive surge from UNI. The Panthers shot 44 percent from the field, which

included a 50 percent mark from 3-point range in the first half. The scrappy defense and deft shooting percentages led to the Shockers playing catchup the entire game. Wichita State fought back hard in the second half and came within 3 points of UNI,

but they were never quite able to wrestle the lead away from the Panthers. Keitel, Donaldson and guard Brooke Brown took over the offensive load for the Panthers in the second half, scoring 37 of the team’s 39 second-half points. Donaldson, Keitel and Brown

finished the game with 22, 19 and 17 points respectively. WSU guard Alex Harden put forth a valiant effort, however, scoring a game and careerhigh 31 points. She accumulated nearly half of her team’s total score and outscored the next three highest scoring players on her team combined. She also had a game-high five turnovers, but she handled the ball for much of the game. “(Harden is) the LeBron James of the (Missouri Valley Conference), honestly,” said UNI head coach Tanya Warren. “She’s as good as I’ve seen, and I’ve been doing this for 21 years.” The Panthers improved to 9-4 in the MVC and 13-11 overall. Up next for UNI is Loyola University Chicago, which UNI beat 70-59 in their first matchup of the season. This time the teams will square off in Chicago at Loyola’s home court. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m.


Classifieds

DAKOTA INGLES

MANAGING EDITOR INGLESDNI@GMAIL.COM

FEBRUARY 20, 2014 |

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PAGE 7

VOLUME 110, ISSUE 38

1, 2 bedroom apartment available next to UNI call 712-358-0592 1,2,3 and 4 bedroom units, 10 minutes north of Cedar Falls. Security gated complex. Some utilites/cable paid. $400-800/mo. www.hildebrandrentals.com 319-352-5555 ~~ FEBRUARY SPECIAL ~~ WALK TO CAMPUS. 1416 Starview Dr. - CF TWO UNITS, AVAIL. JUNE 1 3BR LL Unit $930/mo, 4 BR UL Unit $1240/mo 1 Yr lease + Dep., No Pets/Smoking, Laundry/Central Air/Off St. Parking. J&P Properties 319-277-2564

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NORTHERN-IOWAN.ORG |THURSDAY FEBRUARY 20, 2014

CEDAR VALLEY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 1/2 off 1st month's rent on the following properties See website for more details

4 Bedroom 2 Bathroom 810 W 25th $1600 Heat paid! includes snow/mow, off-street parking, coin-op washer/dryer 1221 Tremont $1200 includes snow/mow, free cable, washer/dryer 609 W 10th $1340 includes snow/mow, free cable, washer/dryer 4 Bedroom 1.5 Bathroom 1904 Sheldon $1,100 includes snow/mow, garage, free cable, dishwasher, washer/dryer 2519 W 4th $1,050 includes snow/mow, off-street parking,free cable,dishwasher, washer/dryer 810 W 25th $1,200 Heat paid! includes Visit us on Facebook snow/mow,off-street parking, to view our latest offers dishwasher, coin-op washer/dryer

$

0

WN D&O APPLY FREE LIMITED TIME

Your style.

Call Tim 319-404-9095

www.CedarValleyPropertyManagement.com Timothy.Hoekstra@gmail.com 124 E 18th Street, Cedar Falls, Iowa Licensed in the State of Iowa

Best location.

ACT NOW - rates increasing Feb. 22

UniversityMills.com

321 Cedar Crest Drive

$630 Heat Paid! includes free cable, some utilities paid, coin-op washer/dryer, snow/mow, off-street parking

2507-2527 Royal Drive

$675 includes free cable, coin-op washer/dryer, snow/mow, off-street parking

3211-3219 Terrace Drive 32

$675 includes free cable, some utilities paid, coin-op washer/dryer, snow/mow, off-street parking, dishwasher, walk-in closets

Call Tim 319-404-9095 124 E 18th St. Cedar Falls

www.CedarValleyPropertyManagement.com

Special Oer on These Great Homes!! 1604 W 6th St. 1620 Linda Dr. 1421 Starview Dr. 822 W 6th St. 515 W 1st St. 603 Iowa St.

-- 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath, garage -- 3 BR, 2 bath, garage -- 4 BR, 1 1/2 bath, walk to campus -- 4 BR, 1 bath, large deck -- 4 BR, 1 bath, pet-friendly -- 5 BR, 2 bath, 2 kitchens, pet-friendly

Save money: Another great reason to live on campus. No surprises. Furnishings, utilities, cable television and Internet service are included.

Sign a lease for next year by March 1 and receive 1/2 month FREE RENT!!

Contact John john@rentfromjohn.com

Live on campus until you graduate. www.uni.edu/dor

2-20-14  

The February 20, 2014 issue of the Northern Iowan, the University of Northern Iowa's independent, student-produced newspaper since 1892.

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