{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

+

become independent other life skills

)

MAK E

L IF E

L ON

M A C P

GUIDE

unplug

nature's calling

202 0

)

SU M M E R P RO G R A M S

G

let your inner athlete

F R IENDS

g

shine

Sponsored by

Winter 2020 Edition

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 1


Hikes, creek walks, crafts, kayaking and games are some of the activities your child may participate in at Cleveland Metroparks summer nature camps. Ages 3 - 15

Animal encounters, crafts and conservation education are all part of the experience at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Summer Day Camp. Ages 5 - 14

Golf lessons, golf etiquette and fun on-course experiences are all part of Cleveland Metroparks Golf Camp. Camps take place at Seneca and Washington Golf Courses. Ages 8 - 17

Living at Its Bestand to learn more visit clevelandmetroparks.com/camps 2For | Family registration dates


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 3


COVER PHOTOS BY KIM STAHNKE PHOTOGRAPHY KIMSTAHNKEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

20 2 0

M A C P

GUIDE SU M M E R P RO G R A M S

10

STEM culinary

service CAMP FRIENDS

Programs provide adventure

opportunities to make lifelong relationships.

Winter 2020 Edition

leadership

athletics

un plu g

CHOOSE THE RIGHT CAMP FOR YOUR CHILD Make sense of the options

Spark your child’s creativity and curiosity with two different camps this summer. Camp Creativity campers will work with professional artists and authors to create their own literary masterpiece, while LEGO & Lux Blox STEM Camp will unlock your child’s imagination with unique STEM activities and problem-solving challenges. Visit akronkids.org/calendar/programs

BALDWIN WALLACE COMMUNITY ARTS SCHOOL

For more than 90 years, Baldwin Wallace University has been bringing school-age and adult learners to campus for immersive music and arts training. Summer Arts programs include music, dance and theatre camps, high school college-prep institutes, and professional development for music teachers. Call 440-826-2482 or visit bw.edu/sap

un plu g

BECK CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Beck Center offers half-day and full-day camps for ages 5-19 in dance, music, theater and visual arts. Students learn new skills and build self-esteem as they create unique works of art, develop new friendships, discover AKRON ARTWORKS hidden talents, stimulate their imagination Akron ArkWorks and have fun. Beck Center also will offeroffers art camps for your more than 140 arts education classes and kid. Their day lessons for people of allcreative ages and abilities. camps provide Call 216-521-2540 or visit beckcenter.org thoughtful and enriching opportunities for kids age 7 to 14. Each themed camp is structured so that morning sessions (9 a.m.-noon) can stand alone or be extended into the afternoon (9 a.m.-3 p.m.). Call 330-983-9983 or visit akronartworks.com

A BREATH OF FRESH AIR Get kids out in nature AKRON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM this summer

Spark your child’s creativity and curiosity with two different camps this summer. Camp Creativity campers will work with professional artists and authors to create their own literary masterpiece, while LEGO & Lux Blox STEM Camp will unlock your child’s imagination with unique STEM activities and problem-solving challenges. Visit akronkids.org/calendar/programs

✱ Visit NortheastOhioParent.com to find more summer camp guide listings. 4 | Family Living at Its Best

BUSY BEES POTTERY & ARTS STUDIO

Busy Bees Pottery & Arts Studio, located in Mentor, offers weekly themed summer art camps for kids ages 5-12. Full- or half-day camps will keep them busy learning various art methods while creating multiple projects each day. Call 440-571-5201 or visit mentor.busybeesart.com

un plu g

athletics

ARTS musico ARTS music academic academic ARTS music

16

20 | Family Living at Its Best

lifelong friends

20 | Family Living at Its Best

leadership outdoors

CAMP ASBURY

un plu g

outdoor

ath

For 62 years, Camp Asbury has been forming faith and connecting people to nature. Resident camp for grades first through twelfth: June 14-July 24. Day camp for grades first through sixth: June 15-July 24. Register online for one-week AKRON ARTWORKS Call BALDWIN WALLACE BUSY BEES POTTERY sessions at eocsummercamps.org. BALDWIN BUSY BEES POTTERY Akron ArkWorks offers 330-569-3171 or WALLACE visit campasbury.org COMMUNITY ARTS SCHOOL & ARTS STUDIO art camps for your & ARTS STUDIO COMMUNITY ARTS SCHOOL For more than 90 Busy Bee kid.90 Their day Forcreative more than Busy Bees Pottery & Arts years, Baldwin Studio, lo camps provide years, Baldwin Studio, located in Mentor, Wallace University offers we thoughtful and Wallace University offers weekly themed has been bringing summer enriching opportunihas been bringing summer artschool-age camps for and kids age ties for kids age 7 to school-age and kids ages 5-12. Fullor adult learners to half-day 14. Each themed camp is learners structured adult to so that half-day music campsand will arts campus for immersive keep the AKRON BALDWIN WALLACE BUSY BEES PO morning sessions music (9ARTWORKS a.m.-noon) campus for immersive and artscan stand keep them busy learning training. Summer Arts programs include various a Akron ArkWorks offers alone or be extended into the afternoon (9 COMMUNITY ARTS SCHOOLwhile creating & ARTS STUDI training. Summer Arts programs include various art methods music, dance and theatre camps, high multiple proje art camps for your a.m.-3 Call 330-983-9983 For more thanCall 90 440-571-5201 or visit music, dancep.m.). and theatre camps, high while school creating multiple projects eachand day. college-prep institutes, creative kid. Their day orcollege-prep visit akronartworks.com years, Baldwinmentor.busybeesart.com school institutes, and Call 440-571-5201 visit professional or development for music camps provide Wallace University professional development for music mentor.busybeesart.com teachers. Call 440-826-2482 or visit thoughtful and has been bringing teachers. Call 440-826-2482 or visit bw.edu/sap AKRON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM CAMP ASBURY enriching opportunischool-age and bw.edu/sap Spark your child’s F ties for kids CAMP age 7 to ASBURY adult learners to For 62 years, CENTER FOR THE ARTS creativity C 14. Each themed camp and is structured so BECK that campus for immersive music and arts BECK CENTER FOR THE ARTS Camp Asbury Beck Center offers curiosity with two can stand h morning sessions (9 a.m.-noon) training. Summer Arts programs include Center offers has been half-day and full-day different camps f aloneBeck or be extended into the this afternoon (9 music, dance and theatre camps, high while creating mult half-day and330-983-9983 full-day forming faith 5-19 in camps for ages Camp a a.m.-3 p.m.). summer. Call CollegeAdvantage_DoubleFooter_NEOParent_Education_Guide-2020.indd 2 school college-prep institutes, and Call 440-571-5201 o camps forwork ages 5-19 in and connecting dance, music, theater Creativityorcampers will with profespeople to nature. Resident c visit akronartworks.com professional development for music mentor.busybeesar dance, music, camp forarts. grades and visual Students sional artists and authors to theater create their people to nature. Resident first through twelfth: June 14teachers. Call 440-826-2482 or visit and visual arts. Students 14-July 24.skills Dayand build new own literary masterpiece, while LEGO & Lux first through twelfth: Junelearn camp for grades first throug bw.edu/sap CHILDREN’S CAMP learn skills andchild’s buildMUSEUM campself-esteem for grades first through sixth: June works of as they create unique Blox STEMAKRON Camp willnew unlock your 15-July 24. RegisterASBUR online fo Sparkofyour child’s self-esteem as they create unique 15-July 24. Register online for one-week art, develop new friendships, discover imagination with unique STEMworks activities and sessions at eocsummercam BECK CENTER THE ARTS330-569-3171 or visit campa creativity and art, develop new friendships, discover sessions at eocsummercamps.org. Call hidden talents, stimulate theirFOR imagination problem-solving challenges. Visit Beck Center curiosity with twoand have hidden talents, stimulate their imagination 330-569-3171 orfun. visitBeck campasbury.org Center also will offer offers akronkids.org/calendar/programs half-day different camps this and have fun. Beck Center also will offer more than 140 arts education classes and and full-day for ages 5-19 in Camp lessons for people of all agescamps more than 140 arts education classessummer. and and abilities. dance, music, theater Creativity campers will work with profespeople to nature. R lessons for people of all ages and abilities. Call 216-521-2540 or visit beckcenter.org and visual arts. Students sional artists and authors to create their first through twelfth Call 216-521-2540 or visit beckcenter.org learn new skills and build own literary masterpiece, while LEGO & Lux camp for grades fir self-esteem as they create unique works of Blox STEM Camp will unlock your child’s 15-July 24. Register art, develop new friendships, discover imagination with unique STEM activities and sessions at eocsum hidden talents, stimulate their imagination problem-solving challenges. Visit 330-569-3171 or vis and have fun. Beck Center also will offer akronkids.org/calendar/programs more than 140 arts education classes and lessons for people of all ages and abilities. Call 216-521-2540 or visit beckcenter.org

g

AKRON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

music

g

g

Akron ArkWorks offers art camps for your creative kid. Their day camps provide thoughtful and enriching opportunities for kids age 7 to 14. Each themed camp is structured so that morning sessions (9 a.m.-noon) can stand alone or be extended into the afternoon (9 a.m.-3 p.m.). Call 330-983-9983 or visit akronartworks.com

6

o service service STEM STEM adventure adven culinary culinary servi leadership STEM leadership adv culinary athle

academic

AKRON ARTWORKS

outdoors

g

ARTS

20

lifelong friends

academic

lifelon fri outd

life

SUMMER CAMP Learn more & open a taxAND PROGRAMS GUIDE college savings account t Area camps to consider

CollegeAdvantage.com/N

Sponsored by

Lear colle

Coll 20 | Family Living at Its Best

CollegeAdvantage_DoubleFo


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 5


CHOO the Right Camp for Your Child

MAKING SENSE OF SUMMER PROGRAM OPTIONS By Kerry Prater

T

he winter chill may have some families dreaming of summer, which is apropos given that many summer camps are already registering campers for the warmer months. Most programs offer a mix of educational, fine arts and sports experiences, but it can be hard to know what is available and what might be the best bet for your child. To help you get a handle on your summer program options, here’s a list of camps by category, as well as useful tips from camp directors to help you select the experience that’s right for your children. ACADEMIC CAMPS

Academic camps are an option for parents who are concerned that their child’s language, math and writing skills may slide during the summer. Vanessa Diffenbacher, Lawrence School associate head of school and Lower School head, says that academic camps not only help curb the “summer slide,” but also can burnish skills that a child may not have fully mastered the previous school year. Diffenbacher advises parents searching for an academic camp to find out what sort of approaches to teaching the program’s instructors use before enrolling their child. If a child didn’t grasp ideas under similar

6 | Family Living at Its Best

approaches during the preceding school year, a new approach might be warranted. Conversely, if a child showed progress during the year, parents may want to continue that approach over the summer. A child’s attitude toward school is a good indicator as to whether an academic camp is right for them. Diffenbacher says that even in the first grade, children have a sense if they can’t read as well as their peers. In such instances, academic camps might bolster a child’s self-esteem. “Usually if they are saying that they don’t like school, there’s something deeper,” she says. “There might be a struggle, an anxiety, a frustration.” ARTS CAMPS

If a family has a budding artist or performer, then an arts camp might be the right venue for them. Michael Lund Ziegler, education director for the Fine Arts Association in Willoughby, says that there are generally two types of arts camps: multi-arts camps, which offer a mix of fine arts programs, and specific-arts camps, which focus on a particular area, such as music. Arts camps not only present children with opportunities to engage others socially, but also to explore the arts and their creativity on a

deeper level in various mediums. Lund Ziegler advises parents looking for an arts camp to consider how opportunities for learning will be presented by the faculty. A good indicator of a quality program is if instructors talk about actively engaging the students so that they learn the value and substance of the art being presented. DAY CAMPS

Day camps often are used by families in place of daycare during the summer, but the two differ in that day camps offer a more structured curriculum for children. Ashley Garson, director of camp and youth at Camp JCC at the Shaw JCC of Akron, says day camps offer a mix of educational and recreational activities for children supervised by trained professionals. Unlike overnight camps, children spend several or more hours at a site, then return home at day’s end. Garson notes that day camps give a child a chance to foster autonomy and independence away from their parents while still returning to the comforts of home each evening. When selecting a day camp, Garson urges parents to consider such things as whether a staff is trained for emergency situations, how well staff members are


OSING vetted and whether there are established lines of communication with parents. “They should also take a tour of facilities and see where their camper is going to be,” Garson says. OVERNIGHT CAMPS

Overnight or “sleepaway” camps involve staying away from home for an extended period of time, ranging from a single night to multiple weeks. Overnight camps usually have full-time professional staff and provide accommodations, meals and support services for campers. Children take part in traditional camping activities, such as arts and crafts, archery, canoeing, hiking, horseback riding and swimming. Richard Basnett, executive director of YMCA Camp Tippecanoe, advises parents to check if a camp is a member of a professional accreditation organization, such as the American Camp Association (ACA) and the Christian Camp and Conference Association (CCCA). Basnett also advises parents to ask camp personnel about how they will deal with behavioral, emergency or medical situations, including discipline and homesickness. Camp directors and nursing staff should be readily available to discuss such issues. “If they are not available, then that would

raise a red flag in my mind,” Basnett says. SPECIALTY CAMPS

Specialty camps emphasize a particular interest, such as language, music or social skills. Other types of specialty camps may focus on specific activities, like horseback riding, pottery or sailing. Catherine Holloway, owner of Etiquette Consulting Services, says that specialty camps can help a child hone skills or talents that will help them throughout their lifetime. When selecting a specialty camp, Holloway suggests that parents ask instructors what activities are scheduled during camp. For her camps, Holloway provides handouts as to what will be addressed during class time. “Parents should ask what the skill set will be at the end,” Holloway says. SPORTS CAMPS

Generally, there are two types of sports camps: single-sport and multi-sport. Single-sport camps focus on helping campers develop skills and confidence in a particular sport. Multi-sport camps, such as those offered by i9 Sports, offer a mix of age-appropriate activities such as baseball, flag football, lacrosse and soccer.

Joey Holibaugh, i9 Sports athletic director for Cuyahoga and Summit counties, says the multi-sport approach allows parents to find out what their child’s interests are rather than deciding for them. If a child has fun playing baseball or soccer, then they’ll probably tell mom and dad about it. That sort of information is useful for parents when selecting what sport or league to join in the fall. When considering a sports camp, Holibaugh suggests parents read online reviews and look for structured programs with experienced, tenured employees. Another helpful criterion is program longevity. “As a dad, I’m less likely to sign up my son for something if he’s the first one that’s trying it,” he says with a laugh. STEM CAMPS

A STEM camp allows a child to develop science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills through handson experiments, field trips and projects. Kathy Kwiatkowski, director of math and science programs at Case Western Reserve University’s Leonard Gelfand STEM Center, says that STEM camps reinforce what children learn in the classroom while exposing them to new scientific concepts through unique opportunities.

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 7


SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?

Questions to ponder when your family is undecided about camp

8 | Family Living at Its Best

S

ummer camp sounds like a lot of fun for your child. Then again, maybe it doesn’t. They’ll be away from home surrounded by strangers in an unfamiliar place. And there’s no guarantee that they will enjoy camp activities. If you’re one of the many parents who are undecided about sending your child to a camp, there are a number of things that you should consider before making a decision. Along with date, time and cost considerations, a dialogue between parent and child is one of the first steps to a positive camping experience. A few pointed questions between parent and child should be part of any conversation regarding camp, says Kathy Kwiatkowski, director of math and science programs at Case Western Reserve University’s Leonard Gelfand STEM Center.

Here are some things parents can address:

1. Talk with your child about their interests. Richard Basnett, executive director of YMCA Camp Tippecanoe, recommends that parents gauge their kids’ interests — and their own — before selecting a camp. If a child has a particular interest in the outdoors, such as canoeing or fishing, then they will likely enjoy a traditional outdoor summer camp. An online view and in-person visits of campgrounds are options to spark a child’s interest in a camp, Basnett says. 2. Consider Age. Parents should consider a child’s age before sending them to camp. Children younger than age 7 may not adjust easily to being away from home. In those cases, parents should consider a day camp to prepare their child for future overnight camp visits. Kwiatkowski suggests that parents discuss how camp personnel address behavioral issues, especially if a child has special needs. 3. Do you like working in teams? For many children, camp may be the first time that they work with others. Getting a sense of whether a child is ready for that means asking questions about teamwork like you might in an employment interview, Kwiatkowski says. 4. Discuss expectations of camp with your kids. Sometimes the difficulty of selecting a camp doesn’t lie with the child at all. “Sometimes parents have trouble letting go of the kids,” Basnett says. “They’re more worried about the kid going to camp than the kid is about going to camp.”


FOSTERING INDEPENDENCE

I

f, after weighing such considerations, parents remain undecided about sending their child to a camp, there is another factor that they may want to consider: Their child’s independence. Ashley Garson, director of camp and youth at Camp JCC at the Shaw JCC of Akron, says even a few hours at a day camp can help a child learn how to function autonomously away from their parents. “It’s a perfect place to spread their wings,” she says. Independence, new friends and good memories are some of the reasons that camp professionals cite as to why parents should consider camp for their children. Another potential reason may be that the experience helps a child to discover who they are. Michael Lund Ziegler, director of education at the Fine Arts Association, credits his experiences in band and jazz camps as a youth with bringing greater focus to his interest in music. “It showed me some of the possibilities that were there in that creative outlet for me,” Lund Ziegler says. While freely admitting he has a procamp bias, Basnett believes that every child should experience camp, especially if parents want to limit a child’s screen and video game time. “It helps the kid grow up,” he says. “When they make it to the end of the week, it just raises their self-esteem.”

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 9


Photo by Kim Stahnke Photography

Camp Friendships

A few campers share their own experiences By Ginny McCabe

A

camp experience provides children an opportunity to learn new things, have fun and set aside the screens — it also gives them a chance to make lasting friendships. Camp also can help kids gain confidence and learn skills they can use for the rest of their lives. From learning how to invent things or finding out about nature to delving deeper into sports and technology, day and overnight camps across Northeast Ohio offer something for everyone to enjoy. Camps also offer kids a unique chance to make friends — either for the afternoon, the week or for the rest of their lives. We talked with a few campers to find out more about their experiences and how they were able to make new friends at camp. Juliana Cerny, 11, of North Ridgeville,

has attended various camps at YMCA of Greater Cleveland for many years.

She has attended day camp and sports camp. Juliana enjoys playing basketball and she plays on a basketball team. She also loves playing volleyball. In addition to her sports skills, she’s comfortable making new

10 | Family Living at Its Best

friends, trying new things and she is at ease being herself. Her mom, Marsha, says she makes friends easily, and it often comes naturally for her, where it may not always be as easy for other kids. “It’s awesome to see her go up to somebody that she doesn’t know and introduce herself, and see where she fits in,” Marsha says, “or she’ll sit back if she feels the need to sit back.” JULIANA TALKS ABOUT HER EXPERIENCE...

What are some of your favorite things about camp? “We get to choose what we get to do, so we get to make our own choices. We also get to go on field trips, play around and have fun. We also learn a lot, explore new things, and they make it easy to understand.” How would you describe your experience at camp? “I made a lot of friends at camp, and that taught me that I can have friends wherever I go. Sometimes, I get to see one of the friends that I made at camp when I go on vacation at Put-in-Bay.”

Tell us about the friends you made at camp? Did you know them before you got to camp or did you meet them there? “I have another friend named Alex that I have spent a lot of time with. We had a lot of fun together at camp. I met my friends Sophie and Alex at camp, and we’ve been able to keep in touch outside of camp. Mainly, I get to see them at camp.” Was it easy to make friends at camp? What are some of the things you did together at camp? “It was easy to make friends at camp. One of the things I did at camp was we went out to the playground and played. We played on the slides and other playground equipment. We also played basketball in the gym. They also gave us time to talk and eat lunch together.” What are some of the things you and your camp friends have in common? “We have a lot in common. We like to play basketball and enjoy doing some of the same things. At other times, we were opposites, where even though my friend might like something and I don’t, we still learned to like it. I may not love it the same way she


Hanna Schaeffer, 8, of Columbus,

attended the one week Falcon Camp “Young Adventurers.”

Hanna and her brother Daly, 11, had never attended a “sleepaway” camp before, nor had they been away from home without their parents for a week or two. This was a new experience for their family. Both Hanna and Daly signed up for this experience with different goals. Hanna wanted to see if she could sleep “away” from her parents for a week. Hanna not only loved her camp experience, she made it the full week, on her own, sleeping in a cabin with six other girls her age. HANNA SHARES HER

CAMP EXPERIENCE...

Tell us about the friends you made at camp? Did you know them before you got to camp or did you meet them there? “Trudy was a good friend I made while I was at camp. We had a lot in common. Violet and I played music

Ezela Manko attended Camp Invention. Courtesy of Camp Invention.

Why would you encourage other kids to go to camp and make friends there? “Because you’re not sitting at home, watching TV or lying on the couch. You’re always doing something fun, learning something new and you’re exercising. You’re always having fun, moving around and you still have the opportunity to learn a lot of new things.”

together. Tali, my camp director, was so kind. She even came to my house a few times to see us. She always checked on me.” Photo courtesy of Effective Leadership Academy

does, but I learned to try something new, and I gained an appreciation for it. It was interesting to learn new things.”

Was it easy to make friends at camp? What are some of the things you did together at camp? “I was pretty shy at the beginning. I was missing home. Trudy came up to me and asked me to play with her and to go to H20 with her, so I did. I’m glad that I did. We became good friends then. I met Ellie at horse care, and she helped me feed the horses.” What are some of the things you and your camp friends have in common? “Trudy and I both loved woodslore. We both love to share funny stories about our lives. We both love to create funny names like John, Paul, George, and we both love horses.” Have you been able to keep in touch with the friends you made at camp? “Trudy’s grandma lives near our house, and she comes to visit her often. We play at her grandma’s house. We like to sew and make cookies together.” Why would you encourage other kids to go to camp and make friends there? “It’s a very enriching experience. You learn life skills that the camp people make really fun and you can use those skills later in life.” Daly attended a two-week regular

summer camp session last summer at Falcon Camp. Both Daly and his

sister, Hanna, were able to form special - CONTINUED ON PAGE 12 -

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 11


friendships at Falcon Camp. Only knowing each other, he and his sister were dropped off at Falcon Camp the second week of June with a giant trunk of “stuff ” they packed themselves — along with hopeful hearts. Daly, described as an “introvert” and an “old soul” by his mom, Heidi, says he wanted to find a friend, someone “just like him.” Daly’s wish came true. Daly and his new Falcon Camp friend, Erik, have stayed in touch after camp ended and they have weekly FaceTime chats. They even planned a sleep-over in conjunction with the Falcon Camp holiday party/reunion this past December. While Daly lives in Columbus and Erik lives in Cleveland, it’s been magical for both kids. DALY TALKS TO US ABOUT

Daly and Hanna Schaeffer at Falcon Camp. Photo courtesy of Falcon Camp

HIS EXPERIENCE...

What are some of the things you learned at camp? “I learned to be self-sufficient. I was able to take care of myself without my parents. I also learned how to make new friends.” Tell me about the friends you made at camp? Did you know them before you got to camp or did you meet them there? “I made lots of friends. All of the kids in my cabin were my friends. I hope that we can be friends for a long time. We had long chats. Erik became my best camp friend. We were inseparable. I did not know anyone when I went to camp, and I left with so many new friends. It was amazing.” Was it easy to make friends at camp? What are some of the things you did together at camp? “I will be honest with you, for the first few days that I was there, I was a little scared of my new friend Erik. He was so outgoing and seemed to have an easy time being friendly with everyone. I am shyer. I enjoyed going to athletics with Erik. On opening night, I shared a laugh with Erik, and then I kept my distance for a day or two, but then, I felt safe. I was able to ask Erik if he wanted to be friends and he did.” What are some of the things you and your camp friends have in common? “I have almost everything in common with Erik. We both realized that we struggle to make friends. We both love swimming.” Have you been able to keep in touch with the friends you made at camp? “I FaceTime with Erik a lot. It’s so fun.”

12 | Family Living at Its Best

Why are camp friends some of your best friends? “We shared a special, unique time together that was away from technology. We got to do cool stuff like sports and activities that were different from what we normally do at home with our school friends. We helped each other through hard times when we felt scared or sad.” Dylan Carmichael, 12, of Indepen-

dence, will attend Falcon camp this summer for the third time.

Prior to the electronics-free Falcon Camp, he camped at other area camps for two years. At first, his mom, Cheryl Chase, was hesitant to send him away to camp for the summer, but she soon realized that not... sending him would be the wrong thing to do, because Carmichael has thrived at camp. He begged to go back, saying there’s something special about Falcon Camp. He’s learned wood-working, about “woodslore,” how to spend time in nature, and a lot about sailing. He also has learned different techniques to help him with archery and riflery, like hand-eye coordination and accuracy. DYLAN TALKS ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE...

What was your camp experience like? “My first time at Falcon Camp, I went for the standard two weeks. Then, as soon as I got in the car, I was like, ‘How soon can I go again?’ Two weeks later, I went for the third session, so I went twice in one summer. Then, this past summer, I went for one month straight.”

I imagine there are a lot of different kids that come to camp. “There’s a lot of different people that you’ll meet there. There was one point, when two kids from Japan came to our cabin, and they didn’t speak English, but we just thought of them as normal people. It was a little bit hard to try to talk to them and explain things to them, but it ended up working out in the end, and we ended up having a good time together. There’s an energy at camp that is warm, loving and accepting.” Did you have any friends when you went the first time? And how have you been able to make friends? “I didn’t really have any friends in mind the first time. I was going with an open mind, and saying, ‘Alright, either my cabinmates are going to be really nice, or they are going to be really mean.’ As I was there for a few days, I had picked up this energy of, ‘Wait, no one’s really mean here.’ Then, I really understood that you can pretty much go out there, talk to people you don’t know, they will talk back, and you’ll have a conversation. You might start by asking their name, and then you’ll talk, and see what happens from there. I’ve made some great friends throughout my time at camp. We do cabin activities a lot, where you do a lot of things together. You learn everyone’s name, and you learn things about them, and if you have things in common with them, you can talk about that. Then, you’ll learn from there…We enjoy the


time we have at camp together and we always get to see our friends again when we come back.” Why would you encourage other kids to go to camp? “It’s a lot of fun, and there are a lot of things that you can really learn from in the aspect of it’s like school, where you’re learning the whole time, but you’re learning without the same structure. It’s still structured, but it’s a little bit looser with what you can do. You can speak your mind about things, and you don’t have to be afraid to ask questions, or to fail and try again. If you fail a test — boom, it’s done; you can’t re-do it. But if you’re doing a sailing course, and you mess up on the sailing course, you can try again tomorrow, or later that day. It’s a place where you can keep trying, and trying until you get it the perfect way that you want it. I think that’s incredible. It’s like you get to decide what your grade is by trying again. At camp, you’re learning the whole time, but you’re having fun while you’re doing it.”

Ezela Manko attended Camp Invention

last summer for the third time.

She started going to the week-long camp in second grade. She has learned skills like teamwork and working together as a group. At Camp Invention, participants create a variety of inventions from recyclable materials that have been gathered by campers. Each year, campers are taught a different curriculum. Monica Shadle, Coordinator of gifted services at Louisville City School District, has been directing Camp Invention for more than 10 years. She says campers like Ezela learn through hands-on science activities and creativity in an environment that’s fun. The kids participate as a group and they are with their group throughout the week. Camp Invention draws attendees from the Louisville City School District, as well as other surrounding school districts. Camp Invention also works with students who have special needs.

EZELA TALKS ABOUT HER CAMP EXPERIENCE...

What was your camp experience like? “It was very fun, and it gave me something to do during the summer, when I didn’t really have anything to do but go outside and play. So, we got to build things and do other activities. They kept us really busy.” Tell us about your early camp experiences. “I didn’t want to go the first time, but then when we went, I realized it was really fun and that I should keep going.” What are some of the things you learned at camp? “We learned that we can be friends with everyone, and we don’t just have to be friends with two or three people.” What were some of the activities that you did during the day? “We got to eat lunch with everyone and we worked on projects together. We had - CONTINUED ON PAGE 14 -

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 13


these robots and we had to build houses and different things we could use them in. We also learned to work as a team and how to be good listeners for each other. We had to listen to everyone’s ideas, so we could find out how to make it work better. Through listening and sharing, we can always build on each other’s ideas. We can also learn to solve problems and we developed problem solving skills.” Did you know anyone from school, or have any other friends at camp? Were you able to make new friends? “I did know one friend that I met in third grade. I also met a lot of new friends, too.” What are some of the things you and your camp friends have in common? “We helped each other to solve problems with our different inventions, and we got to share our thinking to make something new and creative.”

14 | Family Living at Its Best

What would you say is your favorite thing about camp? “You can go there and you feel like you are part of the rest of the group. Everybody gets a chance to talk, share their ideas and you feel like you’re in a safe place.” Why would you encourage other kids to give camp a try? “I would tell them they should, because they will feel like they’re part of the group. If they don’t have a lot of friends, they will make a lot more by learning different things.” Is there anything else you’d like to say about camp or the friends that you made there? Inventing with someone you just met is a great way to start a strong friendship by learning and working together on different projects. And, if you don’t have a really good friendship with someone, you can make one by working together and trying not to argue. You can think together, outside of the box, to work together better.”

Photo courtesy of Classroom Antics

Photo courtesy of University of Akron Esports Camp


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 15


f o h t a e A Br

r i A h Fres

MOTHER NATURE KNOWS BEST WHEN IT COMES TO KEEPING KIDS ACTIVE, HEALTHY AND LEARNING By Heather Tunstall

16 | Family Living at Its Best


T

echnology is pretty cool, we get it. It’s convenient, it’s entertaining, there’s a lot of great learning tools out there. Yeah, yeah, we know. But let’s be honest, the majority of the year is chilly-to-downright-cold in Northeast Ohio, so when warm weather finally comes, it’ll be high time to put away the smart devices and get outside to take advantage of it. Luckily, there are many offerings in the region to look forward to that provide an opportunity to nurture kids’ love of nature. A VITAL PART OF CHILDHOOD

While it may not seem like it at the moment, summertime is around the corner. And summer is the best time for taking a long break from screens and cluttered rooms and giving your kids’ eyes, brains and bodies a dose of pure, elemental play. “Outdoor experiences are healthy for children,” says Bethany Majeski, North Chagrin Nature Center manager with the Cleveland Metroparks. “Exploration of the natural world helps to build strong bodies and minds, and playing in nature helps to stoke the fire of imagination and adventure. In a world where kids increasingly face social and academic pressures, time spent outdoors can be a powerful tool in managing stress and capturing some of the beauty and magic that makes childhood so special.” Going beyond just taking a break from screens, spending time outdoors is an ongoing opportunity for kids to learn about themselves and the world around them on a deeper level, says Ellie Rial, manager of public programs, Holden Forests & Garden. “I feel that it is most important because it allows time for kids to explore the unique sense of wonder that can only be found in nature — like spotting your first lightning bug or the feeling you get climbing your first tree,” she says. “Time spent in nature inspires creativity, curiosity, and offers an outlet for many kids to simply play freely. That feeling, once found, sticks with you forever and is the foundation for an appreciation of nature.”

LIFELONG IMPACT

The Child Mind Institute, in its article “Why Kids Need to Spend Time In Nature,” claims that the average American child spends just four to seven minutes a day in unstructured play outdoors and more than seven hours per day in front of a screen. Meanwhile, studies show that kids who play outside are smarter, happier, more attentive and less anxious than kids who spend more time indoors, according to the institute. When they do put the phone down and go outside, many parents say they see the positive effects of nature on their children firsthand. Julia Buddie, a mother of three in Amherst, notices a shift in her children after they get some fresh air. “I feel it is important for children to explore because it is a mood changer,” Buddie says. “My children are much happier and have less behavioral issues if we have spent some time outside versus being indoors. They’re much more pleasant winding down in the evenings and usually have a good night’s sleep.” Outdoor play also gives them a chance to use their imagination, and it teaches

them how to respect nature, she says. “It’s a family priority in which everyone takes part.” “The majority of the activities my husband and I do are outside,” Buddie says. “Because of that, our children will follow in our footsteps. We fish Lake Erie, paddleboard, swim in our backyard pool, snow ski in the winter, go on nature hikes and visit playgrounds regularly.” In addition, more interaction with nature tends to build a sense of responsibility among both children and adults alike. “Kids ultimately need to learn about nature because it is such an important part of our lives,” says Karie Wheaton, a naturalist with the Geauga Park District. “From animals pollinating flowers to give us the food we eat to what we put on our lawns impacting the water quality in our area — we are innately connected with nature. It is imperative that kids and adults understand this connection and why it is so important. Kids that love nature turn into adults that love nature and ultimately adults that want to protect nature for future generations.” - CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 -

SUMMER OU T D O OR ADVENTURE CAMP LESS SCREEN MORE NATURE

J U NE 15–AU G U S T 13

Spend Summer Outdoors: Learning, Exploring, Immersed in Nature Full day camps for children grades K to 9 and half-day camps for ages 3½ to 5 Off-site field trips vary by week, including: archery, rock climbing and water sport activities Limited scholarships available 2600 South Park Blvd, Shaker Heights, OH 44120 216.321.5935 • naturecenter@shakerlakes.org

S H A K E R L A K E S .O R G

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 17


FIND YOUR EXPERIENCE

There are a number of ways that your family can pack the season with exploration, discovery, education and activity. Surrounded by a pretty great Great Lake, the vast metroparks systems and a genuine National Park, Northeast Ohio has no shortage of nature-based activities in which kids can take part during the summer — from traditional outdoor camps to programs that offer unique ways to explore the outdoors. It just takes a little planning and forethought to make the most of it all. “Ever since the kids were small, we looked for programs that took place outside,” said Michele Caldwell, a mother of five from Mentor. “Through the city of Mentor, they have an amazing choice of summer camps. We most often chose their Civic Center camps, as the kids not only were able to go to the pool almost every day, but took field trips outside to many different destinations, like the zoo, Cedar Point, different waterparks and some of the metroparks.” Metroparks throughout Northeast Ohio, along with the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, offer both formal and informal opportunities for families to interact with nature. “Kids can learn to snowshoe, fish, kayak or enjoy a family campout under the stars,” Majeski says. “They can get up-close with

18 | Family Living at Its Best

live Ohio animals like owls, snakes and turtles, and explore rivers, forests, meadows and the shores of Lake Erie.” If your child does better with a more traditional camp setting, you can find options just about anywhere you turn. From tiny tots to high-schoolers, kids get a chance to learn, play and explore with friends old and new. Check with your city and your local metroparks to see what they have for your kid’s age group. “We have five nature centers across Cuyahoga County that are free and open daily,” Majeski says. “At our centers and throughout the 18 reservations of our park system, we offer a variety of children’s programming and special events, the majority of which are free. We offer immersive, high-quality summer camp experiences and are very excited to be expanding our state-licensed Nature Preschool program. We truly have something to offer kids of all ages.” Nature centers give kids a chance to explore the outdoors any time of year and give them a better understanding of their experience with nature. Buddie found her two oldest children took a lot from their metroparks experiences. “At a young age, Stella and Nora were enrolled at the Lake Erie Nature & Science Center class, Frogs and Polliwogs,” Buddie says. “This class taught children ages 18 months to 36 months about the changing of seasons, different kinds of weather and animals they may encounter in nature as a resident of Northeast Ohio.” Programs like the Cuyahoga Valley National Park’s Junior Ranger Summer Day Camp give kids entering first through sixth grades an opportunity to learn more about the national park and its animal and plant inhabitants, and take part in active adventures that encourage appreciation for

nature and stewardship for the environment. Likewise, Common Ground Center in Oberlin offers Earth Camp for kids ages 6 to 14, which includes such experiences as horseback riding, river walking, hiking and swimming. Earth Camp has themed weeks that keep things exciting, like Eco-Adventures and Nature Survival Quest. It also has an Adventure Camp for older children (ages 12-17). Youth and family programs at Holden Arboretum and Cleveland Botanical Garden focus on unique, exploratory nature-based activities. In July, they’re hosting a family-friendly campout at the Arboretum, which will be a night of camping-related activities such as fire building, campfire cooking, night hikes, campfire stories and more. “It’ll be a great way to try out overnight camping in a completely supported and non-intimidating way,” Rial says. “We’ve also completely retooled our summer camp program and are now offering full-day camps at the garden, roundtrip transportation to our arboretum camps and new themes, such as From Garden to Fork and An Everchanging Planet — all with inquiry-based learning activities designed to spark creativity, fun and a connection to plants and trees.” THE BOTTOM LINE

If it all seems a bit overwhelming and you don’t know where to begin, just start simple. Being outside — in any way — is healthy for kids. “If it is not raining or too cold, and the chores and homework are done, then outside we go — no excuses,” says Caldwell. “The dog can always be walked, we can practice for, the next 5K we want to sign up for or there is always a new step to jump off of.”


Vibrant Vietnam

JAN. 18 – MARCH 1

Immerse yourself in the exotic beauty of thousands of orchids at Cleveland Botanical Garden’s most popular flower show, Orchid Mania. This year we are celebrating the natural beauty of Vietnam, and the Vietnamese culture that cherishes nature and plants. Adults: $15; Children (3-12): $10 | Members: Free

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

11030 EAST BLVD. CLEVELAND, OH | CBGARDEN.ORG | 216.721.1600

| 19


STEM culinary

leadership

u n p lu g

ARTS

g

Akron ArkWorks offers art camps for your creative kid. Their day camps provide thoughtful and enriching opportunities for kids age 7 to 14. Each themed camp is structured so that morning sessions (9 a.m.-noon) can stand alone or be extended into the afternoon (9 a.m.-3 p.m.). Call 330-983-9983 or visit akronartworks.com

AKRON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Spark your child’s creativity and curiosity with two different camps this summer. Camp Creativity campers will work with professional artists and authors to create their own literary masterpiece, while LEGO & Lux Blox STEM Camp will unlock your child’s imagination with unique STEM activities and problem-solving challenges. Visit akronkids.org/calendar/programs

20 | Family Living at Its Best

CAIMDPE

GU

academic

AKRON ARTWORKS

20 2 0

service

SU M M E R P RO G R A M S

music BALDWIN WALLACE COMMUNITY ARTS SCHOOL

For more than 90 years, Baldwin Wallace University has been bringing school-age and adult learners to campus for immersive music and arts training. Summer Arts programs include music, dance and theatre camps, high school college-prep institutes, and professional development for music teachers. Call 440-826-2482 or visit bw.edu/sap

BECK CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Beck Center offers half-day and full-day camps for ages 5-19 in dance, music, theater and visual arts. Students learn new skills and build self-esteem as they create unique works of art, develop new friendships, discover hidden talents, stimulate their imagination and have fun. Beck Center also will offer more than 140 arts education classes and lessons for people of all ages and abilities. Call 216-521-2540 or visit beckcenter.org

adventure

athletics outdoors

lifelong o friends BUSY BEES POTTERY & ARTS STUDIO

Busy Bees Pottery & Arts Studio, located in Mentor, offers weekly themed summer art camps for kids ages 5-12. Full- or half-day camps will keep them busy learning various art methods while creating multiple projects each day. Call 440-571-5201 or visit mentor.busybeesart.com

CAMP ASBURY

For 62 years, Camp Asbury has been forming faith and connecting people to nature. Resident camp for grades first through twelfth: June 14-July 24. Day camp for grades first through sixth: June 15-July 24. Register online for one-week sessions at eocsummercamps.org. Call 330-569-3171 or visit campasbury.org


CAMP CURIOSITY SCIENCE DAY CAMPS

Help your kids ‘Stay Curious’ over summer with engaging, hands-on fun at Camp Curiosity beginning June 1. Pre-K – 8th grade will make new friends while building STEM skills. Stacked discounts available: Early bird (Feb. 29), multi-week registration and returning camp alumni. Members save $20 per camp. Before- and after-care is available. Call 216-621-2400 or visit greatscience.com

CAMP FITCH YMCA

Camp Fitch’s century-old, classic sleep-away summer camp provides boys and girls ages 6-17 with a holistically safe, values-driven community where they discover friendship and achievement. Kids feel like they belong among the camp’s carefully vetted, highly committed and caring staff, who create transformative experiences on the shore of Lake Erie. North Springfield, Pa., Call 814-922-3219 or visit campfitchymca.org

CAMP INVENTION

CAVS ACADEMY SUMMER CAMPS

Join the Cleveland Cavaliers for Cavs Academy Summer Camps, the only official youth basketball summer camp of the Cavaliers. These week-long camps are a great opportunity for boys and girls ages 7-17 of all skill levels to have fun playing basketball while they “up their game.” Visit cavsyouth.com

CHAGRIN VALLEY FARMS

Does your child love horses? Chagrin Valley Farms is excited to share their love for horses with kids of all ages and riding skill levels during summer riding camps that run weekly beginning in mid-June through August. Riding, horse care and games are part of every camp day. Visit chagrinvalleyfarms.com

CLASSROOM ANTICS STEAM CAMPS

Imaginations will soar in the all-new Camp Invention program, “Elevate!” Campers in kindergarten through sixth grade will collaborate in hands-on STEM activities exploring concepts of flight, Earth’s ecosystems and sports innovations. Use promo code LOCAL25 to save $25 (expires 3/31) or LOCAL15 to save $15 (expires 5/12). Call 800-968-4332 or visit invent.org/camp

Kids ages 6-13 get to learn what they love in STEAM Camp by designing video games, creating stop-motion movies, producing videos, coding programs, modding Minecraft or engineering LEGO robots. These affordable day camps are in Beachwood, Berea, Brecksville, Brunswick, Fairlawn, Hudson, Solon and Westlake. Space is limited. Call 800-595-3776 or visit classroomantics.com/clevelandsummer-camps

CAMP LEAD

CLEVELAND CITY DANCE

Camp LEAD: “The Amazing Chase” is a week-long day camp with high-energy activities promoting leadership and social emotional learning. Inspired by the TV show “The Amazing Race,” campers learn about healthy competition, collaboration and accomplishing goals. Campers will stretch personal limits to become effective leaders. Call 216-292-8775 or visit effectivela.org

Watch your child’s eyes sparkle as they experience the joy of dance. Students develop confidence, poise, friendship, technical and social skills in a small classes with patient and experienced teachers, offering individual attention and encouragement to kids to be their personal best with ballet, jazz and more. Opportunities include museum visits and performances. Call 216-295-2222 or visit clevelandcitydance.com

CLEVELAND HEARING & SPEECH CENTER – FACETIME CAMP

The FACEtime Summer Camp at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center is designed for older children and young teens who stutter. Campers will participate in individual and group therapy at the University Circle location and will practice their skills in real-life situations at restaurants and Cleveland-area attractions. Transportation will be required for some offsite activities. Visit chsc.org

CLEVELAND METROPARKS GOLF JUNIOR DAY CAMPS

Cleveland Metroparks offers a wide variety of golf programs, activities and hands-on instruction for junior golfers ages 8-17. There are activities for beginner, intermediate and advanced junior golfers. Registration is now open. Visit clevelandmetroparks.com/golf

CLEVELAND METROPARKS SUMMER NATURE CAMPS

Cleveland Metroparks Summer Nature Camps connect children ages 3-15 with the natural world. From hikes in the woods, kayaking, crafts and games, a variety of Summer Nature Camps offer compelling outdoor adventures. Available in convenient locations throughout Cleveland Metroparks. Registration begins March 3 for Cuyahoga County and Hinckley Township residents, and March 10 for all other participants. Visit clevelandmetroparks.com - CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 -

Learn more & open a tax-advantaged college savings account today at

CollegeAdvantage.com/NEOParent CollegeAdvantage_DoubleFooter_NEOParent_Education_Guide-2020.indd 2

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

1/15/2020 4:40:44 PM

| 21


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

CLEVELAND METROPARKS ZOO SUMMER DAY CAMPS

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Summer Day Camps connect campers with wildlife and inspire the next generation of conservationists. Campers ages 5-14 can spend their summer days at the zoo participating in up-close experiences with ambassador animals, behind-thescenes tours and special activities like giraffe feeding, carousel rides, educational games and crafts. Pre-sale for zoo members starts Feb. 3 and open registration starts Feb. 14. Visit futureforwildlife.org

COMMON GROUND

Earth Camp (ages 6-14) is packed with activities like hiking, swimming, art and more. Adventure Camp (ages 12-14) packs in our high ropes course, zipline tour, swimming and more. The new Adventure Leadership Academy (ages 15-17) is perfect for aspiring camp counselors. Registration opens March 2. Visit commongroundcenter.org

22 | Family Living at Its Best


CPH SUMMER ACADEMY

Join Cleveland Play House for CPH Summer Academy. Students ages 4-18 can participate in half-day, week-long or two-week intensives in June and July. Classes are open to students of all abilities and experience levels. Scholarships and aftercare are available. Call 216-414-7111 or visit clevelandplayhouse.com/academy

CREATIVE PLAYROOMS

Creative Playrooms is the perfect solution for your summer camp needs with on-site swimming pools at most locations, hot meals, full-day care, field trips and so much more. Six locations: Independence, Maple Heights, Parma, Solon, Strongsville and Westlake. Convenient locations, great programming. Call 440-349-9111 or visit creativeplayrooms.com

CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE (TRI-C)

Whether your child is a young performer or a budding engineer, Tri-C Summer Camps will help them discover their passions and talents. Choose from more than 30 camps offered at five locations across the region, featuring culinary, film, game design, music, performing arts, recreation and STEM. Call 216-987-3075 and select option 1 or visit tri-c.edu/summercamps

ETIQUETTE KINDNESS SPECIALTY CAMPS

This summer at Gilmour Academy, Beachwood Recreation, Orange Continuing Ed and Westlake Recreation, kids will have confidence, fun character-building and hands-on learning during these camps. Learn the tricks of first impressions, become a dining expert and discover the art of a well-written thank-you note. Call 216-292-8888

- CONTINUED ON PAGE 24 -

Free

t!

Even

Meet dozens of camps at the 2020 Northeast Ohio Parent Camp & Summer Programs Fair! East and West locations. March 7-8. Learn more at NortheastOhioParent.com or view page 39 in this guide.

The Leonard Gelfand STEM Center Case Western Reserve University’s Leonard Gelfand STEM Center, a collaboration of the College of Arts & Sciences and the School of Engineering, works to: strengthen STEM teaching and learning through active discovery and design; implement research based teaching and learning strategies; marshal the contributions of CWRU faculty, staff, and students; maximize impact on student learning through collaboration; and evaluate and continually refine our programs.

Upcoming Programs and Events: February 15, 2020: Engineering Challenges Carnival, free hands-on event for families, Thwing Center Ballroom, 11111 Euclid Ave. 44106 February - March 2020: Mean Green Math Machine, after school program for 2nd - 5th graders at Carnegie West Branch Cleveland Public Library February - March 2020: Mean Green STEM Machine, after school program for 2nd - 7th graders at Fulton Branch Cleveland Public Library February 2020: School of Medicine Anatomy Camp for select high schools July 6-17, 2020: Shipwreck Camp 2020 Science & Exploration for 12-15 year olds; application available Spring 2020 July 21-31, 2020: Orientation for Environmental Heroes field research

For more information, please call 216-368-5075 e-mail: kmk21@case.edu Web site: Gelfand.case.edu 2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 23


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

FAIRMOUNT CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Ages 3-15 can participate in dance, music, theatre and visual arts camps. Half-day, full-day, one-day and one-week options available from June 1-July 31. Before camp care available free of charge. Call 440-338-3171, email info@ fairmountcenter.org or visit fairmountcenter.org/special-events

FALCON CAMP

ClassroomAntics.com

STEAM Camps

Recognized throughout the Midwest as Ohio’s premier private camp. Independently selected “Top Ten Camp in USA” and Ohio’s “Coolest Camp.” Beautiful lakefront setting, talented staff, wide variety of activities and great food. Outstanding opportunity for fun and growth in a safe, healthy environment. ACA accredited. Boys and girls, ages 6-16. Call 800-837-CAMP or visit falconcamp.com

GEAUGA PARK DISTRICT

Geauga Park District’s eighth annual adventure camps come in week-long forms for youth entering grades fifth through seventh. Camps run the weeks of June 8, July 6, July 13, July 27 and Aug. 3, plus Junior Naturalist Camp the week of June 15. Week-long experiences for teens entering grades eighth through tenth are the weeks of June 15 and July 20. Single-day “X-Treme Adventures” for the older kids are also July 9, 16 and 23. Visit bit.ly/gpdcamps

GILMOUR DAY CAMPS

Camp Gilmour offers Preschool Camp (ages 3-5), Day Camp (ages 5-12), sports and experiential camps such as nature, outdoor adventure, robotics and theater camps. Camps offered June 1-July 31. Enrichment courses available. Optional complimentary enrichment offered each morning for day campers. Before/after care: 7:15 a.m-6 p.m. Call 440-473-8000 ext. 2267, email summercamp@gilmour. org or visit gilmour.org/summercamp

24 | Family Living at Its Best


GOLDFISH SWIM SCHOOL

Goldfish offers year-round lessons for kids 4 months to 12 years in a family-friendly environment with highly trained instructors, small class sizes and shiver-free, 90-degree pools. During the summer months, Goldfish also offers week-long Jump Start Clinics where kids make a month’s worth of progress in only one week. Find a Goldfish near you: Cleveland East Side, Fairview Park, Hudson, North Canton and Strongsville (coming soon). Visit goldfishswimschool.com

HOLDEN FORESTS & GARDENS SUMMER CAMPS

Immerse your child in the wonders of nature at the Holden Arboretum or Cleveland Botanical Garden. From exploring unique ecological areas to learning about farm-totable food preparation, themed summer camps are available for children in pre-K through fifth grade. Call 216-707-2841 or visit cbgarden.org. Call 440-602-3833 or visit holdenarb.org - CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 -

GRAND RIVER ACADEMY

Grand River Academy offers three summer camp options at its campus in Austinburg, Ohio: LEARN Summer Camp, STEAM Academy, and REBOOT, an electronic overconsumption therapy program. Summer at Grand River Academy provides students looking for academic enrichment, recovery or electronic usage help an action-packed summer full of fun and adventure. Call 440-275-2811, email admissions@ grandriver.org or visit grandriver.org

HATHAWAY BROWN SCHOOL

New for 2020, Hathaway Brown School introduces Tiny Trailblazers, a coed camp for 3- and 4-year-olds. With programming available June 8-Aug. 14, each week will have a theme based on a children’s book. Led by early childhood teachers, children will enjoy engaging academic programming and fun, nature-based outdoor play. Visit hb.edu/summer

HAWKEN SUMMER PROGRAMS

Hawken Summer Programs offer a variety of activities led by experienced professionals for boys and girls ages 4-18. Camp offerings include day camps, one-week Passport Camps, Innovation Camps, Athletics Camps and Summer Studies. Camps run between June and August. Call 440-423-2940, email summerprograms@hawken.edu or visit summer.hawken.edu

2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 25


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

LAKE ERIE NATURE & SCIENCE CENTER

Summer camps at Lake Erie Nature & Science Center offer preschoolers and students of all ages the opportunity to explore and connect with the outdoors, meet new friends, encounter local wildlife and discover the wonders of the night sky in Schuele Planetarium. Registration is open and ongoing. Visit lensc.org

LAKE RIDGE ACADEMY

Open to all area students in grades first through twelfth, the summer program includes full- and half-day experiences from June 8-July 17. Camps and classes offered include themed discovery camps, fine arts, technology/STEAM, environmental and experiential, academic, athletics and chess. Most programs are taught by experienced Lake Ridge Academy faculty. Call 440-327-1175 ext. 9141 or visit lakeridgeacademy.org/summer

LAKELAND 2020 COLLEGE FOR KIDS

The College for Kids program, now in its 35th year, offers kids an exciting, fun-filled and educational summer. Hands-on learning and exploration activities are being planned for art, music, science and much more. The College for Kids Summer Day Camp fee includes before- and after-care, lunch, two daily snacks, field trips and all supplies. Visit lakelandcc.edu/camps

LAKESHORE DANCE & GYMNASTICS

Grow, learn and explore in a 23,000-square- foot facility with knowledgeable, trained and caring instructors. Both full-day and half-day camps are available for ages 3-11, June through August. Themed weeks include: Mermaids, Jojo, Princesses, Minecraft and more. Gain skills, grace and strength this summer at Lakeshore. Call 440-461-0015 or visit lakeshoregym.com

SUMMER AT LAUREL

Summer at Laurel offers exciting sports, adventure, theatre, science and specialty camps for girls and boys ages 24 months through twelfth grade. There is a wide range of opportunities at both Laurel’s Lyman Campus in Shaker Heights and its Butler Campus in Russell Township. Half- and full-day options, as well as before and after camp care, make Summer at Laurel the perfect destination for campers and parents alike. Call 216-455-3065 or visit laurelschool.org/summer

26 | Family Living at Its Best

- CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 -


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 27


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

LE CHAPERON ROUGE

Le Chaperon Rouge’s Summer Camp is a fun, educational and engaging program. It implement reading, writing, math, computers, Spanish and French into its weekly curriculum. Additionally, it offers swimming, karate, soccer, dance, gymnastics, stretch-n-grow and other extracurricular activities. Locations include Westlake, Solon, Rocky River, Hudson, Avon, Strongsville, Amherst, Independence, Bath, Brecksville and Shaker Heights. Visit lechaperonrouge.com

LEARNING ABOUT BUSINESS (LAB)

LAB Week is a week-long summer camp for high school sophomores and juniors to learn the basics of running a business. Using an experiential business and entrepreneurial curriculum presented by professionals, the students apply the lessons learned to their online simulation company and compete for market share. Visit learningaboutbusiness.org - CONTINUED ON PAGE 30 -

28 | Family Living at Its Best


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 29


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

LORAIN COUNTY METRO PARKS

Offering summer camps for kids of all ages with a variety of interests, including fishing, sports, outdoor adventure, boating, birding and more. Registration for Lorain County residents opens Feb. 21 via phone at 440-458-5121. Registration for everyone opens Feb. 28 online at loraincountymetroparks.com

MAD SCIENCE AND CRAYOLA IMAGE ARTS ACADEMY

Mad Science and Crayola Imagine Arts Academy will offer STEAM camps throughout Northeast Ohio. Science themes include: robots, archaeology, secret agents, inventions, engineering and more. Featured art camp is Wild World, focusing on animals and conservation. With over 20 years of camp experience, they look forward to helping your child have a fantastic summer. Call 330-498-0033, or visit northeastohio.madscience.org, imagineartsacademy.com

MAGNIFICAT

Discover Magnificat High School this summer. With programs for girls entering grades first through ninth, Magnificat offers participants the opportunity to explore their world, learn new skills and have fun. Visit magnificaths.org

MANDEL JCC

Mandel JCC J-day Camps & Camp Wise Overnight Camp — Summer Happens Here. Helping children learn new skills, develop conďŹ dence and gain self-esteem, all while having a blast, is what spending a summer at Mandel JCC camps is all about. By the end of summer, campers will have gained independence, developed a host of new interests and made lifelong friendships. Call 216-831-0700 or visit mandeljcc.org/camps, campwise.org

- CONTINUED ON PAGE 32 -

30 | Family Living at Its Best


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 31


20 2 0

CAMP

GUIDE SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

MATHNASIUM

Beat the summer slide. When summer comes, the knowledge your child gained in school is in danger of slipping away. It’s especially true for math: on average, students lose approximately 2.5 months of math learning each summer. Contact one of your Northeast Ohio Mathnasiums to help keep your child’s math confidence strong this summer. Visit mathnasium.com

MCC TECH KEY KIDS KAMP

MCC Tech Key Kids Kamp has seven one-week tech sessions from which to choose. Kids will learn LEGOs, Arduino Board programming, video game design, robotics and 3-D printing. Sessions meet from 9 a.m.-3:30 pm. Hands-on learning for children ages 7-12 and 13-17. Registration begins on March 31. Call 440-561-0618 or visit mosscard.com/ techkeyregistration

32 | Family Living at Its Best

NATURE CENTER AT SHAKER LAKES

Swap screen time for nature as you learn and explore in an outdoor classroom. Your child will love these one-of-akind, week-long camp experiences taught by staff, which includes teachers and highly trained naturalists. Find an outdoor adventure to inspire an appreciation for the natural world, unlocking a summer full of learning, reflection, friends and fun. Choose from nine week-long camp experiences. Call 216-321-5935 or visit shakerlakes.org/camp - CONTINUED ON PAGE 34 -


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 33


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

OHIO TUITION TRUST

Summer camps can open new worlds for your child. The same is true for a higher education. For more than 30 years, Ohio’s 529 Plan, CollegeAdvantage, has helped families nationwide save tax-free for education after high school. Someday your child is going to college. Someday starts today with collegeadvantage.com

OLD TRAIL

Old Trail School’s Summer Camp offers sun, fun, friends and nonstop activities in Cuyahoga Valley National Park from June 8 to July 31. They offer 100-plus options for children. Half- and full-day camps are offered, as well as transportation from Hudson and Brecksville. Visit oldtrail.org/summercamp - CONTINUED ON PAGE 36 -

34 | Family Living at Its Best


2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 35


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

PERSPECTIVES ACADEMY

Perspectives Academy Summer Experience is much more than a summer camp. The morning is education (remedial or advancement), afternoon is social skills and other fun activities intermixed with field trips. This program is directed by Dr. Jay Berk, a psychologist with more than 35 years of experience. Program runs six weeks and you can register for one week or all six. Grades fourth through 12th. Visit jayberkphd.com/ summer

RED OAK CAMP

At Red Oak Camp, we have activities that excite, delight, and inspire. Camp sessions begin June 8th for rising 1st-10th graders. Horsemanship, climbing, archery, canoeing, ropes course, and more! Nestled on 87 acres in Kirtland, Red Oak Camp is the perfect choice for your campers this summer. ACA Accredited. redoakcamp.org - CONTINUED ON PAGE 38 -

36 | Family Living at Its Best


REGISTER TODAY!

THEATRE TRAINING BY THEATRE PROFESSIONALS Registration is now open for Cleveland Play House Summer Academy! We have exciting programs for young people this summer ranging from creative drama to musical theatre! Excite creative potential, and nurture your child’s passion for the performing arts! FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER:

clevelandplayhouse.com/academy 216.414.7111 2020 Summer Camp Guide - NortheastOhioParent.com

| 37


20 2 0

MP CAID E

GU

SU MM ER PR OG RA MS

SHIPWRECK CAMP 2020

This two-week day camp (July 6-17) for ages 12-15 will engage campers in a virtual search for a Lake Erie shipwreck. Campers conduct field research, have an introduction to scuba and snorkeling, read a novel, develop . navigation skills, develop a plan, virtually find a wreck and travel to a wreck site. Call 216-368-5075, email kmk21@case. edu or visit gelfand.case.edu

SNAPOLOGY

Snapology’s Discovery Center in Beachwood is an amazing place to build and create with LEGO bricks. Half- and full-day summer camps for ages 4-12. Your camper will have a blast building memories and learning through play with fun LEGO themes. New location at 23645 Mercantile Road, Suite H. Visit cleveland. snapology.com

SUMMER RUFFING IT! 2020

Camp Dates: June 15-July 24. Art, cooking, music, movement, water play and outdoor playground fill the mornings with child-centered activities guided by Montessori-certified teaching staff. Six-week or three-week half-day programs are available. Half-day program runs 9 a.m.-noon.Three and six week options available. Visit ruffingmontessori.net

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL Summer 2020 programs include many new enrichment camps and academic courses, along with its popular sports clinics and day camps. Held at Shaker Heights and Hunting Valley campuses, US camps are led by experienced teachers and coaches. It offers camps for preschool-age kids through high school. Visit us.edu/summer

YMCA OF CENTRAL STARK COUNTY

Welcome to fun and adventure! At the Y, you will play, explore the outdoors, swim and build character. Their camps are run by a team you can trust, trained and ready to bring creativity to camp. Visit ymcastark.org for overnight camps at Tippecanoe, or day camps at our branch locations. Call 330-491-9622 or visit ymcastark.org

38 | Family Living at Its Best


Join us It’s free!

Meet Dozens of Diverse Camps!

WEST

EAST

SATURDAY, MARCH 7

SUNDAY, MARCH 8

Market Square at Crocker Park Westlake campfairwest2020.eventbrite.com

10:00am - 2:00pm Hawken School Lyndhurst campfaireast2020.eventbrite.com

10:00am - 2:00pm

Sponsors

Sponsor

Free Admission - Register Today! Free Tote Bag for First 200 Families (Online Registration)

Camp Scholarship giveaways + other great raffle giveaways

Entertainment :

JESSE JUKEBOX MAD SCIENCE MUSIC / SCIENCE FUN! 2020/Summer Camp Guide /- NortheastOhioParent.com | 39


ng ng nce ng ng ery ery rse op fts ng rts hts

Boys’ andCamps Girls’ Day Camps Overnight Boys’ and Girls’ Boys’ Day Camps and Girls’ Day Camps Overnight Camps Overnight Camps Boys’Overnight and Girls’Camps Day Camps Teen Leadership Programs Teen Leadership Programs Overnight Camps

Swimming Horseback riding Nature & Science Fishing Swimming Canoeing & Kayaking Horseback riding Archery Swimming Riflery Nature & Science riding Rock Climbing & Ropes Horseback Course Fishing Woodshop Nature & Science Arts & Crafts& Kayaking Canoeing Fishing Hiking Archery Sports Canoeing & Kayaking Camp fires & Overnights Riflery

Teen Leadership Programs Teen Leadership Programs

Teen Leadership Programs

We connect campers to nature. Let us connect yours.

We connect campers to nature. Let us connect yours. We connect campers to campers nature.to nature. Let us Let connect yours. We connect us connect yours.

nect campers to nature. Let us connect yours. Archery Rock Climbing & Ropes Course Riflery Woodshop Rock Climbing & Ropes Course ArtsWoodshop & Crafts Arts &Hiking Crafts Sports Hiking Camp fires & Overnights Sports

Summer Sessions

June 12 through August 18

RED OAK CAMP 9057 Kirtland-Chardon Road Kirtland, OH 44094

www.redoakcamp.org

Camp fires & Overnights

Swimming Horseback riding Nature & Science Fishing

Serving Northeast Ohio campers since 1947 – Red Barn • Chincapin • Red Oak

Summer Sessions June 12 throughSessions August 18 Summer Arts & Crafts

Canoeing & Kayaking June 12 through August 18 Hiking Archery and Riflery RED OAK CAMP Rock Climbing & Ropes Course Sports 9057 Kirtland-Chardon Road June 12 Camp throughfires August 18 CAMP RED &OAK Overnights Woodshop

Summer Sessions

Kirtland, OH 44094 Road 9057 Kirtland-Chardon Kirtland, OH 44094

Summer Sessions RED OAK CAMP www.redoakcamp.org

June through August June12 8 through August 18 7

9057 Kirtland-Chardon www.redoakcamp.org Serving Northeast Ohio campers since 1947 – Red Barn • Chincapin • Red Road Oak Kirtland, OH• Chincapin 44094• Red Oak Serving Northeast Ohio campers since 1947 – Red Barn

RED OAK CAMP

www.redoakcamp.org

Kirtland-Chardon Road Serving Northeast Ohio campers since 19479057 – Red Barn • Chincapin • Red Oak Kirtland, OH 44094

www.redoakcamp.org Serving Northeast Ohio campers since 1947 – Red Barn • Chincapin • Red Oak

40 | Family Living at Its Best

Profile for Northeast Ohio Parent Magazine

Northeast Ohio Parent Camp Guide - Winter 2020  

Family Living at its Best in Greater Cleveland!

Northeast Ohio Parent Camp Guide - Winter 2020  

Family Living at its Best in Greater Cleveland!