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Holiday 2019

REAL ESTATE

E H T F OF l l a w Teacher

Justin Paxton

and his students bring

big art to Hatteras

PERMIT NO. 15 MONROE, GA

NORTH BEACH SUN

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PAID PRESORTED STANDARD US POSTAGE


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HOLIDAY 2019


252.441.6115 • nagsheadhammocks.com KILL DEVIL HILLS DUCK COROLLA NORTH BEACH SUN

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Holiday 2019 REAL ESTATE 6

FROM THE DESK

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BUT FIRST...

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WINTER EVENTS CALENDAR

10 TOWN REPORT What's happening all over the beach 11 BUSINESS BRIEFS 12 AT LAND'S EDGE The changing story of trees along our coastal wetlands 14 THE FUTURE OF COASTAL DESIGN The Coastal Studies Institute grows into its environment

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18 OFF THE WALL Justin Paxton and the Hatteras mural club 22 HOME SPOTLIGHT The Flyway Club on Knotts Island 24 D.I.WHY NOT? Once upon a time 25 BABY, IT'S COLD OUTSIDE Winterizing tips for your beach home 26 MOOD BOARD Coastal Christmas 28 SUN SALUTATIONS 30 FIVE FACTS The legendary Croatan Inn

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HOLIDAY 2019

ABOUT THE COVER: Justin Paxton stands with a completed mural decorating a garage door in Hatteras Village (photo courtesy of Jenni Koontz). THIS PAGE: Photos courtesy of Elizabeth Neal (top and bottom) and Jenni Koontz (middle).


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800-635-1559 NORTH BEACH SUN

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FROM THE DESK

STAFF STAFF PUBLISHERS

AdamPUBLISHERS & Cathy Baldwin

The Holiday 2019 edition in development.

Adam &EDITOR Cathy Baldwin Amelia Boldaji EDITOR Amelia Boldaji ART DIRECTOR Dave Rollins

ART DIRECTOR

This magazine is our gift to you.

Dave Rollins GRAPHIC DESIGNER Dylan Bush

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

publishing a quarterly magazine has its seasonal cycles. But unlike more typical businesses on the Outer Banks that fluctuate with rising and falling visitor numbers, we don’t really have an offseason in this line of work. Stories are all assigned? Perfect, time to schedule the photo shoots. Layout’s done? Time to copyedit. The magazine’s at the press? Great, time to start the next one! Publishing a quarterly is a bit like the holiday season, in fact. You spend a few steady months preparing for it – making to-do lists, picking up necessary items here and there, scheduling plans – and then, before you know it, it’s Christmas Day. You enjoy it, you celebrate. Sure, there’s a little lull before the New Year to relax, and then you celebrate again. Our “Christmas Day,” though, is the day we finally send an issue to the press, and our traditional office celebration generally involves a couple rounds of drinks immediately afterwards. Same as the holidays, we usually have some downtime while the magazine’s being printed – and once it’s back in our hands by the thousands, we have a second reason to celebrate. At this point, however, we’re almost always gearing up for the next season as well. It’s like the holidays, alright, except for the fact that it happens four times a year. But you know that giddy feeling of anticipation that comes right before Christmas Eve, when you’re hanging stockings and wrapping presents and spending times with loved ones? It’s a little like that with us in the lead up to a new edition, too. Of course, we can get a bit stressed at times (who doesn’t?), but we also don’t take ourselves too seriously during that final crunch. We get fast-food and walk around the office barefoot and take breaks to look at memes and have semi-serious conversations about the possibility of adding winky-face emojis to certain pieces. In short, we have fun. We had a conversation about that while we were outlining this letter over some rice bowls and maybe a glass or two of rosé. At the end of the day, we know we’re lucky to enjoy what we do here at the Sun, and one of the main reasons we enjoy it so completely is because the magazine you’re holding in your hands right now is a labor of love. It’s not simply about how we make a living, but more about what we can give back – and ultimately, this magazine is meant to be our gift in return to you. We feel tremendously blessed by the support and the vibrancy of our community all the time. Without the number of creative individuals here who both educate and inspire us, there would be no stories to tell, after all. So from our first new ideas meetings to the day a new issue arrives, we’re thinking about you as a reader, first and foremost – about all the things you might want to know or be interested in, and all the ways we can best share those stories in order to express our gratitude. Thank you, to the Outer Banks and beyond – and, as always, we hope you enjoy this issue! LIKE ALMOST ANYTHING ELSE,

Dylan Bush WRITERS Cathy Baldwin • Amelia Boldaji WRITERS Brian Cathy BoutinBaldwin • Steve Hanf Lexi Holian • Catherine Amelia Boldaji Kozak Katrina Mae Leuzinger Catherine Kozak Dan Lewis • Fran Marler Katrina Mae Leuzinger Amanda McDanel Amanda McDanel Chloe Chloe Williams Williams Michele Young-Stone Michele Young-Stone PHOTOGRAPHERS PHOTOGRAPHERS

Lori JenniDouglas Koontz Cory Godwin Baxter Miller Jenni Koontz Elizabeth Neal BaxterHistory Miller Center Outer Banks Ryan Moser SALES MANAGER Elizabeth Neal Helen Furr Outer Banks History Center ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES SALES MANAGER

Sue Goodrich Helen Furr Tori Peters

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES DISTRIBUTOR Sue Goodrich

Aaron Caswell Tori Peters

DISTRIBUTOR

Aaron Caswell The North Beach Sun is published quarterly by Access Media Group. All works herein the property Thecontained North Beach Sunare is published of the North BeachMedia Sun and/or quarterly by Access Group.itsAll contributors. Opinions, responses, and works contained herein are the property inquiries are always welcome. of the North Beach Sun and/or its contributors. Opinions, responses, and inquiries areBEACH always welcome. NORTH SUN 115 West Meadowlark St.

NORTH BEACH SUN Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948 115 West Meadowlark St. 252.449.4444 Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948 editor@northbeachsun.com 252.449.4444

Editor 6

HOLIDAY 2019

Publisher

editor@northbeachsun.com


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IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO PIECE TOGETHER EVERY EDITION of the North Beach Sun – and we’ve put in the (paper)work to prove it. To celebrate another great year we compiled some behind-the-scenes numbers in order to show you what it took to make 2019 one for the books.

BUT FIRST...

87

Issues of the North Beach Sun are published every year. In 2019, as in every year since the summer of 1987, we published four quarterly issues, making this the 131st edition of the Sun.

Original pieces were created by 20 different writers. Each piece averaged about three to four different drafts this year before making it to final layout, at which point every single page of the magazine was proofed or reviewed by no less than five people several times.

79,000

MORE THAN

Edited words published this year.

That's an average of about 19,800 words per issue – not including captions!

EDITION

Oh, the Places We’ve Been!

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Separate photo shoots were handled by more than a dozen photographers. With hundreds of supplied photos gathered from individuals and organizations such as the Outer Banks History Center and the Outer Banks Visitors Bureau, we also combed through an average of nearly 500 professionally commissioned photos per issue this year to select the cream of the crop – which resulted in publishing approximately 50 stunning images every edition.

Original publishers Rex Peters and Bob Furr started the North Beach Sun out of a small office in north Duck.

BARRIER ISLAND STATION, DUCK (LATE 1980S)

NAGS HEAD-MANTEO CAUSEWAY (EARLY 1990S – LATE 1990S)

For a few years in the mid-1990s, the North Beach Sun called the causeway home. VIRGINIA DARE TRAIL, KILL DEVIL HILLS (LATE 1990S – FALL

The North Beach Sun shared a location on the beach road with the Outer Banks Beach Club Visitors Center for a handful of years in a building that has since been demolished. The roof caved in during a hurricane, flooding computers, paperwork and – most devastatingly – the Sun’s server.

2003)

MILEPOST 3, KITTY HAWK (FALL 2003 – DECEMBER 2011)

Once the floodwaters subsided, the North Beach Sun moved to an office building on the bypass in Kitty Hawk, where it stayed until Cathy and Adam Baldwin took over the Sun in January 2012. SEA DUNES SHOPPES, KITTY HAWK (JANUARY 2012

For the first three issues of 2012, the magazine was based out of an office in the Sea Dunes Shoppes. When the ocean breached the dunes during Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012, the office took on 16 inches of seawater.

– OCTOBER 2012)

THE BALDWIN HOME, KILL DEVIL HILLS

The staff temporarily relocated to the Baldwin house for the month of November to put together the holiday 2012 edition.

(NOVEMBER 2012)

MEADOWLARK STREET, KILL DEVIL HILLS

In December 2012, the magazine relocated for the seventh time to its present location near the library in Kill Devil Hills.

(DECEMBER 2012 – PRESENT)

New Chapters AFTER A COMBINED 45 YEARS AS INTEGRAL MEMBERS of the North Beach Sun staff, we bid a fond farewell to Tori Peters (left) and Sue Goodrich (right). It seems that just about everyone on the beach knows “the twins,” and we are sad to see them go. But don’t tell them they’re retiring…Tori says that’s a word their father, Colonel Leonard L. Lewane of the United States Army, never wanted them to use. “As my dad always said, we don’t believe in the word retire,” says Tori. “If you retire, you expire!”

Both Tori and Sue are looking forward to spending more time with their grandkids and travelling Europe this summer to celebrate their joint 60th birthday. Photos by Ryan Moser. NORTH BEACH SUN

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winter events

2019-2020 HATTERAS ISLAND CHRISTMAS PARADE

OUTER BANKS JINGLE JOG CHRISTMAS RUN

This hometown parade spreads holiday cheer throughout Hatteras Village, and you can catch a glimpse of Santa as he rides through town on a fire truck.

Warm up on a winter morning with a Christmasthemed oceanside run through Southern Shores. theobxrunningcompany.com

December 14

116TH ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF THE WRIGHT BROTHERS FIRST FLIGHT December 17

NOVEMBER

This milestone will be celebrated at the Wright Brothers National Memorial, the same place the very first flight occurred. firstflight.org

TIPSY TURKEY 1-MILE BEER RUN

HANGIN’ WITH SANTA & KITES WITH LIGHTS

Kick off the holiday break with this Thanksgivingthemed beer mile that starts and ends at the Outer Banks Brewing Station. theobxrunningcompany.com

Take the kids by Kitty Hawk Kites across from Jockey’s Ridge in Nags Head on Friday or Saturday for pictures with Saint Nick. While you’re there, watch the night sky light up as enormous kites with festive lights soar above Jockey’s Ridge. kittyhawk.com

JANUARY

WINTERLIGHTS PRESENTED BY SOUTHERN BANK

January 25

November 27

24TH ANNUAL ADVICE 5K TURKEY TROT November 28

Start your Thanksgiving off right by burning calories in the annual 5K Turkey Trot in Duck. Proceeds go toward the Advice 5K Turkey Trot Fund, a permanent charitable endowment managed by the Outer Banks Community Foundation. advice5kturkeytrot.com THANKSGIVING DAY 5K November 28

Begin Thanksgiving Day with a 5K at historic Whalehead in the shadow of the Currituck Lighthouse. theobxrunningcompany.com

November 29 – 30

November 30 – January 19 (selected dates)

Stroll through an illuminated winter wonderland at The Elizabethan Gardens this holiday season. Check their website for dates and times. elizabethangardens.org THE BIG CURRI-SHUCK November 30

Enjoy all-you-can eat steamed oysters, steamed crabs, barbeque, local wine and live music from 12-5 p.m. at Sanctuary Vineyards in Jarvisburg. sanctuaryvineyards.com

December 6

Downtown Manteo comes alive on the first Friday of each month from 6-8 p.m. April through December. MANTEO CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS December 6 – 7

Watch the Grand Illumination in front of the historic Manteo courthouse on Friday evening, and then enjoy the Christmas parade through downtown Manteo on Saturday. townofmanteo.com OUTER BANKS HOTLINE FESTIVAL OF TREES December 6 – 7

This multi-day event at the Village Beach Club in Nags Head includes a visit with Santa, a Polar Express movie night, a bazaar and an auction of donated decorated Christmas trees to benefit the local nonprofit Outer Banks Hotline. obxfestivaloftrees.com

WINGS OVER WATER WILDLIFE FESTIVAL December 6 – 8

HOLIDAY 2019

HATTERAS ISLAND OYSTER ROAST

Enjoy oysters, chowder, corn bread and bake sale desserts at Oden’s Dock from 1-4 p.m. Proceeds from this event will benefit the N.C. Coastal Federation’s oyster reef restoration programs. nccoast.org

MARCH

DUCK’S YULETIDE CELEBRATION

March 7 – 8

December 7

Enjoy live music from Just Playin’ Dixieland and carols from the First Flight High School choir while waiting for Santa to arrive via a fire truck and light the town’s crab-pot tree on the Duck Town Green. townofduck.com HOLIDAY FEAST & WINTERLIGHTS COMBO December 7

Tour the festive WinterLights and enjoy a delicious holiday feast at The Elizabethan Gardens. elizabethangardens.org

DINNER WITH SANTA December 21

Join Santa himself for a meal and a tour of WinterLights at The Elizabethan Gardens elizabethangardens.org NEW YEAR IN THE NEW WORLD December 31

Celebrate the New Year in a family-friendly atmosphere in downtown Manteo, including fireworks and live music by The Rhondels. nyemanteo.com

AFTER DARK AT ALL SAINTS January 27 – February 28

A variety of classes on everything from cooking to crafts are held over the course of several weeks at All Saints Church in Southern Shores. Registration is required, and the proceeds are distributed to the community through the church’s outreach programs. afterdarkallsaints.com

FEBRUARY

This encore session of the Wings over Water Festival focuses primarily on migratory birds and waterfowl. wingsoverwater.org

VIRGINIA SYMPHONY February 29

One of the nation’s leading orchestras, the Virginia Symphony will grace the stage of the First Flight High School auditorium for an evening of enchanting music. outerbanksforum.org

2020 WEDDING WEEKEND AND EXPO

31ST ANNUAL ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

Meet local wedding professionals, take a tour of venues and restaurants, and register to win wedding giveaways at this two-day expo at First Flight High School. obxwa.com

One of the largest St. Patrick’s Day parades in the state starts at 1 p.m. at milepost 11.5 on Virginia Dare Trail and continues north to Driftwood Street.

4TH ANNUAL OUTER BANKS BEER MILE March 14

Join the Outer Banks Brewing Station crew for a leprechaun-themed beer mile and a backyard after-party. theobxrunningcompany.com

TRIO HOLIDAY MARKET

RUNNING OF THE LEPRECHAUNS

Featuring a variety of local artists and artisans, this holiday market also offers plenty of edible goodies to sample while you shop. obxtrio.com

Lace up your shoes for this Irish-themed race, complete with a “Get Lucky” costume contest and an after-party. obxse.com

December 7

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Hailed by The Washington Post as “the premier American ragtime ensemble,” Peacherine recreates the sounds of ragtime, dance music and theater selections while offering a silent film accompaniment at the First Flight High School auditorium. outerbanksforum.org

February 1

DECEMBER FIRST FRIDAY

PEACHERINE RAGTIME ORCHESTRA

December 21

March 14

March 15

OBX SHAVE RIDERS FOR ST. BALDRICK'S March 15

Come out to donate or shave your head in order to raise money for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation’s fight against childhood cancer. This event will be held at Jack Brown’s immediately following the 31st Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. facebook.com/OBX-Shave-Riders-for-StBaldricks-Foundation OBX TASTE OF THE BEACH March 26 – 29

This four-day event sponsored by the Dare County Restaurant Association features tapas crawls, wine tastings, brewery tours, cook-offs and much more. obxtasteofthebeach.com


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NORTH BEACH SUN

9


REAL ESTATE

town report

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN YOUR TOWN? HERE’S A REPORT FROM ALL OVER THE OUTER BANKS.

COM PI LED BY CATH ERI N E KOZ AK

Kitty Hawk

Currituck County Construction of a new maritime museum at Historic Corolla Park officially kicked off with a groundbreaking ceremony in October. The attraction, to be built by Sussex Development Corporation, will display and interpret historic boats and artifacts that have been the centerpiece of Currituck County lifestyles, heritage and livelihoods. The Historic Corolla Park currently encompasses the Whalehead Club, the Currituck Beach Lighthouse and the Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education. The maritime museum is expected to be completed by the fall of 2020.

Duck In August, the Duck Town Council unanimously approved a five-year $148,125 contract with Axon Enterprise Inc. to provide cutting-edge law enforcement equipment that automatically integrates officer body cameras, police vehicle cameras and service weapons, and can even accept photos and live-stream video from the community. Police Chief John Cueto said that the Axon Officer Safety Plus Plan includes equipment upgrades and access to evidence.com, a system that is suitable for court. Cueto explained that the Axon program dovetails with the town joining FirstNet, an independent authority within the U.S. Department of Commerce that was authorized in 2012 to build a nationwide broadband network to equip and connect first responders. The network also gives the department access to mobile satellite units to use during power outages. Through the Axon plan, officers’ body cameras automatically switch on 10

HOLIDAY 2019

when an officer engages their vehicle emergency lights, arrives at an emergency scene, or uses a weapon – and includes auto redaction, which edits out visual information unsuitable for public view, such as the interior of a police vehicle. An officer’s cell phone can also sync video to relay to fire departments. Cueto said Duck’s 12 police officers, himself included, each have body cameras. The department also has a forward and rear camera in each of its 12 police vehicles.

Southern Shores After learning that the town would have to come up as much as $9 million for additional beach nourishment, the Southern Shores Town Council voted to hire a consultant with DEC Associates Inc. for $35,000 to provide financial advice on funding a future project. The town was advised by Aptim Coastal Planning & Engineering of North Carolina in September that the northern and southern ends of its beach requires nourishment that’s estimated to cost as much as $16 million. If Dare County picks up the maximum of $7 million it can provide through its shoreline protection fund, the town would still be responsible for the remaining cost. As part of an earlier coordinated nourishment project Aptim conducted in Duck, Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills, the town of Southern Shores completed a beach nourishment project that cost $879,200 in 2017.

According to town officials in Kitty Hawk, the current police station off Kitty Hawk Road is subject to flood damage and needs to be replaced. In a proposal presented to the Kitty Hawk Town Council in September, costs for a new police station and a separate fire/emergency medical services station would be about $2.6 million. Town manager Andy Stewart said that 65 percent of the cost would be covered by budgeted reserve funds. The new stations are expected to be approved before the next fiscal year.

Kill Devil Hills As residents and town officials continued to grapple with concerns about the impact of developing very large oceanfront houses this past October, the Kill Devil Hills Board of Commissioners voted against proposed amendments to its zoning ordinance that would have required additional buffers and parking on event-sized house lots. But the board also agreed to add a discussion to its January meeting agenda about what type of changes the town should make to address the development of event houses. In recent months, the issue of large houses came to a head again in Kill Devil Hills with approval of a 28-bedroom house on the oceanfront and pending proposals for three other large oceanfront houses.

Nags Head The Nags Head Board of Commissioners voted against an ordinance that would approve accessory dwelling units this past September. Considered by some to be an option for addressing the lack of affordable housing, accessory dwelling units are small detached residential living spaces built on the same lot as larger structures. But the ordinance failed due to public concerns over enforcement and about units being permitted in westside neighborhoods.

Mayor Ben Cahoon, however, suggested that further discussion could fine-tune the proposal. So far, the towns of Duck, Kitty Hawk and Manteo, as well as Dare County, have approved some standards for accessory dwelling units.

Manteo The former Hotel Fort Raleigh on Budleigh Street in downtown Manteo was torn down in September, making way for the proposed Manteo Town Common. The old building, most recently used for offices, is owned by Dare County, but in October the county agreed to lease the land to Manteo for $1 a year for 25 years. The town’s goal is to create an area for public green space and recreation, as well as provide sorely-needed visitor parking by adding a minimum of 65 spaces. With the building now razed, details in the conceptual plan are expected to be hammered out over the coming months, and the town will be financially responsible for any construction and maintenance costs of the improvements.

Dare County The new Outer Banks SPCA animal shelter, planned at the site of the current dog park adjacent to Airport Road on Roanoke Island, is expected to cost as much as $1.5 million more than the county’s earlier estimate of $3 million. In an announcement made by Dare County Manager and Attorney Bobby Outten this past October, Outten also added that the additional cost can be covered by county funding without a tax increase. The existing shelter across from the Dare County Emergency Operations Center has long been plagued by flooding during storms, and, as currently proposed, construction of the new shelter could potentially start by this year’s end. When the new facility is complete, it will also include a new dog park located in front of the shelter.


business briefs COM PI LED BY CATH ERI N E KOZ AK

Nags Head Restaurant to Be Sold to Tourism Bureau The Dare County Tourism Bureau has made a deal to purchase Pamlico Jack’s restaurant from owner Mike Kelly for use in conjunction with The Soundside event site, which is managed by the Outer Banks Visitors Bureau and the town of Nags Head. The event site is located on about 10 acres along the Roanoke Sound off U.S. 158, and the Visitors Bureau is currently considering adding an event center and hotel on the Pamlico Jack’s property after it’s acquired. At a meeting in October, the board voted to pay $3.1 million to Kelly, subject to the approval of the Dare County Board of Commissioners. Gardens Recover After Dorian The Elizabethan Gardens on Roanoke Island suffered some damage during Hurricane Dorian in September, which left more than a dozen major trees downed, including a tree that fell on one of the three greenhouses. There were also substantial impacts to fencing, electrical systems and numerous plantings. Although the 65-yearold gardens were closed for a short while, they reopened in October. The Outer Banks Community Foundation provided a $7,000 grant to help with clean-up and recovery, and will continue to assist the gardens through a donor fund dedicated to recovery efforts. Fire at Currituck’s Historic Cotton Gin The iconic Cotton Gin in Jarvisburg lost all but one section of the building in a massive fire that started during the afternoon of October 12. No one was injured, and officials with the Lower Currituck Volunteer Fire Department said the cause of the fire is undetermined and under investigation. The sprawling building on Caratoke Highway first opened as a general store in the 1960s. Owned by Currituck County natives, the Wright family, the flagship Cotton Gin was filled with an eclectic mix of items. The Wright family owns three other Cotton Gin locations that remain open on the Outer Banks in Corolla, Duck and Nags Head, as well as Sanctuary Vineyards in Jarvisburg, which was unaffected by the fire.

A winning entry by the Neal Contracting Group. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Neal.

Winners Recognized for 2019 Parade of Homes

Judges’ Award of Excellence Winners Finch & Company Neal Contracting Group SAGA Realty & Construction Sandmark Custom Homes

This fall, the 2019 Parade of Homes once again showcased the best in design and construction on the Outer Banks.

People’s Choice Award Winners Compass Edge Construction Forrest Seal, LLC LDS Construction & Design Mancuso Development Premiere Coastal Contracting SAGA Realty & Construction Sandmark Custom Homes

Progress Made on New Bridge At a community meeting in October, the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) reported that the construction of a new 2.4-mile bridge on N.C. 12 in Rodanthe is about 20 percent complete. Known as a “jug handle” bridge because of its distinctive shape, it will extend from the southern end of the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge over the Pamlico Sound into Rodanthe, bypassing the section of N.C. 12 in Mirlo Beach that’s subject to frequent overwash during storms. The $145 million bridge, which is part of phase II of NCDOT’s Bonner Bridge replacement project, is expected to open in early 2021. Fishing Piers Take a Beating in Storms Three of the beloved wooden fishing piers on the Outer Banks were significantly damaged during recent storms. According to Avalon Pier’s Facebook page, nearly 300 feet – about half of the pier – was lost during a brush with Hurricane Dorian in September. The owners plan to rebuild, and are trying to raise $100,000 for repairs with a GoFundMe page. Nags Head Fishing Pier also lost about 80 feet off its end in the same storm, according to its website. After it was capped off, it was reopened for fishing, and the pier’s owners are seeking assistance in hopes of rebuilding. Several sections of the Avon Pier were extensively damaged during Tropical Storm Melissa in mid-October as well. About 300 feet of the pier has been reopened, and a “Save the Pier” campaign has been launched to raise funds for repairs. The pier is owned by the National Park Service and managed through a concession contract. Two other wooden piers on the Outer Banks – the Outer Banks Fishing Pier in Nags Head and the Rodanthe Fishing Pier on Hatteras Island – were not significantly damaged during the storms.

REAL ESTATE

market snapshot Listings that are under contract are the highest they’ve been since 2017, according to the Outer Banks Association of Realtors’ September 2019 MLS Statistical Report. In September 2018, there were 367 properties under contract, a 17 percent decrease over 2017, when there were 442 under contract. But in September 2019, the numbers under contract rebounded to 430, a 17 percent jump over the previous year. Overall sales from January through September 2019 also showed a positive trend with an increase of three percent. Residential sales in particular are up five percent, while single-family detachedhome sales also increased a healthy seven percent. Overall inventory is up three percent as well, although residential inventory has dropped two percent. While condominium sales are down 23 percent, and lot and land sales have dropped eight percent, inventory for lots and land is up 12 percent for the third month in a row, and commercial inventory is up 17 percent.

NORTH BEACH SUN

11


REAL ESTATE

AT L A N D ’ S E D G E

The trees tell a story of dynamic change along our coastal wetlands PHOTO COURTESY OF BAXTER MILLER STORY BY AMELIA BOLDAJI

IN NORTH CAROLINA’S COASTAL REGION IT CAN BE HARD NOT TO

– and one phenomenon that’s seen more recent national coverage is the appearance of ghost forests. While starkly beautiful, these declining forested wetlands are created as saltwater intrusion becomes more prominent along coastal habitats, which can have huge implications for both wildlife and the people who live in these areas. Although descriptions of ghost forests have been documented since at least 1910, scientists also agree that they’ve become more common over the past several years. “You don’t necessarily notice when it happens slowly,” says Kinston-based Ryan Stancil who has been studying ghost forests with his partner, photographer Baxter Miller, for the past several years. “You can see things and not really know what you’re seeing.”

NOTICE INDICATORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

12

HOLIDAY 2019

By working with environmental organizations, scientists and other coastal community leaders, the pair debuted RISING in 2018 – a collaborative multimedia exhibition that combines oral histories and photography to highlight topics related to coastal change, such as ghost forests. The traveling exhibit features 15 oversized images, including the one pictured here, which was taken from a helicopter along Juniper Bay in mainland Hyde County. “We’re captivated by visuals, and we wanted the images to provide a striking experience,” says Baxter, while explaining how important it was for her to physically be there for the aerial shot. “It gave us a distance that allowed us to see things differently.” The impetus for making RISING more narratively driven came from a personal connection as well. Baxter’s family history on Hatteras Island dates back to the 1700s, and they still own a cottage in Buxton Woods. Her father, who’s now 83, has witnessed massive changes on the Outer Banks during his lifetime – and Baxter herself can relate to having seen a number of ghost forests well before she knew what they were. And scientists are taking note, too. As ghost forests are becoming more widespread, it’s prompted some cutting-edge research into saltwater intrusion at institutions like Duke University and N.C. State. Graduate fellows funded by N.C. Sea Grant are now even using more than 30 years’ worth of satellite photos and data provided jointly by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey to study areas such as the Alligator River basin in order to better understand how and why ghost forests form as well as how they impact our current environment. Baxter and Ryan agree that these questions are important to our scientific understanding of coastal change, which is why they also wanted RISING to engage a variety of people in an accessible way that goes beyond statistics – and serve as a positive conversation starter about how we can make our communities more resilient to these changes in the future. “On a fundamental level, these are our communities,” Baxter explains. “We want to be part of the conversation – and consider solutions more so than problems.”


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REAL ESTATE

The Future of

Coastal Design Seven years since opening, the Coastal Studies Institute campus thrives as one of the greenest structures in the area.

O

PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH NEAL STORY BY CATHERINE KOZAK

ne of the most striking buildings on the Outer Banks doesn’t necessarily look as if it belongs here. But although Roanoke Island’s Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) has a number of architectural features that seem to set it apart from many other local structures, it was actually designed by incorporating wisdom learned from decades of coastal development. Modern and bold, the long rectangular edifice of concrete and glass is oriented to the south, with one end facing an expansive view of the Croatan Sound. Located in the village of Skyco in between Manteo and Wanchese, and elevated off the flat landscape on concrete pilings, it perfectly showcases what greenminded building design can do when it’s deliberately meant to complement its natural setting. But it took a lot of effort to make CSI a reality. In 1994, a University of North Carolina task force identified the need for a marine research and education facility in the northeast part of the state. Nine years later in 2003, the fledgling institute worked out of an office in downtown Manteo with a mere handful of staff. Construction of a CSI campus was authorized by the state in 2007, with initial plans placing it on land-locked property near the regional airport on Roanoke Island that had been donated by Dare County. But when a 200-acre parcel in Skyco became available, the institute decided that the site was a much better location for coastal research – leading to an $8.25 million deal with a private developer in 2009. A year later, architects with the firm Clark Nexsen saw the opportunity to blend cutting-edge design and technology with long-standing local building styles – which led to CSI’s simple lines and other features that were inspired in part by the classic Southern Shores flat tops pioneered by Frank Stick and the rugged durability of the cottages found in Nags Head’s oceanfront historic district. “The firm gave a presentation about Outer Banks architecture to our board of directors,” recalls Robert McClendon, CSI’s assistant director for administration. “Basically, they integrated a lot of things used in coastal architecture, like raising the building on pilings.” By utilizing sustainable, local materials, minimizing the disturbance of natural resources, and maximizing water conservation and energy efficiency, the $32 million coastal research campus earned an impressive gold-level Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification from the United States Green Building Council when it opened in late 2012. The project has since won numerous other accolades, including the council’s North Carolina Sustainability Award in 2013 and the Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award for Best New Global Design in 2014. 14

HOLIDAY 2019

A variety of native plants line the entranceway to the CSI campus, which is a research partnership led by East Carolina University along with several other N.C. universities (above). A sleek design and features such as concrete pilings and large windows help CSI blend well with its natural setting (below).

And construction of a LEED-certified building was the plan from the beginning, even though it added about $350,000 to the project’s overall costs, according to an estimate done in 2007. “LEED isn’t just about energy efficiency and the environmental footprint,” Robert explains about their decision to move forward despite the increased budget. “It’s also about the health of the occupants.” Inside, the space is open, airy and remarkably merged with the marsh outside – a view of which is visible from a number of different perspectives thanks to the high ceilings, transparent corridor walls and the clerestory windows. Steel and cable rail stairwells also seem to float up three stories that lead to classrooms, research labs and offices, and the building was designed so that at least 95% of its occupiable space is exposed to daylight. Beyond obvious highlights such as a bicycle storage area and reserved onsite parking for energy-efficient vehicles, however, the building’s green features aren’t always immediately evident. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t there – including a geothermal HVAC system that utilizes untreated water provided by Dare County, an 8,000-gallon cistern for rainwater reuse, hard roof and patio surfaces that reduce solar heat, and a fire-suppression system created with environmentally safe materials. Even construction products such as paints were selected for their low-emission qualities. Native landscaping is another significant feature of the 213-acre campus, which includes the 90,000-squarefoot main building and an 18,000-square-foot marine operations and field research facility. But before the site became home to CSI, it was used as a place to deposit dredge material removed from nearby Shallowbag Bay. As a result, the elevation was raised, and a salty sand cover left the area devoid of vegetation. “When we built it, this was basically a no-man’s land,” Robert says. “It was just flat.” Jeff Lewis, CSI’s horticultural specialist, has since restored the landscape with native plant species, which are labeled for the public to view. Upland grasses, beach pea, loblolly pine, cedar and wax myrtle have also returned to the higher and dryer elevations on the property. “It’s taken time, but it’s really growing up beautifully,” Robert says. “The campus itself is now part of the educational process.”


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15


COROLLA – WESTSIDE – One of the most impressive homes in Monteray Shores! This 6BR/5.5BA former showcase model home was built with state-of-the-art designs, materials and appliances. $548,900 SSR#8604

COROLLA – OCEANSIDE – This 8BR/8.5BA vacation home has outstanding ocean views! Located in Ocean Sands – and offering a private pool and hot tub, decks, and spacious living areas – this is every guest’s dream vacation rental! $899,900 SSR#8685

SOUTHERN SHORES – SEMI-OCEANFRONT – Meticulously maintained 4BR/3BA vacation home in Southern Shores. Enjoy an ocean view, open living spaces, and a private beach access from this property! Great rental income and selling fully furnished. $534,900 SSR#8709

DUCK – OCEANSIDE – This 4BR/2.5BA cozy cottage in Duck is just what you’ve been looking for! Located within an X flood zone – and only 400-yards to the beach – the home offers the perfect setting for anyone looking to own on the Outer Banks. $429,000 SSR#8711

SOUTHERN SHORES- SEMI-OCEANFRONT- Well built, well maintained, 5BR/5.5BA home. Solid rental history and great ocean views from the top and second levels. Handicap friendly! $1,229,000 SSR#8751

NAGS HEAD – OCEANFRONT - This 6BR/6.5BA home was remodeled in 2004 and has been very well maintained! With a 75-foot-wide lot, this house has beautiful views of the ocean. $1,485,000 SSR#8772

DUCK - WESTSIDE - This 4BR/3.5BA energy star home was built in 2011, it sits on over a half acre of soundfront property. This home is well suited for year-round living or a family vacation home. $730,000 SSR#8781

DUCK - OCEANSIDE-This charming 4BR/2BA located in Bayberry Bluff, Duck is in the desirable X-flood zone. This is a low traffic subdivision with easy and safe beach access. $439,000 SSR#8792

SOUTHERN SHORES – OCEANFRONT 4BR/3.5BA in Sea Crest Village on a quiet street! Terrific Ocean views with a unique comfortable floorplan, this home has been well maintained. $1,275,000 SSR#8804

COROLLA-WESTSIDE- This 4BR/3.5BA has options for everyone! It is also handicap friendly with an elevator! Sold fully furnished! $439,000 SSR#8806

MARTIN’S POINT - 4BR/3BA Home in Martin’s Point. This single level contemporary ranch has much to offer including a high landscaped lot and a whole house generator! $577,000 SSR#8817

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HOLIDAY 2019

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DUCK – OCEANSIDE – Enjoy all that Duck has to offer from this 4BR/2FBA/3HB home in Caffey’s Inlet Hamlet! X flood zone; and fully furnished! $499,000 SSR#8722

COROLLA – OCEANSIDE – This 5BR/3BA home in Ocean Sands is fantastic! The classic, coastal reverse floor plan is well-suited for vacations and time with family in this well-maintained property. $338,000 SSR#8733

DUCK – WESTSIDE – This roomy 3BR/2BA condo is well-suited for most families and features a spacious open floor plan with outstanding sound views. As a bonus, this property has a garage to keep your vehicle or your water toys in. $279,000 SSR#8735

MARTIN’S POINT – CREEKFRONT – Well maintained 4BR/3.5BA home with amazing water views of Jean Guite Creek and the open sound! Energy saving features. The storage in this home is amazing. An absolute MUST SEE! $668,500 SSR#8749

MARTIN’S POINT - SOUNDFRONT - Spacious, sound front home in Martin’s Point! This 4241 square foot home has an open floor plan everyone can enjoy! Detached three car garage has a spacious one-bedroom apartment above. $995,000 SSR#8794

SOUTHERN SHORES - OCEANSIDE - This 4BR/3BA elevated ranch home in Sea Crest Village! This floor plan accommodates comfortable spacious yearround living. The crow’s nest offers a view of the ocean and adjacent pond! $449,000 SSR#8795

DUCK - WESTSIDE - 5BR/3BA in Jay Crest Village X-zone! Includes access to the Ocean Crest amenities! Home has been well-cared for and gently used as a second home with some rentals. $399,000 SSR#8797

COROLLA-OCEANSIDE-This 5BR/6.5BA in Corolla Light subdivision is extraordinary! Enjoy ocean views from the private deck of this X-zone home! Take an online virtual tour of this home today! $995,000 SSR#8802

HARBINGER – CURRITUCK – 3BR/2BA in beautiful cypress point. This home has a huge 3 car garage and a fantastic floor plan! Built in 2005 with carpets that look brand new and bright and open spaces! $320,000 SSR#8829

COINJOCK - CURRITUCK - 3BR/2BA home conveniently located between OBX beaches and the VA border! This home features a large lot with single level living and an open floor plan. Schedule a showing today! $195,000 SSR#8822

DUCK – WESTSIDE – Beautiful 3BR/3BA home in Jay Crest! This home features beautiful, bright hickory floors and spacious bedrooms. Located in a high elevation area it is in the desirable X-Zone! $424,900 SSR#8824

SOUTHERN SHORES – OCEANSIDE - One of the few remaining flat tops homes in Southern Shores! This 6BR/3BA sits on a large lot in a quiet area and has stunning views! The beach here is wide, stable, and clean! $1,350,000 SSR#8828

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REAL ESTATE

Off the Cape Hatteras teacher Justin Paxton is enlisting students to bring public art to the community

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JENNI KOONTZ STORY BY MICHELE YOUNG-STONE 18

HOLIDAY 2019


Wall The work of the Hatteras Island mural club adorns a VW Bug (top left) and a walk-in cooler (lower left) amongst other locations. Justin Paxton at work on the mural adorning Jeffrey's Seafood in Hatteras (right).

ON A BRISK FALL DAY, JPAX & CREW MEET AT

where one of their many brightly colored murals adorns the side of a carwash. While it isn’t the group’s official name, the tag serves as their personalized group signature on each of their works of art – with “JPax” standing for Justin Paxton, Dare County School’s current Teacher of the Year, and the “crew” referring to a diverse group of Cape Hatteras Secondary School (CHSS) students who make up Hatteras Island’s mural club. After graduating from CHSS along with his future wife, Alex, Justin tried majoring in science in college, but it just didn’t stick. Following his passion, he eventually graduated from East Carolina University with a double major in fine arts and art education, and returned to Hatteras where he was hired as CHSS’s art teacher in 2014.

THE BP GAS STATION IN AVON

Since then, Justin has demonstrated an astounding commitment to his role as a teacher. Not only is he an art instructor for grades sixth through 12th, but he also leads a student travel club with plans to tour Italy this spring and heads an after-school Nerd Night video gaming club. And, for the past two years, he and his students have been making the island richer and more colorful by creating large-scale murals in Avon, Buxton and Hatteras Village. Inspired by a trip to Europe a few years before the club began, Justin admired the art he found walking through the streets of Barcelona, and returned home determined to learn more about it – particularly as it related to adding to the vibrancy of a community. “I saw what other towns were doing with murals and art walks, and I thought, ‘Why can’t we do this in Hatteras?’” Justin explains.

After seeking approval from the Hatteras Village Civic Association, Justin began working independently on his first two murals in 2017. One was of sports-related items inside the Fessenden Center’s gymnasium and the other was a triptych of fish on three garage doors at Hatteras local Bill Balance’s automotive repair shop. A few friends helped out when they could, and from there word spread. Local students in particular wanted to pitch in, and in early 2019 the club officially began. “The mural club has an open-door policy,” Justin says. “If students have sports or other commitments, and they can’t make it one day, it’s no problem. People come out when they can.” Students who participate in the club are generally in the ninth through 12th grades, and many of them have a variety of artistic interests – from wanting to help with small things NORTH BEACH SUN

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A few of the 13 murals that currently dot Hatteras Island include (top to bottom): The inside of the Fessenden Center’s gymnasium, the side of the historic Burrus Red & White supermarket, and the side of the Askins Creek general store in Avon. In the bottom picture, art student Emma Koontz poses by a mural she helped paint at Jeffrey’s Seafood.

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HOLIDAY 2019

like filling in colors to playing bigger roles in ink work and design. And CHSS has also been an enthusiastic supporter of the club by allowing members time during school hours to meet and plan, and also supplying some materials when requested. While street art is most commonly found on the exterior walls of buildings, Justin likes thinking outside the box, and lately there’s been no shortage of interest in the club’s creations. Sometimes business owners approach him with an idea, and sometimes he’ll reach out to an owner directly if he sees a space he thinks is ideal – because, ultimately, the artwork is intended to both enrich and connect the community as much as possible. “Scratchmade Snackery in Hatteras Village was the first one we did when the mural club came together,” Justin says. After seeing octopus tentacles along the interior walls of the bakery, Justin sketched a purple octopus devouring muffins and cupcakes with the idea of painting it on an old Volkswagen Bug parked outside, and the owners loved it. Though some overzealous visitors occasionally scratch the paint while posing for pictures with it, Justin seems unfazed. “I just stop by and touch this one up with teal paint whenever I have some leftover,” he adds. The murals are made with a mix of interior and exterior paints, plus acrylics, spray paint and graffiti ink, and many of them are intended to pay homage to the area’s rich maritime history. In the case of the Nedo True Value Shopping Center in Hatteras Village, the owners wanted a mural that represented how their ancestors arrived on the island – and, as legend has it, they were shipwrecked while rum-running at sea, so their first family member had to ride a barrel to shore. As a result, the mural depicts wooden barrels of rum floating on an angry, white-capped sea surrounded by wreckage and lightning. “I often meet one-on-one with the business owners at first,” Justin says. “Sometimes a student will join me, and we’ll talk ideas. Since the island is so close-knit, we want to bring something to them that they’ll appreciate, something they’ll want to show off that speaks to both the business and the area.” The club even had the largest number of students inside the smallest space when they painted the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse inside the Buxton post office. A total of 15 students signed the piece when it was complete, but it was a tricky project. “Painting the grass was really hard,” says Maria Luna, an Art Three student who worked on the post office mural. “At one point, the sky looked avocado green, and the sand looked like barf.” “In the artworld, you have to be able to take criticism,” Justin says with a laugh. “It’s a learning process for all of us.” To date, there are 13 murals dotting the island, with several other ones either in the planning stages or underway. Although JPax & Crew don’t charge for their work other than funds for the paint, donations are welcomed, and so far, the club has managed to raise $2,500. At this point, the group plans to use this money either to take an art trip or to paint a mural off the island. “When I first started this, I didn’t know where it would lead – I just wanted to have fun on some walls,” Justin says. “But it’s a different feeling to go out and do something that stays there for years. It’s given us a chance to work with the community, and it’s brought my students closer together, too. We’re like family.”


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21


HOME SPOTLIGHT

STEP BACK IN TIME The Flyway Club on Knotts Island PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH NEAL STORY BY MICHELE YOUNG-STONE

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HOLIDAY 2019


I

n the early 1900s, flocks of migrating A few Knotts Island natives still remember the waterfowl on the Outer Banks were Flyway in its heyday as well. In some written memories, increasingly attracting wealthy sportsmen Janet Grimstead Simmons, who was the niece of and business tycoons from more northern Flyway’s main caretaker, recalls working at the Flyway cities, prompting grand hunt clubs to spring with her cousins during summer vacations in the early up all along the Carolina coast. One such retreat was 1960s. They cooked and cleaned and helped with the Flyway. childcare in order to earn the first real money any of In 1920, Ogden Mills Reid and Helen Rogers Reid them had seen. Later, Janet’s father took them all the purchased 426 acres of sound-side property on a way to downtown Norfolk so they could go shopping – remote part of Currituck County known as Knotts which was a very big deal at the time. Island. As well-known New York publishers who The history-rich Flyway stayed in the Reid family eventually acquired a second newspaper to form the until December 2013 when The Conservation Fund vastly profitable New York Herald Tribune, the Reids purchased the property for $2,400,000. Most of the were friends with fellow publisher, philanthropist and land was subsequently sold to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife waterfowl hunter, Joseph P. Knapp, who owned an Service, but 26 acres encompassing the main building astonishing 7,000 acres on neighboring Mackay Island. and the barn were reserved for a private buyer. Though the Reids may not have had quite as many In 2016, former Charlotte residents Michelle and resources as Knapp, they spared no expenses when it Paul Dowdey became the new owners of the Flyway. came to building the Flyway Club as a family get-away Though the buildings had fallen into some disrepair, the – starting with a 5,500-square-foot residence, and Dowdeys have been slowly restoring them as their main adding an 11,000-square-foot farm building between residence and a wedding venue. Though they’ve added 1928 and 1930. some more modern touches, By all accounts, the Reids such as an HVAC system, loved their home away from they’ve also been working home, and they were just as closely with Preservation concerned with protecting it North Carolina to ensure that as they were with enjoying it. the exterior of the buildings Along with Knapp and other remains true to its historical like-minded friends such as J.P. beginnings. Morgan, they played a role in And in many ways, walking creating the More Game Birds inside the buildings is like in America Foundation in 1937, taking a step back in time. The which has since evolved into main lodge features solid oak Ducks Unlimited, one of the paneling with rustic, exposed country’s largest conservation wooden beams and antique A vintage steamer trunk left at the Flyway still has Ogden Reid’s luggage tag attached to it. nonprofits dedicated to the leaded glass windows, plus preservation of wetlands and a working wind vane that’s other waterfowl habitats. connected to the ceiling The Reids also had three children who grew up of the ground-floor living room with a round metal vacationing at the Flyway, but their youngest son, reader that allowed hunters to simply look up from the Ogden Rogers Reid, had a special fondness for the enormous brick fireplace to check the wind direction property. When he married his wife, Mary Louise and decide on the day’s best spot to set up a duck blind. Stewart, in 1949, his mother gave the young couple the Assorted furnishings that belonged to the Reids club as a wedding present. remain as well, including artwork, decoys, a pool table An accomplished man in his own right, Ogden and two tables that were originally used as copy desks Rogers spent a few years working for the family at the New York Herald Tribune. In the U-shaped barn, business in New York before being appointed as which was once used to house livestock and serve as the United States ambassador to Israel and later the staff quarters, a vintage steamer trunk is tucked served as a four-term member of the U.S. House of away in the corner of a room with Ogden Reid’s luggage Representatives. Because of his political connections, tag still attached to it. the Flyway hosted a number of famous dignitaries over Ultimately, there’s a peacefulness to the Flyway the years, including British Prime Minister Winston that makes it easy to understand why so many people Churchill and U.S. presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower traveled there throughout the years to get away from the and Herbert Hoover. busyness of everyday life. An oak-lined drive still leads to Ogden Rogers was so proud of the Flyway that the property, and a variety of huge old trees tower over when the main residence burned down on Christmas the grounds – including magnolias, cedars, pines and two Eve in 1958, he immediately insisted on having it impressive California redwoods. As the story goes, the replicated. Nelson Rockefeller, who had also once been first Mrs. Reid was so enamored of the redwoods that a guest at the club, reportedly obliged by sending his she had them shipped directly to Knotts Island from the own personal architect to Knotts Island – and using the West Coast almost 100 years ago. Like the Flyway itself, original plans, the structure was fully rebuilt by 1960. they continue to endure to this day.

The 11,000-square-foot farm building was added to the Flyway Club sometime between 1928 and 1930 (top left). Architectural details include a working wind vane reader on the ceiling of the main residence, a pointed spire on the farm building, and a staircase leading to the second-level staff quarters (bottom, left to right).

NORTH BEACH SUN

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D.I.WHY NOT? BY AMANDA MCDANEL

Once Upon a

I BELIEVE HEAVEN IS A BOOKSTORE. It’s filled with every book you ever read and loved – and it’s also teeming with books that are patiently waiting to enchant you with their stories for the first time. Books have always played an important role in my life, and ever since I can remember, I’ve had one nearby. From storybooks at home to those at grandma’s house, I have a collection of children’s books with the names and dates of all occasions scribbled on their front pages: Happy Valentine’s Day 1981 – Love, Dad. Merry Christmas, Amanda 1983 – Love, Annie. Happy 5th Birthday – Love, Grandma. I remember some books so vividly that I can almost see my grandma’s hands turning the pages – and my mom even lovingly boxed up my childhood collection and stored it for me until I had my own girls to share them with. Unboxing that collection when I set up our nursery almost 10 years ago was one of the most emotionally rewarding experiences ever – I shrieked in awe, I laughed and I cried as each book brought back a new memory and connected me to my loved ones. While most of those books are now stored on shelves in my daughters’ room, several special ones were silently calling out for me to do more. I pulled a few select pages from some of my favorites and had them framed and hung on the walls of the girls’ room. I created stencils, used old book pages to cut out the letters, and threaded them along twine to spell out both my daughters’ names. But I still hadn’t quite created the piece my inner bookworm was yearning for. Then I came across a piece of art I had picked up years ago at a gallery. It was a slice of wood that had an old book page affixed to it with hand-painted details along the edges. I recognized the page immediately from a Rain or Shine reader that I once kept at my grandma’s house. Using this piece for inspiration, I began designing wallpaper made entirely of children’s book pages. While I take deep delight in storybook illustrations, you could just as easily replicate this with sheet music, maps from sentimental places, menus, playbills, the dictionary or nature guide pages – the options are as endless as your collection and your imagination. TO START, FIRST SELECT A WALL THAT YOU WANT TO HIGHLIGHT.

Use those old books to create a one-of-a-kind wall treatment

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HOLIDAY 2019

This can be an accent wall in a bedroom, bathroom, entryway or even a closet, and I chose to wallpaper the slanted ceiling of my daughters’ playroom. Clean the wall using a damp sponge and warm water mixed with few drops of dish soap. Allow the wall to dry completely. Next, assemble your pages and start designing a theme and a layout. I affixed my selections directly to the wall with painter’s tape, which made it easy to remove and rearrange the images until I was satisfied with the layout, but if you have room, you can also measure the wall size and mark that space off on the floor in order to move the pages around. As you work, you’ll likely start to see themes or groupings – whether it’s because of the size of the text, the colors or the subject of the pictures on each page. Some images may not fit cohesively, so don’t force an image in if it isn’t playing nicely with the others. I suggest leaving the layout for a couple of days to ensure you’re happy with the overall placement before beginning the next step. Once you’re confident in the layout, the fun part begins. On a clean, dry wall, apply a very thin layer of Mod Podge with a foam brush to the section you’re starting at. Working quickly, apply a similarly thin coat to the back of your first page and then affix the page to the sticky wall. Smooth the paper down firmly with the flat edge of a spatula or a credit card to ensure there are no air bubbles. Move on to the next page, and continue applying Mod Podge in thin coats to both the wall surface and the back of the paper, smoothing after each step, until the wall is covered. Wait approximately an hour for the entire project to dry. Mod Podge functions as both a glue and a sealer, so it comes in a variety of finishes, including glossy, satin, flat and more. Be sure to select the finish you want because you’ll also be using this as a sealer for the finished work. Starting at the top of the wall, apply a thin coat of Mod Podge over the surface of the wallpaper. You’ll be painting over each page in its entirety, so while it may appear cloudy at first, rest assured that it will dry clear as long as you use a light hand. Continue working until the wall is fully covered. Allow to dry for 48 hours. At this point you can go back and reseal any loose edges with a small brush. In order to protect your work even further, I also highly recommend spraying the wallpaper with a second coat of clear acrylic sealer. This will enhance the durability of the project and reduce any tackiness. Be sure to choose a sealer spray with the same finish as your Mod Podge to achieve the same glossy, matte or satin final effect – and remember to keep some on hand for easy touch-ups of your masterpiece at any point down the road!


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WINTER ON THE OUTER BANKS IS TRULY ONE OF A KIND. And while many people enjoy slowing down from the bustle of summer and savor the occasional snowfall, the combination of salty winds and icy evenings can take a toll on your home. But have no fear! There are a number of simple things that year-round residents and vacation homeowners alike can do to keep the cold out and the comfort in. It all starts during the last warm spell of autumn, when humidity disappears and the breeze carries a crisp scent of leaves. On days like those, nothing feels quite as good as leaving the windows wide open – but once the temperature drops for good, we tend to simply close them without another thought. Make sure, however, to lock all your windows in place in order to provide a tighter and more efficient seal against the frigid winter winds. Sliding draft stoppers under your front and back doors will add a similar level of protection – and your power bill will thank you. Also don’t forget that while the summer months are a gardener’s delight, winter doesn’t exactly provide the same nurturing environment as its seasonal predecessor. Since you won’t be using your outdoor hose hardly at all during this chillier period, unscrew it and make sure it’s thoroughly emptied before putting it away in order to prevent any residual water from freezing and damaging the rubber. Unscrewing any other nozzles or sprayers you might have will also keep them from potentially rusting in place – and will ensure that you can hook up your sprinklers or fill your kiddie pool the moment that spring brings the island back to life. Other outdoor items can pose tricky problems, but are just as easily solvable – and even though you probably don’t have the room (or the desire) to drag your grill inside as soon as you finish your last fair-weathered barbecue, that doesn’t mean you should neglect it. Preserve the life of your grill by buying a durable cover, and think about removing the grill plates and storing them indoors. They don’t take up a ton of space, and you’ll save them from months of exposure, plus possible rust and corrosion. If your grill has a battery-powered igniter, pop out the battery as well in order to avoid rupture. Grills are just one of many outdoor fixtures that aren’t necessarily designed to survive a seaside winter. Many Outer Banks vacation homes feature outdoor televisions mounted to bars or tiki huts. While homeowners always have the option of simply unplugging those sets and placing them under covers, consider unmounting them entirely and storing them in an under-used guest room. Newer television models are more lightweight and easier than ever to handle – so moving them indoors is a small fix that can save big in the long run. Hopefully, these tips will give you some ideas for bracing your home against the colder winter weather – because while the outside may turn somewhat gray and dreary this season, it’s what inside that counts. NORTH BEACH SUN

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MOOD BOARD

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Marjie Blassey specializes in helping people add a seasonal shine to their homes. But for her, a Christmas on the coast doesn’t necessarily require ornaments galore or a blockbuster budget – instead she suggests focusing on ways to combine natural elements and everyday items for a look that’s both functional and fun.

AS A PROFESSIONAL HOLIDAY DECORATOR,

For beach boxes with an open-floor plan, she also suggests adding extra touches to particular spots in the room – and a mantel is the perfect place for binding fresh-cut greenery with nautical rope (1) to make a unique garland. Stockings (2) in soft, coastal colors can then be hung above to complement the theme. Changing out the items on your sofa with a few seasonal pillows (3) and a matching throw (4) is another easy way to incorporate some holiday spirit. Placing similarly hued candles (5) near driftwood or putting leftover sprigs of greenery in vases (6) on your coffee table will provide some additional fresh texture without overwhelming things. 26

HOLIDAY 2019

8

COM P IL ED BY AM EL IA BOLDAJI

These items can also be used to create a dining room centerpiece – but if you have any outdoor lanterns (7), you might consider bringing them inside and filling them with some string lights (8). You’ll probably also want to place lights on the holiday highlight of the room, and Marjie’s first choice for this is a whimsical flocked Christmas tree (9). With its durable branches, it can even hold heavier items such as treasured family photos in gold and silver frames (10). To complete the look, try repurposing a beach blanket (11) instead of a traditional tree skirt. Not only are you sure to have an extra one lying around, but it will definitely be put to good use well after the New Year – and it’ll also remind you that even on the shortest, chilliest days of winter, spring is just around the corner.


Happy Holidays from all of us at Urban Cottage!

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Salutations Beach Realty & Construction Beach Realty & Construction / Kitty Hawk Rentals is pleased to announce that Laurel Bartlett Heisey has joined the sales team in the Kitty Hawk office. Laurel transitioned to the Outer Banks from Richmond, Va., where she enjoyed a successful career in real estate sales. Laurel’s clients benefit from her years of experience, strong negotiating skills and excellent customer service. Contact Laurel Bartlett Heisey at laurel@beachrealtync.com.

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty Welcomes Daria Vlasenko to the Firm

Daria Vlasenko has joined the Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty sales team in the Elizabeth City location. A native of Russia, Daria moved to the Outer Banks in 2010 with a degree in information technologies. “I know the time and energy it takes to buy or sell a home, and I can help take the stress away from you,” says Daria. She can be reached at daria@cbseaside.com or (252) 305-4645.

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty Welcomes Brook Sparks to the Kitty Hawk Office

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty

Howard Hanna

The VanderMyde Group Named Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty Top Producers

Howard Hanna Real Estate Services on the Outer Banks welcomes Lori Rosser as its newest agent. Lori retired from Dare County as a critical care paramedic and is excited about her next career in real estate with Howard Hanna. Lori can be reached at (252) 305-0896 or lorirosser@howardhanna.com.

Brad Beacham Group Named Top Producing Team for the Kitty Hawk Office

Brad Beacham, along with team members Cameron Griggs and Brook Sparks, led the way in sales volume year-to-date through September to earn the firm’s Top Producing Team Award for the Kitty Hawk location. “Our priority is to consistently provide quality service, marketing and results to our clients,” says Brad. Team leader, Brad Beacham, can be reached at (252) 202-6920 or brad@bradbeacham.com.

The Heather Sakers Team Earns September Team Award for the Kitty Hawk Office

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty is pleased to announce that Heather Sakers, along with team members Charles Gill and Ann Taylor Lusk, earned the Top Producing Team Award for the month of September. A recent five-star review said, “Heather exhibited a patient and calm approach on all aspects of the selling process. Our questions and concerns were answered promptly, and we would recommend Heather highly to anyone who is buying or selling on the Outer Banks.” Team leader, Heather Sakers, can be reached at heather@cbseaside.com or (252) 599-6814.

Chelsea Jordan Earns September Agent of the Month for the Kitty Hawk Office

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty congratulates Chelsea Jordan on earning the Agent of the Month award for the Kitty Hawk office. This award is based on individual closed sales volume for September 2019. “Chelsea is the best realtor we have ever used. She made us feel as though we were her number-one priority,” said a recent fivestar review. Chelsea can be reached at chelsea@cbseaside.com or (252) 207-6659.

Jane Plante Earns September Agent of the Month for the Kill Devil Hills Office

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty congratulates Jane Plante on earning the Agent of the Month award for the Kill Devil Hills office. This award is based on individual closed sales volume for September 2019. “I love all of what the Outer Banks has to offer,” says Jane. “I look forward to helping you realize your dream!” Jane can be reached at janeplante@cbseaside.com or (757) 407-0929. HOLIDAY 2019

Stephen Smith has joined the Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty sales team in the Kill Devil Hills location. “I spent 20-plus years working in the tech arena, so I bring a unique set of skills and experience when it comes to marketing your home,” says Stephen. He can be reached at stephen@cbseaside.com or (252) 216-9230.

Also joining the sales force at Beach Realty & Construction is the sales team of Ed and Myrna Duffey. The Duffeys were previously affiliated with a large Virginia firm and have relocated permanently to the Outer Banks. They are both well qualified to represent buyers and sellers. Myrna has a background in management in the home improvement industry and Ed served in the United States Air Force. You can reach Ed and Myrna at ed@beachrealtync.com and myrna@beachrealtync.com.

Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty is pleased to announce the VanderMyde Group as the Top Producing Team. Heather VanderMyde, along with team members Kiirsten Farr, Will Gregg and Kasey Rabar, continue to rank number one in the firm in sales volume, units sold and new listings year-to-date through September. “Thanks to Heather and her team, this was the best experience we've had selling property,” said a recent five-star review. Team leader, Heather VanderMyde, can be reached at (252) 202-2375 or hvandermyde@gmail.com.

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Coldwell Banker Seaside Realty Welcomes Stephen Smith to the Kill Devil Hills Office

Brook Sparks has joined the firm as a member of the Brad Beacham Group. “During my many years as a property manager, I worked to help clients expand their portfolios based off data and projections,” says Brook. “My goal is to now help buyers understand a home's full earning potential while realizing the most on their return.” Brook can be reached at brooksparks@cbseaside.com or (252) 619-1177.

Congratulations to Mike and Stacy Siers of the Siers Real Estate Group, and to Randy Jones and Lynn Sherman of the Jones Group, for achieving Champion's Club status. This award is given tri-annually for distinguished success in listings and sales. Both teams have received this award for each tri-annual period since joining Howard Hanna. Both teams are also 2019 recipients of the prestigious National Sales Excellence award and will be honored at the annual Howard Hanna awards ceremony.

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates Patrick Lamb Promoted to Property Services Manager

Patrick will be the manager of the newly remodeled and improved Support Services building located at 5101 North Croatan Highway in Kitty Hawk. The maintenance and inspections department will be open and ready for calls on October 31, 2019, in the new location. Over the past two years, Patrick has managed the Inspections Department and helped to create an online inspections process that improved services to vendors and owners. He is looking forward to applying those same processes to the Maintenance Department.

Joey Lamb IV Promoted to Guest Services Manager

Joey Lamb IV is joining the current management team of President and General Manager Dan Hardy, Vice-President and Operations Manager Kim Dubec, Reservations Manager Susan Pruitt, and Assistant Operations Manager Jeffrey McGee. Over the past several years, Joey has been working across all departments, evaluating and making improvements to overall guest and owner communications and services via digital forms and information services for both the Inspections and Maintenance Departments. He has implemented these changes through staff training and consolidated them by developing a guest application in an effort to make the company paperless. He will be working closely with the management team and reservations staff to ensure that all guest services provided are above standard.

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates Announces the Relocation of Maintenance and Inspections Services Departments

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates will be moving two of their integral service departments, Maintenance and Inspections, to the newly renovated and improved Support Services building located at 5101 North Croatan Highway in Kitty Hawk. The staff of those departments will be relocating and open for business in the new location on October 31, 2019. Vendors, owners and those who wish to meet with the team will find them there. They can also be reached by phone at (252) 261-4444 and at their respective emails.


Resort Realty Resort Realty Announces Tom Stewart as New Chief Operating Officer

Affordable Self Storage with Unmatched Quality & Service!

Resort Realty is pleased to announce that Tom Stewart will take the lead of the company as chief operating officer and broker in charge. Tom was formerly the general manager, and prior to that was the director of rental management at Resort. Tom came to Resort from the vacation rental market in Savannah/Tybee, Georgia. Before that, he spent considerable time in the hospitality sector in North Carolina. Tom’s focus will be on heightened owner and guest care and rental performance as Resort Realty continues to grow.

Southern Shores Realty Southern Shores Realty congratulates Mike Ross on being named Agent of the Month for October 2019.

Sun Realty Sun Realty announces Agents of the Month for the Third Quarter of 2019

The M&M Team of Madonna and Michael VanCuren again earned top honors for July. The M&M Team specializes in old-fashioned service and commitment to their clients. This team works out of the Kill Devil Hills office and has earned Sun Realty’s Agent of the Year award 13 times. The M&M Team can be reached at (252) 202-6702. The August Agent of the Month for Sun Realty was Hugh Willey of the Willey Real Estate Group. Working out of the Kill Devil Hills office, Hugh “Scooter” Willey has been building and investing in real estate since 1985. He and his wife, Gerri, are a top-producing team, empowering clients through education, stress-free transactions and excellent service. Reach the Willey Real Estate Group at (252) 489-8491. Sun Realty’s Agent of the Month for September was Michael Davenport. Michael has 32 years of experience in Outer Banks real estate. He currently serves on realtor associations on the state and local levels and was recently recognized by Outer Banks Association of Realtors with a Career Achievement Award. Michael can help navigate through a sea of listings to find the right fit for any buyer’s needs and budget. Contact him at (252) 202-6113.

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NORTH BEACH SUN

29


FIVE FACTS

the croatan inn By Katrina Mae Leuzinger

Photo courtesy of the Outer Banks History Center.

YOU MIGHT REMEMBER IT AS QUAGMIRES OR PAPAGAYO,

but long before the old cedar-shake building became a popular hangout spot for locals, it was the Croatan Inn, providing accommodations for some of the first beach-going vacationers on the Outer Banks. From the time it was built in the early 1930s to day it was demolished in 2006, the Croatan Inn saw six different owners, three operational changes and countless visitors all drawn to the same thing – good food, good company and a spectacular view of the Atlantic.

1

The times were a-changin’ The early 1930s brought a flurry of new developments to the Outer Banks. There were dance halls, soda fountains, bowling alleys and a casino. Gas stations went up to support the steadily growing automobile industry, and the Coast Guard station in Nags Head even installed a telephone.

Virginia Dare Trail was also newly completed, prompting oceanfront property to sell like hotcakes. Quick to jump on the trend, Bernie and Russell “Skipper” Griggs opened the Croatan Inn near milepost 7.5 in what would later become the town of Kill Devil Hills. As owners of the already-established Hampton Lodge at Waterlily in Currituck, it wasn’t hard to convince their primarily sportsmen clientele that they should get a taste of the beach life just a few miles down the road.

2

Built to blend

While other vacation destinations focused on lavish décor and the latest amenities, early Outer Banks tourism industry pioneers like the Griggs understood that a rural, “roughing it” vibe was part of the area’s appeal. Because of this, the Croatan Inn followed the trend of other nearby beach hotels and business, with an unpainted cedar shake exterior, shuttered windows and a simple, wood frame design. In many ways, the hotel was an over-sized beach cottage, with small guest rooms and juniper-paneled walls. People came to enjoy a life that was a little more rustic, and no one minded if you tracked sand in on your bare feet. 30

HOLIDAY 2019

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Put on your dancing shoes

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Eating it up

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A piece of history

The Griggs were also savvy about picking out their parcel of land, and they selected a stretch of beach right beside the shipwrecked Irma. The ship, which ran aground as it was bound for Georgia with a shipment of lumber in 1925, was famously turned into a makeshift dance hall while it deteriorated on the beach – which made the location fairly nostalgic for many people from the start. Over the years the remains of the Irma have drifted some, and been covered and uncovered by sand and water. As recently as 2012, Hurricane Sandy tossed up a piece of its bow at the Bonnet Street beach access, where it stayed until the ocean claimed it yet again.

Long before it was primarily a restaurant, people were raving about the food at the Croatan Inn. Dinner was served in the oceanfront dining room, and guests could enjoy a cocktail upstairs at the Wheelhouse Bar while the chefs cooked up their catch of the day. The menu changed to Mexican fare when it became Papagayo restaurant in 1981, which was a bit of a novelty at the time and tremendously popular. And that popularity didn’t fade when the building eventually became home to Quagmires in 1996. Fondly referred to simply as Quags, it became the spot to unwind with friends after work while enjoying their famous queso dip and their signature Bushwacker— a boozy chocolate coconut milkshake that can still be found on the menu of a number of local hotspots.

Developers bought the property in 2005, and on May 16th, 2006, the 70-yearold structure was bulldozed to eventually make room for a condominium complex called the Croatan Surf Club. A month before demolition day, an auction was held to sell off the remaining contents of the Croatan Inn. Restaurant owners swooped in to buy up equipment, but locals and other visitors also turned up to bid on mementos like signs, murals, chairs and shutters. Still more came out to watch the actual demolition, and to snatch up a stray shingle to remember the iconic building by.


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HOLIDAY 2019

Profile for North Beach Sun

North Beach Sun Real Estate Holiday 2019  

Quarterly newsmagazine covering Real Estate on the Outer Banks of North Carolina

North Beach Sun Real Estate Holiday 2019  

Quarterly newsmagazine covering Real Estate on the Outer Banks of North Carolina

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